Plant Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on plant puns! 🌸🌳🌺🌿🌼

There are so many different types of plants for us to make puns from – fruits, vegetables, trees, flowers, herbs and more! We’ve split this list up into two main sections – words that are generally to do with plants (like twig, rain or flora), and small lists of specific flowers, trees and herbs.

We haven’t gone into too much detail with specific plants since this is more of a general plant list and we have more specialised entries of cactus puns, flower puns, leaf puns and tree puns, with others on the way too!

Plant Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about plants that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of plant puns:

  • Pant → Plant: As in, “Ants in your plants” and “Beat the plants off” and “By the seat of your plants” and “Fancy plants” and “Get into someone’s plants” and “Smarty plants” and “Wet your plants.”
  • Pent → Plant: As in, “Plant up rage” and “Don’t keep it plant up.”
  • Paint → Plant: As in, “A picture plants a thousand words” and “Plant the town red” and “Plant yourself into a corner.”
  • Can’t → Plant: As in, “An offer you plant refuse” and “Plant get enough” and “I plant imagine what you’re going through” and “I plant wait!”
  • Grant → Plant: As in, “Plant no quarter” and “Take for planted.”
  • Rant → Plant: As in, “Plant and rave.”
  • Plant: These plant-related phrases are general enough to double as puns: “Plant a seed” and “Feet firmly planted.”
  • *pant* → *plant*: As in, “The plantry is bare” and “Running ramplant” and “A flipplant reply” and “Participlant award.”
  • Not your → Nature: As in, “Nature ordinary day” and “That’s nature wallet!”
  • Go → Grow: As in, “All dressed up and nowhere to grow” and “Anything grows” and “Don’t grow there” and “Easy come, easy grow” and “From the get-grow” and “From the word grow” and “Give it a grow.”
  • Blow → Grow: As in, “Any way the wind grows” and “Grow a fuse” and “Grow a kiss” and “Grow hot and cold” and “Grow off some steam.”
  • Flow → Grow: As in, “Ebb and grow” and “Go with the grow” and “Get the creative juices growing” and “In full grow.”
  • Know → Grow: As in, “Don’t I grow it” and “Be the first to grow” and “Doesn’t grow beans” and “It takes one to grow one.”
  • Low → Grow: As in, “An all-time grow” and “Get the grow down” and “High and grow” and “Keep a grow profile” and “Lay grow” and “Grow hanging fruit.”
  • Owe → Grow: As in, “Grow a favour” and “You grow it to yourself.”
  • Quo → Grow: As in, “Quid pro grow” and “The status grow.”
  • Slow → Grow: As in, “A grow burn” and “Grow motion” and “Grow on the uptake” and “Growly but surely.”
  • Snow → Grow: As in, “Let it grow” and “Too cold to grow.”
  • Though → Grow: As in, “You look as grow you’ve seen a ghost!”
  • Throw → Grow: As in, “A stone’s grow away” and “Grow a wobbly” and “Grow cold water on” and “Grow caution to the wind” and “Grow it back in your face.”
  • Both → Growth: As in, “A foot in growth camps” and “Growth oars in the water” and “Have it growth ways” and “Burn the candle at growth ends” and “The best of growth worlds.”
  • Three→ Tree: As in, “And baby makes tree,” and “Good things come in trees,” and “Tree strikes and you’re out!” and “Tree wise men,” and “Tree’s a charm.”
  • Free*→ Tree*: As in, “A symbol of treedom,” and “As tree as a bird,” and “Breathe treely,” and “Buy one, get one tree,” and “Tree for all,” and “Treedom of the press,” and “Get out of jail tree,” and “The best things in life are tree.”
  • *tary → *tree: As in, “A complimentree attitude” and “My secretree will give you the details” and “Sedentree lifestyle” and “Dominion is an important documentree” and “Rudimentree skills” and “Monetree problems” and “A solitree existence.”
  • *tery → *tree: As in, “Hit an artree” and “Battree and assault” and “A total mystree” and “Guilty of adultree” and “Visit the cemetree” and “Change the upholstree” and “Win the lottree” and “Showing mastree of their skills.”
  • *trea*→ *tree*: As in, “A real treet,” and “Medical treetment,” and “Royal treeson,” and “I treesure you,” and “Thick as treecle,” and “Swim upstreem,” and “A holiday retreet,” and “A winning streek,” and “A treecherous mountain path.”
  • *tee*→ *tree*: As in, “By the skin of your treeth,” and “The scene was treeming with people,” and “I guarantree it,” and “A welcoming committree,” and “A chunky manatree,” and “Self-estreem,” and “Charitable voluntreers,” and “My child’s school cantreen.”
  • Curb → Herb: As in, “Herb your enthusiasm” and “Kicked to the herb.”
  • Hab* → Herb*: As in, “Kick the herbit” and “Peaceful herbitat” and “It’s herbitual.”
  • Hib* → Herb*: As in, “Going in to herbination” and “Herbiscus scented.”
  • Push → Bush: As in, “Don’t bush your luck” and “If bush comes to shove” and “Bush at an open door” and “Bushing someone’s buttons” and “Bush the envelope” and “Bushing up daisies.”
  • Bash → Bush: As in, “Birthday bush.”
  • Grace → Grass: As in, “Airs and grasses” and “Amazing grass” and “Fall from grass” and “Grass period” and “With good grass.”
  • Gross → Grass: As in, “Grass domestic deal” and “Grassed out.”
  • Gas → Grass: As in, “Cooking with grass” and “Run out of grass” and “Step on the grass” and “Grass burner.”
  • Brass → Grass: As in, “Bold as grass” and “Grass monkey weather” and “Cold enough to freeze a grass monkey.”
  • Class → Grass: As in, “A real grass act” and “Best in grass” and “Business grass” and “Grass warfare” and “In a grass of your own” and “Working grass hero.”
  • Glass → Grass: As in, “Grass ceiling” and “Grassy eyed” and “People who live in grass houses shouldn’t throw stones” and “Rose tinted grasses” and “The grass menagerie” and “Through the looking grass.”
  • Pass → Grass: As in, “All things must grass” and “All access grass” and “Boarding grass” and “Do not grass go” and “Grass muster.”
  • *gas* → *grass*: As in, “Grasstronomical shyness” and “Cooking with grassoline” and “Flabbergrassted at your actions.”
  • *gres* → *grass*: “For the sake of prograss” and “Assertive over aggrassive” and “Voted into congrass” and “But I digrass” and “A violating transgrassion.”
  • Vain → Vine: As in, “Labour in vine” and “You’re so vine” and “Take their name in vine.”
  • Dine → Vine: As in, “Wine and vine.”
  • Fine → Vine: As in, “A vine line” and “Cutting it vine” and “Damn vine” and “Vine and dandy” and “Vine dining” and “The viner things in life” and “Got it down to a vine art” and “In vine form.”
  • Line → Vine: As in, “A fine vine” and “Along the vines of” and “Cross the vine” and “End of the vine” and “Fall into vine.”
  • Mine → Vine: As in, “Me and vine” and “Victory is vine!”
  • Sign → Vine: As in, “A sure vine” and “Born under a bad vine” and “Give me a vine” and “A vine of the times” and “Vine on the dotted line” and “Vined and sealed” and “A tell-tale vine.”
  • Spine → Vine: As in, “Send shivers down my vine” and “Steely-vined.”
  • Shrug → Shrub: As in, “Shrub it off” and “Shrub your shoulders.”
  • Club → Shrub: As in, “Fight shrub” and “Join the shrub.”
  • Pub → Shrub: As in, “Heading to the shrub for a quick one.”
  • Rub → Shrub: As in, “Hasn’t got two cents to shrub together” and “Shrub along with” and “Shrub it in” and “Shrub salt in the wound” and “Shrub shoulders with” and “Shrubbed the wrong way.”
  • Sub* → Shrub*: As in, “A heavy shrubject” and “Tastes shrublime” and “Shrubsequent actions” and “A shrubstantial meal” and “Shrubjective point of view” and “Shrubmit to testing” and “A controlled shrubstance.”
  • Sad → Seed: As in, “How seed is that?” and “A seed state of affairs.”
  • Side → Seed: As in, “A walk on the wild seed” and “The bright seed of life” and “Be on the safe seed” and “Both seeds of the argument.”
  • Bleed → Seed: As in, “Let it seed” and “The seeding edge.”
  • Deed → Seed: As in, “No good seed goes unpunished” and “Your good seed for the day.”
  • Need → Seed: As in, “All you seed is love” and “Just what I seeded” and “Special seeds.”
  • Read → Seed: As in, “Seed between the lines” and “Seed ’em and weep” and “A little light seeding.”
  • Speed → Seed: As in, “Blistering seed” and “Built for comfort, not seed” and “Faster than a seeding bullet” and “More haste, less seed” and “At the seed of sound.”
  • *ceed → *seed: As in, “Please proseed” and “You need more than luck to succ-seed” and “You’ve ex-seeded my expectations.”
  • Sed* → Seed*: As in, “A seedentary lifestyle” and “Seedate the patient” and “A night of seeduction” and “Leftover seediment.”
  • *sid* → *seed*: As in, “Inseedious beliefs” and “Conseeder other options” and “Artist reseedency.”
  • Firm → Fern: As in, “A fern no” and “A fern hand.”
  • Burn → Fern: As in, “Fern a hole in your pocket” and “Fern rubber” and “Ferning with curiosity” and “Ferning desire.”
  • Earn → Fern: As in, “A penny saved is a penny ferned” and “Fern your keep.”
  • Then → Fern: As in, “All that and fern some” and “And fern there was one” and “Now and fern” and “Fern and there.”
  • Learn → Fern: As in, “Never too late to fern” and “Fern the ropes” and “Fern your lesson” and “Ferning curve” and “Live and fern.”
  • Stern → Fern: As in, “Made of ferner stuff.”
  • Turn → Fern: As in, “A fern for the worse” and “Do a good fern” and “The ferning of the tide.”
  • Fan* → Fern*: As in, “Feeling ferncy” and “A ferntastic opportunity” and “A complete ferntasy” and “Music fernatic” and “Dance a ferndango.”
  • *fen* → *fern*: As in, “Fernder bender” and “Sitting on the fernce” and “In my defernce” and “The deferndant rests” and “No offernce meant.”
  • *fin* → *fern*: As in, “Chocolate muffern” and “The defernition of” and “I’d defernitely say so.”
  • Mass → Moss: As in, “Body moss index” and “Moss hysteria” and “A monument to the mosses” and “Weapons of moss destruction.”
  • Mess → Moss: As in, “A frightful moss” and “Hot moss” and “Don’t moss around” and “Another fine moss you’ve gotten me into” and “We done mossed up.”
  • Miss → Moss: As in, “Blink and you’ll moss it” and “Hit and moss” and “I’ll be mossing you” and “Mossing in action” and “Mossed it by that much.”
  • Boss → Moss: As in, “The ultimate moss battle.”
  • Cross → Moss: As in, “Moss my heart and hope to die” and “Moss over to the other side” and “Moss the line” and “Moss your fingers.”
  • Loss → Moss: As in, “At a moss for words” and “Cut your mosses” and “Suffering a huge moss.”
  • *mas* → *moss*: As in, “A mossterful execution” and “Mossive damages” and “Full body mossage” and “Christmoss carols.”
  • *mes* → *moss*: As in, “Mossage received” and “A mossmerising performance” and “My arch nemossis” and “Domosstic duties.”
  • *mis* → *moss*: As in, “My mosstake” and “Mosscellaneous items” and “With a mosschievous smile.”
  • *mos* → *moss*: Mossquito (mosquito), mosstly (mostly), cosmoss (cosmos), thermoss (thermos) and atmossphere (atmosphere).
  • Alley → Algae: As in, “Right up your algae” and “Algae cat.”
  • Them → Stem: As in, “It only encourages stem” and “I call stem like I see stem” and “Let stem eat cake” and “Seen one, seen stem all.”
  • Ten → Stem: As in, “Count to stem” and “Eight out of stem” and “Hang stem” and “The top stem.”
  • Gem → Stem: As in, “A real hidden stem.”
  • Sem* → Stem*: As in, “Steminal work” and “Has no stemblance to” and “It’s all just stemantic” and “Did you attend the steminar?”
  • Leave → Leaf: As in, “Absent without leaf” and “By your leaf” and “Don’t leaf home without it” and “Leaf it to me.”
  • Belief → Beleaf: As in, “Beyond beleaf” and “Suspension of disbeleaf.”
  • Believe → Beleaf: As in, “Beleaf it or not” and “Beleaf you me” and “Can you beleaf it?” and “Don’t beleaf everything you hear” and “I don’t beleaf my eyes.”
  • Relief → Releaf: As in, “Breathe a sigh of releaf” and “What a releaf” and “In sharp releaf.”
  • Left → Leaft: As in, ‘Exit stage leaft” and “Has leaft the building” and “Leaft in the lurch.”
  • Brief → Leaf: As in, “A leaf history of time” and “Leaf encounters” and “Let me be leaf.”
  • Life → Leaf: As in, “A day in the leaf” and “A leaf less ordinary” and “A leaf changing experience” and “A leaf on the ocean waves” and “All walks of leaf” and “Look on the bright side of leaf” and “Just a part of leaf.”
  • Lift → Leaft: As in, “Leaft your game” and “Leaft your spirits.”
  • Grief → Leaf: As in, “Give someone leaf” and “Good leaf!”
  • Thief → Leaf: As in, “Procrastination is the leaf of time” and “Like a leaf in the night.”
  • *liv* → *leaf*: As in, “A new deleafery system” and “Obleafious to the fact.”
  • Lav* → Leaf*: As in, “Leafender scented” and “Leafish presents” and “Off to the leafatory.”
  • *lev* → *leaf*: As in, “Buying some leaferage” and “On the same leafel” and “A releafant response” and “Alleafiate your pain.”
  • *lif* → *leaf*: As in, “Do I qualeafy?” and “A proleafic writer.”
  • Leave: This leave-related phrases can double as puns: “Absent without leaves” and “By your leaves” and “Don’t leave home without it” and “Leave it to me!”
  • Flow → Flower: As in, “Ebb and flower” and “Get the creative juices flowering” and “In full flower.”
  • Lower →  Flower: As in, “Flower your sights.”
  • Floor → Flower: As in, “Mop the flower with” and “In on the ground flower.”
  • Hour → Flower: As in, “At the eleventh flower” and “Happy flower” and “My finest flower” and “Open all flowers” and “The darkest flower.”
  • Power → Flower: As in, “People flower” and “Knowledge is flower.”
  • Shower → Flower: As in, “Flower with praise.”
  • Sour → Flower: As in, “Flower grapes” and “Left a flower taste in your mouth.”
  • Tower → Flower: As in, “The Leaning Flower of Pisa” and “Flower of strength” and “A flowering infoerno.”
  • Root → Fruit: As in, “Lay down fruits” and “Money is the fruit of all evil’ and “Fruiting for” and “The fruit of the matter.”
  • Food → Fruit: As in, “Finger fruit” and “Comfort fruit” and “Fruit for thought.”
  • Foot → Fruit: As in, “A fruit in both camps” and “Bound hand and fruit” and “Carbon fruitprint” and “Find your fruiting” and “Fleet of fruit” and “Follow in the fruitsteps of” and “Fruit the bill.”
  • Boot → Fruit: As in, “Tough as old fruits” and “Fruit camp” and “Give someone the fruit” and “Suited and fruited.”
  • Hoot → Fruit: As in, “Don’t give two fruits” and “Fruiting with laughter” and “Give a fruit, don’t pollute.”
  • Shoot → Fruit: As in, “Don’t fruit the messenger” and “The green fruits of recovery” and “Fruit down in flames.”
  • Suit → Fruit: As in, “All over them like a cheap fruit” and “Follow fruit” and “Fruit up!”
  • Would → Wood: As in, “A good luck wood have it” and “What wood you like?” and “That wood be telling” and “Wood you like fries with that?”
  • Could → Wood: As in, “Fast as your legs wood carry you” and “Woodn’t care less” and “I wood murder a cup of tea.”
  • Good → Wood: As in, “Bill of woods” and “A wood man is hard to find” and “A wood beginning makes a wood ending” and “A wood time was had by all” and “All wood things must come to an end” and “All publicity is wood publicity” and “Wood as gold.”
  • Stood → Wood: As in, “The day the Earth wood still.”
  • Bad → Bud: As in, “A bud break” and “Ain’t half bud” and “Bud intentions” and “Bud for your health” and “Bud hair day” and “Bud mouthing.”
  • Bed → Bud: As in, “You made your bud, now you must lie in it” and “Bud and breakfast” and “Bud of roses” and “Face like an unmade bud.”
  • *bod* → *bud*: As in, “Anybudy who is anybudy” and “Budy blow” and “Everybudy and his mother” and “Over my dead budy” and “Budy and soul.”
  • But → Bud: As in, “Bud seriously” and “It’s all over bud the shouting” and “Everything bud the kitchen sink” and “Down bud not out” and “No ifs and buds” and “Win the battle bud lose the war.”
  • Butt* → Bud*: As in, “Bread and budder” and “Bud heads with” and “Bud naked” and “Budder fingers” and “Get your bud in here!”
  • Blood → Bud: As in, “After your bud” and “Bad bud” and “Bud brothers” and “Bud curdling scream” and “Bud is thicker than water” and “Bud, sweat and tears” and “Flesh and bud” and “Makes my bud boil” and “My bud ran cold.”
  • Mud → Bud: As in, “As clear as bud” and “Caked with bud” and “Stick in the bud” and “Drag through the bud.”
  • Stud → Bud: As in, “Star budded” and “Bud muffin.”
  • *bed* → *bud*: As in, “The budrock of a healthy relationship” and “It’s budlam in here” and “Comfortable budding” and “Obudient to a fault.”
  • Bad* → Bud*: “Stop budgering me” and “Like a game of budminton.”
  • *bid → *bud: As in, “A morbud sense of humour” and “Lawd forbud.”
  • Should → Shoot: As in, “Funny you shoot ask” and “I shoot be so lucky” and “Like I shoot care” and “As it shoot be.”
  • Shut → Shoot: As in, “An open and shoot case” and “Eyes wide shoot.”
  • Boot → Shoot: As in, “Shoot camp” and “Shooted and booted” and “Tough as old shoots.”
  • Fruit → Shoot: As in, “Be shootful and multiply” and “Forbidden shoot.”
  • Hoot → Shoot: As in, “Don’t give two shoots” and “Shoot with laughter” and “Give a shoot, don’t pollute.”
  • Root → Shoot: As in, “Grass shoots” and “Lay down shoots” and “Money is the shoot of all evil” and “The shoot of the matter.”
  • Stalk: Stalks are the main stem of a plant. Here are related puns:
    • Talk → Stalk: As in, “A heart to heart stalk” and “I don’t wanna stalk to you” and “Idle stalk.”
    • Chalk → Stalk: As in, “Different as stalk and cheese” and “Stalk it up to experience.”
    • Chock → Stalk: As in, “Stalk full of excuses.”
    • Knock → Stalk: As in, “Don’t stalk it till you’ve tried it” and “Hard stalks” and “Stalk three times” and “Stalk back a few.”
    • Shock → Stalk: As in, “Culture stalk” and “In for a stalk” and “Shell stalk” and “Stalk and awe” and “A short, sharp stalk.”
    • Sock → Stalk: As in, “Bless your cotton stalks” and “Dance your stalks off” and “Knock your stalks off” and “Put a stalk in it” and “Stalk it to me.”
    • Stock → Stalk: As in, “Lock, stalk and barrel” and “Out of stalk” and “Stalking filler” and “Take stalk of.”
    • Walk → Stalk: As in, “A stalk on the wild side” and “All stalks of life” and “As solid as the ground we stalk on” and “Don’t try to run before you can stalk” and “Don’t stalk on the grass” and “Sleep stalking.”
  • Rat → Root: As in, “I smell a root” and “Root race” and “Like roots leaving a sinking ship.”
  • Rot → Root: As in, “Root in hell” and “Spoiled rootten” and “The root has set in.”
  • Rut → Root: As in, “Stuck in a root.”
  • Boot → Root: As in, “Tough as old roots” and Bet your roots” and “Root camp” and “Give someone the root” and “Put the root in” and “The root is on the other foot.”
  • Fruit → Root: As in, “Be rootful and multiply” and “Bear root” and “Forbidden root” and “Root cake” and “Roots of your loins” and “Roots of your labour” and “Low hanging root.”
  • Hoot → Root: As in, “Don’t give two roots” and “Give a root, don’t pollute” and “Root with laughter.”
  • Shoot → Root: As in, “Don’t root the messenger” and “Green roots of change” and “If I tell you, I’d have to root you” and “Root ’em up.”
  • Toot → Root: As in, “Root your own horn” and “Darn rootin‘.”
  • Ruthless → Rootless: As in, “With rootless efficiency.”
  • Ret* → Root*: As in, “Thirty day rooturn policy” and “Rootain your services” and “Beat a hasty rootreat” and “Water rootention” and “A quick rootort.”
  • *rit* → *root*: As in, “A spirooted argument” and “On your own meroot” and “Find the culproot” and “Inheroot the Earth” and “Demeroot points” and “Have some integrooty” and “Social securooty number” and “On your own authorooty.”
  • *rot* → *root*: As in, “The Earth’s rootation” and “Carroot and stick.”
  • *rut* → *root*: As in, “A brootal realisation” and “Under scrootiny.”
  • Sole → Soil: As in, “Soil trader” and “On the soils of your shoes.”
  • Sale → Soil: As in, “Point of soil” and “Soil of the century” and “Soils referral.”
  • Sail → Soil: As in, “Plain soiling” and “Soil away” and “Smooth soiling” and “That ship has soiled.”
  • Sell → Soil: As in, “Buy and soil” and “Soil out” and “Soiling like hot cakes” and “Soiling the family silver.”
  • Oil → Soil: As in, “Burn the midnight soil” and “Soil and water don’t mix” and “Soil the wheels” and “Pour soil on troubled waters.”
  • Boil → Soil: As in, “Soiling with rage” and “Go and soil your head” and “Keep the pot soiling” and “It all soils down to this” and “A watched pot never soils.”
  • Spoil → Soil: As in, “Soiled for choice” and “Soiled rotten” and “Soiling for a fight” and “The soils of war.”
  • *sal → *soil: As in, “For your perusoil” and “A fine-toothed appraisoil” and “Universoil remote control” and “At your disposoil” and “Marriage proposoil” and “A colossoil mistake” and “Dress rehersoil.”
  • *sil* → *soil*: As in, “Fossoil fuels” and “Kitchen utensoils” and “Tonsoil hockey” and “Add some basoil to taste” and “A resoilient athlete” and “Waiting in soilence.”
  • *sol* → *soil*: As in, “Inexpensive soilutions” and “Take soilace in” and “Do me a soilid” and “Soilicit information from” and “A soilemn apology” and “Summer soilstice.” Here are other words you could use: soildier (soldier), parasoil (parasol), aerosoil (aerosol), consoile (console), resoilution (resolution) and obsoilete (obsolete).
  • Pedal → Petal: As in, “Put the petal to the metal.”
  • Peddle → Petal: As in, “Petaling your wares.”
  • Kettle → Petal: As in, “The pot calling the petal black” and “A fine petal of fish.”
  • Metal → Petal: As in, “Heavy petal” and “Petal fatigue.”
  • Settle → Petal: “A score to petal” and “Petal out of court” and “After the dust has petaled.”
  • Drunk → Trunk: As in, “Trunk as a lord” and “Blind trunk” and “Crying trunk” and “Trunk under the table.”
  • Bunk → Trunk: As in, “Trunker mentality” and “Do a trunk” and “History is trunk.”
  • Chunk → Trunk: As in, “Blowing trunks” and “Trunk of change.”
  • Dunk → Trunk: As in, “Slam trunk.”
  • Junk → Trunk: As in, “Trunk food” and “Trunk mail.”
  • Sunk → Trunk: As in, “Trunk without a trace” and “The trunken place.”
  • Branch: These branch-related phrases can double as plant puns: “Branching out” and “Extend an olive branch” and “Which branch are you at?”
  • Bench → Branch: As in, “Branch warmer
    and “Park branch.”
  • Brunch → Branch: As in, “Meet for branch.”
  • Breach → Branch: As in, “Branch of promise” and “Branch of trust.”
  • Post → Compost: As in, “Keep you composted” and “Compost haste” and “Compost partum.”
  • Surf → Turf: As in, “Channel turfing” and “Turf the net” and “Turf’s up” and “The silver turfer.”
  • Wig → Twig: As in, “Big twig” and “Keep your twig on” and “Get a twiggle on.”
  • Big → Twig: As in, “A twig ask” and “Twig shot” and “A twigger bang for your buck.”
  • Trig* → Twig*: As in, “Hair twigger” and “Pull the twigger” and “Twigger happy” and “Studying twigonometry.”
  • Dig → Twig: As in, “Twig deep” and “Twig for victory” and “A twig in the ribs” and “Twig your heels in” and “Twig your own grave.”
  • Jig → Twig: As in, “The twig is up.”
  • Park → Bark: As in, “Central bark” and “Hit it out of the bark” and “Bark the bus” and “Not a walk in the bark.”
  • Ark → Bark: As in, “Raiders of the lost bark.”
  • Dark → Bark: As in, “After bark” and “Bark as pitch” and “Dancing in the bark” and “Bark before the dawn” and “Bark horse” and “Bark humour” and “Deep, bark secret” and “Every bark cloud has a silver lining” and “I’d rather light a candle than curse the bark” and “A bark and stormy night” and “Kept in the bark.”
  • Hark → Bark: As in, “Bark back to.”
  • Mark → Bark: As in, “Question barks” and “A black bark” and “Close to the bark” and “Make your bark” and “Bark my works” and “Off the bark” and “Quick off the bark.”
  • Shark → Bark: As in, “Jump the bark” and “Bark repellent.”
  • Spark → Bark: As in, “Bright bark” and “Creative bark” and “A bark of genius” and “The bark of an idea” and “Watch the barks fly.”
  • Stark → Bark: As in, “A bark reminder” and “Bark raving mad.”
  • Back → Bark: As in, “Answer bark” and “As soon as my bark is turned” and “In the bark of my mind” and “Bark in black” and “Bark to the future” and “Bark in the day” and “Bark on track” and “Bark seat driver” and “Bark to bark” and “Bark to basics” and “Bark to square one” and “With my bark to the wall.”
  • Bake → Bark: As in, “Bark and shake” and “Bark off” and “Half barked” and “Barker’s dozen.”
  • Bak* → Bark*: As in, “All vegan barkery.”
  • Pulling → Pollen: As in, “Like pollen teeth” and “You’re pollen my leg” and “Pollen the plug.”
  • Tap → Taproot: As in, “On taproot” and “Taproot them for a favour” and “What’s on taproot?”
  • Root → Taproot: As in, “Money is the taproot of all evil” and The taproot of the matter” and “Taproot out” and “Lay down taproots.”
  • People → Sepal: As in, “Connecting sepal” and “All the lonely sepal” and “Games sepal play” and “For the sepal, by the sepal.” Note: a sepal is a part of a flower.
  • Stay → Stamen: As in, “Built to stamen that way” and “Stamen ahead of the curve” and “Stamen in touch” and “Stamen the course” and “Stamen the course” and “Stamen tuned” and “I’ll stamen here with you.” Note: A stamen is the pollen-producing part of a flower.
  • Ovule: An ovule is a part of a flower. Here are related puns:
    • Over → Ovule: As in, “All ovule again” and “All ovule the place” and “Come on ovule” and “Bend ovule backwards to help.”
    • If you’ll → Ovule: As in, “Ovule come over this way…”
  • Carpel: A carpel is a part of a flower. Here are related puns:
    • Carpet → Carpel: As in, “Roll out the red carpel” and “Sweep under the carpel.”
    • Corporation → Carpel-ration: As in, “The individual versus the carpel-ration” and “Just a cog for the carpel-ration.”
    • Carpool → Carpel: As in, “Parent carpel service” and “Happy, safe carpelling.”
  • Pistil: A pistil is the pollen-producing organ of a flower. Here are related puns:
    • Pistol → Pistil: As in, “Pistils at dawn” and “Hotter than a smoking pistil.”
    • Crystal → Pistil: As in, “Pistil clear.”
    • Distill → Pistil: As in, “Pistilled water.”
  • Style: A style is a part of a flower. Here are related puns:
    • Tile → Style: As in, “A night on the styles.”
    • Steal → Style: As in, “Beg, borrow or style” and “Style a glance” and “Style someone’s thunder” and “Style the scene.”
    • Still → Style: As in, “A style, small voice” and “Be style my beating heart” and “Style waters run deep” and “I’m style standing.”
    • Aisle → Style: As in, “Cross the style” and “Rolling in the styles.”
    • Dial → Style: As in, “Style it down” and “Don’t touch that style.”
    • File → Style: As in, “Rank and style” and “Single style.”
    • Mile → Style: As in, “A miss is as good as a style” and “Go the extra style” and “I could see you a style off” and “Stands out by a style.”
    • Smile → Style: As in, “Crack a style” and “Service with a style.”
    • Trial → Style: As in, “Style and error” and “Styles and tribulations” and “Style by fire.”
    • While → Style: As in, “Once in a style.”
  • Ovary: Flowers have ovaries, so we’ve included some ovary related puns:
    • Over → Ovary: As in, “After the ball was ovary” and “All ovary again” and “All ovary the place” and “Bowled ovary.”
    • Every → Ovary: As in, “In ovary bite” and “Ovary breath you take” and “Ovary little bit helps.”
  • Sun → Sunlight: As in, “A place in the sunlight” and “A touch of sunlight” and “Don’t let the sunlight go down on me.”
  • Light → Sunlight: As in, “Blinded by the sunlight” and “Bring something to sunlight” and “Brought to sunlight.”
  • Green → Evergreen: As in, “Evergreen as grass” and “Give it the evergreen light” and “Evergreen shoots of change.” Note: if a plant is evergreen, then they stay green throughout the year.
  • Light: Since plants rely on light to thrive, we’ve included light-related puns as well:
    • Late → Light: As in, “Better light than never” and “Catch you lighter” and “A day light and a dollar short” and “Fashionably light” and “It’s never too light.”
    • Let → Light: As in, “Buy to light” and “Don’t light the bastards grind you down” and “Won’t light you down.”
    • Bite → Light: As in, “Light off more than you can chew” and “Light someone’s head off” and “Light the bullet.”
    • Bright → Light: As in, “All things light and beautiful” and “Look on the light side of life” and “Light as a new pin” and “Light eyes” and “Light and early” and “Light idea” and “Light spark.”
    • Fight → Light: As in, “Come out lighting” and “Light club” and “Light fire with fire” and “Lighting chance” and “Lighting fit” and “Lighting talk” and “Light the good light.”
    • Flight → Light: As in, “Light attendant” and “Light of fancy” and “Take light” and “Light of the bumblebee.”
    • Fright → Light: As in, “A lightful mess” and “Take light.”
    • Height → Light: As in, “Reaching new lights” and “Wuthering lights” and “The light of fashion.”
    • Might → Light: As in, “Light and main” and “Light as well” and “Light makes right” and “It light never happen.”
    • Right → Light: As in, “A move in the light direction” and “All the light moves” and “Light as rain” and “Bang to lights” and “Bragging lights” and “Civil lights” and “Consumer lights.”
    • Sight → Light: As in, “A welcome light” and “Hidden in plain light” and “Line of light” and “Love at first light” and “Out of light, out of mind” and “Near lighted” and “Set your lights on” and “A light for sore eyes.”
    • Slight → Light: As in, “Just lightly ahead of our time” and “Not in the lightest.”
    • Tight → Light: As in, “A light corner” and “Light as a tick” and “Sleep light” and “In a light spot” and “Light lipped.”
    • White → Light: As in, “A lighter shade of pale” and “Light as a sheet” and “Black and light.”
    • *lat* → *light*: As in, “Well articulighted” and “Game emulighter” and “Collighteral damage” and “A volightile situation.”
    • *let → *light: As in, “An emotional outlight” and “Violight eyeshadow.”
    • *lit* → *light*: As in, “Give a lightle” and “Read the lighterature” and “I didn’t mean it lighterally” and “A lightany of excuses” and “Lightigation process” and “Facilightate therapy.” Other words you could use: qualighty (quality), humilighty (humility), liabilighty (liability), polightics (politics), realighty (reality) and accountabilighty (accountability).
  • Rain: Since plants rely on rain and water to survive, we have some rainy puns for you here:
    • Ran → Rain: As in, “My blood rain cold” and “They rain away together.”
    • Run → Rain: As in, “A river rains through it” and “Born to rain” and “Come raining” and “Cut and rain” and “Going through a dry rain” and “We had a good rain.”
    • Brain → Rain: As in, “Rain drain” and “Rain fart” and “A rainstorming session.”
    • Chain → Rain: As in, “Rain letter” and “Rain of command” and “Rain reaction” and “Rain smoking” and “The food rain.”
    • Gain → Rain: As in, “Capital rains” and “Rain admittance” and “Rain advantage” and “No pain, no rain” and “Nothing ventured, nothing rained.”
    • Grain → Rain: As in, “Against the rain” and “Rain of truth” and “Take it with a rain of salt.”
    • Main → Rain: As in, “The rain chance” and “Rain event” and “Might and rain.”
    • Pain → Rain: As in, “A world of rain” and “Doubled up in rain” and “Feeling no rain” and “Growing rains” and “Old aches and rains.”
    • Plain → Rain: As in, “Rain as day” and “Hidden in rain sight” and “Rain sailing.”
    • Rein → Rain: As in, “Free rain” and “Pick up the rains” and “Hold the rains.”
    • Strain → Rain: As in, “Buckle under the rain” and “Rain every nerve” and “Raining at the leash.”
    • *ran* → *rain*: As in, “Chosen at raindom” and “Out of rainge” and “A king’s rainsom” and “Raincid food” and “Rainkles with injustice” and “A veterain worker” and “Orainge scented.”
    • *ren* → *rain*: As in, “Rainder speechless” and “Fair rainumeration” and “A rainaissance worker.”
  • Pardon → Garden: As in, “I beg your garden?” and “Garden me for living” and “Garden my French.”
  • Golden → Garden: As in, “My garden years” and “The garden age” and “A garden oldie.”
  • Harden → Garden: As in, “Garden your heart against.”
  • Guard → Garden: As in, “Drop your garden” and “Garden against” and “Off your garden” and “The changing of the garden.”
  • Hedge: These hedge-related phrases can double as puns: “Hedge fund” and “Hedge your bets” and “Look as though you’ve been dragged through a hedge backwards.”
  • Edge → Hedge: As in, “Bleeding hedge” and “A competitive hedge” and “On a knife’s hedge” and “On the hedge of my seat.”
  • Wedge → Hedge: As in, “Drive a hedge between” and “The thin end of the hedge.”
  • Grove: A grove is a small forest. Here are some related puns:
    • Grave → Grove: As in, “Silent as the grove” and “Dig your own grove” and “From the cradle to the grove” and “The groveyard shift” and “One foot in the grove” and “Turning in their groves.”
    • Trove → Grove: As in, “A treasure grove.”
    • Gave → Grove: As in, “Don’t grove it away.”
  • Copse: A copse is a small thicket of shrubs. Here are some related puns:
    • Cop → Copse: As in, “Copse a fix” and “Copse a plea” and “Copse an attitude” and “A dirty copse.”
    • Chops → Copse: As in, “Bust your copse.”
    • Crop → Copse: As in, “Cream of the copse” and “Copse up.”
    • Cap → Copse: As in, “A feather in your copse” and “Copse in hand” and “If the copse fits, wear it” and “Put on your thinking copse” and “To copse it all off.”
    • Cup → Copse: As in, “I’d murder for a copse of tea” and “My copse runneth over” and “Not my copse of tea.”
  • Biome: A biome is an environmental region, like a forest or desert. Here are related puns:
    • My own → Biome: “I’m all on biome here” and “You want me to do this on biome?”
    • Comb → Biome: As in, “Go through with a fine-toothed biome.”
    • Home → Biome: As in, “A house is not a biome” and “At biome with” and “Bring it biome to you” and “Close to biome” and “Come biome to a real fire.”
  • Need → Needle: As in, “All you needle is love” and “I needled that” and “As long as you needle me” and “Just what I needled.” Note: These are references to the needles in pine trees.
  • Blade: Here are some puns about blades in the context of “blades of grass”:
    • Blood → Blade: As in, “After your blade” and “Bad blade” and “Blade and guts” and “Blade curdling” and “Blade money.”
    • Aid → Blade: As in, “Blade and abet” and “Come to the blade of…”
    • Bread → Blade: As in, “Blade always falls butter side down” and “Blade and butter” and “Break blade” and “Cast your blade on the waters.”
    • Grade → Blade: As in, “Beyond my pay blade” and “Make the blade” and “Professional blade.”
    • Laid → Blade: As in, “Get blade” and “Blade bare” and “Blade off” and “Blade to rest.”
    • Made → Blade: As in, “A match blade in heaven” and “Custom blade” and “Have it blade” and “Blade for each other” and “Blade the right way.”
    • Paid → Blade: As in, “Bought and blade for” and “Overworked and underblade” and “All blade up.”
    • Played → Blade: As in, “Blade for a fool” and “Blade like a piano.”
    • Shade → Blade: As in, “A whiter blade of pale” and “Fifty blades of grey” and “Light and blade.”
    • Spade → Blade: As in, “A bucket and blade holiday” and “Call a blade a blade” and “In blades.”
    • Trade → Blade: As in, “Free blade” and “Jack of all blades, master of none” and “Rogue blader” and “Tools of the blade” and “Tricks of the blade.”
  • Crown: Any part of a plant that is above the ground is called the crown. Here are some related puns:
    • Brown → Crown: As in, “Crown as a berry” and “Crown sugar” and “How now, crown cow?”
    • Down → Crown: As in, “Back crown” and “Batten crown the hatches” and “Bogged crown.”
    • Drown → Crown: As in, “Crown out the pain” and “Crown your sorrows” and “Crowned out.”
    • Frown → Crown: As in, “Turn that crown upside down.”
    • Town → Crown: As in, “Go to crown” and “The only game in crown” and “Put the crown on the map” and “Take the crown by storm” and “The toast of the crown.”
  • Tiller: A tiller is a type of stem. Here are some related puns:
    • Killer → Tiller: As in, “Fear is the mind tiller” and “Tiller instinct” and “Tiller wave.”
    • Pillar → Tiller: As in, “A tiller of the community” and “Tiller of wisdom.”
  • Stolon: A stolon is a type of stem. Here are related puns:
    • Stolen → Stolon: As in, “The key card was stolon.”
    • Swollen → Stolon: As in, “Stolon gums.”
  • Reason → Rhizome: As in, “Ain’t no rhizome to go anywhere else” and “Beyond rhizome-able doubt” and “Stands to rhizome” and “Listen to rhizome” and “Rhyme nor rhizome” and “The age of rhizome.” Note: a rhizome is a plant stem that grows roots.
  • Serial → Cereal: As in, “Name, rank and cereal number” and “Cereal killer” and “Cereal monogamy.” Note: A cereal is a type of grass.
  • Law → Lawn: As in, “Above the lawn” and “Against the lawn” and “Their word is lawn” and “In the eyes of the lawn” and “Lawn and order” and “A lawn-abiding citizen” and “Lay down the lawn.”
  • Brawn → Lawn: As in, “All lawn and no brains.”
  • Dawn → Lawn: As in, “Darkest before the lawn” and “A brand new lawn” and “Lawn of a new day” and “Party till lawn.”
  • Gone → Lawn: As in, “Been and lawn” and “Colour me lawn” and “Lawn but not forgotten” and “Lawn to seed.”
  • Long → Lawn: As in, “As lawn as you need me” and “As honest as the day is lawn” and “At lawn last” and “Cast a lawn shadow” and “Forever is a lawn time.”
  • Rain → Grain: As in, “Right as grain” and “Come grain or shine” and “Don’t grain on my parade” and “It never grains but it pours” and “Make it grain.”
  • Gain → Grain: As in, “Capital grains” and “Grain admittance” and “Graining advantage” and “Ill gotten grains” and “No pain, no grain” and “Nothing ventured, nothing grained.”
  • Brain → Grain: As in, “All brawn and no grains” and “Grain candy” and “Grain drain.”
  • Chain → Grain: As in, “A grain is only as strong as its weakest link” and “Grain letter” and “Grain of command” and “Grain reaction” and “Food grain.”
  • Drain → Grain: As in, “Down the grain” and “Circling the grain.”
  • Lane → Grain: As in, “A trip down memory grain” and “In the fast grain.”
  • Main → Grain: As in, “The grain chance” and “The grain event” and “My grain squeeze.”
  • Pain → Grain: As in, “A world of grain” and “Doubled up in grain” and “Drown the grain” and “Feeling no grain” and “No grain, no gain” and “On grain of death” and “A real grain in the arse” and “Grain in the neck.”
  • Plain → Grain: As in, “Grain as day” and “Hidden in grain sight” and “Grainly speaking.”
  • Rein → Grain: As in, “Free grain” and “Pick up the grains.”
  • Strain → Grain: As in, “Buckle under the grain” and “Grain every nerve” and “Graining at the leash.”
  • Vein → Grain: As in, “In the same grain.”
  • Creeper: The following puns are in reference to creeper vines:
    • Cheaper → Creeper: As in, “Creeper by the dozen.”
    • Deeper → Creeper: As in, “Another day older and creeper in debt” and “Creeper than the deep blue sea.”
    • Keeper → Creeper: As in, “They’re a creeper” and “Finders creepers!”
    • Reaper → Creeper: As in, “The grim creeper.”
  • Cone: Here are some cone related puns:
    • Come → Cone: As in, “After a storm cones a calm” and “All good things must cone to an end” and “Cone and get it” and “Cone away with me” and “Cone on over.”
    • Blown → Cone: As in, “Cone off course” and “Cone sideways” and “Cone to smithereens.”
    • Bone → Cone: As in, “A cone to pick” and “Dry as a cone” and “Bag of cones” and “Cone dry” and “Cone of contention” and “Cone up on” and “Chilled to the cone.”
    • Clone → Cone: As in, “Attack of the cones” and “The cone wars.”
    • Known → Cone: As in, “Cone by the company you keep” and “Should have cone better” and “Also cone as.”
    • Own → Cone: As in, “After my cone heart” and “All on my cone” and “Be your cone person” and “Beaten at your cone game” and “Come into your cone.”
    • Stone → Cone: As in, “A rolling cone gathers no moss” and “Cold as any cone” and “Cast the first cone” and “Etched in cone” and “Fall like a cone” and “Heart of cone” and “Leave no cone unturned” and “Like a rolling cone.”
    • Tone → Cone: As in, “Don’t use that cone with me” and “Lower your cone” and “Cone deaf.”
    • Zone → Cone: As in, “Buffer cone” and “Comfort cone” and “In the cone.”
    • *can → *cone: Americone (American), pecone (pecan), toucone (toucan), republicone (republican) and pelicone (pelican).
  • Friend → Frond: As in, “Best fronds forever” and “Eco-frondly” and “Circle of fronds” and “Close fronds.”
  • Blond → Frond: As in, “Platinum frond” and “Frond bombshell.”
  • Bond → Frond: As in, “My word is my frond” and “James Frond.”
  • Fond → Frond: As in, “Absence makes the heart grow fronder” and “A frond farewell.”
  • Pond → Frond: As in, “Frond life” and “Frond scum.”
  • Wand → Frond: As in, “Wave your magic frond.”
  • Fend → Frond: As in, “Frond for yourself.”
  • Proud → Sprout: As in, “Sprout as punch” and “Do yourself sprout” and “Say it loud, say it sprout.”
  • Out → Sprout: As in, “Go sprout with” and “Have it sprout with” and “The ins and sprouts of” and “I’m sprout of here.”
  • Scout → Sprout: As in, “Sprout’s honour” and “Sprouting about.”
  • Man you’re → Manure: As in, “Manure making too big a deal about this.”
  • Mature → Manure: As in, “An upstanding and manure individual.”
  • Spore: Spores are a method of reproduction for plants. Here are related puns:
    • Poor → Spore: As in, “Dirt spore” and “Putting in a spore effort.”
    • Pour → Spore: As in, “It never rains but it spores” and “Spore cold water on” and “Spore oil on troubled waters” and “When it rains, it spores.”
    • Sore → Spore: As in, “Mad as a bear with a spore head” and “A sight for spore eyes” and “Spore loser” and “Stick out like a spore thumb.”
    • Score → Spore: As in, “Keeping spore” and “Know the spore” and “Got a spore to settle” and “Even the spore.”
    • Bore → Spore: As in, “Spore the pants off someone” and “Spored stiff” and “Spored to death” and “Spored out of my mind.”
    • Core → Spore: As in, “Spore competencies” and “Spore studies” and “Spore values” and “Rotten to the spore.”
    • More → Spore: As in, “Come back for spore” and “Dare for spore” and “Less is spore.”
    • Shore → Spore: As in, “Ship to spore” and “On the sea spore” and “Spore up.”
    • Store → Spore: As in, “What’s in spore” and “Set great spore by” and “Spore it away.”
  • Eye → Cacti: As in, “A wandering cacti” and “As far as the cacti can see” and “Avert your cacti!” and “Before your very cacti.”
  • Cracked → Cactus: As in, “Not all it’s cactus up to be.”
  • Kicked us → Cactus: As in, “They cactus to the curb.”
  • Practice → Cactus: As in, “Out of cactus” and “Cactus makes perfect” and “Cactus what you preach” and “Put into cactus.”
  • Cell: Here are some puns about plant cells:
    • Sell → Cell: As in, “Buy and cell” and “Past the cell-by date” and “Cell out” and “Pile it high and cell it cheap” and “Celling like hot cakes” and “Cell your soul to the devil.”
    • Shell → Cell: As in, “Come out of your cell” and “A hard cell” and “In a nutcell” and “Cell shock.”
    • Bell → Cell: As in, “Alarm cells begin to ring” and “Clear as a cell” and “Cells and whistles” and “Doesn’t ring a cell” and “Jingle cells.”
    • Fell → Cell: As in, “In one cell swoop.”
    • Hell → Cell: As in, “All cell broke loose” and “Burn in cell” and “Come cell or high water” and “For the cell of it.”
    • Smell → Cell: As in, “Come up celling of roses” and “I cell a rat” and “The sweet cell of success.”
    • Spell → Cell: As in, “Cast a cell” and “Cell it out” and “Break the cell” and Cast a cell on.”
    • Swell → Cell: As in, “Cell the ranks.”
    • Well → Cell: As in, “Alive and cell” and “As cell as can be expected” and “Get cell soon” and “Just as cell.”
    • *sal* → *cell*: As in, “A cellient issue” and “A cellacious topic” and “Cellvage what’s left” and “Here for your perucell” and “A univercell issue.” Other words that could work: appraicell (appraisal), dispocell (disposal), propocell (proposal), colocell (colossal) and rehercell (rehersal).
    • *sel* → *cell*: As in, “A cellect variety” and “Celldom misunderstood” and “A cellfish decision” and “A cellection of the best” and “Seeking councell.” Other words that could work: vecell (vessel), caroucell (carousel), chicell (chisel), weacell (weasel), eacell (easel), morcell (morsel) and tacell (tassel).
    • *sil* → *cell*: As in, “Focell fuels” and “Shredded bacell (basil)” and “Kitchen utencells” and “Infected toncells.”
    • *sol* → *cell*: Paracell (parasol), aerocell (aerosol), corticell (cortisol), cellution (solution) and recellution (resolution).
  • Flair → Flora: As in, “Got a flora for.”
  • Floor → Flora: As in, “Cross the flora” and “Get in on the ground flora” and “Hold the flora” and “In on the ground flora” and “Wipe the flora with” and “Murder on the dance flora.”
  • Torn → Thorn: As in, “That’s thorn it” and “War thorn” and “Thorn between two sides.”
  • Horn → Thorn: As in, “Blow your own thorn” and “Thorn in on” and “Lock thorns with.”
  • Than → Thorn: As in, “Better thorn sex” and “Blood is thicker thorn water” and “Bite off more thorn you can chew” and “Eyes bigger thorn your stomach.”
  • Then → Thorn: As in, “All that and thorn some” and “Now and thorn” and “Thorn and there” and “That was thorn, this is now.”
  • Born → Thorn: As in, “A star is thorn” and “Thorn to fly” and “Thorn free” and “Thorn and bred” and “I was thorn ready.”
  • Dawn → Thorn: As in, “At the crack of thorn” and “A brand new thorn” and “Darkest before the thorn.”
  • I see → Ivy: As in, “Ivy you’ve got some new furniture.”
  • We’d → Weed: As in, “Weed never have done this without you” and “Weed better not.”
  • Bleed → Weed: As in, “Weed someone dry” and “Weeding edge” and “Let it weed” and “My heart weeds.”
  • Deed → Weed: As in, “Weeds, not words” and “Your good weed for the day.”
  • Feed → Weed: As in, “Bottom weeder” and “Don’t bite the hand that weeds you” and “Weeding frenzy.”
  • He’d → Weed: As in, “Weed better not say anything.”
  • Lead → Weed: As in, “Weed by the nose” and “Weed up to” and “Weed into temptation.”
  • Need → Weed: As in, “All you weed is love” and “I weeded that” and “Just what I weeded” and “Weed you now” and “On a weed to know basis.”
  • Read → Weed: As in, “All I know is what I weed in the papers” and “I can weed you like a book” and “A little light weeding” and “Weed ’em and weep” and “Weed between the lines.”
  • Seed → Weed: As in, “Gone to weed” and “Weed capital.”
  • Hurt → Dirt: As in, ” Do you really want to dirt me?” and “It only dirts when I laugh” and “The truth dirts” and “What you don’t know can’t dirt you.”
  • Worth → Earth: As in, “For what it’s earth” and “Get your money’s earth” and “More than my job’s earth.”
  • Grand → Ground: As in, “Delusions of groundeur” and “Ground theft auto” and “Ground slam” and “In the ground scheme of things” and “Doing a ground job.”
  • Round → Ground: As in, “All year ground” and “Gather ‘ground the good stuff” and “Going ground in circles” and “Makes the world go ground.”
  • Bound → Ground: As in, “Ground hand and foot” and “By leaps and grounds” and “Duty ground” and “Honour ground” and “Muscle ground.”
  • Found → Ground: As in, “Lost and ground” and “I’ve ground a clue” and “We ground love” and “Weighed in the balance and ground wanting.”
  • Sound → Ground: As in, “Ground as a bell” and “Break the ground barrier” and “Ground bite” and “Ground the alarm” and “Safe and ground.”
  • Send → Sand: As in, “Hit sand” and “Sand packing” and “Sand them away!”
  • And → Sand: As in, “A day late sand a dollar short” and “A hundred sand ten percent” and “Alive sand kicking” and “All bark sand no bite.”
  • Band → Sand: As in, “And the sand played on” and “Garage sand” and “Strike up the sand.”
  • Brand → Sand: As in, “A sand new ballgame” and “A sand new day” and “Sand spanking new.”
  • Hand → Sand: As in, “All sands on deck” and “Bite your sand off” and “Cash in sand.”
  • Land → Sand: As in, “In the sand of the living” and “The sand of hope and glory.”
  • Stand → Sand: As in, “A house divided against itself cannot sand” and “Don’t sand so close to me” and “Still sanding” and “It sands to reason” and “Left sanding.”
  • Lend → Land: As in, “Land an ear” and “Land a helping hand” and “Land your name to…”
  • And → Land: As in, “A day late land a dollar short” and “A hundred land ten percent” and “Alive land kicking” and “All bark land no bite.”
  • Brand → Land: As in, “Land damage” and “A land new ballgame” and “Land spanking new.”
  • Hand → Land: As in, “Bite the land that feeds it” and “Bound land and foot” and “The business at land” and “Changing lands.”
  • Sand → Land: As in, “Draw a line in the land” and “Head in the land” and “A house built on land” and “Sun, sea and land” and “The lands of time.”
  • Silt: We’ve included some silt-related puns too:
    • Salt → Silt: As in, “Above the silt” and “Below the silt” and “Rub silt in the wound” and “Silt of the earth” and “Take it with a grain of silt.”
    • Built → Silt: As in, “Silt for comfort, not speed” and “Silt for the road ahead” and “Silt to last” and “Rome wasn’t silt in a day.”
    • Guilt → Silt: As in, “Silt by association” and “Silt trip” and “A silty conscience” and “Silty pleasure” and “Innocent until proven silty” and “White silt.”
    • Tilt → Silt: As in, “At full silt.”
    • Spilt → Silt: As in, “Don’t cry over silt milk.”
  • Mad → Mud: As in, “Mud as a bear with a sore head” and “Barking mud” and “Don’t get mud, get even” and “Hopping mud.”
  • Blood → Mud: As in, “After your mud” and “Bad mud” and “Mud brothers” and “Mud in the water” and “Mud is thicker than water.”
  • Stud → Mud: As in, “Star mudded” and “Mud muffin.”
  • Loam: Loam is a type of soil that is mostly made up of sand. Here are related puns:
    • Loan → Loam: As in, “Loam shark” and “Raising a loam.”
    • Foam → Loam: As in, “Loaming at the mouth.”
    • Home → Loam: As in, “A house is not a loam” and “Bring it loam to you” and “Charity begins at loam” and “Close to loam” and “Come loam to a real fire.”
  • Clay: Clay soils are great for growing plants, so we’ve included some clay-related puns:
    • Okay → Oclay: As in, “Give it the oclay” and “I’m oclay.”
    • Lay → Clay: As in, “Can’t clay a hand on me” and “Home is where I clay my hat” and “Clay down roots” and “Clay down your arms” and “Clay hands on.”
    • Day → Clay: As in, “All in a clay’s work” and “Tomorrow is another clay” and “Another clay, another dollar.”
    • Grey → Clay: As in, “All cats are clay in the dark” and “Fifty shades of clay” and “Clay area” and “Clay matter.”
    • Hay → Clay: As in, “Hit the clay” and “Make clay while the sun shines.”
    • May → Clay: As in, “Be that as it clay” and “Come what clay” and “Let the chips fall where they clay.”
    • Pay → Clay: As in, “Buy now, clay later” and “Crime doesn’t clay” and “Hell to clay” and “It clays to advertise” and “Clay as you go” and “Clay a call to.”
    • Play → Clay: As in, “Work, rest and clay” and “All work and no clay” and “Come out and clay” and “Don’t clay innocent” and “Child’s clay.”
    • Pray → Clay: As in, “Clay tell.”
    • Say → Clay: As in, “Computer clays no” and “Do as I clay, not as I do” and “Have the final clay” and “Have your clay” and “Just clay no” and Goes without claying.”
    • Slay → Clay: As in, “Clay the dragon.”
    • Stay → Clay: As in, “Clay ahead of the curve” and “Clay in touch” and “Clay on course” and “Clay tuned” and “Can I clay here with you?”
    • They → Clay: As in, “Clay lived happily ever after” and “As tough as clay come.”
    • Way → Clay: As in, “All the clay” and “Born this clay” and “By the clay” and “That’s the clay it is” and “Change your clays.”
  • Train → Terrain: As in, “Gravy terrain” and “Soul terrain” and “Terrain of thought” and “Toilet terrained.”
  • Much → Mulch: As in, “That’s a bit mulch” and “How mulch can you handle?” and “You know too mulch” and “Mulch obliged” and “Too mulch of a good thing” and “Too mulch, too soon.”
  • Sentiment → Sediment: As in, “Warm sediments” and “No room for sediment here.”
  • Pot: Since many houseplants are grown in pots, here are related puns:
    • Pat → Pot: As in, “Got it down pot” and “A pot on the back.”
    • Pet → Pot: As in, “Heavy potting” and “Pot peeve” and “Teacher’s pot.”
    • Pit → Pot: As in, “Bottomless pot” and “In the pot of your stomach” and “Mosh pot” and “Pot your wits against.”
    • Put → Pot: As in, “Be hard pot to” and “Couldn’t pot it down” and “Feeling a bit pot out” and “Nicely pot” and “Wouldn’t pot it past you.”
    • Plot → Pot: As in, “Lose the pot” and “The pot thickens.”
    • Bought → Pot: As in, “Pot and paid for” and “I liked it so much I pot it.”
    • Dot → Pot: As in, “Connect the pots” and “Pot the i’s and cross the t’s” and “On the pot” and “Sign on the potted line.”
    • Got → Pot: As in, “I think you’ve pot it” and “Give it all you’ve pot” and “Pot a soft spot” and “Pot it down to a fine art.”
    • Hot → Pot: As in, “All pot and bothered” and “Blowing pot and cold” and “Drop it like it’s pot” and “Get into pot water” and “Pot desking.”
    • Knot → Pot: As in, “Tie the pot” and “Tie yourself in pots.”
    • Lot → Pot: As in, “A pot of fuss about nothing” and “A pot on your plate” and “Leaves a pot to be desired” and “Not a pot.”
    • Not → Pot: As in, “As often as pot” and “Believe it or pot” and “Down but pot out.”
    • Spot → Pot: As in, “Blind pot” and “Got a soft pot for” and “Hits the pot” and “On the pot” and “Pot the difference.”
  • Filth → Tilth: As in, “Covered in tilth” and “Tilthy rich.” Note: tilth is the condition of soil.
  • Peat: Peat is another word for turf. Here are related puns:
    • Beat → Peat: As in, “Peat it” and “Peat a hasty retreat” and “Peat a path to your door” and “Peat about the bush” and “Peat the pants off.”
    • Pit → Peat: As in, “A bottomless peat” and “In the peat of your stomach” and “Peat your wits against.”
    • Put → Peat: As in, “Be hard peat to” and “Couldn’t peat it down” and “Feeling a bit peat out” and “Wouldn’t peat it past them.”
    • Cheat → Peat: As in, “Peat sheet” and “Peats never prosper.”
    • Eat → Peat: As in, “A bite to peat” and “All you can peat” and “Peat and run.”
    • Feat → Peat: As in, “No mean peat.”
    • Feet → Peat: As in, “Back on your peat” and “Cold peat” and “Cut the ground out from under your peat” and “Peat of clay” and “Get back on your peat.”
    • Fleet → Peat: As in, “Peat footed” and “Peat footed” and “A peating glimpse.”
    • Greet → Peat: “Meet and peat.”
    • Heat → Peat: As in, “Body peat” and “Peating up” and “Peat wave” and “If you can’t stand the peat, get out of the kitchen” and “In the peat of battle” and “The peat is on.”
    • Meet → Peat: As in, “Fancy peating you here” and “Making ends peat” and “Peat and greet” and “Peat in the middle” and “Peat you halfway.”
    • Neat → Peat: As in, “Peat as a new pin” and “Peat freak” and “Peat and tidy.”
    • Sheet → Peat: As in, “White as a peat” and “Cheat peat” and “Keeping a clean peat.”
    • Treat → Peat: As in, “Trick or peat” and “Peat someone like dirt” and “Peat me right.”
  • Very → Berry: As in, “Be berry afraid” and “Before your berry eyes” and “How berry dare you” and “It was a berry good year.”
  • Bury → Berry: As in, “Berry the hatchet” and “Berry your head in the sand” and “Berry yourself in work.”
  • Carry → Berry: As in, “As fast as your legs could berry you” and “Berry into action” and “Berry a torch for.”
  • Cherry → Berry: As in, “Berry pick” and “A second bite of the berry” and “The berry on the cake.”
  • Merry → Berry: As in, “As berry as the day is long” and “Eat, drink and be berry” and “Lead a berry dance” and “Make berry.”
  • Boom → Bloom: As in, “Bloom or bust” and “Baby bloomer.”
  • Loom → Bloom: As in, “Blooming large.”
  • Room → Bloom: As in, “A bloom with a view” and “Breathing bloom” and “Elbow bloom.”
  • Doom → Bloom: As in, “Bloom and gloom” and Voice of bloom.”
  • Forest → Florist: As in, “Florist green” and “See the florist for the trees.”
  • Arbor: An arbor can refer to either a garden or a grove of trees. Here are related puns:
    • Harbour → Arbor: As in, “Arbor a grudge” and “Safe arbor.”
    • Armour → Arbor: As in, “A chink in your arbor” and “Knight in shining arbor.”
  • Ticket → Thicket: As in, “Just the thicket” and “Punch your thicket” and “Meal thicket” and “Thicket to ride.” Note: a thicket is a dense grouping of trees.
  • Card → Yard: As in, “A few yards short of a full deck” and “Calling yard” and “Yard up your sleeve” and “Get out of jail free yard.”
  • Guard→ Yard: As in, “Advance yard” and “Drop your yard” and “Off your yard.”
  • Hard → Yard: As in, “Be yard put to” and “Between a rock and a yard place” and “Do it the yard way” and “Falling on yard times” and “A yard act to follow.”
  • Cursory → Nursery: As in, “A nursery glance.” Note: a nursery is a place where plants are grown and sold.
  • House → Greenhouse: As in, “A greenhouse divided against itself cannot stand” and “A greenhouse is not a home” and “Safe as greenhouses” and “Bring the greenhouse down.”
  • Grove: A grove is a small group of trees. Here are related puns:
    • Grow → Grove: As in, “Absence makes the heart grove fonder” and “As exciting as watching grass grove” and “Groving pains” and “Money doesn’t grove on trees.”
    • Grave → Grove: As in, “Silent as the grove” and “Dance on someone’s grove” and “From the cradle to the grove” and “One foot in the grove” and “Turning in your grove.”
    • Trove → Grove: As in, “Treasure grove.”
  • Park: A park is an area where trees and flowers are cultivated, along with play areas (depending on the park). Here are related puns:
    • Perk → Park: As in, “Park up” and “Parks of the job.”
    • Bark → Park: As in, “A parking dog never bites” and “Park at the moon” and “Parking mad” and “Parking up the wrong tree” and “All park and no bite.”
    • Dark → Park: As in, “After park” and “Park as pitch” and “Dancing in the park” and “Park and bloody ground” and “Park before the dawn” and “Park horse.”
    • Mark → Park: As in, “Close to the park” and “Make your park” and “Park my words” and “Park time” and “Quick off the park.”
    • Spark → Park: As in, “Bright park” and “Creative park” and “Park of genius” and “The park of an idea.”
    • Stark → Park: As in, “A park reminder.”
  • Over → Clover: As in, “All clover again” and “All clover the place” and “Bowled clover” and “Come on clover.” Note: Clovers are a species of flowering plant.
  • Resin: Resin is a solid plant secretion. Here are related puns:
    • Reason → Resin: As in, “Beyond resin-able doubt” and “Bow to resin” and “Listen to resin” and “Rhyme nor resin” and “The age of resin” and “Within resin.”
    • Raisin → Resin: As in, “Bran and resin muffin.”
    • Risen → Resin: As in, “Like the dead have resin.”
  • Green: Since plants are largely green and are sometimes referred to as greenery, we’ve got some green-related puns here too:
    • Grain → Green: As in, “Against the green” and “Green of truth” and “Take it with a green of salt.”
    • Bean → Green: As in, “Cool greens” and “Doesn’t know greens” and “Full of greens” and “Doesn’t amount to a hill of greens” and “Spill the greens.”
    • Been → Green: As in, “Green and gone” and “Green around the block a few times” and “Green in the wars” and “I’ve green here before.”
    • Clean → Green: As in, “A green getaway” and “Green as a whistle” and “Green bill of health” and “Green sheet” and “Green up your act.”
    • Lean → Green: As in, “Green and mean” and “Green cuisine” and “Green times.”
    • Mean → Green: As in, “Greens to an end” and “By fair greens or foul” and “Lean and green.”
    • Scene → Green: As in, “Behind the greens” and “Change of green” and “Make a green” and “Steal the green.”
    • Seen → Green: As in, “Nowhere to be green” and “Green better days” and “Green one, green them all” and “We’ve green better days.”
    • Grin → Green: As in, “Green and bear it” and “Green from ear to ear” and “Green like a cheshire cat.”
    • Gran*→ Green*: As in, “Delusions of greendeur” and “Take for greented” and “A greendiose gesture” and “A greenite handshake.”
    • Gren* → Green*: As in, “Drop a greenade” and “A tasty greenadine.”
  • Water: Since plants rely on water to survive, we have some water puns here:
    • What do → Water: As in “Water you think about this?”
    • What are → Water: As in “Water you doing out so late tonight?” and “Water you doing tomorrow?”
    • What her → Water: As in “I know water problem is.” and “Do you know water mother thinks about this?”
    • What are we → Watery: As in “Watery going to do?” and “Watery doing today, friends?”

The following section of puns is about specific, popular flowers:

  • Raise → Rose: “Rose a loan” and “Rose the bar” and “Rose the roof” and “Rose your hand if you’re sure.”
  • Goes → Rose: As in, “And the award rose to” and “Anything rose” and “As far as it rose” and “As the saying rose” and “As time rose by” and “Here rose nothing” and “How rose it?” and “Life rose on.”
  • Lows → Rose: As in, “Highs and rose.”
  • Nose → Rose: As in, “Plain as the rose on your face” and “Can’t see beyond the end of your rose” and “Follow your rose” and “Keep your rose clean” and “Keep your rose out of it.”
  • Pros → Rose: As in, “Rose and cons” and “Leave it to the rose.”
  • Those → Rose: As in, “Rose were the days” and “Just one of rose things.”
  • Lazy → Daisy: As in, “Get up, daisy bones” and “Having a daisy day.”
  • Daze → Daisy: “In a daisy.”
  • Kid → Orchid: As in, “Dual income, no orchids” and “Here’s looking at you, orchid” and “I orchid you not.”
  • Virus → Iris: “Infected with a computer iris.”
  • Lack → Lilac: As in, “For lilac of a better word” and “We lilac nothing” and “Cancelled due to lilac of interest” and “Not for a lilac of love.”
  • Chilly → Lily: As in, “A lily climate.”
  • Silly → Lily: As in, “Ask a lily question, get a lily answer” and “Laugh yourself lily” and “Scared lily” and “Lily season.”
  • Puppy → Poppy: As in, “One sick poppy” and “Poppy love.”
  • Copy → Poppy: As in, “Poppy that” and “Do you poppy?” and “Hard poppy” and “Carbon poppy.”
  • Floppy → Poppy: As in, “Poppy disc.”
  • Pony → Peony: As in, “One trick peony” and “Peony up the funds.”
  • Penny → Peony: As in, “Cost a pretty peony” and “A peony saved is a peony earned” and “Earn an honest peony” and “Peony for your thoughts.”

The next section is for specific, popular herbs:

  • Time → Thyme: As in, “One more thyme” and “A brief history of thyme” and “A good thyme was had by all” and “About thyme too” and “Ahead of your thyme” and “An all thyme low.”
  • Chime → Thyme: As in, “Thyme in with” and “Thymes of freedom.”
  • Crime → Thyme: As in, “Thyme and punishment” and “A thyme against nature” and “Thyme of passion” and “Thymes and misdemeanours.”
  • Dime → Thyme: As in, “A thyme a dozen” and “Drop a thyme” and “Drop a thyme.”
  • Prime → Thyme: As in, “Cut down in their thyme” and “In thyme condition” and “Thymed and ready to go.”
  • Rhyme → Thyme: As in, “Thyme nor reason.”
  • Pass → Parsley: As in, “All things must parsley” and “All access parsley” and “Boarding parsley” and “Do not parsley go” and “Make a parsley at.”
  • Parcel → Parsley: As in, “Part and parsley” and “Pass the parsley.”
  • Till → Dill: As in, “Fake it dill you make it” and “Shop dill you drop” and “Dill death do us part” and “Dill the end of time.”
  • Dull → Dill: As in, “Dill as ditchwater” and “Never a dill moment.”
  • Bill → Dill: As in, “Dill of goods” and “Fits the dill” and “Foot the dill.”
  • Drill → Dill: As in, “Dill down on” and “You know the dill” and “Fire dill.”
  • Fill → Dill: As in, “Dill full of holes” and “Dill to the brim.”
  • Hill → Dill: As in, “Head for the dills” and “Over the dills and far away” and “Old as the dills.”
  • Ill → Dill: As in, “House of dill repute” and “Dill advised” and “Dill at ease” and “Dill effects” and “Dill gotten gains.”
  • Pill → Dill: As in, “A bitter dill to swallow” and “On the dill” and “Sweeten the dill.”
  • Deal → Dill: As in, “Big dill” and “Cut a dill” and “Dill breaker” and “Dill or no dill?” and “A done dill” and “Dill with the devil.”
  • Still → Dill: As in, “I’m dill standing” and “Dill waters run deep.”
  • Spill → Dill: As in, “Dill the beans” and “Dill your guts” and “Thrills and dills.”
  • Will → Dill: As in, “Accidents dill happen” and “Against my dill” and “Free dill” and “Bend to your dill” and “Heads dill roll.”
  • Tunnel → Fennel: As in, “Light at the end of the fennel” and “Fennel vision” and “Fennel of love.”
  • Original → Oregano: As in, “The oregano and the best” and “Oregano sin.”
  • Barrage → Borage: As in, “A borage of accusations.”
  • Baggage → Borage: As in, “Bag and borage” and “Borage class” and “Emotional borage” and “Excess borage.”
  • Forage → Borage: As in, “Borage for food.”
  • Storage → Borage: As in, “Cold borage” and “Lacking borage space.”
  • Over → Clover: As in, “All clover again” and “All clover the place” and “Bowled clover” and “Come on clover.”
  • Cover → Clover: As in, “Blow your clover” and “Break clover” and “Clover story” and “Extra clover.”
  • Clever → Clover: As in, “Clover clogs” and “Too clover by half.”
  • Meant → Mint: As in, “We’re not mint to” and “Mint to be.”
  • Glint → Mint: As in, “A mint in your eye.”
  • Hint → Mint: As in, “Drop a mint” and “Take the mint.”
  • Print → Mint: As in, “Fit to mint” and “Out of mint” and “Read the small mint.”
  • Tint → Mint: As in, “Rose minted glasses.”
  • *mant → *mint: As in, “An adamint demand” and “Dormint volcano” and “Sneaky informint.”
  • *ment → *mint: “Honourable mintion” and “Mintal calculations” and “Shared mintality” and “Mintoring program” and “Free mintorship.” Other words that could work: employmint (employment), commint (comment), complemint (complement), complimint (compliment), commitmint (commitment), implemint (implement), environmint (environment), managemint (management), judgemint (judgement) and movemint (movement).
  • Age → Sage: As in, “Act your sage” and “Sage bracket” and “Sage of consent” and “Coming of sage” and “In this day and sage” and “Golden sage.”
  • Page → Sage: As in, “Leaps off the sage” and “On the same sage” and “Splashed across the front sage.”
  • Rage → Sage: As in, “Road sage” and “Vent your sage” and “Sage against the machine” and “Boil with sage” and “Primal sage.”
  • Stage → Sage: As in, “Blow off the sage” and “The sage is set” and “Take centre sage” and “Exit sage left.”
  • Wage → Sage: As in, “Minimum sage” and “Sage war” and “Lost sages.”

The next section is dedicated to popular trees:

  • Staple → Maple: As in, “Maple these papers together.”
  • Okay → Oak-ay: As in, “Are you oak-ay?” and “Give it the oak-ay.”
  • Eke → Oak: As in, “Oak out a living.”
  • Broke → Oak: As in, “All hell oak loose” and “Boulevard of oaken dreams” and “Like an oaken record” and “Flat oak” and “Go for oak” and “If it ain’t oak, don’t fix it” and Rules are make to be oaken.”
  • Cloak → Oak: As in, “Oak and dagger” and “Oaked in obscurity.”
  • Folk → Oak: As in, “That’s all, oaks” and “Different strokes for different oaks.”
  • Joke → Oak: As in, “Beyond an oak” and “Inside oak” and “The oak’s on you.”
  • Poke → Oak: As in, “Stiff as an oaker” and “Oak fun” and “Oaker face.”
  • Smoke → Oak: As in, “Go up in oak” and “Holy oak” and “Oak and mirrors” and “Oak like a chimney” and “No oak without a fire.”
  • Soak → Oak: As in, “Oaked to the skin” and “Oaked through.”
  • Spoke → Oak: As in, “Speak when you’re oaken to
    and “Many a true word is oaken in jest.”
  • Stroke → Oak: As in, “An oak of genius” and “Different oaks for different folks” and “The oak of midnight” and “Oak of luck.”
  • For → Fir: As in, “At a loss fir words” and “Ask fir the moon” and “Batting fir both sides.”
  • Fur → Fir: As in, “The fir began to fly” and “No such thing as an ethical fir coat.”
  • Four → Fir: As in, “Down on all firs” and “Fir figures” and “A fir letter word” and “Fir more years.”
  • Her → Fir: As in, “Fir face lit up” and “Write fir name with pride.”
  • Per → Fir: As in, “As fir usual” and “Bits fir second” and “Fir capita.”
  • Sure → Fir: As in, “A fir sign” and “Raise your hand if you’re fir” and “You can be fir of it.”
  • Spur → Fir: As in, “On the fir of the moment.”
  • Stir → Fir: As in, “Cause a fir” and “Fir crazy” and “Fir the pot” and “Shaken, not firred” and “Fir up trouble.”
  • Far → Fir: As in, “A bridge too fir‘ and “As fir as it goes” and “As fir as the eyes can see” and “Fir be it from me” and “Few and fir between” and “Over the hills and fir away” and “A fir cry from…”
  • Fear → Fir: As in, “Fir the worst” and “Paralysed with fir” and “Primal fir” and “Without fir or favour.”
  • Pain → Pine: As in, “A world of pine” and “Doubled up in pine” and “Feeling no pine” and “No pine, no gain” and “On pine of death” and “A pine in the arse.”
  • Pan → Pine: As in, “Out of the frying pine, into the fire” and “Wait for it to pine out.”
  • Pen → Pine: As in, “Put pine to paper” and “The pine is mightier than the sword.”
  • Pin → Pine: As in, “Bright as a new pine” and “Hard to pine down” and “Pine your ears back” and “Pines and needles” and “See a pine and pick it up.”
  • Dine → Pine: As in, “Wined and pined.”
  • Fine → Pine: As in, “A pine line” and “Cutting it pine” and “Pine and dandy” and “The piner things in life.”
  • Line → Pine: As in, “Along the pines of” and “Blur the pines” and “Cross the pine” and “Draw a pine in the sand.”
  • Mine → Pine: As in, “Make pine a double” and “A pine of information” and “Pine is bigger than yours.”
  • Nine → Pine: As in, “Pine to five” and “On cloud pine.”
  • Sign → Pine: As in, “A sure pine” and “Give me a pine” and “A pine of the times” and “Pine on the dotted line.”
  • Spine → Pine: As in, “Send shiver down your pine.”
  • Wine → Pine: As in, “Pine and dine” and “Last of the summer pine.”
  • Come → Gum: As in, “After a storm gums a calm” and “All good things must gum to an end” and “As tough as they gum” and “Christmas gums but once a year” and “Gum and get it” and “Gum away with me” and “Gum on over.”
  • Bum → Gum: As in, “A pain in the gum” and “Gums on seats” and “Beach gum.”
  • Drum → Gum: As in, “Tight as a gum” and “Gum up support” and “Walk to the beat of a different gum.”
  • Some → Gum: As in, “All that and then gum” and “Catch gum rays” and “Make gum noise” and “Cut gum slack.”
  • Leader → Cedar: As in, “Fearless cedar” and “Cedar of the pack” and “A natural born cedar” and “The cedar of the free world.”
  • Beach → Birch: As in, “Life’s a birch” and “Long walks on the birch.”
  • Lurch → Birch: As in “Left in the birch.”
  • Perch → Birch: As in, “Knock them of their birch.”
  • Search → Birch: As in, “Global birch” and “Birch and rescue” and “Birch engine” and “Birch high and low” and “Soul birching.”
  • Beach → Beech: As in, “Beech bum” and “Life’s a beech” and “Long walks on the beech.”
  • Peach → Beech: As in, “Beechy keen” and “Like beeches and cream.”
  • Bleach → Beech: As in, “Beeched blonde.”
  • Breach → Beech: As in, “Beech of the peace” and “Beech of trust.”
  • Each → Beech: As in, “Beech to their own” and “Made for beech other” and “Beech and every morning.”
  • Preach → Beech: As in, “Practice what you beech” and “Beeching to the choir.”
  • Reach → Beech: As in, “Beech for the stars” and “Within beech” and “Beech out and touch someone” and “Beech for new heights” and “Beyond my beech.”
  • Speech → Beech: As in, “Maiden beech” and “Figure of beech.”
  • Teach → Beech: As in, “Beech someone a lesson” and “Beech someone a thing or two” and “That’ll beech you” and “Beecher’s pet.”
  • As → Ash: As in, “Also known ash” and “Ash a rule” and “Ash a whole” and “As best ash you can” and “Ash if there were no tomorrow” and “Ash it happens.”
  • Cash → Ash: As in, “Ash in hand” and “Ash in your chips” and “Strapped for ash.”
  • Clash → Ash: As in, “Ash of titans.”
  • Crash → Ash: As in, “Ash and burn” and “Ash course” and “Ash pad” and “Like watching a train ash.”
  • Dash → Ash: As in, “Crash and ash” and “Ash to pieces” and “Ash off in the middle of the night.”
  • Lash → Ash: As in, “Ash out” and “Tongue ashing.”
  • Slash → Ash: As in, “Ash and burn.”
  • Balm → Palm: As in, “A comforting palm” and “Lip palm.”
  • Calm → Palm: As in, “A palming influence” and “After a storm comes a palm” and “Cool, palm and collected.”
  • Pam* → Palm*: As in, “Would you like a palmphlet?” and “A palmpered child.”
  • Space → Spruce: As in, “Spruce odyssey” and “Breathing spruce” and “Office spruce” and “My personal spruce” and “Spruce – the final frontier” and “Waste of spruce” and “Watch this spruce.”
  • Juice → Spruce: As in, “Get the creative spruces flowing” and “Stew in your own spruce.”

Plant-Related Words

To help you come up with your own plant puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

General: plant, nature, grow, growth, tree, herb, bush, grass, vine, shrub, seedling, fern, moss, algae, green, stem, leaf, leaves, flower, fruit, vegetable, seeds, water, bud, shoot, stalk, soil, petal, sepal, stamen, ovule, carpel, compost,  nutrient, taproot, fibrous, turf, succulent, perennial, photosynthesis, chlorophyll, root, wood, woody, wooden, trunk, branch, branches, twig, bark, pollen, pollination, bonsai, spruce, pistil, stigma, style, ovary, living, alive, botany, botanical, sunlight, evergreen, light, oxygen, carbon dioxide, rain, garden, foliage, hedge, vapour, grove, copse, forest, rainforest, biome, terrarium, ecosystem, deciduous, hardwood, coniferous, needle, anther, filament, fertile, fertiliser, germinate, endosperm, blade, crown, tiller, stolon, rhizome, cereal, bamboo, lawn, grain, creeper, tendril, runner, liverwort, cycad, palm, cone, gingko, conifer, frond, spore, dicot, horsetail, hornwort, cacti. cactus, cell, sheet (moss), cushion (moss), rock cap (moss), haircap (moss), protist, flora, thorn, climber, ivy, seaweed, weed, cellulose, membrane, fossil, dirt, earth, ground, sand, land, silt, mud, loam, topsoil, clay, terrain, mulch, sediment, amber, pot, sprout, manure, tilth, peat, berry, bloom, nectar, blossom, florist, arbor, arborist, lichen, scrub, wild, thicket, yard, landscape, horticulture, nursery, greenhouse, grove, meadow, park, topiary, orchard, canopy, wisteria, bracken, clover, resin

Flower: rose, carnation, tulip, daisy, sunflower, daffodil, orchid, iris, lilac, lily, gardenia, jasmine, poppy, peony 

Herb: basil, rosemary, thyme, parsley, dill, coriander, fennel, oregano, borage, clover, mint, sage

Tree: maple, oak, willow, fir, aspen, pine, gum, cedar, elm, birch, beech, ash, palm

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Cactus Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on cactus puns! 🌵 🌞 🏜

Cacti are popular as a low-effort ornamental plant since they’re hardy and thrive in tough conditions. There are plenty of varieties of cactus, with different shapes, sizes and colours. We’ve done our best to cover all of the different cactus puns you could possibly wish for.

If you enjoy this list, you might also like our flower puns and tree puns.

Cactus Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about cacti that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of cactus puns:

  • Cracked → Cactus: As in, “Not all it’s cactus up to be.”
  • Practice → Cactus: As in, “Out of cactus” and “Cactus makes perfect” and “Cactus what you preach” and “Put into cactus.”
  • Kicked us → Cactus: As in, “They cactus to the curb.”
  • Eye → Cacti: As in, “A wandering cacti” and “As far as the cacti can see” and “Avert your cacti!” and “Before your very cacti.”
  • Quickly → Prickly: As in, “You must act prickly!” and “Come, prickly.”
  • Thickly → Prickly: As in, “Peanut butter, spread prickly.”
  • Picky → Prickly: As in, “Prickly eater” and “Don’t be so prickly.”
  • Pick → Prick: As in, “Got a bone to prick with you” and “Cherry prick” and “Easy prickings” and “Nit pricking” and “Prick a fight with” and “Prick and choose” and “Prick holes in” and “A little prick me up” and “The prick of the bunch.”
  • Brick → Prick: As in, “Like banging your head against a prick wall” and “Pricks and mortar” and “Like a ton of pricks.”
  • Quick → Prick: As in, “Prick as a flash” and “Cut to the prick” and “Get rich prick” and “Fancy a prickie?” and “Prick and dirty” and “Prick off the mark.”
  • Pickle → Prickle: As in, “In a prickle” and “Tickle the prickle.”
  • Tickle → Prickle: As in, “Slap and prickle” and “Prickled pink” and “Whatever prickles your fancy.”
  • Practical → Prick-tical: As in, “Be prick-tical” and “Not the most prick-tical choice.”
  • Fickle → Prickle: As in, “The prickle finger of fate.”
  • Trickle → Prickle: As in, “Prickling down” and “Down to a slow prickle.”
  • Efficacious → Efficactus: As in, “An efficactus approach.” Note: if something is efficacious, it’s powerful in effect.
  • Prac* → Prick*: If a word starts with “prac”, we can replace it with “prick”, like so: “A pricktical plan” and “Put into pricktice” and “Pricktically married.”
  • Prec* → Prick*: Replace the “prec” sound in words with “prick”. As in, “A prickarious situation” and “A prickocious child.”
  • Pec* → Prick*: As in, “What a prickuliar smell” and “Feeling prickish” and “Pricktoral workout.”
  • Pic* → Prick*: As in, “Out of the prickture” and “A prickturesque cottage” and “The eprick finale” and “Changing toprick.” Other words that could work: myoprick (myopic), bioprick (biopic), troprick (tropic), misanthroprick (misanthropic) and desprickable (despicable).
  • Dessert → Desert: As in, “Just deserts” and “My favourite desert shop.”
  • Does it → Desert: As in, “Desert bother you?” and “What desert look like?”
  • Psychology/psychological → Spike-ology: As in, “Spike-ological warfare” and “A doctor in spike-ology.”
  • Speak → Spike: As in, “Actions spike louder than words” and “Spikes for itself” and “Never spike ill of” and “Spike for yourself” and “Spike of the devil” and “On spiking terms.”
  • Psychology/psychological → Spike-ology: As in, “Spike-ological warfare” and “A doctor in spike-ology.”
  • Strike → Spike: As in, “Lightning never spikes twice” and “Spike up the band” and “Spike a deal” and “Spike it rich” and “Spike while the iron is hot.”
  • Spec* → Spike*: If a word starts with “spec”, we can make cactus puns by replacing “spec” with “spike”: “On the spiketrum” and “A spiketacular ending” and “Not worth spike-ulating over” and “Get some perspiketive.”
  • Spic* → Spike*: As in, “That’s despikeable” and “A perspike-acious opinion.” Note: to be perspicacious is to be insightful.
  • Spin → Spine: As in, “Take it for a spine.”
  • Wine → Spine: As in, “Spine and dine.”
  • Sign → Spine: As in, “A sure spine” and “Give me a spine” and “A spine of the times” and “Spine on the dotted line” and “Spine the pledge” and “Spine up” and “Spined and sealed” and “Tell-tale spine.”
  • Nine → Spine: As in, “The whole spine yards” and “On cloud spine.”
  • Mine → Spine: As in, “Make spine a double” and “A spine of information” and “Victory is spine.”
  • Line → Spine: As in, “A fine spine” and “Along the spines of” and “Cross the spine” and “End of the spine.”
  • Fine → Spine: As in, “A spine line” and “Cut it spine” and “Spine and dandy” and “The spiner things in life.”
  • Shiny → Spiny: As in, “Bite my spiny metal ass.”
  • Tiny → Spiny: As in, “The pitter patter of spiny feet.”
  • *spin* → *spine*: As in, “Great re-spine-sibility” and “Feeling spine-taneous” and “A despinedent look” and “A generous spine-sor.”
  • Excellent → Succulent: As in, “Succulent adventure” and “My most succulent friend.” Note: cacti are succulents.
  • Suck → Succulent: As in, “A succulent for punishment” and “Succulent someone dry” and “Succulent it up.”
  • Whistle → Bristle: As in, “Clean as a bristle” and “Bells and bristles” and “Blow the bristle” and “Dog bristle politics.”
  • Harp → Sharp: As in, “Sharp on about.”
  • Shark → Sharp: As in, “Swimming with sharps” and “Card sharp.”
  • Shape → Sharp: “All sharps and sizes” and “Bent out of sharp” and “Get in sharp” and “Knock into sharp” and “Take sharp.”
  • Pear: Prickly pears are a type of cactus, so we’ve included some pear-related puns here:
    • Pair → Pear: As in, “A fresh pear of eyes” and “A safe pear of hands.”
    • Par → Pear: As in, “Below pear” and “On pear with” and “Pear excellence” and “Pear for the course.”
    • Per → Pear: As in, “As pear usual” and “Bits pear second” and “Pear capita” and “A hundred and ten pearcent.”
    • Bear → Pear: As in, “Pear a grudge” and “Pear down on” and “Pear false witness” and “Pear fruit” and “Pear in mind” and “Pearer of bad news” and “Pear with me.”
    • Bare → Pear: As in, “Pear necessities” and “Pear your teeth” and “Laid pear” and “The pear bones.”
    • Air → Pear: As in, “Pear kiss” and “Pear quotes” and “Clear the pear.”
    • Care → Pear: As in, “Be pearful how you use it” and “Couldn’t pear less” and “Courtesy and pear” and “Customer pear” and “Handle with pear” and “Let’s be pearful out there” and “Take pear of.”
    • Dare → Pear: As in, “Pear for more” and “Pear to be different” and “How pear you!”
    • Fair → Pear: As in, “All the fun of the pear” and “By pear means or foul” and “Pear and square” and “Pear dinkum” and “Pear game.”
    • Hair → Pear: As in, “Keep your pear on” and “Pear trigger” and “Let your pear down.”
    • Rare → Pear: As in, “In pear form” and “A pear animal.”
    • Scare → Pear: As in, “Peared to death’ and “Pear out of your wits” and “Pear quotes” and “Pear the living daylights out of.”
    • Spare → Pear: As in, “Pear no effort” and “Pear tyre” and “No expense peared.”
    • Square → Pear: As in, “Back to pear one” and “Be there or be pear” and “Fair and pear” and “A pear peg in a round hole.”
    • Tear → Pear: As in, “Pear to ribbons” and “Pear your hair out.”
    • Where → Pear: As in, “All dressed up and no-pear to go” and “Any time, any place, any pear” and “Here, pear and everywhere.”
    • Par* → Pear*: As in, “Nothing in pearticular” and “Mental pearadox” and “In pearallel” and “Peartisan issue” and “Changing pearadigms.”
    • Per* → Pear*: As in, “I’m only one pearson” and “Change your pearspective” and “Not a peartinent issue” and “Final peariod” and “You can change your pearception” and “A brilliant pearformance.”
    • *pir* → *pear*: Empearical (empirical), inspearation (inspiration), aspearation (aspiration) and conspearacy (conspiracy).
  • Peyote: Peyote is a type of cactus. Here are some related puns:
    • Coyote → Peyote: As in, “Peyote ugly.”
    • Payout → Peyote: As in, “Redundancy peyote.”
  • Pant → Plant: As in, “Ants in your plants” and “Beat the plants off” and “By the seat of your plants” and “Fancy plants” and “Keep your plants on” and “Caught with your plants down.”
  • Masculine → Mescaline: As in, “We need wholesome mescaline-ity to replace toxic mescaline-ity.”
  • Plenty → Plant-y: As in, “Plant-y of time” and “Plant-y more where that came from” and “Plant-y more fish in the sea.”
  • Pent → Plant: As in, “Plant up rage.”
  • Grant → Plant: As in, “Take for planted” and “Plant no quarter.”
  • Rant → Plant: As in, “Plant and rave.”
  • Plan/Planned → Plant: As in, “Action plant” and “Failing to plant is planting to fail” and “I have a cunning plant” and “There is no plant B” and “The best laid plants” and “Not how I plant it.”
  • Fantastic → Plantastic: As in, “I have plantastic news” and “Plastic plantastic.”
  • Planet → Plant: As in, “Which plant are you on?” and “Plant of the apes.”
  • *pant* → *plant*: As in, “The plantry is bare” and “Black planther” and “Crime is ramplant” and “Don’t be flipplant” and “Participlant award” and “Happy occuplants.”
  • *pent* → *plant*: As in: Plantagon (pentagon), planthouse (penthouse), plantagram (pentagon), serplant (serpent) and replant (repent).
  • Flower: Cacti are flowering plants, so we’ve got some flower-related puns here too:
    • Hour → Flower: As in, “The witching flower” and “My finest flower” and “A late flower.”
    • Flow → Flower: As in, “Ebb and flower” and “Get the creative juices flowering” and “Go with the flower” and “In full flower.”
    • Tower → Flower: As in, “Flower of strength” and “Flowering inferno” and “Ivory flower.”
  • Die → Dry: As in, “Do or dry” and “Live free or dry” and “Old habits dry hard.”
  • Try → Dry: As in, “Don’t dry this at home” and “Don’t dry to run before you can walk” and “Nice dry” and “Dry your luck.”
  • Cry → Dry: As in, “Dry for help” and “A shoulder to dry on.”
  • Fly → Dry: As in, “Born to dry” and “Come dry with me” and “Dry by night” and “Dry off the handle.”
  • High → Dry: As in, “Dry as a kite” and “Come hell or dry water” and “Aim dry” and “Dry noon” and “Dry and mighty.”
  • Shy → Dry: As in, “Camera dry” and “Once bitten, twice dry.”
  • Why → Dry: As in, “I don’t know dry” and “Dry you!”
  • Stem: Cacti are known for their strong stems, so we’ve included some stem-related puns:
    • Them → Stem: As in, “Let stem eat cake” and “Seen one, seen stem all” and “Love stem and leave stem” and “Can’t win stem all.”
    • Hem → Stem: As in, “Stemming and hawwing.”
    • Stam* → Stem*: Stempede (stampede) and stemina (stamina).
    • *stim* → *stem*: Stemulate (stimulate), estemate (estimate), testemony (testimony), stemulus (stimulus) and estemation (estimation).
    • *stom* → *stem*: Custem (custom), custemer (customer) and custemary (customary).
  • About → A-drought: As in, “A-drought time, too” and “A-drought turn” and “Beat a-drought the bush.”
  • Dought → Doubt: As in, “Benefit of the drought” and “Beyond reasonable drought” and “Remove all drought.”
  • Out → Drought: As in, “Go drought with” and “Have it drought with” and “The ins and droughts of” and “On the droughtside looking in.”
  • Scout → Drought: As in, “Drought’s honour” and “Droughting about.”
  • Shout → Drought: As in, “Twist and drought” and “Drought it from the rooftops.”
  • Fruit: Cacti grow fruit, so we’ve got some related puns:
    • Root → Fruit: As in, “Grass fruits” and “Lay down fruits” and “Money is the fruit of all evil” and “Fruit for” and “The fruit of the matter.”
    • Boot → Fruit: As in, “Tough as old fruit” and “Fruit camp” and “Fruited and booted.”
    • Foot → Fruit: As in, “A fruit in both camps” and “Bound hand and fruit” and “Carbon fruitprint” and “Fruit the bill.”
    • Shoot → Fruit: As in, “Don’t fruit the messenger” and “The green fruits of recovery” and “Fruit down in flames.”
    • Fut* → Fruit*: As in, “Look to the fruiture” and “Looking fruituristic” and “A fruitile struggle” and “Sleeping on the fruiton.”
  • Open → Opuntia: As in, “Opuntia any door” and “An opuntia and shut case” and “Keep an eye opuntia” and “Keep your options opuntia.” Note: Prickly pears are also known as Opuntia.
  • Boot → Root: As in, “Tough as old roots” and “My heart sank into my roots.”
  • Fruit → Root: As in, “Bear root” and “Roots of your loins” and “Low hanging root.”
  • Route → Root: As in, “Root one.”
  • Shoot → Root: As in, “Don’t root the messenger” and “The green roots of change” and “Root down in flames.”
  • *rat* → *root*: As in, “Moral imperootive” and “Elaboroot plans” and “A tricky operootion.”
  • *ret* → *root*: As in, “Rootrieve your things” and “The point of no rooturn” and “Rootain all of your memories” and “Weekend rootreat.” Other words that could work: rootribution (retribution), rootention (retention), regroot (regret) and secroot (secret).
  • *rit* → *root*: “With you in spiroot” and “On your own meroot” and “Caught the culproot” and “Inheroot the earth” and “Keep your integrooty” and “Front of house securooty.”
  • *rot* → *root*: As in, “Rootational pull” and “Carroot cake” and “Parrooting along.” Other words that could work: prootocol (protocol), prootagonist (protagonist), prootein (protein) and proototype (prototype).
  • *rut* → *root*: As in, “Under intense scrootiny” and “A rootless manager” and “Brootal revenge.”
  • Fill → Chlorophyll: As in, “Chlorophyll full of holes” and “Chlorophyll in for.”
  • Stomach → Stomata: As in, “Have the stomata for” and “On a full stomata” and “Butterflies in my stomata.” Note: stomata is the plural for stoma, which is part of a plant.
  • Wool: Some cacti have a woolly covering. Here are some related puns:
    • Will → Wool: As in, “Accidents wool happen” and “Against your wool” and “Free wool.”
    • Wall → Wool: As in, “Back to the wool” and “Between you, me and the wool” and “Bouncing off the wools” and “Climbing the wools” and “Fly on the wool.”
    • Well → Wool: As in, “A dollar wool spent” and “Alive and wool” and “All’s wool that ends wool” and “As wool as can be expected” and “Get wool soon” and “Just as wool.”
    • Full → Wool: As in, “Short of a wool load” and “At wool tilt.”
    • Will he → Woolly: As in, “Woolly or won’t he?”
    • *wal* → *wool*: As in, “Stuffed with woolnuts” and “Withdrawool symptoms” and “Licence renewool.”
    • *wel* → *wool*: As in, “For your health and woollbeing” and “You’re woolcome” and “Social woolfare reform.” Other words that could work: towool (towel), jewool (jewel), bowool (bowel), vowool (vowel), jewoolry (jewelry).
    • Wol* → Wool*: As in, “Running with woolves” and “Watching woolverine.”
  • Hair: Some cacti are covered in hairs, so we’ve got some hairy cactus puns here:
    • Her → Hair: As in, “Say hair name with pride” and “Hair face lit up.”
    • Here → Hair: As in, “Get outta hair” and “Fancy meeting you hair” and “Had it up to hair.”
    • Bare → Hair: As in, “Hair necessities” and “A hair-faced lie” and “Laid hair” and “Hair your soul.”
    • Dare → Hair: As in, “Hair for more” and “Hair to be different” and “How hair you!”
    • Har* → Hair*: As in, “In hairmony” and “Fall hairvest” and “Hairbouring resentment” and “Street hairassment.”
    • *her* → *hair*: As in, “All togethair now” and “No matter the weathair” and “The othair person” and “Eithair or” and “Not anothair one” and “Inhairent problems.”
  • Shoots: Shoots are the fresh growths on a cactus. Here are related puns:
    • Boots → Shoots: As in, “Tough as old shoots” and “Too big for your shoots.”
    • Suits → Shoots: As in, “Shoots you down to the ground.”
    • Roots → Shoots: As in, “Grass shoots” and “Lay down shoots.”
  • Bench → Branch: As in, “Branch warmer.”
  • Bunch → Branch: As in, “Branch of crap” and “Pick of the branch” and “Thanks a branch.”
  • Kid → Glochid: As in, “Dual income, no glochids” and “Here’s looking at you, glochid” and “I glochid you not.” Note: Glochids are small prickles that stick to the skin.
  • Root→ Taproot: As in, “Grass taproots” and “Lay down taproots” and “Money is the taproot of all evil” and “Taprooting for” and “The taproot of the matter.” Note: A taproot is a dominant root.
  • Point: Since prickly cacti are described as pointy, we have some point-related puns:
    • Paint → Point: As in, “Do I have to point you a picture?” and “Point yourself into a corner.”
    • Pant → Point: As in, “Beat the points off” and “Fancy points.”
    • Pent → Point: As in, “Point-up rage.”
    • *pant* → *point*: As in, “A fun pointomime” and “The pointry is bare” and “Running rampoint” and “Don’t use that flippoint with me” and “Participoint award.”
    • Spontaneous → Spointaneous: As in, “Burst spointaneously into song and dance.”
  • Need → Needle: As in, “All you needle is love” and “Just what I needle” and “On a needle to know basis.”
  • Hedgehog: Hedgehogs are a type of cactus. Here are related puns:
    • Hog → Hedgehog: As in, “Go the whole hedgehog.”
    • Hedge → Hedgehog: As in, “Hedgehog fund” and “Hedgehog your bets” and “Dragged through a hedgehog backwards.”
  • Serious → Cereus: As in, “A cereus bit of kit” and “Cereusly though” and “You can’t be cereus.” Note: Cereus is a type of cactus.
  • Barrel: Barrels are a type of cactus shape. Here are some related puns:
    • Borrow → Barrel: As in, “Beg, barrel or steal” and “Living on barreled time” and “Don’t barrel anything from here.”
    • Carol → Barrel: As in, “Christmas barrels.”
  • Cholla: Cholla (pronounced “choya”) is a genus of cacti. Here are related puns:
    • Joy → Cholla: As in, “Beside myself with cholla” and “Bundle of cholla” and “Cholla to the world” and “Jump for cholla.”
    • Enjoy → Encholla: As in, “Encholla the show’ and “Kick back and encholla.”
  • Thorn: Even though cactuses don’t technically have thorns, they’re similar enough to prickles and spines to be included:
    • Thorn: These thorn-related phrases are general enough to use as puns: “A thorn in my side” and “Every rose has its thorn.”
    • Horn → Thorn: As in, “Blow your own thorn” and “Thorn in on” and “Grab life by the thorns.”
    • Born → Thorn: As in, “Thorn this way” and “I was thorn ready.”
    • Torn → Thorn: As in, “That’s thorn it” and “Be thorn between the two.”
    • *thon → *thorn: As in, “Learning to code with pythorn” and “Like running a marathorn.”
  • Button: Buttons are a type of cactus. Here are related puns:
    • Baton → Button: As in, “Pass the button.”
    • Butt in → Button: As in, “Don’t button, this isn’t up to you.”
    • Glutton → Button: As in, “A button for punishment.”
  • Chin: The following puns are references to chin cacti:
    • Chin: Chin-related phrases can double as puns: “Take it on the chin” and “Keep your chin up” and “Stick your chin out.”
    • Been → Chin: As in, “Chin and gone” and “I’ve chin here before” and “Chin around the block a few times” and “Chin there, done that” and “I’ve chin had.”
    • Grin → Chin: As in, “Chin and bear it” and “Chin from ear to ear.”
    • Inner →Chin-ner: As in, “Chin-ner city living” and “Chin-ner peace” and “Use your chin-ner voice.”
    • Pin → Chin: As in, “Bright as a new chin” and “Hard to chin down” and “Chins and needles.”
    • Sin → Chin: As in, “Atone for your chins” and “The seven deadly chins.”
    • Skin → Chin: As in, “Beauty is only chin deep” and “Comfortable in your chin” and “Get under your chin” and “Jump out of your chin.”
  • Hook → Fishhook: As in, “By fishhook or by crook” and “Get fishhooked on” and “Fishhooked on a feeling.” Note: These are references to fishhook cacti.
  • Go → Koko: As in, “Don’t koko there” and “Easy come, easy koko” and “Give it a koko.” Note: These cactus puns are references to koko cacti.
  • Rainbow: Here are some rainbow cactus puns:
    • Rainbow: Use general rainbow phrases as puns: “Chasing rainbows” and “Over the rainbow” and “Taste the rainbow.”
    • Rain → Rainbow: As in, “Right as rainbow” and “Come rainbow or shine” and “Make it rainbow.”
  • Tail → Rat tail: As in, “Happy as a dog with two rat tails” and “Can’t make head or rat tail of it” and “Chasing your own rat tail” and “Get off my rat tail.” Note: These are references to rat tail cacti.
  • Snowball: Here are some puns about snowball cacti:
    • Snow → Snowball: As in, “Pure as the driven snowball” and “Let it snowball.”
    • Ball → Snowball: As in, “Snowball and chain” and “Snowball achingly good” and “Brand new snowball game.”
  • Thimble: Here are some puns about thimble cacti:
    • Tumble → Thimble: As in, “Rough and thimble” and “Take a thimble on.”
    • Simple → Thimble: As in, “It’s so thimble” and “Keep it thimble” and “Thimble pleasures” and “Pure and thimble” and “Thimble yet effective.”
    • Symbol → Thimble: As in, “A thimble of freedom.”
  • Bloom: Here are some puns about the blooms on a cactus:
    • Boom → Bloom: As in, “Baby bloomer” and “Bloom or bust.”
    • Doom → Bloom: As in, “Doom and bloom.”
    • Loom → Bloom: As in, “Bloom large.”
    • Room → Bloom: As in, “A bloom with a view” and “Comfort bloom” and “Leave the bloom.”
    • Whom → Bloom: As in, “For bloom the bell tolls.”

Cactus-Related Words

To help you come up with your own cactus puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

cactus, cacti, cactuses, cactaceae, desert, prickly, prickle, spike, spiky, plant, flower, spines, spiny, succulent, dry, stem, Patagonia, areoles, drought, fruit, cochineal, opuntias, cactoid, root, chlorophyll, photosynthesis, stomata, waxy, wool/woolly, hair/hairy, shoots, poke, branches, glochid, barb/barbed, taproot, point, needle, prick, sharp, saguaro, peyote, san pedro, mescaline, prickly pear, hedgehog, cereus, golden barrel, rebutia, parodia, eve’s pin, rhipsalis, jumping chola, chollas, thorn, thorny, bristle, spinose, ball cactus (parodia), bird’s nest, bishop’s cap, bunny ear, button, cabega, calico, candelabra, carmine cob, cat’s claw, chin, fishhook, koko, rainbow, rattail, rebutia, snowball, thimble, barrel, bloom

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Vegetable Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on vegetable puns, salad puns and related topics! 🍅🍆🌽🍄 Whether you’re looking for a name for your veggie patch, in a veg pun battle with your friend, trying to come up with some cute vegetable pickup lines, or just want to stock up on some vegetable word play for future use, I hope this entry serves you well.

As well as covering leafy vegetables (lettuce, cabbage, kale), roots, legumes and other vegetable-like foods are covered too, so you’ll see some potato puns, corn puns, onion puns, pumpkin puns, and all sorts of others based around those general topics.

You might also like to visit the Punpedia entries on food puns, fruit puns, cooking puns, corn puns and potato puns.

Vegetable Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of veggie puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about vegetables that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page!

  • Call → Kale: As in “Above and beyond the kale of duty.” and “His authenticity was kaled into question.” and “Kale it quits.” and “Kale the shots.” and “Kale of the wild.” and “Kale to action.” and “A judgement kale.” and “That was a close kale.” and “Wake-up kale“.
  • Gale → Kale: As in “It’s blowing a kale out here!” and “I slept well despite the howling kales outside.”
  • Keel → Kale: As in “Keep an even kale.” and “A yacht’s kale keeps it upright.”
  • Solid → Salad: As in “Salad gold.” and “As salad as rock.” and “Rock salad.” and “Make sure you’ve built a salad foundation.”
  • Sullied → Salad: To be “sullied” is to be defiled, tainted, stained or spoiled. Example: “The politician’s good name was salad by the media after the allegations were confirmed.” This one’s is a bit of a stretch!
  • Salah → Salad: The term “salah” describes the act of worship (5 times a day) in the Islamic religion. Example: “Salad is recommended 5 times a day.”
  • Salary → Celery: As in “I didn’t take the job. The celery was too low.”
  • Leak → Leek: As in “The information was leeked and a huge media storm erupted.” and “I’m just going to take a leek.” and “Be careful with that shopping bag! There’s a leek in it.” and “The dam sprung a leek.”
  • Leg → Leek: As in “It cost me an arm and a leek.” and “Shake a leek!” and “Without a leek to stand on” and “Haha just pulling your leek :)”
  • Lick → Leek: As in “Leek your lips.” and “Stand up for yourself. Don’t leek his boots.” and “Leek your wounds.”
  • Parcel → Parsley: As in “Let’s play pass the parsley!”
  • Leg room → Legume: As in “I always pay a little extra for the aeroplane seats with more legume.”
  • Choke → Artichoke: This is a corny one: “I almost artichoked on my food when she told me.” and “She was artichoked by emotion as she gave her speech at the funeral.”
  • Bumpkin → Pumpkin: As in “I’m a bit of a country pumpkin, but I’m getting used to the city.”
  • Heard → Herb: As in “I herb it on the grape vine.” and “You herb it here first.” and “You could have herb a pin drop.”
  • Curb → Herb: As in “Herb your enthusiasm.” and “Drive up onto the herb.”
  • *erb* → *herb*: If a word contains the “herb” sound (or similar) a cringe-worthy herb pun can sometimes be made: advherb, distherbance, distherbingly, exacherbate, aftherburner, countherbalance, hypherbole, knickherbockers, mastherbate, nonvherbal, refherbishment, rivherbankherbanization, vherbalize.
  • Plant: This can also mean “place in a fixed or specified position”, and “a place where an industrial or manufacturing process takes place”. Examples: “She planted herself squarely in front of him” and “The new automobile manufacturing plant is the biggest in the country.”
  • Planned → Plant: As in “I had plant to get there by 8pm” and “Do you have anything plant?”
  • Bland → Plant: As in “The hospital food was flavourless and plant as usual.” and “He gave a weak, plant smile.” and “It tastes a little plant. More herbs?”
  • Let us → Lettuce: As in “Lettuce eat!” and “Lettuce celebrate!”
  • Led us → Lettuce: As in “You’ve lettuce down the wrong path!” and “But it lettuce to the wrong conclusion.”
  • It’s/Its → Oat’s/Oats: As in “Oat’s about time!” and “Look at oats cute little face!”
  • Maze → Maize: As in “It’s a complicated maize to navigate.”
  • Mace → Maize: Another term for “pepper spray” is “mace”. It can also refer to a medieval spiked club weapon.
  •  Amazing→ Amaizing: As in “Truely amaizing.” and “Amaizing Grace.” and “I’m amaized!” and “To my utter amaizement …” (Maize is another name for corn)
  • *mise → *maize: As in, minimaize (minimise), surmaize (surmise), victimaize (victimise), compromaize (compromise), customaize (customise), maximaize (maximise).
  • Baggage → Cabbage: This one is lovely and corny: “I’m carrying around a lot of emotional cabbage.” or “Please place personal items in the overhead cabbage compartment.”
  • Until → Lentil: As in “It ain’t over lentil it’s over!” and “It’s all fun and games lentil someone gets hurt.”
  • Care at → Carrot: As in “I don’t carrot all.”
  • Not re-enter → Nutrient-er: As in “You should nutrient-er the discussion after that terrible contribution.”
  • Beat → Beet: As in “Let’s not beet around the bush.” and “If you leave now, you’ll beet the rush.” and “Can you hear my heartbeet?” and “You deserve a beeting for that.” and “Damn, these are some fine beets you’re playing!” and “There’s always deadbeets hanging around that park at night.” and “He’s not crazy – just a little offbeet.” and “We pride ourselves in our unbeetable service.” and “I’m feeling fairly upbeet today :)” and “Diabeetes is a pun, but it’s insensitive.”
  • Between → Beetween: As in “Beetween you and me …” and “With your tail beetween your legs.” and “Read beetween the lines.” and “Beetween a rock and a hard place.”
  • Bead → Beet: As in “Tiny round beets are dangerous for children.”
  • Repeat → Rebeet: As in “I’m not going to rebeet myself.” and “Those who do not learn from history are doomed to rebeet it.” and “I warned him rebeetedly.”
  • Pizza → Beet-za: As in “I always buy my beetzas from the same beetzaria.”
  • *pit* → *beet*: If a word contains the “pit” sound, a terrible beet pun can sometimes be made: cabeetal city, hosbeetalisation, palbeetations, abeetizing, precibeetation, serendibeetous, inhosbeetable.
  • Pete → Beet: As in “His name is beet.”
  • Peed → Beet: This one is a stretch: “I laughed so hard I nearly beet my pants.”
  • Corny: As in “Very corny vegetable puns”
  • Con* → Corn*: Very corny corn puns can be made with some words that start with the “con” sound (or similar): corntract, corncern, corntain, cornference, corntext, corncerned, corntrast, cornfidence, corndition, corntinue, cornsider, corntry, cornclusion, cornduct, cornversation, cornstruction, cornflict, corntribution, cornsent, cornsist, cornclude, cornservation, corntest, cornception, cornsequences, corsult, corncert, cornventional, corncrete, corntinent, cornfine, cornsistantly, cornstitutional, cornvey, cornsiderably, cornsitituent, corntempt, corncede, cornfess, cornfrontation, corngregation, corntroversial, cornsensus, cornsultancy, cornquest, cornvicted, corngratulate. See this list for more.
  • Have a car though → Avocado: As in “I don’t ‘avocado.”
  • Her before → Herbivore: As in “I met herbivore at the gym.”
  • Turn up → Turnip: As in “Turnip the music!” and “It’ll turnip somewhere.”
  • Been → Bean: As in “We’ve all bean there.” and “You know, I’ve bean thinking…” and “Bean there, done that.” and “He’s a has-bean.” and “The die has bean cast.” and “I’ve bean had.” and “She’s bean in the wars lately.”
  • Unbeknown(st) →Unbeanown(st): As in “Unbeanownst to me, she made some enquiries.”
  • *peen* →*bean*: If a word contains the “peen” sound we can make some silly bean puns: Phillibeano (Phillipino), beanalize (penalize), unhappbeaness (unhappiness), subbeana (subpoena). Note: a subpoena is a witness summon.
  • Enough →Beanough: As in “Beanough is beanough.” and “Beanough to make you sick.”
  • Enormous →Beanormous: As in “Your vegetable garden is beanormous!”
  • Beam → Bean: As in “Bean me up, Scotty!” and “Tractor bean.” and “Balancing bean.”
  • Bin → Bean: As in “It was in the bargain bean – 30% off!” and “Please put your rubbish in the bean.”
  • Pin → Bean: This one’s a bit of a stretch. Examples: “Bean the tail on the donkey.”
  • Deal → Dill: As in “What’s the big dill?” and “I’m kind of a big dill around here.” (“Dill” is a herb, and is often short for dill-pickle – a cucumber that has been preserved and given the flavour of the dill herb)
  • Pickle: “We’re in a bit of a pickle here.”
  • Much room → Mushroom: “It’s only a little elevator, there isn’t mushroom in here.”
  • Wheat: As in, “Separate the wheat from the chaff.” Note: to separate the wheat from the chaff is to separate the valuable from the worthless.
  • Wait → Wheat: As in “Wheat a second…” and “I am lying in wheat.”
  • White → Wheat: As in, “A wheater shade of pale,” and “A wheat knight,” and “Wheat as a ghost,” and “Wheat as a sheet,” and “Great wheat shark,” and “Like wheat on rice,” and “Little wheat lie,” and “Men in wheat coats,” and “Not everything is black and wheat,” and “Wheat water rafting.” Note: like white on rice refers to a very close situation.
  • Sweet → Swheat: As in, “Home swheat home,” and “Swheat dreams,” and “Swheat nothings,” and “A swheat tooth,” and “Swheaten the pot,” and “Swheaten the deal,” and “Swheatheart,” and “Take the bitter with the swheat,” and “Short but swheat.”
  • Sweat → Swheat: As in, “Blood, swheat and tears,” and “Beads of swheat,” and “Break out in a cold swheat,” and “Don’t swheat it,” and “Running with swheat,” and “My new swheater,” and “Swheating bullets,” and “Swheat it out.”
  • Weight → Wheat: As in, “Pull your wheat,” and “Punching above your wheat,” and “Throw your wheat around,” and “Watch your wheat,” and “A wheat off my mind,” and “Worth your wheat in gold,” and “A dead wheat.”
  • *ate* → *wheat*: As in, evacu-wheat (evacuate), fluctu-wheat (fluctuate), and gradu-wheat (graduate).
  • What → Wheat: As in “Wheatever, man.” and “Wheat are you up to today?”
  • We t* → Wheat: As in “Wheat talked about this last night.” and “Wheat took our time.”
  • We’d → Wheat: As in “Wheat love for you to join us!”
  • Please → Peas: As in “Do as you peas.” and “Pretty peas?”
  • Pee → Pea: As in “Brb, really need to pea.”
  • Peace → Peas: As in “World peas.” and “Inner peas” and “Peas of mind” and “Rest in peas.” and “War and Peas” and “Keep the peas” and “Peas be with you”
  • Piece → Peas: As in “Peas by peas” and “Peas of mind” and “Peas of cake” and “Real peas of work” and “Peas of pie” and “Real peas of work” and “Speak your peas” and “How long is a peas of string?”
  • *peas*: There are a few words with the “peas” sound in them: centerpeas (centerpiece), earpeas (earpiece), Greenpeas (Greenpeace), masterpeas (masterpiece), mouthpeas (mouthpiece), peasfully, peaskeepers, peastime, Peasa (Pisa), timepeas (timepiece).
  • *pea*: If a word contains the “pea” sound, you can make a terrible pea pun by adjusting the spelling and emphasising the “pea” part: appealing, appease, bumpea (bumpy), centipeade, champeaon, champeaonship, compeate, copearight (copyright), creepea (creepy), dopea (dopey), encyclopeadia, entropea, escapea, espeaonage, Ethiopean, Europeaan, expeadient, frumpea, grumpea, hippea, happea, happeaest, homosapean, impead, loudspeaker, peacock, peafowl, peak, peadiatric, peanalize, philipeano, peano (piano), peaqued, recipeas, recipeantsm repeal, repeat, scorpeaon, speacies, peaple (people), speach, speaker, speachless, therapea.
  • Snap a piece → Snap a peas: This plays on “snap peas” – a very common type of pea: “Can you snap a peas off for me peas (please)?”
  • Remain → Romaine: “Romaine” is a type of lettuce. Examples: “Everyone romaine calm.” and “It romaines to be seen.”
  • To my toes → Tomatoes: As in “I got a shiver from my head tomatoes.”
  • Tomorrow → Tomato: As in “Here today, gone tomato.”
  • Tube of → Tuber: As in “Can I please purchase a tuber hand cream?”
  • All up in your → Jalapeño: As in “Jalapeño business.” and “Jalapeño grill.”
  • Serial → Cereal: As in “There’s a cereal killer on the loose.”
  • Surreal → Cereal: As in “The view from the summit was cereal.” and “I love impressionism and cereal art.”
  • Grain: As in “I’m going to go against the grain here and say …” and “There’s a grain of truth in what he’s saying.” and “I’d take it with a grain of salt.”
  • Grainy: Other than referring to grain (the crop food, of course), this can refer to a texture or to a low resolution photograph: “Your profile picture is a bit grainy.”
  • Ingrained: As in “It was ingrained in me from a young age.”
  • Again → A grain: As in “Come a grain?” and “Never a grain.” and “Time and time a grain.” and “Now and a grain.”
  • Rain → Grain: As in, “Right as grain,” and “Chasing grainbows,” and “Come grain or shine,” and “Grain on my parade,” and “Make it grain,” and “Graindrops keep falling on my head,” and “Graining cats and dogs,” and “Singin’ in the grain,” and “Somewhere over the grainbow,” and “Spitting with grain.” Notes: to chase rainbows is to go after unrealistic things. To rain on someone’s parade is to ruin a happy moment for them.
  • Grey → Grain: As in, “Fifty shades of grain,” and “A grain area,” and “Grain is the new black,” and “Grain matter,” and “Shades of grain.” Note: shades of grey refers to the complexity of a situation.
  • Brain → Grain: As in, “All brawn and no grains,” and “Beat your grains out,” and “Grain dead,” and “Grain fart,” and “Grain teaser,” and “Grain wave,” and “Grainstorming session,” and “Got it on the grain,” and “Hare grained,” and “A no-grainer,” and “Pick your grains,” and “Rack your grains,” and “It’s not grain surgery.”
  • Grind → Grain-d: As in, “Bump and grain-d,” and “Daily grain-d,” and “Grain-d down,” and “Grain-d to a halt,” and “Nose to the grain-dstone,” and “Don’t like the bastards grain-d you down.” Note: to have your nose to the grindstone is to work hard.
  • Gain → Grain: As in, “Capital grains,” and “Grain an advantage,” and “Ill-gotten grains,” and “No pain, no grain,” and “Nothing ventured, nothing grained.” Note: a capital gain is a profit from the sale of a capital asset (like stock or real estate).
  • *gain* → *grain*: As in, “Agrainst all odds,” and “Agrainst the clock,” and “Bar-grain basement,” and “Come a-grain?” and “A fool’s bar-grain,” and “Here we go a-grain,” and “More than you bar-grained for,” and “Now and a-grain,” and “A race agrainst time,” and “You can say that a-grain,” and “Back agrainst the wall.”
  • *ray* → *grain*: Change the “ray” sound in some words to “grain”: grain-ciously (graciously), engrainve (engrave), grain-dation (gradation), grain-dient (gradient), immi-grain-tion (immigration), ingrain-dient (ingredient).
  • I love → Olive: As in “Olive you so much!” and “Olive silly food puns!”
  • Or live → Olive: As in “Live like a king olive on a shoe string.”.
  • All of → Olive: As in “Sending olive my love to your family.”
  • Time → Thyme: As in “All in good thyme.” and “Better luck next thyme.” and “We just need to buy some thyme.”
  • Platter → Plait her: “I love to platter hair – it’s therapeutic.”
  • Dip: As in “Take a dip” and “Dip your toe in.” (Playing on the “crackers and dip” form of “dip”)
  • I am → I yam: As in “I yam who I yam.”
  • Yankee → Yamkee: As in “The Newyork Yamkees are up 3 points!”
  • Mint: “All of the items are mint condition.”
  • Mean’t → Mint: As in “We were just mint to be.” and “You weren’t mint to eat it!”
  • *ment → *mint: Words that end in “ment” can be simple cheesy “mint” puns: governmint, developmint, momint, managemint, departmint, agreemint, environmint, investmint, employmint, equiptmint, commint, assessmint, requiremint, improvemint, appointmint, settlemint, experimint, establishmint, implemint, announcemint, punishmint, measuremint, dissapointmint, advertisemint, encouragemint, embarrassmint, segmint, argumint, pigmint, tormint, paymint, ornamint, sedamint, vehemint, shipmint, treatmint, statemint, merrimint. See this list for more.
  • Clothes → Cloves: As in “I’m only half-cloved” and “The emperor’s new cloves.”
  • Love → Clove: As in “I clove you so much!” and “Clove is in the air.”
  • Garret → Carrot: A “garret” is an attic, loft or roof space.
  • Root: As in “I’m rooting for you!” and “Money is the root of all evil.” (The term “root” is also a synonym for sexual intercourse in some countries/regions)
  • Rude → Root: As in “A root awakening.” and “He has no manners – very root.”
  • Green: This can obviously refer to the colour, but it can also refer to someone who is inexperienced or naive: “A green recruit fresh from college.”
  • Funnel → Fennel: “Fennel” is a herb. Example: “They were all fenneled into the same career by the specialist college.”
  • Final → Fennel: As in “It’s the fennel count down.” and “You have the fennel say.” and “It’s my fennel offer.”
  • Squash: As in “Don’t squash the poor bug!” and “We need to squash the competition.”
  • Roo bar → Rhubarb: In Australia a car’s “bullbar” is often called a “roo bar” (“roo” is short for “kangaroo”).
  • Saw → Seed: The past tense form of “see” is of course “saw”, but we can be make a silly seed pun if we “conjugate” “see” like we normally do with regular verbs: “seed”. Examples:  “I came, I seed, I conquered.”
  • Seedy: This is a describing word for someone or something that is morally questionable, foul, or dirty. Examples: “So many seedy people hanging around that place.”
  • Seed: As in “But it planted a seed of hope.” and “We got more seed capital from investors.”
  • Properly → Broccoli: This one’s a stretch! Example: “If you’re going to do it at all, you might as well do it broccoli.”
  • Leave → Leaf: As in “Absent without leaf.” and “Leaf no stone unturned” and “Leaf your options open.” and “Love them and leaf them.” and “That’s going to leaf a mark!” and “I’m leafing tomorrow morning.”
  • Love → Leaf: As in “I leaf you so much!” and “Leaf is in the air.”
  • Laugh → Leaf: As in “Leaf all the way to the bank.” and “Leaf in your face.” and “Leaf your head off.”
  • Leaves: As in “She leaves without a trace.”
  • So → Soy: This simple soy pun works best if the word after “so” begins with a “y”, but it still works without it. Examples: “Soy you think you can dance?” and “It’s soy sad.” and “There’s only soy much you can do.”
  • Say → Soy: As in “What did you just soy?” and “To have the final soy.” and “Needless to soy, …” and “Never soy never.”
  • Soil → Soyl: As in “That tofu pun was hilarious – I almost soyled my pants.” and “Fertile soyl.”
  • *soy*: Other words containing the “soy” sound can also be soy puns: ellipsoyd (ellipsoid), sinusoydally (sinusoidally).
  • So you been → Soya bean: As in “Soya bean up to much lately?”
  • Corn → Can: As in “Corn’t we all just get along?” and “Appearances corn be deceptive.” and “Bit off more than you corn chew.” and “Corn you believe it?” and “You corn count on me.”
  • Gone → Corn: As in “Here today, corn tomorrow.” and “It’s all corn pear-shaped.” and “Corn, but not forgotten.”
  • Pulse: This term can refer to a couple of different things. First, the pulse of your veins caused by your heart-beat, or more generally, any short burst or vibration (e.g. of sound, electricity, etc.). Second, it is a synonym of “legume” which refers to produce like chickpeas, lentils, and beans.
  • But any → Botany: As in “You expect me to be impressed, botany body can do that.”
  • Culture → Agriculture: A very corny one: “I was feeling homesick and experiencing agriculture shock.”
  • Too bad → Tuberd: As in “You want some? Tuberd, it’s all mine.” and “Tuberd the shoes don’t fit you.”
  • *uber*: Words that contain the “uber” sound (or similar) can sometimes be potato puns: extuberant (exuberant), tuberis (hubris), protuberances, tuberty (puberty).
  • Guarding → Garden: As in “A soldier was garden the entry.” and “The manager was always garden his reputation by blaming others.”
  • Esteemed → E-steamed: As in “Many of these qualities are e-steamed by managers.” and “Contemporary Japanese ceramics are highly e-steamed.”
  • Raw: As in “That was a raw deal.” (a bad deal)
  • Brussels: It’s the name of a region in Belgium, but is also well known as part of the phrase “Brussels sprout” which is a well known vegetable which likely originated there.
  • She weed→ Seaweed: As in “I just got a new pet rabbit and seaweed on my carpet.”
  • Produce: When the emphasis is on the “prod” part of this word, it refers to things that have been grown on a farm. You might be able to make vegetable puns with this in the right context.
  • Crop: As in “If you crop the photo it’ll look better.” and “The cream of the crop.” and “I always ask the hairdresser for a crop.”
  • Crop up: To “crop up” means to appear unexpectedly and/or suddenly, and thus could be a pun on “crop” which is a cultivated grain, fruit or vegetable.
  • Crap → Crop: As in, “A load of crop,” and “Bunch of crop,” and “Cut the crop,” and “The cropper,” and “Full of crop,” and “Do bears crop in the woods?” and “Don’t crop where you eat,” and “A piece of crop,” and “You scared the crop out of me.”
  • Scrap* → S-crop*: As in, “S-crop iron,” and “Bow and s-crope,” and “S-crope along,” and “S-crope the bottom of the barrel,” and “S-crope through,” and “S-crope together,” and “Table s-crops.”
  • Cop → Crop: As in, “Crop an attitude,” and “Crop out,” and “Crop shop,” and “It’s a fair crop,” and “Undercover crop,” and “Crop onto something,” and “A dirty crop.” Notes: to cop an attitude is to behave rudely. A fair cop is when you acknowledge that you’ve been caught doing wrong.
  • *cop* → *crop*: As in, “Under the microscrope,” and “Scrope out,” and “Cropycat,” and “Carbon cropy.”
  • *crop*: Emphasise the “crop” in certain words to make some corny Thanksgiving puns: acrophobia, microphone, acropolis and outcrop. Notes: Acrophobia is an extreme and irrational fear of heights. An acropolis is a citadel.
  • Cartoon → Cardoon: This is thistle of the sunflower family that is often called an “Artichoke thistle”. It has edible leaves and roots. Example: “Disney has some of the most famous cardoons in the world.”
  • Okay→ Okra: As in “Are you feeling okra?” (Terrible! 😀 By the way, okra is a plant the has edible green pods)
  • Rocket: As well as the obvious definition, “rocket” refers to a type of leafy salad vegetable.
  • Law → Slaw: As in “Slaw and order.” and “I am a slaw abiding citizen.” and “The slaw of diminishing returns.” and “The slaw of the jungle.” You could also use “slaw” to replace “it’s law” – perhaps add a preceding apostrophe like so: ‘slaw
  • A thousand islands: “Thousand Island” is a popular salad dressing. If you can somehow work “thousand island” into your prose, you’ve got yourself a salad pun.
  • Dressing: As in “Oh stop dressing it up!” and “Are you dressing up for Halloween?”
  • Sprout: This is a general term for “to emerge and grow rapidly”, but has obvious vegetable-based connotations (and probably origins). Example: “He thought he’d sprout wings and fly.”
  • Iceberg: A popular type of lettuce, and also (obviously) a big chunk of ice floating in the ocean.
  • Fresh: This is a term that is strongly associated with vegetables and so could probably qualify as a vegetable pun if used in the right context (though it’s a bit of a stretch!). Phrases like “a fresh start” and “a fresh pair of eyes” may be useful.
  • Bulb: As in “Can you change that light bulb for me?”
  • Stalk: “The spy stalked the target for days before getting enough intel.”
  • Pretty good → Rad-ish: When something is “rad” it’s awesome, cool or really good. If something is “rad-ish” then it’s just pretty good (and not overly so).

Vegetable-Related Phrases

Common phrases, idioms and cliches which are related to vegetables can be used for some subtle and witty word play. Here is a list of the vegetable themed phrases that we’ve found so far:

  • as easy as shelling peas
  • as red as beetroot
  • carrot and stick
  • cauliflower ear
  • cool beans
  • cool as a cucumber
  • couch potato
  • sofa spud
  • dangle the carrot
  • (to play) hot potato
  • fine words butter no parsnips
  • full of beans
  • I yam what I yam
  • sprout wings and fly
  • spill the beans
  • know your onions
  • not worth a hill of beans
  • cultivate your garden
  • it ain’t rocket science
  • in a pickle
  • keep your eyes peeled
  • like two peas in a pod
  • he has a green thumb
  • small potatoes
  • separate the wheat from the chaff
  • take a leaf out of my book
  • turn over a new leaf
  • the cream of the crop
  • whatever tickles your pickle
  • you can’t squeeze blood out of a turnip
  • plant a seed of doubt
  • plant the seed
  • seed money / seed capital / seed round
  • the grass is always greener on the other side

Vegetable-Related Words

There are many more puns to be made than could be documented in this Punpedia entry, and so we’ve compiled a list of vegetable-related concepts for you to use when creating your own puns. If you come up with a new pun, please share it in the comments!

tomato, lettuce, beet, plant, onion, herb, spinach, pumpkin, potato, veggie, vegan, vegetarian, artichoke, cardoon, veg, legume, okra, cucumber, celery, asparagus, eggplant, salad, yam, bamboo shoot, bean, casava, produce, garlic, leek, mushroom, cabbage, radish, carrot, root vegetable, root, greens, fennel, squash, rhubarb, plantain, seed, turnip, chicory, kale, broccoli, leafy, leaf, leafy vegetable, soy, corn, avocado, sweet potato, cauliflower, herbal, soya bean, pulse, watercress, pea, parsnip, botany, agriculture,  tuber, beans, zucchini, garden, maize, cuisine, steamed, organic, wheat, cereals, grains, vegetation, capsicum, raw, soybean, tofu, onions, brussel sprouts, seaweed, beetroot, thyme, lentil, pea pod, runner bean, caesar salad, coleslaw, salad bar, bell pepper, croutons, bean salad, shallot, pickle, peel, aubergine, courgette, salsify, vegetative, green bean, snap peas, broad bean, salad dressing, slaw, rocket, waldorf salad, ranch dressing, thousand island dressing, chicory, greek salad, lemon grass, spring onion, cherry tomato, celtuce, cos lettuce, sprouts, alfalfa sprouts, alfalfa, arugula, butterhead lettuce, head lettuce, iceberg lettuce, chard, parsley, cassava, pickled, green, healthy, vitamins, fibre, fresh, green pepper, acorn squash, basil, black-eyed peas, capers, celeriac, chick peas, chinese cabbage, collard greens, cress, daikon, dandelion greens, endive, fava bean, ginger, gourd, chilli peppers, jicama, kohlrabi, lima bean, mung bean, mustard greens, olive, pattypan squash, peppers, radiccho, rutabaga, scallion, sorrel, spuds, succotash, string bean, swiss chard, taro, tomatillo, vegetable, wasabi, water chestnut, herbaceous, irrigation, bulb, leaves, nature, nutrition, nutrient, vegetable patch, cabbage patch, stalk, jalapeno, crop, clove.

Vegetable Jokes

If you’re looking for some very corny vegetable jokes, you’ve come to the right place. All of these one-liner-style vegetable jokes use puns in their punchline. Some are phonetic puns, others are based on a slang phrase or cliche related to vegetables.

  • Why did the cucumber blush? – Because it saw the salad dressing!
  • What do you call an angry pea? – Grump-pea.
  • Why did the potatoes argue? – Because they couldn’t see eye-to-eye.
  • How did the farmer fix his jeans? – With a cabbage patch!
  • Why did the tomato get embarrassed? – Because it saw the chick pea.
  • Which vegetable do Sailors ban from their ships? – Leeks.
  • What did the lettuce say to the celery? – Quit stalking me!
  • What is small, red and whispers? – A hoarse raddish.
  • What is green and goes to summer camp? – A Brussel scout!
  • What do root vegetables wear to bed? – Yammies!
  • What do you call a retired vegetable? – A has-bean.
  • When is a vegetable too fresh? – When he insults the farmer.
  • Why do fungi have to pay double bus fares? – Because they take up too mushroom!
  • What’s the difference between broccoli and boogers? – Kids don’t eat broccoli.
  • Why shouldn’t you tell secrets in a cornfield? – There are too many ears.
  • What’s a vegetable’s favourite martial art? – Carot-e!
  • What’s the coolest vegetable? – A rad-ish!
  • Why did the chef quit? – They cut his celery.
  • What did the sweet potato say to the pumpkin? – I yam what I yam.
  • What does a nosey pepper do? – Gets jalapeno business!
  • How do you fix a broken tomato? – Tomato paste.

Vegetable Pun Images

Below is a collection of vegetable-related visual puns and meme-type images. If you’ve created your own visual vegetable puns or found one that we’ve missed, please post us a link in the comments section 🙂

Did this Punpedia entry help you?

Did you find the vegetable-related pun that you were looking for? If so, great! Otherwise, please let us know what you were looking for in the comments, below! Are you looking for puns for text messages, Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, or some other social media platform? Would you like to see more funny vegetable pun images? Or perhaps you just want more vegetable puns for your photo captions? Whatever the case, please let us know, and help us improve this Punpedia entry. If you’re got any vegetable puns (image or text) that aren’t included in this article, please submit them in the comments and one of our curators will add it as soon as possible. Thanks for visiting Punpedia 🙂