Holiday Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on holiday puns! ✈⛵ 🏖

Whether it’s a weekend away or a full-on sabbatical, everyone needs a holiday once in a while. Enjoy a quick break with us and our holiday puns – whether it’s by boat, plane, train or bus, we’ve endeavoured to cover it here. We hope that you have fun going through this list and that you find the perfect holiday pun for your needs.

While this list is as thorough and comprehensive as possible, it is for vacation type holidays in general – for specific destinations, we also have beach puns, and for annual holidays and events we have Thanksgiving puns and Halloween puns, with more to come!

Holiday Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about holidays that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of holiday puns:

  • Vacation: Since vacation is a synonym for holiday, we’ve included vacation-related phrases for you to play with: “A summer vacation,” and “We’re going on vacation!”
  • Vocation → Vacation: As in, “Helping others is my vacation.” Note: a vocation is a job or trade to which a person feels a special pull or love. 
  • Getaway: As in, “A clean getaway,” and “I really need to getaway.”
  • Weekend: Play with some weekend-related phrases in your holiday wordplay: “A wet weekend,” and “A long weekend,” and “A much-needed weekend.” Note: a wet weekend is a very boring or disappointing experience. 
  • We can → Weekend: As in, “Weekend do it!”
  • Oh, tell → Hotel: As in, “Hotel me what happened!”
  • Hotel: As in, “Heartbreak hotel,” and “Hotel California.” Note: “Heartbreak Hotel” and “Hotel California” are both names of famous songs that could work as holiday puns in the right context.
  • Hostile → Hostel: As in, “A hostel takeover,” and “A hostel environment.”
  • Retreat: As in, “Beat a hasty retreat,” and “Time to retreat.”
  • Treat → Retreat: As in, “Trick or retreat.”
  • Peach → Beach: As in, “Beachy keen,” and “A juicy beach,” and “Skin like beaches and cream.”
  • C → Sea: As in, “I need some vitamin sea.”
  • Day → Holiday: As in, “A holiday in the life of…” and “A holiday without sunshine is like night,” and “All in a holiday’s work,” and “All the livelong holiday,” and “An apple a holiday keeps the doctor away,” and “Another holiday older,” and “Another holiday, another dollar,” and “Around the world in eighty holidays,” and “As honest as the holiday is long,” and “At the end of the holiday,” and “Catch of the holiday,” and “A cold holiday in hell,” and “Dawn of a new holiday,” and “Forever and a holiday,” and “It’s just not my holiday,” and “Make a holiday of it,” and “Make my holiday.” Notes: if someone is as honest as the day is long, then they’re very honest. 
  • Air → Airbnb: As in, “Airbnbs and graces,” and “Breath of fresh airbnb,” and “Castles in the airbnb,” and “Clear the airbnb,” and “Hot airbnb,” and “In the airbnb tonight,” and “Something special in the airbnb,” and “Spring is in the airbnb,” and “There’s a nip in the airbnb.”
  • Destination: As in, “It’s not the journey, it’s the destination,” and “Final destination.”
  • Pack: To make travel puns, we can make references to packing (for a journey) : “Action packed,” and “Fanny pack,” and “I know, I packed it,” and “Jam packed,” and “Leader of the pack,” and “Pack a punch,” and “Pack it in,” and “Pack of lies,” and “Pack your bags!” and “Send packing,” and “Six pack,” and “Care package,” and “Packed to the rafters,” and “Good things come in small packages.”
  • Peck → Pack: As in, “A pack on the cheek,” and “Keep your packer up,” and “The packing order.” Notes: a pecking order is the hierarchy of power or status within a group. 
  • Pick → Pack: As in, “A bone to pack with you,” and “Want to pack some flowers?” and “Easy packings,” and “Hand packed,” and “Cherry pack,” and “You’re just nit packing,” and “Pack a card, any card,” and “Pack a fight,” and “Pack and choose,” and “Pack holes in,” and “Pack of the bunch,” and “Pack up the pieces,” and “Pack your brains,” and “See a penny and pack it up,” and “Stop packing at it.”
  • Back → Pack: As in, “As soon as my pack is turned,” and “You’ve got it packwards,” and “Don’t answer pack,” and “At the pack of my mind,” and “Pack to the future,” and “Pack from the dead,” and “Pack in the day,” and “Get pack on your feet,” and “Packseat driver,” and “Pack to basics,” and “Pack to school,” and “Pack to the drawing board,” and “A packhanded compliment,” and “Bend over packwards,” and “Comepack king,” and “Crawl pack into your shell,” and “Eyes in the pack of your head,” and “Fighting pack tears,” and “Go pack on your word,” and “I want you pack,” and “I scratch your pack, you scratch mine,” and “It’s all coming pack to me now,” and “Kick pack and enjoy,” and “I know it like the pack of my hand,” and “Like water off a duck’s pack,” and “Never look pack.”
  • *pack*: As in, package, packet, backpack, unpack, jetpack, and wolfpack
  • Stay → Staycation: As in, “Out-staycation one’s welcome,” and “Staycation safe,” and “Here to staycation,” and “If you can’t take the heat, staycation out of the kitchen.” Note: a staycation is where one takes time off to holiday, but spends the holiday resting at home. 
  • Bag: As in, “Bag a bargain,” and “Bag lady,” and “Bag of bones,” and “Bag of tricks,” and “Dirt bag,” and “It’s in the bag,” and “Let the cat out of the bag,” and “A mixed bag,” and “Pack your bags!” and “Bag of nerves,” and “Bottom of the bag.”
  • Brag → Bag: As in, “Bagging rights,” and “I don’t mean to bag, but…”
  • *bag*: Emphasize the existing “bag” in some words: airbag, scumbag, sandbag, handbag, gasbag, cabbage, garbage, and bagel
  • *big/bog/bug* → *bag*: As in, ambaguity, mind-baggling, jitterbag and ladybag
  • Suitcase: As in, “I live out of a suitcase.”
  • Case → Suitcase: As in, “An open and shut suitcase,” and “As the suitcase may be,” and “Suitcase closed,” and “Catch a suitcase,” and “Get off my suitcase,” and “I rest my suitcase,” and “In any suitcase,” and “On a suitcase by suitcase basis,” and “Suitcase of mistaken identity.”
  • Travel: As in, “Bad news travels fast,” and “Don’t just travel, travel right,” and “A fellow traveller,” and “A seasoned traveller,” and “The road less travelled,” and “Time travel,” and “Travel broadens the mind,” and “Travel light.”
  • Trouble → Travel: As in, “Asking for travel,” and “Bridge over traveled water,” and “Double travel,” and “Here comes travel,” and “Looking for travel,” and “A nose for travel,” and “This is a local shop, we’ll have no travel here,” and “Travel and strife,” and “Travel in paradise,” and “Up to your neck in travel.”
  • Travesty → Travelsty: As in, “I heard it on the news. What a travelsty.”
  • Extravagant → Extravelgant: As in, “An extravelgant dinner and date.”
  • Escape: As in, “The great escape,” and “Escape your memory,” and “Make good your escape,” and “A narrow escape.”
  • Scapegoat → Escapegoat: A scapegoat is an innocent who carries the blame for other’s actions.
  • Trip: As in, “Day tripped,” and “Guilt trip,” and “Power trip,” and “Road trip,” and “Trip of a lifetime,” and “A trip down memory lane.”
  • Ship → Trip: As in, “Abandon trip,” and “Don’t give up the trip,” and “Extend the hand of friend-trip,” and “Jump trip,” and “Loose lips sink trips,” and “Run a tight trip,” and “Trips of the desert,” and “Trips that pass in the night,” and “That trip has sailed,” and “Rebound relation-trip,” and “A stormy relation-trip.” Notes: loose lips sink ships is a warning against unguarded talk or gossip. 
  • *trip*: We can use words that contain the word “trip” to make some bad holiday puns: triple, tripe, tripod, triplet, trippy, strip, stripe, outstrip, airstrip
  • Journey: As in, “Journey to the centre of the Earth,” and “A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step,” and “It’s not the destination, it’s the journey.”
  • *jour* → *journey*: As in, journeylist (journalist), journeylism (journalism), bonjourney, sojourney, adjourney. Notes: a sojourn is a temporary stay. 
  • Leisure: As in, “A gentleman of leisure,” and “Marry in haste, repent at leisure.”
  • Pleasure → P-leisure: As in, “Business before p-leisure,” and “Earthly p-leisures,” and “Guilty p-leisures,” and “Life’s simple p-leisures.”
  • Break: Holidays are commonly referred to as “breaks” (as in, “I need a break!”) so we’ve included the word here: “A bad break,” and “At breakneck speed,” and “Bed and breakfast,” and “Break a leg,” and “Break and enter,” and “Break bread,” and “Break even,” and “Break out in a cold sweat,” and “Break the bank,” and “Break the mould,” and “A breakthrough,” and “Break your heart,” and “A deal breaker,” and “A lucky break,” and “All hell breaks loose.”
  • Brake → Break: As in, “Hit the breaks!”
  • Bake → Break: As in, “Break and shake,” and “Half-breaked.” Note: if something is half-baked, then not much effort was put into it. 
  • Rest: Since many people go on holiday to rest, we’ve included rest in this entry. As in, “At rest,” and “Come to rest,” and “A cut above the rest,” and “Eternal rest,” and “For the rest of us,” and “For the rest of your life,” and “Give it a rest,” and “I rest my case,” and “Laid to rest,” and “The rest is history.”
  • *rest*: As in, “In the interest of justice,” and “Make interesting,” and “Nearest and dearest,” and “Rest on your laurels,” and “Can’t see the forest for the trees,” and “Mud-wrestling,” and “On the crest of a wave,” and “Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery,” and “Interest free,” and “Can’t be underestimated.”
  • Wrist → Rest: As in, “Slap on the rest.”
  • *rust* → *rest*: As in, “Earn one’s crest,” and “Restle up,” and “Don’t trest anyone,” and “Trest is a two-way street.”
  • Tourist: As in, “Tourist trap.”
  • Terror → Tour: As in, “The tourists will have won,” and “Night tours.”
  • Broad → Abroad: As in, “As abroad as it is long,” and “Abroad brush,” and “Abroad shoulders,” and “In abroad daylight,” and “Abroad strokes.”
  • Brad → Abroad: As in, “Abroad Pitt.”
  • Bread → Abroad: As in, “Abroad and butter,” and “Abroad of life,” and “Abroadcrumb trail,” and “Half a loaf is better than no abroad,” and “Have your abroad buttered on both sides,” and “Put abroad on the table,” and “Take the abroad out of someone’s mouth,” and “The best thing since sliced abroad.”
  • Bored → Abroad: As in, “Abroad stiff,” and “Abroad to death,” and “Abroad to tears,” and “Abroad out of my mind.”
  • *broad* → *abroad*: As in, abroadway, abroadcast, abroadband, abroadsheet, and overabroad.”
  • Beach: “Beach bum,” and “Life’s a beach,” and “Meet me at the beach!”
  • B*tch → Beach: As in, “Beach fest,” and “Beach slap,” and “Life’s a beach,” and “Payback’s a beach,” and “Son of a beach,” and “Bow down, beaches.”
  • Breach → Beach: As in, “A beach of trust,” and “The perimeter has been beached!”
  • Beetroot → Beachroot: As in, “Red as a beachroot,” and “Chocolate beachroot cake,” and “A beachroot latte.”
  • Preach → Beach: As in, “Practice what you beach,” and “Beaching to the choir,” and “Beach to deaf ears,” and “Papa, don’t beach.”
  • Bleach → Beach: As in, “I’m going to beach my hair.”
  • Drop it → Tropic: As in, “Tropic like it’s hot.”
  • Topic → Tropic: As in, “A hot tropic,” and “Drop the tropic,” and “We’re going off-tropic,” and “What’s your favourite tropic?”
  • Topical → Tropical: As in, “Apply this tropical cream when needed.” Note: a topical is something applied to the skin, rather than being ingested.
  • Island: As in, “No man is an island,” and “Treasure island,” and “A tropical island.”
  • I land → Island: As in “Islanded a job at that new tech company.”
  • Aligned → Island: As in and “Our incentives are well-island.”
  • Sel* → Sail*: If a word starts with “sel” a boat pun can often be made by replacing it with “sail”: sailection (selection), sailect (select), sailf (self), sailling (selling), sail (sell), saildom (seldom), sailfish (selfish), sailfless (selfless), sailective (selective).
  • Sea*: Most words starting with “sea” are easy sea puns: season, seasonal, seated, searingly, sealants, seamseatbelt.
  • See* → Sea*: If a word starts with “see” it can often be replaced with “sea” to create a simple sea pun: seaminly, seads, seaker, seathe, seap, seak, sean, sea (see).
  • Se* → Sea*: Some words that start with just “se” also have a “sea”-ish sound, and the ones that don’t can usually be made into terrible puns anyway: seacret, searious, seargeant, seacretion, seacure, seacurity, seacondary, seacretariat, seaconds, seacrete, searum, searenity, searvitude, seanile, seadation, seaclusion, seacretive, seaze, seaquential, sealection, seacretly, seaquences, seanior, seaniority, seagregate, seaping, seacession, seariousness, seaminars, seaveral, seaxual, seaparation, seantimental, seansational, seaquential, seacluded, seacularist, seathing, seaquin, seasame, seaclusion.
  • Se*cy/Ce*cy → Sea*sea: Most words that start with “se” or “ce” and end with “cy” can be double sea puns: seacresea (secrecy), sealibasea (celibacy).
  • *cy → *sea: If a word ends in “cy” it’s an easy “sea” pun: polisea, agensea, democrasea, currensea, emergensea, efficiensea, tendensea, frequensea, fansea, constituensea, pregnansea, accurasea, redundansea, bureaucrasea, presidensea, legasea, conspirasea, mersea, privasea, bankruptsea, consistensea, literasea, urgensea, deficiensea, dependency, consultansea, tenacity, isea (icy), secrecy, intimasea.
  • Seizure → Seazure: As in “If I read one more ocean pun I’m going to have a seazure.”
  • Season → Sea-sun: As in, “A person for all sea-suns,” and “Are mangoes in sea-sun?” and “Party sea-sun,” and “Sea-sun’s greetings,” and “A sea-suned traveller,” and “Silly sea-sun,” and “The festive sea-sun.”
  • Scenic → Seanic: As in “Let’s take the seanic route.”
  • Sun: As in, “A place in the sun,” and “A day without orange juice is like a day without sunshine,” and “A touch of sun,” and “Everything under the sun,” and “Good day, sunshine,” and “Here comes the sun,” and “Make hay while the sun shines,” and “Ride off into the sunset,” and “Sun drenched,” and “Sun, sea and sand,” and “Walking on sunshine,” and “You are my sunshine,” and “Put it where the sun doesn’t shine,” and “Fly too close to the sun,” and “Moment in the sun,” and “Never in a month of Sundays.” Notes: “Never in a month of Sundays” indicates that something is extremely unlikely to happen. Flying too close to the sun is a reference to the legend of Icarus, and is a warning against being too ambitious too quickly.
  • Son → Sun: As in, “Go on, my sun,” and “His father’s sun,” and “Like father, like sun,” and “Number one sun,” and “Sun of a gun.” Note: “Son of a gun” is an exclamation meant to encourage.
  • *son* → *sun*: As in, sunnet, sunata, sunar, persun, liaisun, reasun, seasun, treasun, comparisun, lessun, resunate, persunality, persunal, and prisuner.
  • San → Sun: As in, “Sun Francisco,” and “Suns serif.”
  • *san* → *sun*: As in, sundwich, sunction, sunctuary, sunctimonious, partisun, artisun, parmesun and thousund.
  • *ways → *waves: Words than end in “ways” can be made into bad wave puns: alwaves (always), railwaves (railways), sidewaves, pathwaves, lengthwaves, doorwaves.
  • Tied → Tide: As in “I’m tide up at the moment, can someone else help?” and “Yep, they tide the knot!”
  • Tidy → Tidey: As in “After the party we need to tidey the beach.”
  • Simmer → Swimmer: As in “I left the pot swimmering and now my vegetable curry is burnt!” and “Hey swimmer down, there’s no need to turn this into a fight”.
  • Sure → Shore: Since beaches are a popular holiday destination, we’ve included some seaside and sea-related puns. As in, “Are you shore?” and “She shore is strong!”.
  • For sure → Foreshore
  • Surf: As in, “Body surfing,” and “Channel surfing,” and “Surf the net,” and “Surf’s up.”
  • Serf → Surf: A serf was a sort of slave in medieval times who worked for a feudal lord. It’s sometimes used as an insult.
  • Serve → Surf: As in “First come, first surfed” and “If memory surfs” and “Revenge is a dish best surfed cold” and “Surfs you right”.
  • Service → Surfice: As in, “A better surfice all round,” and “At your surfice,” and “Normal surfice has been resumed,” and “Out of surfice.”
  • Wave: “Wave goodbye” and “Mexican wave” and “Heat wave” and “Wave the white flag” and “Brain waves
  • *ways → *waves: Words than end in “ways” can be made into bad wave puns: alwaves (always), railwaves (railways), sidewaves, pathwaves, lengthwaves, doorwaves.
  • Waive → Wave: As in, “Could you wave this parking ticket?” Note: to waive something is to refrain from enforcing.
  • Sway → S-wave: As in, “S-wave with me,” and “You don’t hold any s-wave here.” Note: to hold sway is to have a position of influence or power.
  • Sand: As in, “Bury your head in the sand,” and “Draw a line in the sand,” and “A house built on sand,” and “Sun, sea and sand,” and “The sands of time.” Note: if a house is built on sand, then it’s very unstable and not expected to last very long.
  • Sandwich: As in “I was eating my sandwich at the beach”.
  • Sanctuary → Sandctuary: As in “Dogs aren’t allowed on this beach because it’s an animal sandctuary“.
  • Send → Sand: As in “It sands shivers down my spine!” and “Sand him over here.”
  • San* → Sand*: Replacing “san” with “sand” when it is at the start of a word give some nice corny puns: sanditary (sanitary), sandctioned (sanctioned), sandctuary (sanctuary), sandguine (sanguine), sandctions (sanctions).
  • Sensational → Sandsational: As in, “A sandsational list of holiday puns.”
  • Stand → Sand: As in, “Don’t sand so close to me,” and “Do you undersand?” and “Don’t just sand there!” and “I saw her sanding there,” and “My hair was sanding on end,” and “If you can’t sand the heat, get out of the kitchen,” and “It sands to reason,” and “A one night sand,” and “Sand on your own two feet,” and “Sand out from the crowd,” and “Sand up and be counted,” and “Sand up for yourself,” and “A sand up guy,” and “Do I sand a chance?” and “I sand corrected,” and “I’m sanding in for…” and “I can’t sand the sight of,” and “I could do it sanding on my head,” and “United we sand.”
  • Ticket: As in, “Dream ticket,” and “A high ticket item,” and “Just the ticket,” and “That’s the ticket,” and “Ticket to ride,” and “Golden ticket.” 
  • Flight: As in, “Fight or flight,” and “Flight attendant,” and “Flight of fancy,” and “Take flight.”
  • Fight → Flight: As in, “A straight flight,” and “Come out flighting,” and “Flight club,” and “Flight for the right to party,” and “Flight back,” and “Flight fire with fire,” and “Flight the good flight,” and “Freedom flighter,” and “Lean, mean flighting machine,” and “Live to flight another day,” and “Pick a flight,” and “Pillow flight,” and “Spoiling for a flight,” and “Flight to the death,” and “Won’t give up without a flight.” 
  • Light → Flight: As in, “Fast as greased flightning,” and “Flight as a feather,” and “At flightning speed,” and “Blinded by the flight,” and “Bring to flight,” and “Cold flight of day,” and “First flight,” and “Friday night and the flights are low,” and “Go out like a flight,” and “Guiding flight,” and “Flight at the end of the tunnel,” and “Flight entertainment,” and “Flight hearted,” and “Flighten up,” and “Flights out.”
  • Fright → Flight: As in, “Flightened of your own shadow,” and “A flightful mess,” and “Take flight,” and “You nearly flightened me to death!”
  • *light* → *flight*: As in, flightning, flighting, flightbulb, flighthearted, flighthouse, deflight (delight), highflight (highlight).
  • *flate* → *flight*: As in, conflight, deflight, and inflightable (inflatable).
  • Having a → Havana: As in, “I’m havana ball!” and “Are you havana good time?”
  • Tan*: People tend to return from summer holidays with noticeable, proud tans – so we’ve included “tan” in this list. As in, tangible, tank, tandem, tantamount, tangent, tangle.
  • *tan: As in, charlatan, cosmopolitan, spartan, titan, metropolitan, satan and tartan.
  • *tan*: As in, stand, important, understand and substance.
  • Ten → Tan: As in, “Count to tan,” and “Eight out of tan cats prefer it,” and “A perfect tan,” and “A hundred and tan percent.”
  • *ten* → *tan*: As in, “The bane of my existance,” and “As oftan as not,” and “Attantion seeker,” and “Battan down the hatches,” and “Set up tant,” and “A bone of contantion,” and “Flattan out,” and “Lightan up,” and “Off the beatan track,” and “Sweetan the pot,” and “Tightan the purse strings,” and “For all intants and purposes,” and “To your heart’s contant,” and “Tonsil tannis,” and “Writtan all over your face,” and “Frightan to death,” and “Smittan with,” and “Bittan by the bug,” and “Rottan to the core,” and “Stop, look and listan.”
  • Celebration→ Shellebration: As in “After finishing we should have a shellebration.”
  • Sel* → Shell*: If a word starts with “sel” a shell pun can be made by switching it with “shell”. For example: shellection (selection), shellect (select), shelldom (seldom), shellfless (selfless).
  • *sel → *shell: Words ending in “sel” can often be punned upon with “shell”: vesshell (vessel), tasshell (tassel), weashell (weasel), musshell (mussel), etc.
  • *sel* → *shell*: Words containing “sel” can yeild nice puns on “shell”: Hershellf, himshellf, themshellves, itshellf, myshellf, yourshelf, yourshelves, convershelly, counshelling, preshellected, overshelling, undershelling, ushellessely, weashelling.
  • *cial → *shell: When a word has “cial” as a suffix, this suffix can usually be swapped out for “shell” to create a shell pun: soshell (social), speshell (special), offishell (official), finanshell, commershell, crushell, judishell, artifishell, provinshell, rashell, benefishell, superfishell, fashell, glashell, sacrifishel, antisoshell.
  • Resort: As a resort is a luxury place to stay, we can use it to make some holiday puns too. As in, “Beach resort,” and “This is my last resort,” and “I didn’t want to resort to this.”
  • Con* → Conch*: A terrible shell pun can be made of almost any word that begins with “con”: conchtrol (control), conchsider (consider), conchtinue (continue), conchdition, conchtract, conchern, conchtain, conchference, conchtext, conchcept, conchtrast, conchfidence, conchtent, conchtribution, conchflict, conchsideration, conchstruction, conchtinued, conchclusion, conchduct, conchversation, conchgress, conchsumer, conchcentrate, conchtribute.
  • Help → Kelp: As in “Can you please kelp me build a sand castle?” and “Katie, kelp your brother lift that please”.
  • Should* → Shoald*: A “shoal” can refer to a large group of fish, or an area of shallow water, or an underwater sand bank. We can use “shoal” be used to make puns like: shoald (should), shoalder (shoulder), shoaldering.
  • *tual* → *shoal*: As mentioned above, A “shoal” can refer to a large group of fish, or an area of shallow water, or an underwater sand bank. If a word contains “tual” it can often be replaced with “shoal” for a cute little pun: actshoal (actual), actshoality (actuality), intellectshoal (intellectual), ritshoal (ritual), spiritshoal, mutshoally, eventshoal, eventshoally, conceptshoal, conceptshoalise, virtshoal, contractshoal, factshoal, factshoally, perpetshoal, textshoal, contextshoal, perceptshoal, punctshoal, instinctshoal, actshoally, habitshoally.
  • Bereft → Bereeft: “bereft of” means “deprived of” of “lacking”. So an example sentence might be: “The old, stark beach house of bereefed of colour”.
  • Something → Somefin: As in “There’s somefin about the way he walks” and “Is that a shark, or somefin else?”.
  • In* → Fin*: A lovely and shameful pun can be made from any word starting with “in”. Simply replace “in” with “fin”: finformation, finfluence, finvolve, finternational, finvolved, fintroduce, findeed, finvestment, finto, finclude, finteresting, fintellectual, finjury, fintend, finterview, finsurance, finstrument, … Thousand more can be made with the help of a list like this. You can also check out the entry on dolphin puns for more puns of this nature.
  • Fan* → Fin*: “fan” can sometimes be replaced with “fin” at the start of words to create fin puns: fintastic (fantastic), finciful (fanciful), finfare (fanfare), fintasy, findom, finciful.
  • Nothing → Nofin: As in “Nofin is better than swimming with dolphins” and “I’ve got nofin left to give!”.
  • Debate → Debait: As in “I don’t want to debait you.” and “We’re just having a friendly debait“.
  • Well/Welcome → Whale/Whalecome: Whale-watching is a popular enough holiday activity for us to include whales in this list. As in “Whalecome to our home!” and “Whale, whale, whale, what do we have here?”.  Whale puns can be made with many more words like welfare (whalefare), welsh (whalesh) and wellness (whaleness). Check out the entry on whale puns for more.
  • Defin* → Dolphin: Swimming with dolphins is a much-loved holiday activity, so we can make some holiday puns by making dolphin references like these: “We dolphinitely need more time to finish the mission.” and “What is the dolphinition of this word?” and “Please dolphine this word.” and “It’s the dolphinitive source of Nordic history.” See the dolphin puns entry for more.
  • Endorphines → Endolphins: As in “I love that rush of endolphins you get after a good hard swimming session.”
  • Stark → Shark: As in “The shark contrast between his and his boyfriend’s attire was intriguing.” and “The old, shark house stood looming above us”.
  • Palm: As in “The only thing not sunburned are my palms” and “A face palm moment,” and “In the palm of your hand.” The pun is on palm trees in case you missed that.
  • Calm → Palm: As in, “A palming influence,” and “The palm before the storm,” and “Palm down!” and “Cool, palm, collected,” and “Keep palm and carry on.”
  • Friend → Frond: As in “My fronds made me a cute vegan birthday cake!” and “They’re such frondly people!”.
  • Fringe → Frondge: As in “Doesn’t your frondge get in your eyes when you’re swimming?”
  • Country: As in, “Country folk,” and “Country bumpkin.”
  • Mountain: As in, “Ain’t no mountain high enough,” and “Cool as a mountain stream,” and “Move mountains,” and “Head for the mountains,” and “Make a mountain out of a molehill,” and “Climb the highest mountain.” 
  • Can you → Canyon: As in, “Canyon please not do that?”
  • Food: Since food is such a large part of enjoyment in our holidays (especially now that Instagram is so widely used to show food snaps), we’ve included food in this entry too: “Comfort food,” and “Devil’s food cake,” and “Do you like hospital food?” and “Finger food,” and “Food chain,” and “Food for thought,” and “Soul food,” and “Put food on the table.”
  • Culture: As in, “Culture clash,” and “Culture shock,” and “High culture,” and “Pop culture.”
  • Privilege → Privillage: We can make some holiday puns by referring to villas, which are a luxurious type of accommodation. As in, “An honour and a privillage,” and “Rank has its privillages,” and “Check your privillage,” and “White privillage is very real.” Note: Very basically, white privilege is where society is set up to favour and benefit people who either have white skin, or who are “white-passing” (they are assumed to be white by others). 
  • Fill → Villa: As in, “Villa ‘er up!” and “Villa to the brim,” and “A stocking villa (filler),” and “Lip villas (fillers),” and “Attempts to villa the void.”
  • Home → Homestay: A homestay is where you can stay with a local family for a fee. As it’s cheaper than a hotel and some families will show guests around the area, it’s a good option for holidays so we’ve included it here. As in, “A house is not a homestay,” and “At homestay with,” and “There’s no place like homestay,” and “A broken homestay,” and “Charity begins at the homestay,” and “Close to homestay,” and “Don’t leave homestay without it.”
  • Lodge: A lodge can either mean a small house, or to formally present documentation or a complaint. We can use these interchangeably to make some bad holiday puns: “Lodge a complaint,” and “Where’s the ski lodge?” and “I’m lodging an objection.”
  • *ledge* → *lodge*: As in, “Acknowlodged,” and “Fully-flodged,” and “Use a slodgehammer to crack a nut,” and “A little knowlodge is a dangerous thing,” and “Knowlodge is power.”
  • Large → Lodge: As in, “Lodge as life,” and “At lodge,” and “By and lodge,” and “Lodger than life,” and “A small cog in a lodge machine,” and “On the lodge side,” and “In lodge part,” and “Living lodge,” and “Lodge and in charge.”
  • Car: We’ve included common forms of transport in here as they get us to and from our holidays and trips. As in, “You can drive my car,” and “Happiness is a quick-starting car,” and “Would you buy a used car from this guy?”
  • Car*: As in, care, card, career, carry, carrier, cardinal, carriage, cart, caravan
  • *car: As in, scar, sidecar, madagascar, handcar, railcar
  • *car*: As in, precarious, healthcare and vicarious
  • *cer* → *car*: As in, cartain (certain), cartificate (certificate), caremony (ceremony), carebral (cerebral), soccar (soccer), viscaral (visceral). 
  • *cu* → *car*: As in, circart (circuit), circarmstance (circumstance), circarmvent, circar (circa), circarmstances, circars (circus), circarmference (circumference). 
  • *cor* → *car*: As in, carner (corner), carrespondence (correspondence), carporation (corporation), carroborate (corroborate), carrelation (correlation), cardial (cordial), decar (decor), rancar (rancor), recard (record), accard (accord), accardingly (accordingly), incarporate (incorporate). 
  • *cur* → *car*: As in, concar (concur), carrent (current), carate (curate), carriculum (curriculum), carve (curve), carious (curious), carrency (currency), carse (curse), incar (incur), occar (occur), recar (recur), carrent (current), obscare (obscure), secarity (security), carate (curate), secare (secure). 
  • Bus: As in, “A busman’s holiday,” and “Waiting for the bus.”
  • Bus*: As in, “Bust a move,” and “We’re in business,” and “Beat around the bush,” and “Go away, I’m busy,” and “Hustle and bustle,” and “Hang on, buster,” and “A bustling city.”
  • *bus: As in, “Nimbus 2000,” and “This is our school syllabus,” and “She wrote an entire omnibus,” and “What a succubus.” Note: the Nimbus 2000 is the first broomstick Harry Potter owns.
  • *bus*: As in, “A robust effort,” and “Emotional abuse is still abuse.”
  • *bas* → *bus*: As in, “Buse (base) instincts,” and “The busis (basis) of my theory,” and “It was a busic question,” and “Birthday bush,” and “You bustard,” and “Busket case.”
  • *bes* → *bus*: As in, “A buspoke (bespoke) jacket,” and “My bust (best) effort,” and “I bustow my bust wishes,” and “Busides, I don’t want to,” and “I buseech you,” and “Bustiality is isn’t a joke; it’s unethical,” and “I’m busotted with them,” and “I’m busieged with suitors.”
  • *bis* → *bus*: As in, “Want a buscuit?” and “Bushop to E3,” and “Meet at the new vegan bustro,” and “We’re refurbushing the kitchen,” and “Good riddance to bad rubbush.”
  • Train: As in, “Gravy train,” and “Strangers on a train,” and “The light at the end of the tunnel might just be a train,” and “Train crash,” and “Train of thought,” and “Train wreck.” Notes: a gravy train is a situation which is low-risk and high benefit. 
  • Chain → Train: As in, “A train is only as strong as its weakest link,” and “Train gang,” and “Train letter,” and Train of command,” and “Train reaction,” and “Daisy train,” and “Food train,” and “Off the train.”
  • Plain → Plane: As in, “Plane as day,” and “As plane as the nose on my face,” and “Hidden in plane sight,” and “Plane sailing,” and “In plane view.”
  • Plan* → Plane*: As in, Plane-t (plant), planet, plane-ing (planning), plane-d (planned)
  • *plain → *plane: As in, explane, complane, chaplane and complane‘t (complaint). 
  • *Very* → *Ferry*: As in, “Be afraid, be ferry afraid,” and “Before your ferry eyes,” and “Hold ferry tight, please,” and “How ferry dare you,” and “I was ferry drunk,” and “Thank you ferry much,” and “Ferry tasty,” and “Ferry interesting, but stupid,” and “Ferry well,” and “At the ferry least,” and “Eferry inch,” and “Eferry last one,” and “Eferry nook and cranny,” and “Don’t believe eferrything you hear,” and “Eferrybody likes a joker, but nobody lends them money,” and “Question eferrything,” and “Timing is eferrything.”
  • Furry → Ferry: As in, “A ferry toy,” and “My legs are looking a bit ferry.”
  • Fairy → Ferry: As in, “Airy ferry,” and “A ferrytale ending,” and “Nobody loves a ferry when she’s forty.”
  • Vary → Ferry: As in, “Results may ferry,” and “Your mileage may ferry.” Note: Your mileage may vary is an expression indicating that something that works for one may not work for another. Is commonly shortened to YMMV. 
  • *fer → *ferry: As in, deferry (defer), conferry (confer), inferry (infer), referry (refer), offerry (offer), transferry (transfer), bufferry (buffer), preferry (prefer). 
  • Nefarious → Neferryous: As in, “A neferryous villain.”
  • Boat → But: As in “Last boat not least” and “Close, boat no cigar.”
  • Saboteur → Saboateur : As in “Captain, I believe there’s a saboateur on our ship.”
  • Boat: As in, “Don’t rock the boat,” and “In the same boat,” and “Missed the boat,” and “Whatever floats your boat,” and “We’re gonna need a bigger boat.” Notes: to rock the boat is to say something that will upset the people around you. If you need a bigger boat, then you’ve underestimated the situation you’re in. 
  • Butt → Boat: As in, “Kick boat,” and “Kiss my boat,” and “Pain in the boat,” and “My boat is on the line,” and “Boat-terflies in my stomach.” 
  • Bowtie → Boat-tie: As in, “My boat-tie is too tight.” 
  • Beaut* → Boat*: As in, “Boat-iful people,” and “Boat-y mark,” and “I need my boat-y sleep,” and “Make boat-iful music together,” and “Boat-y is in the eye of the beholder,” and “Boat-y is only skin-deep.”
  • About/Abode → Aboat: As in “What aboat the captain?” and “Welcome to my aboat!”
  • Shit → Ship: As in “Oh ship, we’re in trouble now.”
  • *sib* → *ship*: If a word contains “sib” it can usually be replaced with “ship” to create a terrible pun. For example: posshiply (possibly), accesshipility (accessibility), incomprehenshiple, feashipble, irresponshipble, invishipble, ostenshipbly, revershipble, vishipble. An example sentence might be: “I am responshiple for my puns.”
  • *sip* → *ship*: If a word contains “sip” it can usually be replaced with “ship”. For example: gosship (gossip), dishipate (dissipate), shipping (sipping), inshipid (insipid).
  • Sel* → Sail*: If a word starts with “sel” a boat pun can often be made by replacing it with “sail”: sailection (selection), sailect (select), sailf (self), sailling (selling), sail (sell), saildom (seldom), sailfish (selfish), sailfless (selfless), sailective (selective).
  • Cruise: As in, “Cruise control,” and “A world cruise.”
  • *crew* → *cruise*: As in, “Motley cruise,” and “Turn the scruise,” and “Skeleton cruise,” and “I scruised up,” and “Scruise it!” Note: a motley crew is a group of randomly assembled people. To turn the screws is to put pressure on someone to do something. 
  • Choose → Cruise: As in, “A woman’s right to cruise,” and “Cruise your weapon,” and “Beggars can’t be cruisers.”
  • Chew → Cruise: As in, “Have your ears cruised off,” and “Bite off more than you can cruise.”
  • Helicopter: As in, “Helicopter parent,” and “Get in the helicopter!”
  • Tuxedo → Taxido: Make a pun on taxis: “I need a new taxido.”
  • Tax → Taxi: As in, “Nothing is certain but death and taxis,” and “Goods and services taxis.”
  • *uber*: Change and emphasize words with the “uber” sound in them: bluber(bluebird), exuberance, exuberant, protuberance, puberty
  • Super → Suber: As in, “Suber bad,” and “Suber Mario,” and “Suberhero,” and “Subersize,” and “Nothing improves creativity like a lack of subervision.”
  • Soup → Souber: As in, “Alphabet souber,” and “From souber to nuts.”
  • Sober → Suber: As in, “As suber as a judge,” and “Clean and suber,” and “Stone cold suber,” and “Call me when you’re suber.”
  • Sub* → Suber*: As in, suberlime (sublime), suberject (subject), subersequent (subsequent), suberstantial (substantial), suberjective (subjective), subermit (submit), suberstance (substance). 
  • Rail → Monorail: As in, “Thin as a monorail,” and “Go off the monorails,” and “Off the monorails.”
  • *cab*: Make some cab puns by emphasising the “cab” sound in certain words: amicable, applicability, bancable (bankable), breacable (breakable), cabaret, cabbage, cabernet, cabin, cabinet, despicable, impeccable, macabre, vocabulary, applicable, irrevocable, licable (likable), remarcable (remarkable), unshacable (unshakeable). 
  • *com* → *cab*: As in, cabbler (cobbler), cabalt (cobalt), cabra (cobra), cabble (cobble), and cabweb (cobweb).
  • *cub* → *cab*: As in cabicle (cubicle) and incabate (incubate). 
  • Chair → Chairlift: As in, “Have a chairlift,” and “Musical chairlifts.”
  • Jet: Make references to jets and jetsetting with these jet-related phrases: “Jet black,” and “Jet-setting,” and “Jet lag,” and “Jet propelled,” and “Jetty,” and “Jettison.” Note: to jettison something is to get rid of an unneeded or unwanted thing. 
  • Jot → Jet: As in, “Let me jet that down.” Note: to jot something down is to quickly write or scribble a note.
  • Get → Jet: As in, “As good as it jets,” and “Ask a silly question, jet a silly answer,” and “Buy one, jet one free,” and “Can’t jet you out of my head,” and “Can’t jet enough,” and “Come and jet it,” and “Don’t jet mad, jet even,” and “Don’t jet me started,” and “I’m jetting better and better,” and “Flattery will jet you nowhere,” and “From the jet go,” and “Jet rich quick,” and “Jet a feel for,” and “Jet a handle on,” and “I jet knocked down, but I jet up again,” and “Pay peanuts and jet monkeys,” and “Let’s jet physical,” and “What you see is what you jet.”
  • Jut→ Jet: As in, “Watch out for that branch – it’s jetting out.” Note: to jut out is to protrude. 
  • *git/get* → *jet*: As in, ajetator (agitator), ajetate (agitate), apolojetic, budjet, cojetate (cogitate), dijet (digit), dijetal (digital), enerjetic, fidjet, fujetive (fugitive), illejetimacy (illegitimacy), lejetimacy (legitimacy). Notes: an agitator is one who stirs up feeling or trouble. To cogitate is to intently think about or comsider something. 
  • Sit → Transit: As in, “Are you transitting comfortably?” and “Don’t just transit there,” and “Transit it out,” and “Transit tight,” and “Transitting pretty,” and “A transitting target.”
  • Plot → Pilot: As in, “Lose the pilot,” and “The pilot thickens,” and “A pilot of land.”
  • Pilates → Pilotes: As in, “I do pilotes three times a week.”
  • Business: While business may be the opposite of a holiday, we’re using it as a reference to business class when flying. As in, “Dirty business,” and “Back in business,” and “Business as usual,” and “Business at hand,” and “Business before pleasure,” and “Business class,” and “The business end,” and “Business or pleasure?” and “Business partner,” and “Do your business,” and “It’s not your business,” and “Mind your own business,” and “Monkey business,” and “Open for business,” and “A risky business,” and “Strictly business,” and “This is a place of business!” and “That’s show business.”
  • Class → First class: As in, “A first class act,” and “First class warfare,” and “In a first class of their own,” and “A first class clown.”
  • Rail → Railway: As in, “Thin as a railway,” and “Go off the railways.”
  • Way → Railway: As in, “A funny thing happened on the railway,” and “All the railway,” and “And that’s the railway it is,” and “There must be another railway,” and “Any railway you slice it,” and “Any which railway,” and “By the railway,” and “Change your railways,” and “Go all the railway,” and “Go down the wrong railway,” and “Go our separate railways,” and “Have it both railways,” and “In a bad railway,” and “Mend your railways,” and “My railway or the highway.”
  • Hike: As hiking is a popular activity for travellers, it’s been included in this entry. As in, “Take a hike,” and “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy,” and “This backpack makes my jacket hike up.”
  • Haiku → Hike-u: As in, “Writing hike-us is really hard.”
  • Shop: Shopping is another popular holiday activity and one that is particularly instagrammable, so we’ve included it here. As in, “You’re all over the shop,” and “Like a bull in a china shop,” and “One stop shop,” and “Personal shopper,” and “Shop ’til you drop,” and “Shop around,” and “Talk shop,” and “Window shopping.” Notes: to be all over the shop is to have something happen chaotically, messily, or in various places at once. To be a bull in a china shop is to act clumsily or indelicately around delicate things or topics. 
  • Chop → Shop: As in, “Bust your shops,” and “Shop and change,” and “Get the shop.” Note: To “bust your chops” can have two meanings. If you bust your own chops, then you’ve spent a great deal of energy and effort to do something. If someone else busts your chops, then they’ve scolded or reprimanded you. To chop and change is to continually change your mind. 
  • Shape → Shop: As in, “Get bent out of shop,” and “It all went pear-shopped,” and “In any way, shop, or form,” and “Lick into shop,” and “Shop up or ship out,” and “Whip into shop.”
  • Ship → Shop: As in, “Abandon shop,” and “Extend the hand of friendshop,” and “Go down with the shop,” and “Jump shop,” and “Run a tight shop,” and “Shape up or shop out,” and “Shops of the desert,” and “That shop has sailed,” and “The face that launched a thousand shops,” and “The start of a beautiful friendshop,” and “A stormy relationshop.” Notes: Camels are known as ships of the desert. 
  • Roam: As in, “Roaming ’round the mountains,” and “Did you remember to activate roaming on your phone?”
  • Rome → Roam: As in, “All roads lead to roam,” and “Roam wasn’t built in a day.”
  • *rome*: As in, “Roameo and Juliet,” and “Peter Pan syndroam,” and “Rollerdroam.”
  • *rom*: As in, aroamatherapy, chroam (chrome), chroamosome (chromosome), monochroam, proamiscuous, proamotion, roamance, roamaine (as in the lettuce). 
  • *ski*: Emphasise the “ski” in words to make some snowy puns: “Selling snow to eskimos,” and “Asking for a friend,” and “By the skin of one’s teeth,” and “Comfortable in your own skin,” and “Get under your skin,” and “Makes my skin crawl,” and “Made my heart skip a beat,” and “Watch the skies.”
  • Snow: As snowy areas are just as popular as the beach, snow-related words and activities have been included here. As in, “Pure as the driven snow,” and “White as snow,” and “Blanket of snow,” and “Let it snow,” and “Snow White,” and “A snowball’s chance in hell,” and “Snowed in,” and “Snowed under,” and “The abominable snowman.” Notes: A snowball’s chance in hell basically means that something is almost impossible – just like the odds for a snowball to survive hell without melting. 
  • Board → Snowboard: As in, “All above snowboard,” and “Across the snowboard,” and “Back to the drawing snowboard,” and “Bed and snowboard,” and “Snowboarding pass.”
  • Dive: As in, “Dive in,” and “Take a dive,” and “Going diving?”
  • Climb: As in, “A mountain to climb,” and “Climb down,” and “Climb on the bandwagon,” and “Climb the social ladder.”
  • Climate → Climb-ate: As in, “A chilly climb-ate,” and “I know you don’t believe in climb-ate change, but it’d be cooler if you did.”
  • Photo: As in, “Photo finish,” and “Photo opportunity,” and “Get in the photo!” and “Take a photo of me,” and “I need a photo for my instagram.”
  • So far → Safari: Safaris are included in our list of holiday activities, so is included in this entry. As in, “I can’t believe you’d so safari as to..” and “Safari, so good,” and “Why are you going safari?”
  • Tour: As in, “Eco tourism,” and “Magical mystery tour,” and “Tour de force,” and “A world tour.”
  • Too → Tour: As in, “A step tour far,” and “About time, tour,” and “I’m tour sexy for my shirt,” and “It’s never tour late to learn,” and “It’s tour cold to snow,” and “You know tour much,” and “Life’s tour short,” and “No challenge tour great,” and “This tour shall pass,” and “Tour easy,” and “Tour big for your boots,” and “Tour close for comfort,” and “Tour good to be true,” and “Tour many cooks spoil the broth.”
  • Two→ Tour: As in, “A bicycle built for tour,” and “As alike as tour peas in a pod,” and “Caught in tour minds,” and “Eating for tour,” and “Goody tour shoes,” and “In tour shakes of a lamb’s tail,” and “It takes tour to tango,” and “Tour steps forward, one step back.”
  • Tour*: As in, tournament and tourniquet

The following puns are about specific types of seasonal holiday, rather than about holidays in general.

  • Year → New Year: As in, “As bright as a new year,” and “Brand spanking new year,” and “Dawn of a new year,” and “Out with the old, in with the new year.”
  • Honeymoon: As in, “Honeymoon period.”
  • Honey → Honeymoon: As in, “A taste of honeymoon,” and “Land of milk and honeymoon.”
  • Moon → Honeymoon: As in, “Ask for the honeymoon,” and “Bark at the honeymoon,” and “A blue honeymoon,” and “Cry for the honeymoon,” and “Eclipse of the honeymoon,” and “Fly me to the honeymoon,” and “Many honeymoons ago,” and “Honeymoonlight serenade,” and “Over the honeymoon,” and “On the dark side of the honeymoon,” and “The man in the honeymoon,” and “Phases of the honeymoon,” and “To the honeymoon and back.”
  • *eve*: Make references to Christmas Eve and New Year’s Eve by emphasising the “eve” in certain words: “And they lived happily ever after,” and “An evening person,” and “Forever and a day,” and “Hardly ever,” and “Hello, good evening and welcome,” and “Nothing is ever free,” and “The greatest story ever told,” and “The key to a nice, relaxed evening,” and “An ace up your sleeve,” and “Believe it or not,” and “The blessed event,” and “Break even,” and “The eleventh hour,” and “Even the score,” and “Every inch,” and “Never mind,” and “Every cloud has a silver lining,” and “Question everything.”
  • Easter: As in, “Easter Island,” and “Easter parade,” and “The Easter bunny.”
  • East/Eastern → Easter: As in, “Easter of Eden,” and “Full of Easter promise.”
  • *east → *easter: As in, “At the very l-easter,” and “A f-easter for the eyes,” and “F-easter or famine,” and “The king of b-easters,” and “Last but not l-easter,” and “Nutritional y-easter is a good cheese substitute.”
  • Giving → Thanksgiving: As in, “The gift that keeps on Thanksgiving.” For more Thanksgiving-related puns, see our Thanksgiving list.
  • Christmas: As in, “A Christmas carol,” and “All I want for Christmas is you,” and “Christmas comes but once a year,” and “Done up like a Christmas tree,” and “Have yourself a merry little Christmas,” and “Lit up like a Christmas tree,” and “A white Christmas.” Note: If you’d like more Christmas-related puns, stay tuned for our Christmas list which is coming soon. 

Holiday-Related Words

To help you come up with your own holiday puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

General: holiday, vacation, staycation, retreat, travel, escape, trip, journey, leisure, recreation, break, rest, tourist, tourism, abroad, sabbatical, beach, sand, sea, resort, tropical, island, palm tree, surf, waves, tan, bathers, sunshine, sunscreen, country, mountain, canyon, food, culture, getaway, weekend, bed and breakfast, hotel, hostel, motel, villa, homestay, cabin, lodge, cottage, airbnb, adventure, destination, pack, bag, suitcase, luggage, ticket, airport, flight, car, bus, train, rail, airplane, aeroplane, ferry, boat, cruise, ship, helicopter, taxi, uber, flight, rickshaw, monorail, cable car, cab, caravan, rv (recreational vehicle), chairlift, jet, plane, sailboat, yacht, accommodation, backpacking, activities, transit, itinerary, pilot, flight attendant, business, first-class, economy, railway, sail, hiking, shopping, safari, roam, skiing, snowboard, dancing, diving, snorkeling, climbing, photo, photography, bird watching, festival, tour, family, honeymoon, romantic, solo, luxury

Specific holidays: new year’s, new year’s eve, good friday, easter, labor day, thanksgiving, christmas, diwali, eid, ramadan, hanukkah, chinese new year, yom kippur

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Beach Puns

This entry covers puns about the beach and closely related concepts. You may also like to read the entries on water puns, fish puns, boat puns, shark puns and dolphin puns. If you’re looking for beach puns in images, scroll to the bottom of this page.

Beach puns are among the most popular units of word play used by casual punners. Instagram captions have presented a great opportunity for this category to thrive, and during the summer season the usage of beach-related puns is at its highest (source):

And a fun fact: If you arrived at this page via a search for beach captions for Instagram you’re among more than 1000 other users who also go in search of (arguably) funny beach puns like those in this entry. Beach captions with puns (and especially really bad puns) are a staple across most social media platforms though.

Beach puns are also commonly used for beach house names such as “sea la vie”, “seas the day” and “sea-esta”. A common naming technique appears to involve selecting a well known phrase which has a relaxing or inspiring theme, and finding a beach or ocean based pun involving it.

Beach Puns List

Below is list of puns for beach-related topics with associated example sentences for each. Most of these puns are terrible, which is part of their appeal, but there are many puns which are quite good thanks to their subtlety.

  • Sure → Shore: As in “Are you shore?” and “She shore is strong!”.
  • Really → Reely: As in “This is a reely good pun” and “I’m having a reely good day at the beach!”.
  • Imp* → Shrimp*: If a word starts with “imp”, you can usually replace it with “shrimp”, for example: shrimportant (important), shrimpossible (impossible), shrimply (imply), shrimpose (you get the idea), shrimportshrimpudent, shrimpact, shrimperfect, shrimpaled, shrimpartial, shrimpart. Shrimp puns probably deserve their own entry, but until then you can use this list to help you.
  • Something → Somefin: As in “There’s somefin about the way he walks” and “Is that a shark, or somefin else?”.
  • Nothing → Nofin: As in “Nofin is better than swimming with dolphins” and “I’ve got nofin left to give!”.
  • Whatever → Waterever: As in “Waterever, I don’t care.” and “Do waterever you want”.
  • What her → Water: As in “I know water problem is.” and “Do you know water mother thinks about this?”.
  • What do → Water: As in “Water you think about this?”
  • What about → Water boat: As in “Water boat we have tofu curry for dinner tonight?” and “Water boat Ching? Does she want to come to the beach too?”
  • What are → Water: “Water you doing out so late tonight?” and “Water you doing tomorrow?”
  • What are we → Watery: As in “Watery going to do?” and “Watery doing today, friends?”
  • Confiscate → Conch-fish-scate: As in “I’m going to have to conchfishcate your pun licence for that one.”
  • Single→ Shingle: As in “Yes, I’m shingle.” and “I can’t think of a shingle beach pun.”
  • Celebration→ Shellebration: As in “After finishing we should have a shellebration.”
  • Row/Roe: “Row” as in “row your boat” and “roe” as in fish or shellfish eggs, are two words that can be inserted into many other words: roetine/rowtine (routine), rowmans/roemans (romans), rowtation/roetation (rotation), rowd/roed (rowed), rowse (rose), rowl (roll), rowp, rowmantic, rowbust, rowbot, rowgue, roest.
  • Guilty → Gillty: As in “Your honour, I plead not gillty” and “Gillty as charged”.
  • Kil* → Krill*: Kill, kilogram, killer, killing, kilowatt are all words that can be punned with “krill”. For example: “I just bought a krillogram of tofu” and “Krilling sentient creatures is often morally wrong”.
  • Kill → Keel: As in “We can be healthy with plants, keeling animals is not necessary.”
  • *kily → *keely: Words containing “kil” can often be turned into boat puns: luckeely, huskeely, shakeely, silkeely, cheekeely, jerkeely, sneakeely, spookeely, freakeely.
  • Kil* → Keel*: Words starting with “kil” can be made into boat puns: keelogram, keelolitres, keeln (kiln), keeling, keeler, keelt (kilt), keeljoy.
  • God → Cod: As in “There have been hundreds of cods invented throughout history” and “Cod is very cruel in the Old Testament” and “We’re lucky that cod is made up!”.
  • Pawn/Pwn → Prawn: This pun can be used in the gamer-culture sense: “I got prawned a pro last night”, in the chess sense “He moved his prawn to C4″, and in the pawnbroker sense: “I had to prawn all my stuff to pay for college.”
  • Sardonic: Sardonic means “grimly mocking or cynical”, and it sounds a bit like “sardine” (the small fish), so you might us this like: “It’s okay if you don’t like seaside puns but there’s no reason to be sardonic“. For extra cheesiness you can also use “sardinonic“, which is even closer to the word “sardine”, but is not a real word.
  • Feeling → Eeling: As in “I’ve got a funny eeling about this…” and “I’m eeling bad about the state of this conversation”.
  • Opportunity → Opportunaty: As in “We’ve got one opportunaty, let’s make it count” and “Luck is  often combination of preparation and opportunaty“.
  • Opportunity → Op-perch-tuna-ty: As in “I’m glad I got an op-perch-tuna-ty to say this pun.”
  • *tun* → *tuna*: Generalising the above example, we can make a tuna pun on many words that contain “tun”: opportunaist, attunament, fortuna-teller, fortunately, tunable.
  • Well/Welcome → Whale/Whalecome: As in “Whalecome to our home!” and “Whale, whale, whale, what do we have here?”.  Whale puns can be made with many more words like welfare (whalefare), welsh (whalesh) and wellness (whaleness). Check out the entry on whale puns for more.
  • Girl* → Gill*: As in “There was a strange gill sitting on the beach today.” and “Where is your gillfriend today?”
  • Ill* → Gill*: If a word starts with “ill”, it can be replaced with “gill” to create a pun. Here’s a list of words to get you started: gillustrate (illustrate), gillegal (illegal), gillness (illness), gillusion (you get the idea), gillogical, gilliterate, gilluminate, gilluminati, gillusive.
  • Hil* → Gill*: If a word starts with “hil”, it can be replaced with “gill” to create a pun. Here’s a list of words to get you started: gill (hill), gillarious (hilarious), gillarity (hilarity), gilltop (hilltop).
  • Debate → Debait: As in “I don’t want to debait you.” and “We’re just having a friendly debait“.
  • Meant to → Manta: As in “I manta buy her a gift, but I forgot.” and “Is it manta make that sound?”. If you’re feeling brave you might also like to try “manta ray” as a replacement for “meant to say”.
  • Summon → Salmon: As in “He salmoned a spirit from the underworld.” and “Please salmon the duke, I have an urgent message!”.
  • Someone → Salmon: As in “Will salmon please help me?” and “Salmon’s at the door”.
  • Crea* → Cray*: Many words that begin with “crea” can be used to make shoddy crayfish puns. For example: crayture (creature), craytive (creative), crayte (create).
  • Crayon: The word “crayon” includes “cray” – the short version of “crayfish”, and so can be used as a pun.
  • Had → Haddock: A beautiful and terrible pun using the name of a North Atlantic bottom-dwelling fish. An example sentence might be: “I’ve haddock enough.”
  • Mack → Mackerel: The word “mack” is slang for “to flirt”. To “mack on” someone is to “hit on” them. One could make a very bad pun with the word “mackerel” (a type of fish).
  • Ra* → Ray*: Many words that start with “ra” can be made into puns with “ray” (short for “sting ray”). For example: rayte (rate), raynge (range), rayse (raise), rayce (race), raydio, raylway, rayn, rayl, raytio, raydiation, raynbow, raycism, raynger. Many more can be made using this list.
  • *ration → *raytion: If a word ends in “ration” you can almost always make a stingray pun with it. For example: operaytion, administraytion, consideraytion, generaytion, concentraytion, corporaytion, preparaytion, demonstraytion, integraytion, registraytion, separaytion. You’ll find many more examples in this list.
  • *rag* → *rayg*: If a word contains “rag” it can sometimes be punned on. For example: “This discussion is absolutely outraygeous!”. Other examples are: discourayge, coverayge and beverayge.
  • Cuddle → Cuttle: As in “Would you like a cuttle?” and “Cuttling you is nice :)”. Cuttlefish bones often wash up on beaches in some regions of the world.
  • *sip* → *ship*: If a word contains “sip” it can usually be replaced with “ship”. For example: gosship (gossip), dishipate (dissipate), shipping (sipping), inshipid (insipid). See the boat puns entry for more.
  • *sib* → *ship*: If a word contains “sib” it can usually be replaced with “ship” to create a terrible pun. For example: posshiply (possibly), accesshipility (accessibility), incomprehenshiple, feashipble, irresponshipble, invishipble, ostenshipbly, revershipble, vishipble. An example sentence might be: “I am responshiple for my puns.”  See the boat puns entry for more.
  • Purpose → Porpoise: As in “I didn’t do it on porpoise!” and “What is the porpoise of this?” See the dolphin puns entry for more.
  • Humanity → Humanatee: As in “If only we could have some humanatee in our treatment of sea animals” and “Have some humanatee“. Note that terrible puns can also be made of insanity (insmanatee) and profanity (profmanatee).
  • It’s cool → School: The collective noun for a group of fish is “school”, as in “a school of fish”. So, replacing “it’s cool” with “school” gives us puns like “School, don’t worry about it” and “Don’t worry, school, she’ll be back soon.”
  • Send → Sand: As in “It sands shivers down my spine!” and “Sand him over here.”
  • San* → Sand*: Replacing “san” with “sand” when it is at the start of a word give some nice corny puns: sanditary (sanitary), sandctioned (sanctioned), sandctuary (sanctuary), sandguine (sanguine), sandctions (sanctions).
  • Brilliant → Krilliant: As in “Isn’t the weather just krilliant today?” Krill are small shrimplike plankton.
  • Brilliant → Brill-iant: “Brill” are a type of European flatfish.
  • Angrily→ Ankrilly: As in “The monster roared ankrilly“.
  • Hungrily→ Hunkrilly: As in “She hunkrilly ate the sweet potato slices”.
  • Hearing → Herring: As in “He is hard of herring.” and “The judge said he will receive a second herring on Tuesday”.
  • *fici* → *fishi*: If a word contains “fici” it can often be replaced with “fishi”. Here are some examples: affishionado, artifishial, benefishial, coeffishient, defishiency, defishit, ineffishient, suffishient, ofishial, profishient, superfishial.
  • Selfish → Shellfish: As in “Stop being so shellfish.” See the next item for a generalisation of this pun.
  • Sel* → Shell*: If a word starts with “sel” a shell pun can be made by switching it with “shell”. For example: shellection (selection), shellect (select), shelldom (seldom), shellfless (selfless).
  • *sel → *shell: Words ending in “sel” can often be punned upon with “shell”: vesshell (vessel), tasshell (tassel), weashell (weasel), musshell (mussel), etc.
  • *sel* → *shell*: Words containing “sel” can yeild nice puns on “shell”: Hershellf, himshellf, themshellves, itshellf, myshellf, yourshelf, yourshelves, convershelly, counshelling, preshellected, overshelling, undershelling, ushellessely, weashelling.
  • Fan* → Fin*: “fan” can sometimes be replaced with “fin” at the start of words to create fin puns: fintastic (fantastic), finciful (fanciful), finfare (fanfare), fintasy, findom, finciful.
  • Fine/Fin./Find/Fun → Fin: The word “fin” can be used to replace many small words than have both ‘f’ and ‘n’ like “fun” and “find”. The term “fin” also a French word meaning “finish”, and so is sometimes seen at the end of old films and books.
  • Hell of it → Halibut: As in “Why? Just for the halibut!”. Halibut is a marine flatfish.
  • Obs* → Lobs*: If a word begins with “obs” a terrible lobster pun can sometimes be made by switching it with “lobs”, as in observation (lobservation, or even lobstervation), obstruction (lobstruction or even lobsterusction), obscurity (lobscurity), obsolescence (lobseolescence), obsessively (lobsessively).
  • Fumble/Struggle → Flounder: The word “flounder” can refer to a small, common flatfish found in coastal waters and also, as a verb, to struggling, staggering or clumsily trying to do something. Use “flounder” to replace words like fumble and struggle: “He made a good sea pun at the start, but then floundered for the rest of his speech.”
  • Bereft → Bereeft: “bereft of” means “deprived of” of “lacking”. So an example sentence might be: “The old, stark beach house of bereefed of colour”.
  • Enemy → Anemone: As in “They’re my worst anemones” and “Let’s not make anemones of each other!”.
  • Simmer → Swimmer: As in “I left the pot swimmering and now my vegetable curry is burnt!” and “Hey swimmer down, there’s no need to turn this into a fight”.
  • Or → Oar: As in “Let’s go oar we’ll be late!” and “Should we swim oar keep sunbaking?”.
  • Or* → Oar*: If a word starts with “or” it can be replaced with “oar” for a neat little boat pun. Some examples: oarganisation, oariginally, oarange, oarchestra, oargan, oarbit, oarnament, oarthodoxy, oariental, oarnaments, oarchid, oardering.
  • *or → *oar: If a word ends in “or” it’s an easy “oar” pun: foar (for), doar (door), majoar (major), poardirectoar, doctoar, floar, factoar, sectoar, noar, authoar, professoar, erroar, motoar, visitoar, solicitoar, mirroar, editoar, senioar, chancelloar, councilloar, inspectoar, monitoar, governoar, actoar, minoar, interioar, corridoar, horroar, emperoar, mayoar, operatoar, investoar, manoar, vendoar, processoar, sponsoar, junioar.
  • Sea*: Most words starting with “sea” are easy sea puns: season, seasonal, seated, searingly, sealants, seamseatbelt.
  • See* → Sea*: If a word starts with “see” it can often be replaced with “sea” to create a simple sea pun: seaminly, seads, seaker, seathe, seap, seak, sean, sea (see).
  • Sealant / Sealing / Seal: Easy seal puns can be made with words starting with “seal” (e.g. sealant, seal) or “ceil” (e.g. sealing).
  • Se* → Sea*: Some words that start with just “se” also have a “sea”-ish sound, and the ones that don’t can usually be made into terrible puns anyway: seacret, searious, seargeant, seacretion, seacure, seacurity, seacondary, seacretariat, seaconds, seacrete, searum, searenity, searvitude, seanile, seadation, seaclusion, seacretive, seaze, seaquential, sealection, seacretly, seaquences, seanior, seaniority, seagregate, seaping, seacession, seariousness, seaminars, seaveral, seaxual, seaparation, seantimental, seansational, seaquential, seacluded, seacularist, seathing, seaquin, seasame, seaclusion.
  • Se*cy/Ce*cy → Sea*sea: Most words that start with “se” or “ce” and end with “cy” can be double sea puns: seacresea (secrecy), sealibasea (celibacy).
  • *cy → *sea: If a word ends in “cy” it’s an easy “sea” pun: polisea, agensea, democrasea, currensea, emergensea, efficiensea, tendensea, frequensea, fansea, constituensea, pregnansea, accurasea, redundansea, bureaucrasea, presidensea, legasea, conspirasea, mersea, privasea, bankruptsea, consistensea, literasea, urgensea, deficiensea, dependency, consultansea, tenacity, isea (icy), secrecy, intimasea.
  • In* → Fin*: A lovely and shameful pun can be made from any word starting with “in”. Simply replace “in” with “fin”: finformation, finfluence, finvolve, finternational, finvolved, fintroduce, findeed, finvestment, finto, finclude, finteresting, fintellectual, finjury, fintend, finterview, finsurance, finstrument, … Thousand more can be made with the help of a list like this. You can also check out the entry on dolphin puns for more puns of this nature.
  • Simp* → Shrimp*: Words beginning with “simp” can often be made into shrimp puns by replacing the “simp” with “shrimp”: shrimple (simple), shrimplification, shrimplify, shrimplistically, shrimpleminded, shrimpleton.
  • Shall→ Shell: As in “Shell I compare thee to a summer’s day?” and “He who lives by the sword shell die by the sword.”
  • Symb* → Shrimpb*: Replacing the suffix “symb” with “shrimpb” gives some pleasantly jarring shrimp pins: shrimpbolic (symbolic), shrimpbolises (symbolises), shrimpbiosis (symbiosis).
  • Should* → Shoald*: A “shoal” can refer to a large group of fish, or an area of shallow water, or an underwater sand bank. We can use “shoal” be used to make puns like: shoald (should), shoalder (shoulder), shoaldering.
  • Show l* → Shoal: This is a subtle one because it involves a word break. Whenever you use the word “show”, and the following word starts with an “L”, then you can replace “show” with “shoal” (a shoal is a large school of fish). For example: “That’s cool! You should shoal Liam.” and “She laughs when we shoal little blue flowers to her.”.
  • *tual* → *shoal*: As mentioned above, A “shoal” can refer to a large group of fish, or an area of shallow water, or an underwater sand bank. If a word contains “tual” it can often be replaced with “shoal” for a cute little pun: actshoal (actual), actshoality (actuality), intellectshoal (intellectual), ritshoal (ritual), spiritshoal, mutshoally, eventshoal, eventshoally, conceptshoal, conceptshoalise, virtshoal, contractshoal, factshoal, factshoally, perpetshoal, textshoal, contextshoal, perceptshoal, punctshoal, instinctshoal, actshoally, habitshoally.
  • *sole → *shoal: As in “The shoal of my shoe is worn down.” and “Your new gaming conshoal is cool.” and “Yeah, he’s a bit of an asshoal.”
  • Defin* → Dolphin: As in “We dolphinitely need more time to finish the mission.” and “What is the dolphinition of this word?” and “Please dolphine this word.” and “It’s the dolphinitive source of Nordic history.” See the dolphin puns entry for more.
  • Endorphines → Endolphins: As in “I love that rush of endolphins you get after a good hard swimming session.”
  • Con* → Conch*: A terrible shell pun can be made of almost any word that begins with “con”: conchtrol (control), conchsider (consider), conchtinue (continue), conchdition, conchtract, conchern, conchtain, conchference, conchtext, conchcept, conchtrast, conchfidence, conchtent, conchtribution, conchflict, conchsideration, conchstruction, conchtinued, conchclusion, conchduct, conchversation, conchgress, conchsumer, conchcentrate, conchtribute.
  • More → Moray: As in “Mum, we need moray sunscreen!”.
  • Mor* → Moor*: Words that begin with the “more” sound can be turned into a pun on the boat-related word, moor (meaning “to tie a boat to the shore or an anchor”): moore, moorning, moortgage, mooral, moortality, moorale, moortar, moorphine, moorgue, moorphologically.
  • Snap → Snapper: As in “Please snapper my neck if my puns ever get worse than this.”
  • Must → Mast: As in “We mast sail towards that island!” and “We mastn’t get too confident”.
  • Mas* → Mast*: Sometimes a word that begins with “mas” can be made into a boat pun by a replacement of “mas” with “mast”: mastacre (massacre), mastculinity, mastonry, mastochistic, mastquerading, mastage (massage). Obviously we can also make puns when a word starts with “mast”: master, masterpiece, masterminding.
  • Wail → Whale: As in “Poor thing, he’s been whaling over his grandmother who recently passed.” and “A good whale can help one overcome grief”.
  • *cial → *shell: When a word has “cial” as a suffix, this suffix can usually be swapped out for “shell” to create a shell pun: soshell (social), speshell (special), offishell (official), finanshell, commershell, crushell, judishell, artifishell, provinshell, rashell, benefishell, superfishell, fashell, glashell, sacrifishel, antisoshell.
  • Muscle → Mussel: As in “Yeah, she’s so mussely!” and “Mussels are made up of millions of tiny cells”.
  • Go be → Goby: As in “Goby alone for a while – it will help”. A “goby” us a small fish which has a sucker on its underside.
  • Help → Kelp: As in “Can you please kelp me build a sand castle?” and “Katie, kelp your brother lift that please”.
  • Friend → Frond: As in “My fronds made me a cute vegan birthday cake!” and “They’re such frondly people!”.
  • Seizure → Seazure: As in “If I read one more ocean pun I’m going to have a seazure.”
  • Fringe → Frondge: As in “Doesn’t your frondge get in your eyes when you’re swimming?”
  • Palm: As in “The only thing not sunburned are my palms“. The pun is on palm trees in case you missed that.
  • Calm → Palm: As in, “A palming influence,” and “The palm before the storm,” and “Palm down!” and “Cool, palm, collected,” and “Keep palm and carry on.”
  • *bably → *bubbly: As in “I’m probubbly going to stick around for a bit longer” and “It was indescribubbly mysterious” and “All the while he just impertububbly paced along the shore”.
  • Kid* → Squid*: The prefix “kid” can be replaced with “squid” as follows: squidding (kidding), squidnapped (kidnapped), squidney (kidney), squid (kid).
  • ?id* → Squid*: If a word begins with “?id” where ‘?’ represents any letter, then this prefix can sometimes be replaced with “squid”. For example: squiddle (middle), squidlife crisis (midlife crisis), squidget (midget), squiddle (riddle), squidiculous (ridiculous), squideotape (videotape), squiddish (yiddish), squidth (width), squidow (widow), squidget (widget).
  • *pon → *prawn: Words ending in “pon” can be converted to prawn puns by replacing it with “prawn”: weaprawn (weapon), couprawn (coupon), whereuprawn (whereupon), tamprawn (tampon), thereuprawn (thereupon), uprawn (upon), whereuprawn (whereupon).
  • *pear → *peir: As in “Then all of a sudden she dissapiered!” and “After appiering to check his watch, he quickly ran away.” and “That is a sharp speir you’ve got there”.
  • *able → *abubble: Words ending in “able” can be converted to terrible bubble puns by replacing it with “abubble”: reasonabubble (reasonable), availabubble (available), enabubble (enable), comfortabubble (comfortable), valuabubble (valuable), constabubble (constable), acceptabubble, capabubble, inevitabubble, vegetabubble, suitabubble, variabubble, vulnerabubble, profitabubble, acceptabubble, sylabubble, reliabubble, … Many more shameful puns like this can be made with the help a of list like this one.
  • Issue → Fishue: As in “That’s not the fishue here though.” and “I was fishued a sign for parking without a ticket”.
  • Net: “net” has two senses: “net weight” and “net income” is one sense, and “fish net” is the other sense.
  • Place → Plaice: “plaice” is a common North Atlantic flatfish.
  • Clam*: Words that begin with clam can be used as shellfish puns: clamouring, clammy, clamp, clamber, clampdown.
  • Boy → Buoy: As in “It’s a buoy!” and “His buoyfriend is a great person”.
  • Bubbly: “bubbly” has a “this water is bubbly” sense and a “he has a really bubbly personality” sense.
  • Specific → Pacific: As in “You need to be more pacific.” and “Are you sure you have the pacifications for this?” and “Pacifically, there are two apples and three nectarines”.
  • Surgeon → Sturgeon: A “sturgeon” is the name of a large fish – it sounds like “surgeon”, a medical professional.
  • *ways → *waves: Words than end in “ways” can be made into bad wave puns: alwaves (always), railwaves (railways), sidewaves, pathwaves, lengthwaves, doorwaves.
  • Waive → Wave: As in, “Could you wave this parking ticket?” Note: to waive something is to refrain from enforcing.
  • Sway → S-wave: As in, “S-wave with me,” and “You don’t hold any s-wave here.” Note: to hold sway is to have a position of influence or power.
  • Title → Tidal: As in “I like it, but I’m not sure on the tidal” and “Use ‘Ms.’ as her tidal” and “The championship tidal match is tomorrow morning.”
  • Acquaintance → Aquaintance: As in “I don’t know her well, she’s just an aquaintance“.
  • Not → Naut: As in “I’m naut going to keep arguing with you”.
  • Naughty → Nauty: As in “There’s that nauty sailor again”.
  • Tied → Tide: As in “I’m tide up at the moment, can someone else help?” and “Yep, they tide the knot!”
  • Tidy → Tidey: As in “After the party we need to tidey the beach.”
  • Tad → Shad: A “shad” is a common herring-like fish which lives in the sea and breeds in rivers.
  • Sandwich: As in “I was eating my sandwich at the beach”.
  • Sanctuary → Sandctuary: As in “Dogs aren’t allowed on this beach because it’s an animal sandctuary“.
  • Stand → Sand: As in, “Don’t sand so close to me,” and “Do you undersand?” and “Don’t just sand there!” and “I saw her sanding there,” and “My hair was sanding on end,” and “If you can’t sand the heat, get out of the kitchen,” and “It sands to reason,” and “A one night sand,” and “Sand on your own two feet,” and “Sand out from the crowd,” and “Sand up and be counted,” and “Sand up for yourself,” and “A sand up guy,” and “Do I sand a chance?” and “I sand corrected,” and “I’m sanding in for…” and “I can’t sand the sight of,” and “I could do it sanding on my head,” and “United we sand.”
  • Gullible → Seagullible: As in “Kyani is so seagullible!”
  • Puffing → Puffin: A puffin is a seabird found near northern and arctic waters. An example sentence: “He ran along the beach, puffin his chest as he passed the ladies”.
  • Crazy → Cray-sea: As in “He is so craysea!” and “Enough of this crayseaness!”. Hyphen is, of course, optional.
  • Turn → Tern: A “tern” is a sea bird similar to a seagull, but smaller and with a forked tail.
  • Wish → Fish: As in “I just fish we had more time!” and “If you rub the lamp you get three fishes“.
  • Stark → Shark: As in “The shark contrast between his and his boyfriend’s attire was intriguing.” and “The old, shark house stood looming above us”.
  • About/Abode → Aboat: As in “What aboat the captain?” and “Welcome to my aboat!”
  • Jelly: Can be used as a pun on jellyfish and the slang term for jealous (“Oh you’re just jelly.”) and as a pun on the food item.
  • Hell/Haul → Hull: As in “Hull is a fiery place.” and “We’ll need a bigger truck to hull all these goods.”
  • Sooner → Schooner: As in “Schooner or later.” and “I’ll call her schoon“. A “schooner” is a sailing ship with two or more masts.  See the boat puns entry for more.
  • Sel* → Sail*: If a word starts with “sel” a boat pun can often be made by replacing it with “sail”: sailection (selection), sailect (select), sailf (self), sailling (selling), sail (sell), saildom (seldom), sailfish (selfish), sailfless (selfless), sailective (selective).
  • Waded: Along with walking through water, this can mean to “read laboriously through a long piece of writing”, so a water pun could be by using it with this definition: “Wading through your last comment was difficult.” It could also just be used in place of “walk”.
  • Could → Cod: As in “I codn’t understand that.” and “Sorry I cod only stay for a few minutes last night”.
  • Bitch → Beach: As in “Those beaches don’t know me!” and “She says you were being a bit beachy“.
  • Each → Beach: As in “Beach of us have our own towel”.
  • Bae → Bay: As in “Bay! Please stop with the beach puns, you’re embarrassing me.”
  • Combine → Combrine: As in “With our power combrined we should be able to defeat them.” and “It’s what you get when you combrine salt and water”. Similar puns can be made for most words ending in “bine”: turbrine (turbine), concubrine (concubine), columbrine (columbine).

Beach-Related Phrases

Common phrases, idioms and cliches which are related to the beach can be used for some subtle and witty word play. Here is a list of the beach themed phrases that we’ve found so far:

  • Keel over and die
  • To see stars
  • Like a fish out of water
  • Plenty of fish in the sea
  • That shore is (funny/sad/long/etc.)
  • Something fishy about that
  • The coast is clear
  • Bigger fish to fry
  • Surfing the net
  • Happy as a clam
  • One sandwich short of a picnic
  • Channel surfing
  • Devil and the deep blue sea
  • Don’t rock the boat
  • A sea change
  • For everything, there is a season
  • He’s fishing for compliments
  • High-tide / High water mark
  • Hook, line and sinker
  • He/She has one oar out of water
  • Going against the tide
  • Jump the shark
  • Lay there like a beached whale
  • Muddy the water
  • My head is swimming
  • My lips are sealed
  • Paddle your own canoe
  • Back to the salt mine
  • Blood is thicker than water
  • Sealed with a loving kiss
  • She’s not the only fish in the sea
  • Signed, sealed and delivered
  • Sink a shot (through the hoop)
  • Sink or swim
  • To sink your teeth into
  • A fine kettle of fish
  • Butter fingers
  • That argument doesn’t hold water
  • That’s water under the bridge
  • Take it with a grain of salt
  • A picture is worth a thousand words
  • Whatever floats your boat
  • Dead in the water
  • Distance makes the heart grow fronder
  • A whale of a time
  • Keep your head above water
  • Drinks like a fish
  • Drunk as a sailor
  • Drowning your sorrows
  • Feeling blue
  • An albatross around the neck
  • From sea to shining sea
  • As big as a whale
  • In a nutshell
  • Keep at bay
  • Last resort
  • Mexican wave
  • No man is an island
  • Neither fish nor foul
  • Out of the blue
  • Plain sailing
  • Bubble and squeak
  • Queer fish
  • Ripped me off
  • Rising tide
  • Rub salt in the wound
  • Sands of time
  • Burst your bubble
  • Bury your head in the sand
  • A drop in the ocean
  • Stem the tide
  • Surf and turf
  • Take a long walk off a short pier
  • Teeth as white as pearls
  • Clam up and be quiet
  • The net result
  • Throw in the towel
  • Trim one’s sails
  • Walking on sunshine
  • A woman needs a man like a fish needs a bicycle
  • Worth one’s salt

Beach-Related Words

This Punpedia entry certainly isn’t an exhaustive list of all the possible beach puns, so below is a large list of beach themed words which you can use to invent your own puns. Some of the words below are leaning towards ocean-related, rather than precisely beach-related, and some of the items in this list are phrases rather than words. Here they are:

abalone, aboard, albatross, anemone, aquaculture, aquatic, archipelago, ashore, barrel, bathers, bathing, bay, beach ball, beach bum, beached, beach chair, beach goer, beach hut, beach towel, beach umbrella, bubble, frond, beachcomber, beaches, beachfront, beach-side, beachwear, bikini, blowhole, blue, blue sky, board shorts, boardwalk, boat, body board, body surfing, Bondi, brackish, breaker, breaking, buoy, canal, canoe, canoes, cape, Caribbean, cessel, clam, coast, coastal, coastline, coconut, conch, conch shell, coral, cove, crab, crabs, crash, crustacean, current, cuttlefish, deck chair, diver, diving, dog beach, dolphin, driftwood, drown, dune, dune buggy, dunes, erosion, estuaries, estuarine, estuary, fin, fish, fisheries, fishermen, fishnet, fishery, fishing, flip-flips, flip-flop, flipper, float, floater, floating, flounder, foam, foamy, foreshore, goggles, gravel, gulf, gull, harbor, harbour, hawaii, hermit crab, high tide, hot, island, isle, jellyfish, jet ski, jetsam, jetty, kayak, kite surfing, keel, lagoon, life-saver, lifeguard, light house, limestone, lobster, low tide, mangrove, marine, marine biology, maritime, marooned, mollusc, mudflat, mussel, nautical, net, nude beach, nudist, ocean, oceanic, oceanographer, ocean-side, ocean view, offshore, onshore, over-fishing, oyster, pacific, paddle, paddle board, paddling, palm, palm tree, parasailing, pearl, pebble, pelican, picnic, pier, pirate, pontoon, porpoise, powerboat, recreation, reef, resort, rip, rock pool, sail, sailors, saline, salt, salt water, salty, sanctuary, sand, sand bar, sand castle, sand dune, sand flea, sand hopper, sand skipper, sandbank, sandbar, sandles, sand ridge, sandy, scuba, scuba diving, sea, sea anemone, sea bird, sea cucumber, sea gull, sea life, sea spray, sea turtle, seabed, seaborne, sea craft, seafloor, seafood, sea grass, seahorse, seal, seascape, seashell, sea shore, seaside, sea spray, seaward, seawater, seaweed, sediment, shallow, shark, shell, shellfish, shingle, ship, ships, shoal, shore, shoreline, sink, sinking, snorkel, SOS, splash, splashing, starfish, stilt, sting ray, strait, submerge, submerged, sun, sun bathing, sun bake, sunbathers, sunburn, sunglasses, sunny, sunrise, sunscreen, sunset, surf, surfboard, surfers, surfing, swell, sweltering, swim, shark, swimming, swimsuit, tan, tanning, thong, thongs, tidal, tide, tide pool, tidepool, towel, trawler, trawling, treasure, tropical, turquoise, turtle, umbrella, underwater, urchin, vacation, walrus, water, waterfront, water, waters, wave, waves, wet, wet suit, whale, wharf, wreckage, yacht, between the flags, tsunami, real, Bali, white sand, hot sand, windy

Beach Jokes

Jokes of the exceedingly cheesy or one-liner variety usually involve some sort of pun. Here’s a list of beach-themed jokes involving word play. Tap or hover on the black rectangles to reveal the answer.

  • What did one tide-pool say to the other tide-pool? – Show me your mussels!
  • What did the beach say to the wave? – “Long tide, no sea”
  • What washes up on very small beaches? – Microwaves!
  • What did the ocean say to the beach? – Nothing, it just waved
  • Why was the sand wet? – Because the sea weed!
  • What did the shark plead in the murder case? – Not gill-ty
  • Why do sea-gulls fly over the sea? – Because if they flew over the bay they would be bagels!
  • How do oysters call their friends? – On shell phones!
  • What is the strongest creature in the sea?  – A mussel!
  • Why are some fish at the bottom of the ocean? – Because they dropped out of school!
  • Where do crabs go to borrow money? – The prawn broker!
  • Why do fish swim in salt water? – Because pepper makes them sneeze!
  • What gets wetter the more it dries? – A towel!
  • What does a mermaid wear to maths lessons? – An algae-bra!
  • Where do little fish go every morning? – To plaice school!
  • What did the ocean say to the sand? – I mist you!
  • Where do fish sleep? – On a seabed!
  • What did Cinderella wear when she went swimming in the ocean? – Glass flippers!
  • How does the ocean say goodbye? – It waves!
  • What is a cetacean’s favourite TV show? – Whale of fortune!
  • How many tickles does it take to make an octopus laugh? – Tentacles
  • What is the best day to go to the beach? – Sunday!
  • Where does a ship go when it’s sick? – To the dock!
  • Where does a fish go to borrow money? – A loan shark!
  • Which fish is the most famous? – The star fish!
  • Why don’t oysters share their pearls? – Because they’re shellfish!
  • Why are fish so smart? – Because they live in schools!
  • Which part of a fish weighs the most? – The scales!
  • Which fish is the most valuable? – The goldfish!
  • What happens when you throw a green rock into the Red Sea? – It gets wet!
  • What do you get when you cross a fish and an elephant? – Swimming trunks!
  • Why is the sand so quiet? – Because the waves keep going “Shhhh!”

Beach Pun Images

Looking for beach puns in image or meme form? Below is a collection of beach pun pictures that we’ve managed to find. Have you found or made a good one? Post us the link in a comment at the bottom of the page 🙂

Beach Pun Conversations & Battles

Spontaneous pun battles and pun conversations are common on most social media platforms (Reddit and Facebook in particular), and also in SMS conversations and forum threads. Here’s a collection of screenshots of conversations involving beach puns:

Did this Punpedia entry help you?

Whether you were looking for a punny beach caption, a really good beach pun to out-wit your friends in a pun battle or a cute beach pun for your beach shack or pet fish’s name, we really hope this entry in Punpedia has been helpful to you. If you’ve got any suggestions for puns that we’ve missed, Punpedia entries that you want us to write, or just general suggestions for how Punpedia can be improved, please feel free to leave us a comment below! Thanks 🙂