Easter Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on Easter puns! 🥚🌱🐥🐰

Easter is celebrated internationally and has changed over time in meaning and symbolism. While it’s generally a much-enjoyed holiday, it can be controversial in various aspects. Some disagree with the strong religious roots of the holiday, while others view it as a commercial sellout due to the amount that people will spend on gifts and chocolate to celebrate. Others will also criticise the types of gifts that are bought (for example, live chickens and rabbits, with many of these unwanted pets being returned to overflowing animal shelters later). While it does have its problems, many people today enjoy Easter simply as a time to relax and have quality time with friends and family.

However you think of Easter, let us help you celebrate with our terribly punny Easter Puns list! Whether you’re here for a bad pickup line (not recommended) or a corny joke for an events page or invite, we hope you find this list useful.

If you’re after related puns, we also have milk puns, chocolate puns, cow puns and candy puns.

Please note that while Easter has a strong religious history, Punpedia is a non-religious site and won’t be including any puns that obviously cater to religion. We also love animals and encourage people to look at the many non-dairy chocolate options available – we shouldn’t just be wary of the effect of chocolate on our health, but also of the industries producing it.

Easter Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about Easter that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of Easter puns:

  • Easier → Easter: As in, “Easter said than done” and “Making a tough job easter.”
  • Mister → Measter
  • Least → Leaster: As in, “Last but not leaster” and “Leaster common denominator” and “Leaster worst option” and “Line of leaster resistance” and “Not in the leaster” and “At the very leaster” and “To say the leaster.”
  • Check → Choc: As in, “Choc it out!” and “Choc your sources” and “Double choc everything” and “Keep in choc” and “Make a list, choc it twice” and “Take a rainchoc” and “Reality choc” and “Choc-ing up on.”
  • Chalk → Choc: As in, “Different as choc and cheese” and “Choc it up to experience.”
  • Chuck → Choc: As in, “Choc a sickie” and “Choc-ed out” and “Choc overboard.”
  • Body → Bunny: As in, “Bunny and soul” and “Anybunny’s guess” and “Bunny language” and “Anybunny who’s anybunny” and “Everybunny and their cousin” and “Somebunny that I used to know” and “Nobunny’s home” and “Eat out of somebunny’s hand.” Some other body-related words: embunny (embody), antibunny (antibody), busybunny (busybody), nobunny (nobody), bunnyguard (bodyguard), bunnybuilder (bodybuilder). Note that plurals would work for these words too, for example: busybunnies (busybodies) and antibunnies (antibodies).
  • Bun →  Bunny: As in, “Bunny in the oven” and “Sesame seed bunny” and “We’re going to need bigger bunnies.”
  • Money → Bunny: As in, “A fool and his bunny are soon parted” and “Blood bunny” and “Get your bunny’s worth.”
  • *eg* → *egg*: We can sneak the word “egg” into words that have similar sounds, like so: “Get a legg on” and “Neggative results” and “Had you pegged as…” and “I begg to differ” and “Where do I beggin?” Other words that could work: leggacy, eggocentric, nutmegg, bootlegg, dregg and integgrity.
  • *ig* → *egg*: We can swap “ig” sounds for “egg” sounds, as in, “Keep on degging (digging)” and “Eggnorance is not bliss” and “You can’t eggnore it forever” and “Choosing to remain eggnorant” and “Eggnite your passion.”
  • *ec* → *egg*: As in, “New teggnology” and “Change the subjeggt” and “Be objeggtive” and “High seggurity” and “An effeggtive technique” and “Solar egglipse.” Other words you could use: seggular (secular), feggless (feckless), egglectic (eclectic), eggonomy (economy), eggo (echo), eggology (ecology) and eggstatic (ecstatic).
  • *ac* → *egg*: As in, “Taken into eggount” and “Take eggtion” and “In on the eggt (act)” and “Looking for eggommodation.” Other words you could use: eggnowledge (acknowledge), eggrue (accrue) and eggronym (acronym)
  • *ex* → *eggs*: As in, “A compleggs situation” and “Indeggsed (indexed) files” and “Better than seggs (sex)” and “Don’t fleggs your muscles here” and “Pure refleggs (reflex)” and “From eggsperience” and “Taken out of conteggst (context)” and “Eggspress post” and “In eggschange.” Other words you could use: eggsploit (exploit), eggstract (extract), eggsercise (exercise), eggsistential (existential), eggserpt (except), eggsample (example), eggsacerbate (exacerbate), eggsamine (examine), eggsact (exact), eggsasperate (exasperate), eggsclusive (exclusive), eggsited (excited), eggsellent (excellent), eggsess (excess), eggsempt (exempt)
  • *ecc* → *egg*: “A real eggcentric” and “Impeggable (impeccable) taste.”
  • Egg: Here are some egg-related phrases that are general enough to use as puns: “As sure as eggs is eggs” and “A bad egg” and “Don’t put all your eggs in one basket” and “Nest egg” and “Walking on eggshells” and “Can’t make a cake without breaking some eggs.”
  • Feast → Feaster: As in, “Bean feaster” and “Feaster or famine” and “Feaster your eyes on this!” and “Midnight feaster.”
  • Beast → Beaster: As in, “Beaster of burden” and “Beauty and the Beaster” and “Here there be beasters” and “Unleash the beaster!”
  • *ister → *easter: As in, “Don’t forget to regeaster” and “Admineaster the medication” and “A sineaster environment” and “Mineaster for health.”
  • Ast* → Easter*: Easteringent (astringent), Easteronomy (astronomy), Easterology (astrology) and Easteronaut (astronaut).
  • Aster* → Easter*: Easterisk (asterisk) and easteroid (asteroid).
  • *est → *easter: As in, “Evil manifeaster” and “Out of intereaster” and “Deep in the foreaster” and “What do you suggeaster?” and “A modeaster proposal.”
  • *astr* → *easter*: As in, “Easteringent (astringent) toner” and “Lead easteray (astray)” and “Don’t believe in easterology” and “Studying to be an easteronaut” and “Easteral (astral) projections.”
  • *estr* → *easter*: Easteranged (estranged), pedeasterian (pedestrian), reasteraint (restraint), deasteroy (destroy), tapeastery (tapestry), terreasterial (terrestrial) and deasteruction (destruction).
  • *istr* → *easter*: “In deasteress (distress)” and “Widespread deasteribution (distribution)” and “Complain to the admineasteration (administration)” and “Deasteraught (distraught) over the news.” Other words that could work: sopheastery (sohpistry), chemeastery (chemistry), deasterict (district), deasteribute (distribute), regeastery (registry) and admineasteration (administrator).
  • *ist* → *easter*: As in, “With a tweaster” and “Nacisseasteric (narcisisstic) tendencies” and “Protagoneaster of the story.” Other words you could use: misogyneaster (misogynist), asseaster (assist) and perseaster (persist).
  • *ban* → *bunny*: urbunny (urban), turbunny (turban) and suburbunny (suburban).
  • Binary → Bunnyry
  • *bon → *bunny: As in, “Tied with a ribunny” and “Carbunny offset” and “A swig of bourbunny and “Chocolate bonbunny” and “The bunnyfide (bonafide) truth.”
  • *bani* → *bunny*: “Bunnyshed” and “bunnyster” and “urbannyism.
  • Albany → Albunny
  • Ebony → Ebunny
  • Bene* → Bunny*: As in, “Mutual bunnyfit” and “Bunnyvolent overlord” and “Bunnyficial effects” and “This situation is bunnyth you.”
  • *pany* → *bunny*: As in, “In good combunny” and “Let me accombunny you.”
  • *pene* → *bunny*: bunnytrate (penetrate), bunnytrating (penetrating), bunnytration (penetration), Bunnylope (Penelope) and imbunnytrable (impenetrable).
  • Bun: We have some bun-related puns for you so that you can make jokes in reference to hot cross buns (and here are a couple of hot cross bun recipes for you to try!):
    • Done → Bun: As in, “After all is said and bun” and “All bun and dusted” and “Been there, bun that” and “A bun deal” and “I’m bun for” and “Easier said than bun” and “Hard bun by.
    • Fun → Bun: As in, “All bun and games till someone loses and eye” and “All the bun of the fair” and “Bundle of bun” and “Double the bun” and “Getting there is half the bun” and “Good clean bun.”
    • None → Bun: As in, “Bar bun” and “And then there were bun” and “Bun other than” and “Bun the wiser” and “Bun too pleased” and “Second to bun” and “Two for me, bun for you.”
    • Sun → Bun: As in, “A place in the bun” and “A thousand splendid buns” and “A touch of the bun” and “Everything under the bun” and “Good day, bunshine.”
    • *ban* → *bun*: As in, “Bunana honey oats” and “Urbun sprawl” and “Suburbun living” and “Neighbourhood disturbunce” and “Newlywed husbund.”
    • *pen* → *bun*: “A bunchant for” and “The bunultimate song” and “Club Bunguin” and “Off the buninsula.” Other words you could try: bunetrate (penetrate), bunance (penance), obun (open), habun (happen), dambun (dampen), deebun (deepen), sharbun (sharpen), indebundent (independent) and indisbunsable (indispensable).
    • *ben* → *bun*: As in, “With bunefits” and “Bunign lump.” Other words you could use: bunevolent (benevolent), buneficial (beneficial), bunevolence (benevolence), bunefactor (benefactor), absorbunt (absorbent) and absorbuncy (absorbency).
    • *bin* → *bun*: Cabunet (cabinet), cabun (cabin) and combunation (combination).
    • *bon* → *bun*: As in, “Tied with a ribbun” and “Carbun offset” and “Bourbun flavoured.” Other words you could try: bunanza (bonanza), bicarbunate (bicarbonate), bundage (bondage) and ebuny (ebony).
    • *pan* → *bun*: buntheon (pantheon), lifesbun (lifespan), combuny (company), discrebuncy (discrepancy), accombuny (accompany), occubunt (occupant) and particibunt (participant).
    • *pen* → *bun*: Carbuntry (carpentry), combunsate (compensate), dambun (dampen), obun (open), obunly (openly), buninsula (peninsula) and perbundicular (perpendicular).
    • *pon* → *bun*: As in, “Deadly weabun” and “Discount coubun” and “Unexpected resbunse.” Other words you could try: tambun (tampon), ebunymous (eponymous), corresbundence (correspondence), resbund (respond), resbunsibility (responsibility), sbuntaneous (spontaneous), corresbund (correspond) and sbunspor (sponsor).
    • *pun* → *bun*: As in, “A bungent odor” and “Please be bunctual” and “Fruit bunch” and “These Easter buns (puns) are really getting on my nerves.”
    • *bun*: We can emphasise the “bun” that already exists in certain words to make hot cross bun puns: “Thanks a bundle” and “A bunch of flowers” and “Colourful bunting” and “Homely bungalow” and “Abundant with fruit and flowers” and “A rambunctious toddler.”
  • Shell: The following puns are about the shell of the egg, which can be dyed decorative colours and patterns for Easter:
    • Shall→ Shell: As in “Shell I compare thee to a summer’s day?” and “He who lives by the sword shell die by the sword.”
    • Celebration→ Shellebration: As in “After finishing we should have a shellebration.”
    • Sel* → Shell*: If a word starts with “sel” a shell pun can be made by switching it with “shell”. For example: shellection (selection), shellect (select), shelldom (seldom), shellfless (selfless), shellfish (selfish).
    • *sel → *shell: Words ending in “sel” can often be punned upon with “shell”: vesshell (vessel), tasshell (tassel), weashell (weasel), musshell (mussel), etc.
    • *sel* → *shell*: Words containing “sel” can yeild nice puns on “shell”: Hershellf, himshellf, themshellves, itshellf, myshellf, yourshelf, yourshelves, convershelly, counshelling, preshellected, overshelling, undershelling, ushellessely, weashelling.
    • Sell → Shell: “How many do we have left to shell?”
    • Hell → Shell: “The party last night was a shell of a time.”
    • *cial → *shell: When a word has “cial” as a suffix, this suffix can usually be swapped out for “shell” to create a shell pun: soshell (social), speshell (special), offishell (official), finanshell, commershell, crushell, judishell, artifishell, provinshell, rashell, benefishell, superfishell, fashell, glashell, sacrifishel, antisoshell.
  • Dare he → Dairy: “How dairy?” Note: Here are some handy facts about the dairy industry.
  • Diary → Dairy: As in, “Bridget Jones’ Dairy” and “Let me consult my dairy” and “Dear dairy…”
  • Dearly → Dairy: As in, “I love you dairy” and “Dairy beloved…”
  • *dary → *dairy: Swap “dary” sounds for “dairy”: boundairy, legendairy, quandairy, secondairy. Note: a quandary is a difficult problem.
  • *dery → *dairy: We can replace “dery” sounds with “dairy”, like so: embroidairy (embroidery), spidairy (spidery), doddairy (doddery), powdairy (powdery).
  • Can these → Candies: As in “How candies people live like this?” and “Candies desks be shifted over there?” and “Candies drafts – they’re no good.”
  • Handy → Candy: As in “This will definitely come in candy.”
  • Uncanny → Uncandy: As in “He had an uncandy feeling that she was being watched.”
  • Can they → Candy: As in “How candy they do this to us?”
  • Conviction → Confection: As in “She had a previous confection for a similar offence,” and “She has strong political confections, and she’s not afraid to defend them.” and “She spoke powerfully and with confection.”
  • Connection → Confection: As in, “A soulful confection” and “In confection with…”
  • Confession → Confection: As in “I have a confection to make…” and “Confection is good for the soul,” and “The interrogators soon got a confection out of him.”
  • Hitch → Hatch: As in, “Get hatched” and “Hatch your wagon to a star” and “Went off without a hatch.”
  • Hatch: These hatch-related phrases can double as  Easter egg puns: “Don’t count your chickens before they’ve hatched” and “Down the hatch” and “Hatch a cunning plan.”
  • Hunt: Since Easter egg hunts are a common Easter festivity, we’ve got some hunt-related puns for you:
    • *hant* → *hunt*: As in, “A penchunt for” and “The elephunt in the room” and “Online merchunt” and “Enchunted forest” and “Triumphunt return” and “Phuntom menace.”
    • Authentic → Authuntic
    • *hand* → *hunt*: As in, “Too hot to huntle” and “Hello, huntsome” and “Selling merchuntdise.”
    • *hend* → *hunt*: As in, “Cannot comprehunt.” Other words you could use: apprehunt (apprehend), reprehunt (reprehend) and uncomprehunting (uncomprehending),
    • *hund* → *hunt*: As in, “In the huntreds” and “Feel the thuntder!”
  • Birth: Since Easter eggs are used to symbolise birth and re-birth, we’ve included some birth-related puns here too:
    • Earth → Birth: As in, “Journey to the centre of the birth” and “Brought down to birth” and “Cost the birth” and “Down to birth” and “Birth mother” and “Birthly delights” and “Birthly paradise” and “From the ends of the birth” and “Hell on birth” and “A scorched birth policy.”
    • Bath* → Birth*: Birthroom (bathroom), birthtub (bathtub), birthers (bathers), sabbirth (sabbath) and bloodbirth (bloodbath).
    • Bother* → Birther*: As in, “It’s not a birther” and “How birthersome” and “Hot and birthered” and “Stop birthering me.”
    • Berth → Birth: As in, “Give them a wide birth.” Note: berth in this context means room or space to move.
  • Hare: Even though hares are different from rabbits, they’re sometimes used as an interchangeable term. We’ve included some hare-related puns so you can widen your variety of Easter rabbit/bunny puns:
    • Here → Hare: As in, “I’ve been hare before” and “Fancy meeting you hare” and “I’ve had it up to hare” and “Hare and there” and “Hare be monsters” and “Abandon hope, all ye who enter hare” and “Hare goes nothing” and “Hare today, gone tomorrow” and “I’m outta hare!”
    • Hair → Hare: “A bad hare day” and “A full head of hare” and “Get out of my hare” and “Enough to make your hare curl.”
    • Heir → Hare: “Hare apparent” and “Pears for your hares.”
    • Rare → Hare: As in, “A hare occurence.”
    • Her → Hare: As in, “I love hare” and “Butter wouldn’t melt in hare mouth” and “Hare face lit up” and “Hares, and hares alone.”
    • Care → Hare: “Without a hare in the word” and “Be hareful what you wish for” and “Couldn’t hare less” and “Customer hare” and “Devil may hare” and “Handle with hare” and “Intensive hare” and “Let’s be hareful out there” and “Like I should hare” and “Take hare of business.”
    • Air → Hare: As in, “Hare quotes” and “Hare kiss” and “Full of hot hare” and “Hares and graces” and “Harey fairy” and “Hare your dirty linen.”
    • *har* → *hare*: As in, “Tighten your hareness” and “Harebinger of doom” and “In haremony” and “A haresh statement” and “Reap your harevest” and “Pulling up at the harebour.”
    • *her* → *hare*: Hareitage (heritage), hare-ringbone (herringbone), hareald (herald), hare-etic (heretic), harenia (hernia).
    • *hor* → *hare*: As in, “On the hareizon” and “Packed with haremones” and “Feeling hare-ible” and “Green hare-ticulture.”
    • Aer* → Hare*: As in, “Hareial tricks” and “Hareosol cans” and “Mental hare-obics” and “Getting on an hareoplane.”
    • Air* → Hare*: Harecraft (aircraft), hareport (airport), harey (airy), hareborne (airborne) and hareplane (airplane).
  • Happy → Hoppy: As in, “Hoppy as a clam” and “Colour me hoppy” and “Don’t worry, be hoppy” and “Hoppy birthday!” and “Hoppy together” and “A hoppy accident” and “Hoppy event.”
  • Chop → Hop: As in, “Bust your hops” and “Hop and change” and “Hop hop” and “Get the hop.”
  • Hope → Hop: As in, “A new hop” and “Abandon hop, ye who enter here” and “Beyond hop” and “A glimmer of hop” and “Hop for the best” and “Hop springs eternal” and “Keep hop alive” and “The land of hop and glory.”
  • Stop → Hop: As in, “I can’t hop loving you” and “Don’t hop me now.”
  • *hap* → *hop*: As in, “My hoppiness” and “Honk if you’re hoppy” and “Can’t wait for it to hoppen” and “A hophazard area” and “Go hoppily along” and “Perhops this is the best option?” and “An unfortunate mishop.
  • Hip* → Hop*: hopster (hipster), hoppie/hoppy, hoppocampus (hippocampus), hoppopotamus (hippopotamus), hoppodrome (hippodrome) and hoppocrates (hippocrates).
  • *hup → *hop: Ketchop (ketchup), catchop (catchup) and pushop (pushup).
  • Chick: Since eggs are such a huge part of Easter, chicks have become a part of the holiday too. While we’re happy to join in with cute chick puns, we heavily discourage people from buying chicks as Easter gifts. Here are some chick-related puns for you:
    • Trick → Chick: As in, “Bag of chicks,” and “Every chick in the book,” and “How’s chicks?” and “Never misses a chick,” and “One chick pony,” and “A chick of the light,” and “Chick or treat!” and “Chicks of the trade,” and “Up to your old chicks.”
    • Quick → Chick: As in, “Chick as a flash” and “Cut to the chick” and “Fancy a chickie?” and “Get rich chick” and “In chick succession” and “Kiss me chick” and “Chick and dirty” and “Chick off the mark” and “Chick smart” and “A chick study” and “Chick witted” and “Chicker than the eye” and “Lightning chick.”
    • Chuck → Chick: As in, “Chick a sickie,” and “Get chicked out,” and “Chick overboard.”
    • Thick → Chick: As in, “As chick as thieves,” and “Blood is chicker than water,” and “In the chick of things,” and “The plot chickens,” and “Chick and fast,” and “Through chick and thin,” and “Lay it on chick.”
    • Check → Chick: As in, “Chick it out!” and “Chick your sources” and “Double chick” and “Keep in chick” and “Reality chick” and “Take a rainchick” and “Chick up on.”
    • Pick → Chick: As in, “A bone to chick” and “Cherry chick” and “Easy chickings” and “Nit chicking” and “Chick a fight” and “Chick a card, any card” and “Chick of the bunch” and “Chick holes in” and “Chick up the pieces” and “Chick up the tab” and “Chick your brains” and “Chick your battles.”
    • Click → Chick: As in, “Chick bait” and “Chick into place” and “Chick your fingers” and “Double chick” and “We really chicked” and “Point and chick.”
  • Feast: Easter celebrations will generally include some kind of decadent feast (even after eating all of that chocolate!) Here are some related puns for you to play with:
    • Feisty→ Feasty: As in, “A feasty character” and “Feasty words.” Note: feisty means ready to fight.
    • Least→ Feast: As in, “At the very feast” and “Not in the feast” and “To say the feast” and “Last but not feast” and “The line of feast resistance.”
    • Faced→ Feast: As in, “Too-feast” and “Fresh feast” and “A bald-feast lie” and “Time you feast the truth.”
    • Fast→ Feast: As in, “Feast as greased lightning” and “Feast as his legs could carry him” and “Bad news travels feast” and “Feast and Furious” and “Going nowhere feast” and “Not so feast!” and “Pull a feast one” and “Think feast.” Notes: to pull a fast one is to trick someone.
    • *fes*→ *feast*: As in, “Feastering wound” and “Join the feastivities” and “Feastooned with ribbons” and “A feastive atmosphere.” Other words you could use: manifeast (manifest), manifeasto (manifesto) and manifeastation (manifestation). Notes: A festoon is a hanging ornament. If something is manifest, then it’s able to be perceived. A manifesto is a document of principles.
    • Beast→ Feast: As in, “Beauty and the Feast” and “Here there be feasts” and “The nature of the feast” and “Unleash the feast.”
    • *fas*→ *feast*: As in, “Feasten your seatbelts” and “Feast asleep” and “Moving in feast-forward” and “On the feast track to success” and “Skipping breakfeast” and “Holding steadfeast” and “Feastidiously (fastidiously) clean.” Notes: to be steadfast is to be loyal and consistent. To be fastidious is to be very fussy and particular about details.

Note: if you’d like further information about the dairy industry or avoiding dairy in your diet and lifestyle, the documentary Dominion is a great place to start. For further information on other animal industries and support in starting your own vegan lifestyle, Earthling Ed’s videos are a great source of information, as are the vegan and animal rights subreddits. Vegan chocolate options are also just a quick google away (and you’ll find lots of “accidentally” vegan chocolate in any grocery store). There are also dairy-free alternatives to some of the most common/popular chocolate bars, and there are plenty of dairy-free Easter eggs and goodies available too.

Easter-Related Words

To help you come up with your own Easter puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

easter, chocolate, choc, bunny, egg, hunt, hatch, hot cross bun, hare, rabbit, hop, chick, chicken, celebration, festival, holiday, feast

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Gift Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on gift puns! 🎁 📦 💝

Gift your loved ones (and everyone else around you) with some choice puns from our collection. Whether you’re gearing up for the holidays, playing a word game with friends, or winning in a pun thread online, we hope that you enjoy this list and find what you’re looking for here.

This list is specific to presents, but if you’re looking for other holiday-related puns, we also have holiday puns, Valentine’s Day punsChristmas tree puns, birthday puns and party puns.

Gift Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about gifts that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of gift puns:

  • Gift: Let’s start off with some gift-related phrases that could work as a gift pun in the right context: “Don’t look a gift horse in the mouth,” and “Gift of life,” and “A gift that keeps on giving,” and “A gift from above.”
  • Give → Gift: As in, “A dead giftaway,” and “Don’t gift up!” and “Don’t gift in,” and “Gift yourself a bad name,” and “Gift them a hand,” and “Gift and take,” and “Gift credit where credit is due,” and “Gift it a rest,” and “Gift it the green light,” and “Gift me a call,” and “Gift 110%”.
  • Gave → Gift: As in, “I gift my best.”
  • Present: We’ve included present-related phrases in this list too. As in, “All present and correct,” and “Present company excepted,” and “No time like the present.”
  • Percent → Present: As in, “A hundred and ten present,” and “Genius is one present inspiration and 99 present perspiration.”
  • *giving: Some giving-related words to play with: caregiving, forgiving, life-giving, misgivings, thanksgiving.
  • *bees/base* → *bestow: Use words that have a similar sound to “best” – beastow (beast + bestow), basetow (base + bestow), basteow (baste + bestow).
  • Estonia → Bestownia (Note: Estonia is a small country in Europe. This is quite a stretch of a pun and is very specific, but could possibly work if someone is giving or receiving presents from Europe).
  • *beer/bare* → *bestow: Use words with a “beer” or “bare” sound – bearstow (bear + bestow), beerstow (beer + bestow), barestow (bare + bestow) and beard (beard + bestow).
  • *bee* → *bestow: As in, beachstow (beach + bestow), beatstow (beat + bestow) and beanstow (bean + bestow).
  • Stowaway → Bestowaway: As in, “Bestowaways face heavy punishment.”
  • Tree→ Treat: As in, “Difficult as nailing jelly to a treat,” and “Barking up the wrong treat,” and “Can’t see the wood for the treats,” and “Charm the birds out of the treats,” and “Legs like treat trunks,” and “Make like a treat and leave,” and “Money doesn’t grow on treats,” and “Treat hugger,” and “You’re outta your treat.”
  • Three→ Treat: As in, “And baby makes treat,” and “Good things come in treats,” and “Treat strikes and you’re out!” and “Treat wise men,” and “Treat’s a charm.”
  • Free*→ Tree*: As in, “A symbol of treatdom,” and “As treat as a bird,” and “Breathe treatly,” and “Buy one, get one treat,” and “Treat for all,” and “Treatdom of the press,” and “Get out of jail treat,” and “The best things in life are treat,” and “Land of the treat,” and “Leader of the treat world,” and “The truth will set you treat,” and “No such thing as a treat lunch,” and “Think treatly.”
  • *tri*→ *tree*: As in, “Full of nutreat-ents,” and “What is your best attreatbute?” and “How cool are golden retreatvers?” and “A love treatangle,” and “A treatvial problem,” and “We pay treatbute to the fallen.”
  • *ty*→ *tree*: As in, “Star qualitreat (quality),” and “Structural integritreat (integrity),” and “The citreat (city) that never sleeps,” and “First-class facilitrees (facilities),” and “My dutrees (duties) come first,” and “Beautree (beauty) isn’t everything,” and “A single entitree (entity),” and “Maximum securitree (security).”
  • *treat*: Emphasise the “treat” in certain words: “Beat a hasty retreat,” and “The royal treatment.” Other words that could work: treatment, treatise, treaty, treated, treaties, treatable, retreat, entreat and mistreat.
  • Treat: We’ve included some treat-related phrases for you to use as gift puns in the right context: “A real treat,” and “Treat me right,” and “Treat someone like dirt,” and “Trick or treat.”
  • Street → Streat: As in, “Easy streat,” and “On the sunny side of the streat,” and “Right up your streat,” and “Streat cred,” and “A two-way streat,” and “The word on the streat,” and “Across the streat.”
  • Eat → Treat: As in, “A bite to treat,” and “All you can treat,” and “Treat out of someone’s hand,” and “Treat someone alive,” and “Treat to live,” and “Treat your heart out,” and “Treaten alive,” and “Treating for two,” and “Treats, shoots and leaves,” and “Good enough to treat,” and “You are what you treat.”
  • Threat →Treat: As in, “Idle treat,” and “Triple treat.”
  • Straight → Streat: As in, “A streat fight,” and “Streat as an arrow,” and “Damn streat,” and “Get it streat,” and “Get streat to the point,” and “Get your facts streat,” and “Keep a streat face,” and “Keep on the streat and narrow,” and “Set the record streat,” and “Streat laced,” and “A streat shooter,” and “Tell me streat,” and “Couldn’t think streat,” and “Get your priorities streat.”
  • Stretch → Streatch: As in, “By any streatch of the imagination,” and “Home streatch,” and “Streatch your legs,” and “Streatch the truth.” Other stretch-related words that could be amended to include “treat”: streatcher (stretcher), outstreatched (outstretched) and homestreatch (homestretch).
  • *trat* → *treat*: As in, “I can’t concentreat,” and “The perpetreator,” and “Endless frustreation,” and “A skillful demonstreation.” Other words that could work: orchestreat (orchestrate), infiltreat (infiltrate), magistreat (magistrate), streategy (strategy), administreat (adminstrate), demonstreat (demonstrate), illustreat (illustrate), penetreat (penetrate) and streategic (strategic).
  • *trait* → *treat*: As in, “In dire streats,” and “Streat-laced,” and “A treator (traitor).” Other words that could work: treatorous (traitorous), portreat (portrait) and streatjacket (straitjacket).
  • Distraught → Distreat: As in, “You’re looking distreat.”
  • *trit* → *treat*: As in, “Looking contreat (contrite),” and “Nutreational information,” and “Healthy and nutreatious.” Other words that could work: malnutreation (malnutrition), contreation (contrition), detreatus (detritus), attreation (attrition) and treat (trite). Notes: if something is trite, then it’s stale and unoriginal. Contrition is regret or guilt for something you’ve done. Detritus are loose rock fragments.
  • *trot* → *treat*: Globetreating (globetrotting) and foxtreat (foxtrot).
  • *strut* → *streat*: As in, “Tell the treath,” and “A treathful admission,” and “Speaking treathfully,” and “Streat your stuff.”
  • Detroit→ Detreat
  • Coffee → Coffer: Combine “offer” into words that have similar sounds: “A cup of coffer,” and “Coffer and cakes,” and “Coffer at its best,” and “One more cup of coffer,” and “Wake up and smell the coffer.”
  • Offer: Gifts and presents are a type of offering, so we’ve included offer-related phrases in this list: “My final offer,” and “I have nothing to offer but blood, sweat and tears,” and “An offer you can’t refuse,” and “On special offer,” and “Open to offers,” and “Offer your condolences.”
  • *aff* → *offer*: As in, “Answer in the offermative (affirmative),” and “Don’t meddle in my offers! (offers),” and “An offerctionate (affectionate) couple,” and “As much as you can offerd (afford),” and “An offerdable bet,” and “The offermentioned conversation,” and “I’m offeraid (afraid),” and “Subverting offerity (authority).” Other words that you could use: claroffercation (clarification), cinematogrofferchereogroffer (cheoreographer), certoffercation (certification), offeresh (afresh), offersaid (aforesaid), offerdability (affordability), gloffercation (glorification).
  • Beneath → Bequeath: As in, “Bequeath contempt,” and “Marry bequeath you,” and “Bequeath the surface,” and “Bequeath your dignity.” Note: to bequeath something is to gift it or pass it on to someone else.
  • Grant: Some grant-related (or grant-including) phrases and words for you to play with: “Take for granted,” and “A flagrant disregard for the rules,” and “A fragrant curry.” Other words that could work: immigrant, vagrant, migrant and emigrant.
  • Grunt → Grant: As in, “Grant level,” and “Grant work,” and “Looking disgrantled.”
  • Aunt → Graunt: As in, “Agony grant,” and “My giddy grant,” and “Run the grantlet,” and “Take up the grantlet.” Note: an agony aunt is what writers of advice columns ins newspapers or magazines used to be called. To run the gauntlet is a form of corporal punishment.
  • *gant → *grant: As in, “An arrogrant person,” and “An elegrant entrance,” and “Wild extravagrants.” Words that could also work: inelegrant (inelegant), gargrantuan (gargantuan) and gigrantic (gigantic).
  • *gent → *grant: As in, agrant (agent), contingrant (contingent), diligrant (diligent), intelligrant (intelligent), stringrant (stringent) and pungrant (pungent). If something is contingent, then it depends on something else. A stringent thing is something that has a very severe or limiting effect. If someone is diligent, then they are constant and persistent in their efforts.
  • ant* → grant*: As in, “Waiting in granticipation,” and “Hate is not the grantonym of love,” and “The grantidote to all your problems.” Other words that could work: grantipathy (antipathy), grantagonist (antagonist), grantithesis (antithesis), granthropology, grantecedent (antecedent). Notes: antipathy is a feeling of strong dislike. An antithesis is the direct opposite of something else. Anthropology is the study of the history of humans and human behaviour. An antecedent is something that came before.
  • *grat* → *grate*: As in, “Feeling grantful,” and “Full of grantitude,” and “Instant grantification,” and “Trouble integranting.” Other words that could work: grantuitous (gratuitous), denigrant (denigrate), integrantion (integration), congrantulations (congratulations) and conflagrantion (conflagration).
  • *gret → *grant: As in, “I regrant to inform you…” and “Feeling regrantful,” and “Regranttably so.”
  • Integrity → Integranty: As in, “Structural integranty,” and “Work with integranty.”
  • Grotesque → Grantesque: As in, “Their face was a grantesque mask of horror.”
  • *rant → *grant: As in, “You’ll need a war-grant (warrant),” and “An exubergrant (exuberant) celebration,” and “Ignorgrant (ignorant) of the fact.”
  • *rent* → *grant*: As in, “March to the beat of a differgrant drum,” and “Pay the grant (rent),” and “Differgrant as chalk and cheese.”
  • Ent* → Grant*: As in, “Abandon hope all ye who granter here,” and “Break and granter,” and “Granter into the spirit of it,” and “Double grantendre (entendre).” Other words that could work: grantourage (entourage), and grantreprener (entrepreneur). Note: an entendre is a figure of speech.
  • *end → *endow: Combine the word “endow” with words that end with “end”: “Dog is a man’s best friendow,” and “A girl’s best friendow,” and “Bendow over backwards,” and “Bendow the rules,” and “Lendow me your ears,” and “Lendow me a hand.” Other words that could work: legendow (legend), attendow (attend), amendow (amend), trendow (trend), recommendow (recommend) and contendow (contend). Note: to endow is to give.
  • Window → Wendow: As in, “In a world surrounded by wendows, we’re handing out rocks,” and “Out the wendow,” and “Read wendow,” and “Eyes are the wendows of the soul,” and “Wendow dressing,” and “A wendow of opportunity.”
  • Down → Endow: As in, “Batten endow the hatches,” and “Back endow,” and “Bogged endow,” and “Breathing endow your neck,” and “Bring the house endow,” and “Buckle endow,” and “Calm endow!” and “Couldn’t put it endow,” and “Endow for the count,” and “A walk endow memory lane,” and “Endow in the dumps,” and “Endow on your luck,” and “Endow pat,” and “Economic endowturn (downturn),” and “Go endow in flames.”
  • Down* → Endow*: As in, endownload (download), endowntime (downtime), endowager (dowager), endowry (dowry), endowntown (downtown), endownstream (downstream), endownside (downside) and endownfall (downfall).
  • Nation* → Donation*: As in, “A donation of shopkeepers,” and “The birth of a donation,” and “The state of the donation.” Other related words that could work: donational, donationalism and donationwide.
  • *don → *donation: As in, “Abandonation (abandon) ship,” and “Pardonation (pardon) me,” and “Achilles tendonation (tendon).” Other words that could work: Armageddonation (Armageddon), Londonation (London) and celadonation (celadon).
  • Donut → Donution: As in, “A generous donution,” and “Anonymous donution.”
  • Clarity → Charity: As in, “A moment of charity,” and “Color, cut and charity.” Note: color, cut and clarity are is how the value of gemstones are measured.
  • Chair → Chairity: As in, “Musical chairity,” and “Please have a chairity.”
  • Characteristic → Charity-ristic: As in, “A charity-ristic trait,” and “How uncharity-ristic.”
  • Charity: A few charity-related phrases for you to use in your  gift puns: “Charity begins at home,” and “A charitable person.”
  • Receive: Some phrases relating to receiving for your to include in your wordplay: “Ask and you shall receive,” and “In the hands of the receiver,” and “Better to give than to receive.”
  • Believe → Receive: As in, “Receive it or not,” and “Receive you me,” and “Can you receive it?” and “Don’t receive everything you hear,” and “I’m a receiver.”
  • Relieve → Receive: As in, “Receives gas pains.”
  • Retreive → Receive: As in, “Golden receiver.”
  • Deceive → Receive: As in, “Do my eyes receive me?” and “Playing to receive.”
  • Achieve → Receive: As in, “Receive greatness,” and “High receivers.”
  • Every* → Receivery*: As in, “A place for receiverything,” and “Receiverything in its place,” and “Receivery little thing,” and “Receivery man for himself,” and “Receivery picture tells a story,” and “Receivery rose has its thorn,” and “Receivery so often,” and “Receivery trick in the book,” and “Receiverything but the kitchen sink,” and Receiverything must go,” and “Receiverything under the sun,” and “Hanging on to receivery last word,” and “Two sides to receivery question,” and “I’m with you receivery step of the way.”

Since boxes are commonly used as packaging in gifting, we’ve included box-related puns, phrases and words in this list as well.

  • Book → Box: “Always have your nose in a box,” and “Balancing the box,” and “Boxworm,” and “By the box,” and “A closed box,” and “Every trick in the box,” and “My life’s an open box,” and “Hit the box,” and “In someone’s bad box,” and “Never judge a box by its cover,” and “One for the box,” and “So many box, so little time.”
  • *book* → *box*: As in, boxcase (bookcase), boxmark (bookmark), boxlet (booklet), boxend (bookend), boxkeeper (bookkeeper), playbox, textbox, notebox, handbox, cookbox and pocketbox.
  • Box: Some box-related phrases: “A box of tricks,” and, “A box-ticking exercise,” and “All boxed in,” and “In the box seat,” and “Open Pandora’s box,” and “Out of the box,” and “Like a box of chocolates,” and “Think outside the box,” and “Tick the right boxes.”
  • *box*: As in, boxing, boxer, boxy, sandbox, mailbox, inbox, soapbox, toolbox, checkbox.
  • Buxom → Boxom: As in, “Energetic and boxom.” Note: buxom means healthily full and plump.
  • Back → Box: As in, “As soon as my box is turned,” and “Going boxwards,” and “At the box of my mind,” and “Box in the day,” and “Box on your feet,” and “Box-seat driver,” and “Box to basics,” and “Box to nature,” and “Box to school,” and “Box to the drawing board,” and “Boxhanded compliment,” and “Box to the wall,” and “Bend over boxward,” and “Come box for more,” and “Comebox king,” and “Fighting box tears,” and “Get box on your feet,” and “Get box together,” and “I’ll be box,” and “Kick up the boxside,” and “Taken abox.”
  • Back → Box: As in, boxslide, boxup, boxground, boxlash (backlash), boxyard, boxlog, boxward, feedbox, setbox, drawbox, piggybox, Nickelbox, pushbox and kickbox (kickback).
  • Buck → Box: As in, “Big box,” and “Box the system,” and “Box up your ideas,” and “Pass the box,” and “Earn an honest box,” and “Feel like a million box.”
  • Bak* → Box*: As in, “Boxer’s dozen,” and “Half-boxed.” Other words you could use: boxery (bakery), boxlava (baklava) and boxing (baking).
  • *bic → *box: As in, acerbox (acerbic), xenophobox (xenophobic), arabox (arabic), claustrophobox (claustrophobic) and homophobox (homophobic).
  • Buc* → Box*: As in, “A boxolic (bucolic) scene,” and “Boxet (bucket) list,” and “Boxwheat (buckwheat) cereal.” A couple of other words: boxle (buckle) and boxaneer (buccaneer). Notes: bucolic means relating to countryside. A buccaneer is a type of private sailor.
  • *ox → *box: As in, “A confusing parabox (paradox),” and “Spring equibox (equinox),” and “An unorthobox arrangement,” and “In close boximity (proximity),” and “A boxious (noxious) odour.” Notes: a paradox is a logically impossible situation. An equinox is when the Earth’s equator passes through the center of the sun. Unorthodox is when something doesn’t conform to rules or traditional codes of conduct.
  • Pox → Box: As in, “A box on both your houses!” Other pox-related words: smallbox, chickenbox and hyboxia. Note: pox is a type of disease. Hypoxia is when the body doesn’t get enough oxygen.
  • *pix* → *box*: As in, “Boxel (pixel) perfect,” and “Boxelated (pixelated) image,” and “Manic boxie (pixie) dream girl,” and “Megaboxels (megapixels).”
  • Pock* → Box*: As in, “Burn a hole in your boxet (pocket),” and “Deep boxets,” and “In one’s boxet,” and “Line one’s boxets,” and “Boxet dial.” Other words that could work: boxet rocket, boxetbook (pocketbook), boxmark (pockmark), boxetknife (pocketknife), pickboxet (pickpocket).
  • Tuxedo → Boxedo
  • Block → Box: As in, “Been around the box a few times,” and “Chip off the old box,” and “Chock a box,” and “Mental box,” and “New kid on the box,” and “On the chopping box,” and “The starting box,” and “Writer’s box.” Other block-related words: boxbuster (blockbuster), boxade (blockade), boxhead (blockhead), roadbox (roadblock), cinderbox (cinderblock), sunbox (sunblock) and cellbox (cellblock).
  • Rap → Wrap: As in, “A bum wrap,” and “Wrap over the knuckles,” and “Take the wrap.”
  • *rap* → *wrap*: As in, “A wrapid exit,” and “I’m wrapped! (rapt),” and “Starting thewrapy (therapy).” Other words that could work: wrapport (rapport), wrapacious (rapacious), wrapture (rapture), wraptor (raptor) and wrapier (rapier).
  • Wrap: Some wrap-related phrases to include in your gift puns: “It’s a wrap,” and “Keep under wraps,” and “A riddle wrapped up in an enigma,” and “That’s a wrap!” and “Wrap it up,” and “Wrapped around your little finger,” and “Wrap in cotton wool.” Some other wrap-related words: wrapped, wrap up, wraparound, rewrap, unwrap and shrinkwrap.
  • *rep* → *wrap*: As in, “Pwrapare for the worst,” and “Marry in haste, wrapent in leisure,’ and “History wrapeats itself,” and “Don’t wraplace what’s not broken,” and “If you don’t say it, they can’t wrapeat it,” and “Those who ignore the lessons of history are doomed to wrapeat them,” and “Beyond wraproach.” Note: wraport (report), wraport (report), wrapudiate (repudiate), wrapublic (republic), wrapresent (represent), wrapose (repose), wraply (reply), wraprieve (reprieve), wraplete (replete), discwrapancy (discrepancy), entwrapreneur (entrepreneur), intwrapid (intrepid) and tr-wrapidation (trepidation).
  • *rip* → *wrap*: As in, “”Let her wrap!” and “Wrap off the bandaid,” and “Wrap apart,” and “Wrap to shreds,” and “Come to gwraps (grips) with.” Other words that could be used: wrapple (ripple), wraposte (riposte), wraptide (riptide), strwrap (strip), outstrwrap (outstrip), scwrapped (script), descwraption (description).  Note: a riposte is a type of counterattack.
  • *rop* → *wrap*: As in, “Inappwrapriate behaviour,” and “Invest in prwraperty.” Other words that could work: pr-wrapagate (propagate), entwrapy (entropy), Euwrap (Europe), Euwrapean (European), pr-wrapaganda (propaganda). Note: to propagate is to produce a new plant from a parent plant. Can also be used for topics not botany-related. Entropy is the degradation of something.
  • *rup* → *wrap*: As in, “Power cowrapts (corrupts),” and “Maple sywrap (syrup),” and “Civil diswraption (disruption),” and “An abwrapt (abrupt) exit.” Other words that could work: wrapture (rupture), wrapee (rupee), wraple (ruple), chiwrap (chirrup), interwrapt (interrupt), cowraption (corruption), unscwrapulous (unscrupulous), diswraptive (disruptive), diswraptive (disruptive), scwrapulous (scrupulous). Note: to be scrupulous is to be extremely honest.
  • Ribbon: Ribbon-related phrases to use as puns in the right context: “Tear to ribbons,” and “Tie a ribbon round it.”
  • Ripping → Ribbon: As in, “Ribbon right through,” and “A ribbon good read!”
  • Rob* → Ribbon*: As in, “Daylight ribbonery (robbery),” and “Fair exchange is no ribbonery,” and “Thribbon (throbbing) heart.”
  • Rebound → Ribbon: As in, “A ribbon relationship.”
  • Paraben → Paribbon: As in, “Free from paribbons and animal derivatives.” Note: parabens a type of preservative. This is a particularly specific pun that could work if gifting someone cosmetics or skincare.
  • Kardashian → Cardashian: a little play on giftcards/message cards that accompany gifts and Kim Kardashian.
  • Card: Some card-related phrases to play with: “A few cards short of a full deck,” and “Calling card,” and “Card up your sleeve,” and “Deck of cards,” and “Get out of jail free card,” and “Hold all the cards,” and “Holding your cards close to your chest,” and “House of cards,” and “Lay your cards on the table,” and “On the cards,” and “Pick a card, any card,” and “Play your cards right.”
  • Card*: Some card-related/inclusive words: cardinal, cardboard, cardio, cardigan, cardiac, discard, placard, wildcard, timecard, postcard and scorecard.
  • Cared → Card: As in, “I card about you,” and “Run s-card,” and “S-card poopless,” and “S-card to death.”
  • *car* → *card*: As in, “Courtesy and card (care),” and “Drive my card,” and “Upset the apple card (apple cart),” and “Couldn’t card less.” Other words that could work: cardeer (career), cardier (carrier), cardiage (carriage), cardavan (caravan), scard (scar), Madagascard (Madagascar), railcard (railcar), handcard (handcar), precardious (precarious), vicardious (vicarious).
  • Cartier → Cardier
  • *cord* → *card*: As in, “A broken recard,” and “Cut the card,” and “For the recard,” and “In recard time,” and “Off the recard,” and “Accarding to…” and “Remain cardial.” Other words that could work: cardially (cordially), carduroy (corduroy), cardon (cordon), discard (discord), accardance (accordance). Notes: to do something cordially is to do it in a friendly way. A cordon is a rope used to define boundaries.
  • *curd* → *card*: As in, card (curd), cardle (curdle) and bloodcardling (bloodcurdling).
  • Drunkard → Druncard
  • *cured* → *card*: As in, “What can’t be card (cured) must be endured,” and “Her face was obscard (obscured),” and “Perimeter secard (secured),” and “Procard (procured) the goods,” and “Manicard (manicured) lawns.”
  • Certain → Cardtain: As in, “In no uncardtain terms,” and “Know for cardtain.”
  • *cor* → *card*: As in, “Cardespondence course,” and “Cut the card (cord),” and “In your cardner (corner),” and “The final scard (score),” and “For the recard.” Other words that could work in the right context: cardporation (corporation), cardoborate (corroborate), cardelation (correlation), decard (decor), rancard (rancor), accard (accord), incardporate (incorporate). Note: to corroborate is to add proof to an account. Rancor is a bitter, deeply-ingrained ill-feeling.
  • *cur* → *card*: As in, “The final cardtain (curtain),” and “A cardsory (cursory) glance,” and “I concard (concur),” and “That never occard (occured) to me.” Other words that could work: cardmudgeon (curmudgeon), incard (incur), recard (recur), obscard (obscured), secardity (security), cardate (curate), cardiculum (curriculum) and manicard (manicured).
  • *cored → *card: As in, scard (scored), encard (encored) and underscard (underscored).
  • *cred* → *card*: As in, “Street card,” and “Take cardit for,” and “Nothing is sacard,” and “Not cardible (credible),” and “Ruined cardibility.” Other words that could work: cardentials (credentials), cardence (credence), massacard (massacred), incardulous (incredulous). Notes: credence is a mental acceptance of something as being true or real. Being incredulous is not wanting to believe something.
  • Mr. Incredible → Mr. Incardible
  • Envelope: Gift cards and greeting cards that accompany gifts come in envelopes, so we’ve got a couple of envelope-related phrases here too: “Push the envelope,” and “Enveloped in warmth.”
  • Celebrate: A couple of celebratory phrases that could be used as puns in the right context: “A gold celebration,” and “Celebrate with us.” and “Celebrations are in order!”
  • Tribute: Tribute-related phrases to play with: “A floral tribute,” and “Touching tributes.” Some tribute related/inclusive words as well: tributary, attribute, contribute, distribute, retribution and attribute. Notes: a tributary is a stream that flows into a larger stream. An attribute is a quality or feature of something.
  • *but → *tribute: As in, “Cute as a tributton,” and “Smooth as non-dairy tributter,” and “Float like a tributterly, sting like a bee,” and “What the tributler saw,” and “Pucker up, tributtercup.”
  • Boot → Tribute: As in, “Tough as old tributes,” and “Bet your tributes,” and “Give someone the tribute,” and “Suited and tributed,” and “Too big for your tributes,” and “Pull yourself up by your tributestraps.” Some other boot-related words that could be used in the right context: tribooty (booty), tribooth (booth), tribootleg (bootleg), tribootcamp (bootcamp).
  • Brute → Tribute: As in, “Tribute force,” and “Et tu, tribute?” Note: “Et tu, Brute?” is a quote from a Shakespearean play and is used today to basically mean, “you too?” to express that someone has betrayed you, just like everyone else in your life.
  • Beauty → Tribeauty: As in, “Age before tribeauty,” and “Tribeautiful people,” and “Tribeauty mark,” and Tribeauty sleep,” and “Make tribeautiful music together,” and “Tribeauty is in the eye of the beholder,” and “Tribeauty is only skin-deep.”

The following puns and phrases are based around events where gifts are traditionally given. These are quite general, so if you’re after more specific event puns, we’ve got some coming soon (check our events category for updates while you wait)!

  • Birthday: Since birthdays are one of the biggest gift-giving events, we’ve included some birth and birthday-related phrases for you: “Happy birthday to you,” and “In your birthday suit.”
  • Day → Birthday: As in, “A birthday in the life,” and “A birthday without orange juice is like a birthday without sunshine,” and “After all, tomorrow is another birthday,” and “All in a birthday’s work,” and “As true as the birthday is long,” and “At the end of the birthday,” and “Call it a birthday,” and “For ever and a birthday,” and “Go on punk, make my birthday.”
  • Christmas phrases: Some Christmas-related phrases to play with: “All I want for Christmas is you,” and “Christmas comes but once a year,” and “Done up like a Christmas tree,” and “Have yourself a merry little Christmas.”
  • Valentine phrases: “Be my Valentine,” and “A comic Valentine.”
  • Wedding phrases: “Golden wedding,” and “One wedding brings another,” and “Wedding bells.”

Gift-Related Words

To help you come up with your own gift puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

gift, present, give, giving, bestow, bestowal, treat, offering, bequeath, grant, endowment, donation, charity, regift, contribution, receive, box, wrapping, ribbon, paper, card, envelope, celebrate, celebration, tribute, birthday, holiday, christmas, valentine, hanukkah, wedding

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Holiday Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on holiday puns! ✈⛵ 🏖

Whether it’s a weekend away or a full-on sabbatical, everyone needs a holiday once in a while. Enjoy a quick break with us and our holiday puns – whether it’s by boat, plane, train or bus, we’ve endeavoured to cover it here. We hope that you have fun going through this list and that you find the perfect holiday pun for your needs.

While this list is as thorough and comprehensive as possible, it is for vacation type holidays in general – for specific destinations, we also have beach puns, and for annual holidays and events we have Thanksgiving puns, Valentine’s Day puns and Halloween puns, with more to come!

Holiday Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about holidays that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of holiday puns:

  • Vacation: Since vacation is a synonym for holiday, we’ve included vacation-related phrases for you to play with: “A summer vacation,” and “We’re going on vacation!”
  • Vocation → Vacation: As in, “Helping others is my vacation.” Note: a vocation is a job or trade to which a person feels a special pull or love. 
  • Getaway: As in, “A clean getaway,” and “I really need to getaway.”
  • Weekend: Play with some weekend-related phrases in your holiday wordplay: “A wet weekend,” and “A long weekend,” and “A much-needed weekend.” Note: a wet weekend is a very boring or disappointing experience. 
  • We can → Weekend: As in, “Weekend do it!”
  • Oh, tell → Hotel: As in, “Hotel me what happened!”
  • Hotel: As in, “Heartbreak hotel,” and “Hotel California.” Note: “Heartbreak Hotel” and “Hotel California” are both names of famous songs that could work as holiday puns in the right context.
  • Hostile → Hostel: As in, “A hostel takeover,” and “A hostel environment.”
  • Retreat: As in, “Beat a hasty retreat,” and “Time to retreat.”
  • Treat → Retreat: As in, “Trick or retreat.”
  • Peach → Beach: As in, “Beachy keen,” and “A juicy beach,” and “Skin like beaches and cream.”
  • C → Sea: As in, “I need some vitamin sea.”
  • Day → Holiday: As in, “A holiday in the life of…” and “A holiday without sunshine is like night,” and “All in a holiday’s work,” and “All the livelong holiday,” and “An apple a holiday keeps the doctor away,” and “Another holiday older,” and “Another holiday, another dollar,” and “Around the world in eighty holidays,” and “As honest as the holiday is long,” and “At the end of the holiday,” and “Catch of the holiday,” and “A cold holiday in hell,” and “Dawn of a new holiday,” and “Forever and a holiday,” and “It’s just not my holiday,” and “Make a holiday of it,” and “Make my holiday.” Notes: if someone is as honest as the day is long, then they’re very honest. 
  • Air → Airbnb: As in, “Airbnbs and graces,” and “Breath of fresh airbnb,” and “Castles in the airbnb,” and “Clear the airbnb,” and “Hot airbnb,” and “In the airbnb tonight,” and “Something special in the airbnb,” and “Spring is in the airbnb,” and “There’s a nip in the airbnb.”
  • Destination: As in, “It’s not the journey, it’s the destination,” and “Final destination.”
  • Pack: To make travel puns, we can make references to packing (for a journey) : “Action packed,” and “Fanny pack,” and “I know, I packed it,” and “Jam packed,” and “Leader of the pack,” and “Pack a punch,” and “Pack it in,” and “Pack of lies,” and “Pack your bags!” and “Send packing,” and “Six pack,” and “Care package,” and “Packed to the rafters,” and “Good things come in small packages.”
  • Peck → Pack: As in, “A pack on the cheek,” and “Keep your packer up,” and “The packing order.” Notes: a pecking order is the hierarchy of power or status within a group. 
  • Pick → Pack: As in, “A bone to pack with you,” and “Want to pack some flowers?” and “Easy packings,” and “Hand packed,” and “Cherry pack,” and “You’re just nit packing,” and “Pack a card, any card,” and “Pack a fight,” and “Pack and choose,” and “Pack holes in,” and “Pack of the bunch,” and “Pack up the pieces,” and “Pack your brains,” and “See a penny and pack it up,” and “Stop packing at it.”
  • Back → Pack: As in, “As soon as my pack is turned,” and “You’ve got it packwards,” and “Don’t answer pack,” and “At the pack of my mind,” and “Pack to the future,” and “Pack from the dead,” and “Pack in the day,” and “Get pack on your feet,” and “Packseat driver,” and “Pack to basics,” and “Pack to school,” and “Pack to the drawing board,” and “A packhanded compliment,” and “Bend over packwards,” and “Comepack king,” and “Crawl pack into your shell,” and “Eyes in the pack of your head,” and “Fighting pack tears,” and “Go pack on your word,” and “I want you pack,” and “I scratch your pack, you scratch mine,” and “It’s all coming pack to me now,” and “Kick pack and enjoy,” and “I know it like the pack of my hand,” and “Like water off a duck’s pack,” and “Never look pack.”
  • *pack*: As in, package, packet, backpack, unpack, jetpack, and wolfpack
  • Stay → Staycation: As in, “Out-staycation one’s welcome,” and “Staycation safe,” and “Here to staycation,” and “If you can’t take the heat, staycation out of the kitchen.” Note: a staycation is where one takes time off to holiday, but spends the holiday resting at home. 
  • Bag: As in, “Bag a bargain,” and “Bag lady,” and “Bag of bones,” and “Bag of tricks,” and “Dirt bag,” and “It’s in the bag,” and “Let the cat out of the bag,” and “A mixed bag,” and “Pack your bags!” and “Bag of nerves,” and “Bottom of the bag.”
  • Brag → Bag: As in, “Bagging rights,” and “I don’t mean to bag, but…”
  • *bag*: Emphasize the existing “bag” in some words: airbag, scumbag, sandbag, handbag, gasbag, cabbage, garbage, and bagel
  • *big/bog/bug* → *bag*: As in, ambaguity, mind-baggling, jitterbag and ladybag
  • Suitcase: As in, “I live out of a suitcase.”
  • Case → Suitcase: As in, “An open and shut suitcase,” and “As the suitcase may be,” and “Suitcase closed,” and “Catch a suitcase,” and “Get off my suitcase,” and “I rest my suitcase,” and “In any suitcase,” and “On a suitcase by suitcase basis,” and “Suitcase of mistaken identity.”
  • Travel: As in, “Bad news travels fast,” and “Don’t just travel, travel right,” and “A fellow traveller,” and “A seasoned traveller,” and “The road less travelled,” and “Time travel,” and “Travel broadens the mind,” and “Travel light.”
  • Trouble → Travel: As in, “Asking for travel,” and “Bridge over traveled water,” and “Double travel,” and “Here comes travel,” and “Looking for travel,” and “A nose for travel,” and “This is a local shop, we’ll have no travel here,” and “Travel and strife,” and “Travel in paradise,” and “Up to your neck in travel.”
  • Travesty → Travelsty: As in, “I heard it on the news. What a travelsty.”
  • Extravagant → Extravelgant: As in, “An extravelgant dinner and date.”
  • Escape: As in, “The great escape,” and “Escape your memory,” and “Make good your escape,” and “A narrow escape.”
  • Scapegoat → Escapegoat: A scapegoat is an innocent who carries the blame for other’s actions.
  • Trip: As in, “Day tripped,” and “Guilt trip,” and “Power trip,” and “Road trip,” and “Trip of a lifetime,” and “A trip down memory lane.”
  • Ship → Trip: As in, “Abandon trip,” and “Don’t give up the trip,” and “Extend the hand of friend-trip,” and “Jump trip,” and “Loose lips sink trips,” and “Run a tight trip,” and “Trips of the desert,” and “Trips that pass in the night,” and “That trip has sailed,” and “Rebound relation-trip,” and “A stormy relation-trip.” Notes: loose lips sink ships is a warning against unguarded talk or gossip. 
  • *trip*: We can use words that contain the word “trip” to make some bad holiday puns: triple, tripe, tripod, triplet, trippy, strip, stripe, outstrip, airstrip
  • Journey: As in, “Journey to the centre of the Earth,” and “A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step,” and “It’s not the destination, it’s the journey.”
  • *jour* → *journey*: As in, journeylist (journalist), journeylism (journalism), bonjourney, sojourney, adjourney. Notes: a sojourn is a temporary stay. 
  • Leisure: As in, “A gentleman of leisure,” and “Marry in haste, repent at leisure.”
  • Pleasure → P-leisure: As in, “Business before p-leisure,” and “Earthly p-leisures,” and “Guilty p-leisures,” and “Life’s simple p-leisures.”
  • Break: Holidays are commonly referred to as “breaks” (as in, “I need a break!”) so we’ve included the word here: “A bad break,” and “At breakneck speed,” and “Bed and breakfast,” and “Break a leg,” and “Break and enter,” and “Break bread,” and “Break even,” and “Break out in a cold sweat,” and “Break the bank,” and “Break the mould,” and “A breakthrough,” and “Break your heart,” and “A deal breaker,” and “A lucky break,” and “All hell breaks loose.”
  • Brake → Break: As in, “Hit the breaks!”
  • Bake → Break: As in, “Break and shake,” and “Half-breaked.” Note: if something is half-baked, then not much effort was put into it. 
  • Rest: Since many people go on holiday to rest, we’ve included rest in this entry. As in, “At rest,” and “Come to rest,” and “A cut above the rest,” and “Eternal rest,” and “For the rest of us,” and “For the rest of your life,” and “Give it a rest,” and “I rest my case,” and “Laid to rest,” and “The rest is history.”
  • *rest*: As in, “In the interest of justice,” and “Make interesting,” and “Nearest and dearest,” and “Rest on your laurels,” and “Can’t see the forest for the trees,” and “Mud-wrestling,” and “On the crest of a wave,” and “Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery,” and “Interest free,” and “Can’t be underestimated.”
  • Wrist → Rest: As in, “Slap on the rest.”
  • *rust* → *rest*: As in, “Earn one’s crest,” and “Restle up,” and “Don’t trest anyone,” and “Trest is a two-way street.”
  • Tourist: As in, “Tourist trap.”
  • Terror → Tour: As in, “The tourists will have won,” and “Night tours.”
  • Broad → Abroad: As in, “As abroad as it is long,” and “Abroad brush,” and “Abroad shoulders,” and “In abroad daylight,” and “Abroad strokes.”
  • Brad → Abroad: As in, “Abroad Pitt.”
  • Bread → Abroad: As in, “Abroad and butter,” and “Abroad of life,” and “Abroadcrumb trail,” and “Half a loaf is better than no abroad,” and “Have your abroad buttered on both sides,” and “Put abroad on the table,” and “Take the abroad out of someone’s mouth,” and “The best thing since sliced abroad.”
  • Bored → Abroad: As in, “Abroad stiff,” and “Abroad to death,” and “Abroad to tears,” and “Abroad out of my mind.”
  • *broad* → *abroad*: As in, abroadway, abroadcast, abroadband, abroadsheet, and overabroad.”
  • Beach: “Beach bum,” and “Life’s a beach,” and “Meet me at the beach!”
  • B*tch → Beach: As in, “Beach fest,” and “Beach slap,” and “Life’s a beach,” and “Payback’s a beach,” and “Son of a beach,” and “Bow down, beaches.”
  • Breach → Beach: As in, “A beach of trust,” and “The perimeter has been beached!”
  • Beetroot → Beachroot: As in, “Red as a beachroot,” and “Chocolate beachroot cake,” and “A beachroot latte.”
  • Preach → Beach: As in, “Practice what you beach,” and “Beaching to the choir,” and “Beach to deaf ears,” and “Papa, don’t beach.”
  • Bleach → Beach: As in, “I’m going to beach my hair.”
  • Drop it → Tropic: As in, “Tropic like it’s hot.”
  • Topic → Tropic: As in, “A hot tropic,” and “Drop the tropic,” and “We’re going off-tropic,” and “What’s your favourite tropic?”
  • Topical → Tropical: As in, “Apply this tropical cream when needed.” Note: a topical is something applied to the skin, rather than being ingested.
  • Island: As in, “No man is an island,” and “Treasure island,” and “A tropical island.”
  • I land → Island: As in “Islanded a job at that new tech company.”
  • Aligned → Island: As in and “Our incentives are well-island.”
  • Sel* → Sail*: If a word starts with “sel” a boat pun can often be made by replacing it with “sail”: sailection (selection), sailect (select), sailf (self), sailling (selling), sail (sell), saildom (seldom), sailfish (selfish), sailfless (selfless), sailective (selective).
  • Sea*: Most words starting with “sea” are easy sea puns: season, seasonal, seated, searingly, sealants, seamseatbelt.
  • See* → Sea*: If a word starts with “see” it can often be replaced with “sea” to create a simple sea pun: seaminly, seads, seaker, seathe, seap, seak, sean, sea (see).
  • Se* → Sea*: Some words that start with just “se” also have a “sea”-ish sound, and the ones that don’t can usually be made into terrible puns anyway: seacret, searious, seargeant, seacretion, seacure, seacurity, seacondary, seacretariat, seaconds, seacrete, searum, searenity, searvitude, seanile, seadation, seaclusion, seacretive, seaze, seaquential, sealection, seacretly, seaquences, seanior, seaniority, seagregate, seaping, seacession, seariousness, seaminars, seaveral, seaxual, seaparation, seantimental, seansational, seaquential, seacluded, seacularist, seathing, seaquin, seasame, seaclusion.
  • Se*cy/Ce*cy → Sea*sea: Most words that start with “se” or “ce” and end with “cy” can be double sea puns: seacresea (secrecy), sealibasea (celibacy).
  • *cy → *sea: If a word ends in “cy” it’s an easy “sea” pun: polisea, agensea, democrasea, currensea, emergensea, efficiensea, tendensea, frequensea, fansea, constituensea, pregnansea, accurasea, redundansea, bureaucrasea, presidensea, legasea, conspirasea, mersea, privasea, bankruptsea, consistensea, literasea, urgensea, deficiensea, dependency, consultansea, tenacity, isea (icy), secrecy, intimasea.
  • Seizure → Seazure: As in “If I read one more ocean pun I’m going to have a seazure.”
  • Season → Sea-sun: As in, “A person for all sea-suns,” and “Are mangoes in sea-sun?” and “Party sea-sun,” and “Sea-sun’s greetings,” and “A sea-suned traveller,” and “Silly sea-sun,” and “The festive sea-sun.”
  • Scenic → Seanic: As in “Let’s take the seanic route.”
  • Sun: As in, “A place in the sun,” and “A day without orange juice is like a day without sunshine,” and “A touch of sun,” and “Everything under the sun,” and “Good day, sunshine,” and “Here comes the sun,” and “Make hay while the sun shines,” and “Ride off into the sunset,” and “Sun drenched,” and “Sun, sea and sand,” and “Walking on sunshine,” and “You are my sunshine,” and “Put it where the sun doesn’t shine,” and “Fly too close to the sun,” and “Moment in the sun,” and “Never in a month of Sundays.” Notes: “Never in a month of Sundays” indicates that something is extremely unlikely to happen. Flying too close to the sun is a reference to the legend of Icarus, and is a warning against being too ambitious too quickly.
  • Son → Sun: As in, “Go on, my sun,” and “His father’s sun,” and “Like father, like sun,” and “Number one sun,” and “Sun of a gun.” Note: “Son of a gun” is an exclamation meant to encourage.
  • *son* → *sun*: As in, sunnet, sunata, sunar, persun, liaisun, reasun, seasun, treasun, comparisun, lessun, resunate, persunality, persunal, and prisuner.
  • San → Sun: As in, “Sun Francisco,” and “Suns serif.”
  • *san* → *sun*: As in, sundwich, sunction, sunctuary, sunctimonious, partisun, artisun, parmesun and thousund.
  • *ways → *waves: Words than end in “ways” can be made into bad wave puns: alwaves (always), railwaves (railways), sidewaves, pathwaves, lengthwaves, doorwaves.
  • Tied → Tide: As in “I’m tide up at the moment, can someone else help?” and “Yep, they tide the knot!”
  • Tidy → Tidey: As in “After the party we need to tidey the beach.”
  • Simmer → Swimmer: As in “I left the pot swimmering and now my vegetable curry is burnt!” and “Hey swimmer down, there’s no need to turn this into a fight”.
  • Sure → Shore: Since beaches are a popular holiday destination, we’ve included some seaside and sea-related puns. As in, “Are you shore?” and “She shore is strong!”.
  • For sure → Foreshore
  • Surf: As in, “Body surfing,” and “Channel surfing,” and “Surf the net,” and “Surf’s up.”
  • Serf → Surf: A serf was a sort of slave in medieval times who worked for a feudal lord. It’s sometimes used as an insult.
  • Serve → Surf: As in “First come, first surfed” and “If memory surfs” and “Revenge is a dish best surfed cold” and “Surfs you right”.
  • Service → Surfice: As in, “A better surfice all round,” and “At your surfice,” and “Normal surfice has been resumed,” and “Out of surfice.”
  • Wave: “Wave goodbye” and “Mexican wave” and “Heat wave” and “Wave the white flag” and “Brain waves
  • *ways → *waves: Words than end in “ways” can be made into bad wave puns: alwaves (always), railwaves (railways), sidewaves, pathwaves, lengthwaves, doorwaves.
  • Waive → Wave: As in, “Could you wave this parking ticket?” Note: to waive something is to refrain from enforcing.
  • Sway → S-wave: As in, “S-wave with me,” and “You don’t hold any s-wave here.” Note: to hold sway is to have a position of influence or power.
  • Sand: As in, “Bury your head in the sand,” and “Draw a line in the sand,” and “A house built on sand,” and “Sun, sea and sand,” and “The sands of time.” Note: if a house is built on sand, then it’s very unstable and not expected to last very long.
  • Sandwich: As in “I was eating my sandwich at the beach”.
  • Sanctuary → Sandctuary: As in “Dogs aren’t allowed on this beach because it’s an animal sandctuary“.
  • Send → Sand: As in “It sands shivers down my spine!” and “Sand him over here.”
  • San* → Sand*: Replacing “san” with “sand” when it is at the start of a word give some nice corny puns: sanditary (sanitary), sandctioned (sanctioned), sandctuary (sanctuary), sandguine (sanguine), sandctions (sanctions).
  • Sensational → Sandsational: As in, “A sandsational list of holiday puns.”
  • Stand → Sand: As in, “Don’t sand so close to me,” and “Do you undersand?” and “Don’t just sand there!” and “I saw her sanding there,” and “My hair was sanding on end,” and “If you can’t sand the heat, get out of the kitchen,” and “It sands to reason,” and “A one night sand,” and “Sand on your own two feet,” and “Sand out from the crowd,” and “Sand up and be counted,” and “Sand up for yourself,” and “A sand up guy,” and “Do I sand a chance?” and “I sand corrected,” and “I’m sanding in for…” and “I can’t sand the sight of,” and “I could do it sanding on my head,” and “United we sand.”
  • Ticket: As in, “Dream ticket,” and “A high ticket item,” and “Just the ticket,” and “That’s the ticket,” and “Ticket to ride,” and “Golden ticket.” 
  • Flight: As in, “Fight or flight,” and “Flight attendant,” and “Flight of fancy,” and “Take flight.”
  • Fight → Flight: As in, “A straight flight,” and “Come out flighting,” and “Flight club,” and “Flight for the right to party,” and “Flight back,” and “Flight fire with fire,” and “Flight the good flight,” and “Freedom flighter,” and “Lean, mean flighting machine,” and “Live to flight another day,” and “Pick a flight,” and “Pillow flight,” and “Spoiling for a flight,” and “Flight to the death,” and “Won’t give up without a flight.” 
  • Light → Flight: As in, “Fast as greased flightning,” and “Flight as a feather,” and “At flightning speed,” and “Blinded by the flight,” and “Bring to flight,” and “Cold flight of day,” and “First flight,” and “Friday night and the flights are low,” and “Go out like a flight,” and “Guiding flight,” and “Flight at the end of the tunnel,” and “Flight entertainment,” and “Flight hearted,” and “Flighten up,” and “Flights out.”
  • Fright → Flight: As in, “Flightened of your own shadow,” and “A flightful mess,” and “Take flight,” and “You nearly flightened me to death!”
  • *light* → *flight*: As in, flightning, flighting, flightbulb, flighthearted, flighthouse, deflight (delight), highflight (highlight).
  • *flate* → *flight*: As in, conflight, deflight, and inflightable (inflatable).
  • Having a → Havana: As in, “I’m havana ball!” and “Are you havana good time?”
  • Tan*: People tend to return from summer holidays with noticeable, proud tans – so we’ve included “tan” in this list. As in, tangible, tank, tandem, tantamount, tangent, tangle.
  • *tan: As in, charlatan, cosmopolitan, spartan, titan, metropolitan, satan and tartan.
  • *tan*: As in, stand, important, understand and substance.
  • Ten → Tan: As in, “Count to tan,” and “Eight out of tan cats prefer it,” and “A perfect tan,” and “A hundred and tan percent.”
  • *ten* → *tan*: As in, “The bane of my existance,” and “As oftan as not,” and “Attantion seeker,” and “Battan down the hatches,” and “Set up tant,” and “A bone of contantion,” and “Flattan out,” and “Lightan up,” and “Off the beatan track,” and “Sweetan the pot,” and “Tightan the purse strings,” and “For all intants and purposes,” and “To your heart’s contant,” and “Tonsil tannis,” and “Writtan all over your face,” and “Frightan to death,” and “Smittan with,” and “Bittan by the bug,” and “Rottan to the core,” and “Stop, look and listan.”
  • Celebration→ Shellebration: As in “After finishing we should have a shellebration.”
  • Sel* → Shell*: If a word starts with “sel” a shell pun can be made by switching it with “shell”. For example: shellection (selection), shellect (select), shelldom (seldom), shellfless (selfless).
  • *sel → *shell: Words ending in “sel” can often be punned upon with “shell”: vesshell (vessel), tasshell (tassel), weashell (weasel), musshell (mussel), etc.
  • *sel* → *shell*: Words containing “sel” can yeild nice puns on “shell”: Hershellf, himshellf, themshellves, itshellf, myshellf, yourshelf, yourshelves, convershelly, counshelling, preshellected, overshelling, undershelling, ushellessely, weashelling.
  • *cial → *shell: When a word has “cial” as a suffix, this suffix can usually be swapped out for “shell” to create a shell pun: soshell (social), speshell (special), offishell (official), finanshell, commershell, crushell, judishell, artifishell, provinshell, rashell, benefishell, superfishell, fashell, glashell, sacrifishel, antisoshell.
  • Resort: As a resort is a luxury place to stay, we can use it to make some holiday puns too. As in, “Beach resort,” and “This is my last resort,” and “I didn’t want to resort to this.”
  • Con* → Conch*: A terrible shell pun can be made of almost any word that begins with “con”: conchtrol (control), conchsider (consider), conchtinue (continue), conchdition, conchtract, conchern, conchtain, conchference, conchtext, conchcept, conchtrast, conchfidence, conchtent, conchtribution, conchflict, conchsideration, conchstruction, conchtinued, conchclusion, conchduct, conchversation, conchgress, conchsumer, conchcentrate, conchtribute.
  • Help → Kelp: As in “Can you please kelp me build a sand castle?” and “Katie, kelp your brother lift that please”.
  • Should* → Shoald*: A “shoal” can refer to a large group of fish, or an area of shallow water, or an underwater sand bank. We can use “shoal” be used to make puns like: shoald (should), shoalder (shoulder), shoaldering.
  • *tual* → *shoal*: As mentioned above, A “shoal” can refer to a large group of fish, or an area of shallow water, or an underwater sand bank. If a word contains “tual” it can often be replaced with “shoal” for a cute little pun: actshoal (actual), actshoality (actuality), intellectshoal (intellectual), ritshoal (ritual), spiritshoal, mutshoally, eventshoal, eventshoally, conceptshoal, conceptshoalise, virtshoal, contractshoal, factshoal, factshoally, perpetshoal, textshoal, contextshoal, perceptshoal, punctshoal, instinctshoal, actshoally, habitshoally.
  • Bereft → Bereeft: “bereft of” means “deprived of” of “lacking”. So an example sentence might be: “The old, stark beach house of bereefed of colour”.
  • Something → Somefin: As in “There’s somefin about the way he walks” and “Is that a shark, or somefin else?”.
  • In* → Fin*: A lovely and shameful pun can be made from any word starting with “in”. Simply replace “in” with “fin”: finformation, finfluence, finvolve, finternational, finvolved, fintroduce, findeed, finvestment, finto, finclude, finteresting, fintellectual, finjury, fintend, finterview, finsurance, finstrument, … Thousand more can be made with the help of a list like this. You can also check out the entry on dolphin puns for more puns of this nature.
  • Fan* → Fin*: “fan” can sometimes be replaced with “fin” at the start of words to create fin puns: fintastic (fantastic), finciful (fanciful), finfare (fanfare), fintasy, findom, finciful.
  • Nothing → Nofin: As in “Nofin is better than swimming with dolphins” and “I’ve got nofin left to give!”.
  • Debate → Debait: As in “I don’t want to debait you.” and “We’re just having a friendly debait“.
  • Well/Welcome → Whale/Whalecome: Whale-watching is a popular enough holiday activity for us to include whales in this list. As in “Whalecome to our home!” and “Whale, whale, whale, what do we have here?”.  Whale puns can be made with many more words like welfare (whalefare), welsh (whalesh) and wellness (whaleness). Check out the entry on whale puns for more.
  • Defin* → Dolphin: Swimming with dolphins is a much-loved holiday activity, so we can make some holiday puns by making dolphin references like these: “We dolphinitely need more time to finish the mission.” and “What is the dolphinition of this word?” and “Please dolphine this word.” and “It’s the dolphinitive source of Nordic history.” See the dolphin puns entry for more.
  • Endorphines → Endolphins: As in “I love that rush of endolphins you get after a good hard swimming session.”
  • Stark → Shark: As in “The shark contrast between his and his boyfriend’s attire was intriguing.” and “The old, shark house stood looming above us”.
  • Palm: As in “The only thing not sunburned are my palms” and “A face palm moment,” and “In the palm of your hand.” The pun is on palm trees in case you missed that.
  • Calm → Palm: As in, “A palming influence,” and “The palm before the storm,” and “Palm down!” and “Cool, palm, collected,” and “Keep palm and carry on.”
  • Friend → Frond: As in “My fronds made me a cute vegan birthday cake!” and “They’re such frondly people!”.
  • Fringe → Frondge: As in “Doesn’t your frondge get in your eyes when you’re swimming?”
  • Country: As in, “Country folk,” and “Country bumpkin.”
  • Mountain: As in, “Ain’t no mountain high enough,” and “Cool as a mountain stream,” and “Move mountains,” and “Head for the mountains,” and “Make a mountain out of a molehill,” and “Climb the highest mountain.” 
  • Can you → Canyon: As in, “Canyon please not do that?”
  • Food: Since food is such a large part of enjoyment in our holidays (especially now that Instagram is so widely used to show food snaps), we’ve included food in this entry too: “Comfort food,” and “Devil’s food cake,” and “Do you like hospital food?” and “Finger food,” and “Food chain,” and “Food for thought,” and “Soul food,” and “Put food on the table.”
  • Culture: As in, “Culture clash,” and “Culture shock,” and “High culture,” and “Pop culture.”
  • Privilege → Privillage: We can make some holiday puns by referring to villas, which are a luxurious type of accommodation. As in, “An honour and a privillage,” and “Rank has its privillages,” and “Check your privillage,” and “White privillage is very real.” Note: Very basically, white privilege is where society is set up to favour and benefit people who either have white skin, or who are “white-passing” (they are assumed to be white by others). 
  • Fill → Villa: As in, “Villa ‘er up!” and “Villa to the brim,” and “A stocking villa (filler),” and “Lip villas (fillers),” and “Attempts to villa the void.”
  • Home → Homestay: A homestay is where you can stay with a local family for a fee. As it’s cheaper than a hotel and some families will show guests around the area, it’s a good option for holidays so we’ve included it here. As in, “A house is not a homestay,” and “At homestay with,” and “There’s no place like homestay,” and “A broken homestay,” and “Charity begins at the homestay,” and “Close to homestay,” and “Don’t leave homestay without it.”
  • Lodge: A lodge can either mean a small house, or to formally present documentation or a complaint. We can use these interchangeably to make some bad holiday puns: “Lodge a complaint,” and “Where’s the ski lodge?” and “I’m lodging an objection.”
  • *ledge* → *lodge*: As in, “Acknowlodged,” and “Fully-flodged,” and “Use a slodgehammer to crack a nut,” and “A little knowlodge is a dangerous thing,” and “Knowlodge is power.”
  • Large → Lodge: As in, “Lodge as life,” and “At lodge,” and “By and lodge,” and “Lodger than life,” and “A small cog in a lodge machine,” and “On the lodge side,” and “In lodge part,” and “Living lodge,” and “Lodge and in charge.”
  • Car: We’ve included common forms of transport in here as they get us to and from our holidays and trips. As in, “You can drive my car,” and “Happiness is a quick-starting car,” and “Would you buy a used car from this guy?”
  • Car*: As in, care, card, career, carry, carrier, cardinal, carriage, cart, caravan
  • *car: As in, scar, sidecar, madagascar, handcar, railcar
  • *car*: As in, precarious, healthcare and vicarious
  • *cer* → *car*: As in, cartain (certain), cartificate (certificate), caremony (ceremony), carebral (cerebral), soccar (soccer), viscaral (visceral). 
  • *cu* → *car*: As in, circart (circuit), circarmstance (circumstance), circarmvent, circar (circa), circarmstances, circars (circus), circarmference (circumference). 
  • *cor* → *car*: As in, carner (corner), carrespondence (correspondence), carporation (corporation), carroborate (corroborate), carrelation (correlation), cardial (cordial), decar (decor), rancar (rancor), recard (record), accard (accord), accardingly (accordingly), incarporate (incorporate). 
  • *cur* → *car*: As in, concar (concur), carrent (current), carate (curate), carriculum (curriculum), carve (curve), carious (curious), carrency (currency), carse (curse), incar (incur), occar (occur), recar (recur), carrent (current), obscare (obscure), secarity (security), carate (curate), secare (secure). 
  • Bus: As in, “A busman’s holiday,” and “Waiting for the bus.”
  • Bus*: As in, “Bust a move,” and “We’re in business,” and “Beat around the bush,” and “Go away, I’m busy,” and “Hustle and bustle,” and “Hang on, buster,” and “A bustling city.”
  • *bus: As in, “Nimbus 2000,” and “This is our school syllabus,” and “She wrote an entire omnibus,” and “What a succubus.” Note: the Nimbus 2000 is the first broomstick Harry Potter owns.
  • *bus*: As in, “A robust effort,” and “Emotional abuse is still abuse.”
  • *bas* → *bus*: As in, “Buse (base) instincts,” and “The busis (basis) of my theory,” and “It was a busic question,” and “Birthday bush,” and “You bustard,” and “Busket case.”
  • *bes* → *bus*: As in, “A buspoke (bespoke) jacket,” and “My bust (best) effort,” and “I bustow my bust wishes,” and “Busides, I don’t want to,” and “I buseech you,” and “Bustiality is isn’t a joke; it’s unethical,” and “I’m busotted with them,” and “I’m busieged with suitors.”
  • *bis* → *bus*: As in, “Want a buscuit?” and “Bushop to E3,” and “Meet at the new vegan bustro,” and “We’re refurbushing the kitchen,” and “Good riddance to bad rubbush.”
  • Train: As in, “Gravy train,” and “Strangers on a train,” and “The light at the end of the tunnel might just be a train,” and “Train crash,” and “Train of thought,” and “Train wreck.” Notes: a gravy train is a situation which is low-risk and high benefit. 
  • Chain → Train: As in, “A train is only as strong as its weakest link,” and “Train gang,” and “Train letter,” and Train of command,” and “Train reaction,” and “Daisy train,” and “Food train,” and “Off the train.”
  • Plain → Plane: As in, “Plane as day,” and “As plane as the nose on my face,” and “Hidden in plane sight,” and “Plane sailing,” and “In plane view.”
  • Plan* → Plane*: As in, Plane-t (plant), planet, plane-ing (planning), plane-d (planned)
  • *plain → *plane: As in, explane, complane, chaplane and complane‘t (complaint). 
  • *Very* → *Ferry*: As in, “Be afraid, be ferry afraid,” and “Before your ferry eyes,” and “Hold ferry tight, please,” and “How ferry dare you,” and “I was ferry drunk,” and “Thank you ferry much,” and “Ferry tasty,” and “Ferry interesting, but stupid,” and “Ferry well,” and “At the ferry least,” and “Eferry inch,” and “Eferry last one,” and “Eferry nook and cranny,” and “Don’t believe eferrything you hear,” and “Eferrybody likes a joker, but nobody lends them money,” and “Question eferrything,” and “Timing is eferrything.”
  • Furry → Ferry: As in, “A ferry toy,” and “My legs are looking a bit ferry.”
  • Fairy → Ferry: As in, “Airy ferry,” and “A ferrytale ending,” and “Nobody loves a ferry when she’s forty.”
  • Vary → Ferry: As in, “Results may ferry,” and “Your mileage may ferry.” Note: Your mileage may vary is an expression indicating that something that works for one may not work for another. Is commonly shortened to YMMV. 
  • *fer → *ferry: As in, deferry (defer), conferry (confer), inferry (infer), referry (refer), offerry (offer), transferry (transfer), bufferry (buffer), preferry (prefer). 
  • Nefarious → Neferryous: As in, “A neferryous villain.”
  • Boat → But: As in “Last boat not least” and “Close, boat no cigar.”
  • Saboteur → Saboateur : As in “Captain, I believe there’s a saboateur on our ship.”
  • Boat: As in, “Don’t rock the boat,” and “In the same boat,” and “Missed the boat,” and “Whatever floats your boat,” and “We’re gonna need a bigger boat.” Notes: to rock the boat is to say something that will upset the people around you. If you need a bigger boat, then you’ve underestimated the situation you’re in. 
  • Butt → Boat: As in, “Kick boat,” and “Kiss my boat,” and “Pain in the boat,” and “My boat is on the line,” and “Boat-terflies in my stomach.” 
  • Bowtie → Boat-tie: As in, “My boat-tie is too tight.” 
  • Beaut* → Boat*: As in, “Boat-iful people,” and “Boat-y mark,” and “I need my boat-y sleep,” and “Make boat-iful music together,” and “Boat-y is in the eye of the beholder,” and “Boat-y is only skin-deep.”
  • About/Abode → Aboat: As in “What aboat the captain?” and “Welcome to my aboat!”
  • Shit → Ship: As in “Oh ship, we’re in trouble now.”
  • *sib* → *ship*: If a word contains “sib” it can usually be replaced with “ship” to create a terrible pun. For example: posshiply (possibly), accesshipility (accessibility), incomprehenshiple, feashipble, irresponshipble, invishipble, ostenshipbly, revershipble, vishipble. An example sentence might be: “I am responshiple for my puns.”
  • *sip* → *ship*: If a word contains “sip” it can usually be replaced with “ship”. For example: gosship (gossip), dishipate (dissipate), shipping (sipping), inshipid (insipid).
  • Sel* → Sail*: If a word starts with “sel” a boat pun can often be made by replacing it with “sail”: sailection (selection), sailect (select), sailf (self), sailling (selling), sail (sell), saildom (seldom), sailfish (selfish), sailfless (selfless), sailective (selective).
  • Cruise: As in, “Cruise control,” and “A world cruise.”
  • *crew* → *cruise*: As in, “Motley cruise,” and “Turn the scruise,” and “Skeleton cruise,” and “I scruised up,” and “Scruise it!” Note: a motley crew is a group of randomly assembled people. To turn the screws is to put pressure on someone to do something. 
  • Choose → Cruise: As in, “A woman’s right to cruise,” and “Cruise your weapon,” and “Beggars can’t be cruisers.”
  • Chew → Cruise: As in, “Have your ears cruised off,” and “Bite off more than you can cruise.”
  • Helicopter: As in, “Helicopter parent,” and “Get in the helicopter!”
  • Tuxedo → Taxido: Make a pun on taxis: “I need a new taxido.”
  • Tax → Taxi: As in, “Nothing is certain but death and taxis,” and “Goods and services taxis.”
  • *uber*: Change and emphasize words with the “uber” sound in them: bluber(bluebird), exuberance, exuberant, protuberance, puberty
  • Super → Suber: As in, “Suber bad,” and “Suber Mario,” and “Suberhero,” and “Subersize,” and “Nothing improves creativity like a lack of subervision.”
  • Soup → Souber: As in, “Alphabet souber,” and “From souber to nuts.”
  • Sober → Suber: As in, “As suber as a judge,” and “Clean and suber,” and “Stone cold suber,” and “Call me when you’re suber.”
  • Sub* → Suber*: As in, suberlime (sublime), suberject (subject), subersequent (subsequent), suberstantial (substantial), suberjective (subjective), subermit (submit), suberstance (substance). 
  • Rail → Monorail: As in, “Thin as a monorail,” and “Go off the monorails,” and “Off the monorails.”
  • *cab*: Make some cab puns by emphasising the “cab” sound in certain words: amicable, applicability, bancable (bankable), breacable (breakable), cabaret, cabbage, cabernet, cabin, cabinet, despicable, impeccable, macabre, vocabulary, applicable, irrevocable, licable (likable), remarcable (remarkable), unshacable (unshakeable). 
  • *com* → *cab*: As in, cabbler (cobbler), cabalt (cobalt), cabra (cobra), cabble (cobble), and cabweb (cobweb).
  • *cub* → *cab*: As in cabicle (cubicle) and incabate (incubate). 
  • Chair → Chairlift: As in, “Have a chairlift,” and “Musical chairlifts.”
  • Jet: Make references to jets and jetsetting with these jet-related phrases: “Jet black,” and “Jet-setting,” and “Jet lag,” and “Jet propelled,” and “Jetty,” and “Jettison.” Note: to jettison something is to get rid of an unneeded or unwanted thing. 
  • Jot → Jet: As in, “Let me jet that down.” Note: to jot something down is to quickly write or scribble a note.
  • Get → Jet: As in, “As good as it jets,” and “Ask a silly question, jet a silly answer,” and “Buy one, jet one free,” and “Can’t jet you out of my head,” and “Can’t jet enough,” and “Come and jet it,” and “Don’t jet mad, jet even,” and “Don’t jet me started,” and “I’m jetting better and better,” and “Flattery will jet you nowhere,” and “From the jet go,” and “Jet rich quick,” and “Jet a feel for,” and “Jet a handle on,” and “I jet knocked down, but I jet up again,” and “Pay peanuts and jet monkeys,” and “Let’s jet physical,” and “What you see is what you jet.”
  • Jut→ Jet: As in, “Watch out for that branch – it’s jetting out.” Note: to jut out is to protrude. 
  • *git/get* → *jet*: As in, ajetator (agitator), ajetate (agitate), apolojetic, budjet, cojetate (cogitate), dijet (digit), dijetal (digital), enerjetic, fidjet, fujetive (fugitive), illejetimacy (illegitimacy), lejetimacy (legitimacy). Notes: an agitator is one who stirs up feeling or trouble. To cogitate is to intently think about or comsider something. 
  • Sit → Transit: As in, “Are you transitting comfortably?” and “Don’t just transit there,” and “Transit it out,” and “Transit tight,” and “Transitting pretty,” and “A transitting target.”
  • Plot → Pilot: As in, “Lose the pilot,” and “The pilot thickens,” and “A pilot of land.”
  • Pilates → Pilotes: As in, “I do pilotes three times a week.”
  • Business: While business may be the opposite of a holiday, we’re using it as a reference to business class when flying. As in, “Dirty business,” and “Back in business,” and “Business as usual,” and “Business at hand,” and “Business before pleasure,” and “Business class,” and “The business end,” and “Business or pleasure?” and “Business partner,” and “Do your business,” and “It’s not your business,” and “Mind your own business,” and “Monkey business,” and “Open for business,” and “A risky business,” and “Strictly business,” and “This is a place of business!” and “That’s show business.”
  • Class → First class: As in, “A first class act,” and “First class warfare,” and “In a first class of their own,” and “A first class clown.”
  • Rail → Railway: As in, “Thin as a railway,” and “Go off the railways.”
  • Way → Railway: As in, “A funny thing happened on the railway,” and “All the railway,” and “And that’s the railway it is,” and “There must be another railway,” and “Any railway you slice it,” and “Any which railway,” and “By the railway,” and “Change your railways,” and “Go all the railway,” and “Go down the wrong railway,” and “Go our separate railways,” and “Have it both railways,” and “In a bad railway,” and “Mend your railways,” and “My railway or the highway.”
  • Hike: As hiking is a popular activity for travellers, it’s been included in this entry. As in, “Take a hike,” and “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy,” and “This backpack makes my jacket hike up.”
  • Haiku → Hike-u: As in, “Writing hike-us is really hard.”
  • Shop: Shopping is another popular holiday activity and one that is particularly instagrammable, so we’ve included it here. As in, “You’re all over the shop,” and “Like a bull in a china shop,” and “One stop shop,” and “Personal shopper,” and “Shop ’til you drop,” and “Shop around,” and “Talk shop,” and “Window shopping.” Notes: to be all over the shop is to have something happen chaotically, messily, or in various places at once. To be a bull in a china shop is to act clumsily or indelicately around delicate things or topics. 
  • Chop → Shop: As in, “Bust your shops,” and “Shop and change,” and “Get the shop.” Note: To “bust your chops” can have two meanings. If you bust your own chops, then you’ve spent a great deal of energy and effort to do something. If someone else busts your chops, then they’ve scolded or reprimanded you. To chop and change is to continually change your mind. 
  • Shape → Shop: As in, “Get bent out of shop,” and “It all went pear-shopped,” and “In any way, shop, or form,” and “Lick into shop,” and “Shop up or ship out,” and “Whip into shop.”
  • Ship → Shop: As in, “Abandon shop,” and “Extend the hand of friendshop,” and “Go down with the shop,” and “Jump shop,” and “Run a tight shop,” and “Shape up or shop out,” and “Shops of the desert,” and “That shop has sailed,” and “The face that launched a thousand shops,” and “The start of a beautiful friendshop,” and “A stormy relationshop.” Notes: Camels are known as ships of the desert. 
  • Roam: As in, “Roaming ’round the mountains,” and “Did you remember to activate roaming on your phone?”
  • Rome → Roam: As in, “All roads lead to roam,” and “Roam wasn’t built in a day.”
  • *rome*: As in, “Roameo and Juliet,” and “Peter Pan syndroam,” and “Rollerdroam.”
  • *rom*: As in, aroamatherapy, chroam (chrome), chroamosome (chromosome), monochroam, proamiscuous, proamotion, roamance, roamaine (as in the lettuce). 
  • *ski*: Emphasise the “ski” in words to make some snowy puns: “Selling snow to eskimos,” and “Asking for a friend,” and “By the skin of one’s teeth,” and “Comfortable in your own skin,” and “Get under your skin,” and “Makes my skin crawl,” and “Made my heart skip a beat,” and “Watch the skies.”
  • Snow: As snowy areas are just as popular as the beach, snow-related words and activities have been included here. As in, “Pure as the driven snow,” and “White as snow,” and “Blanket of snow,” and “Let it snow,” and “Snow White,” and “A snowball’s chance in hell,” and “Snowed in,” and “Snowed under,” and “The abominable snowman.” Notes: A snowball’s chance in hell basically means that something is almost impossible – just like the odds for a snowball to survive hell without melting. 
  • Board → Snowboard: As in, “All above snowboard,” and “Across the snowboard,” and “Back to the drawing snowboard,” and “Bed and snowboard,” and “Snowboarding pass.”
  • Dive: As in, “Dive in,” and “Take a dive,” and “Going diving?”
  • Climb: As in, “A mountain to climb,” and “Climb down,” and “Climb on the bandwagon,” and “Climb the social ladder.”
  • Climate → Climb-ate: As in, “A chilly climb-ate,” and “I know you don’t believe in climb-ate change, but it’d be cooler if you did.”
  • Photo: As in, “Photo finish,” and “Photo opportunity,” and “Get in the photo!” and “Take a photo of me,” and “I need a photo for my instagram.”
  • So far → Safari: Safaris are included in our list of holiday activities, so is included in this entry. As in, “I can’t believe you’d so safari as to..” and “Safari, so good,” and “Why are you going safari?”
  • Tour: As in, “Eco tourism,” and “Magical mystery tour,” and “Tour de force,” and “A world tour.”
  • Too → Tour: As in, “A step tour far,” and “About time, tour,” and “I’m tour sexy for my shirt,” and “It’s never tour late to learn,” and “It’s tour cold to snow,” and “You know tour much,” and “Life’s tour short,” and “No challenge tour great,” and “This tour shall pass,” and “Tour easy,” and “Tour big for your boots,” and “Tour close for comfort,” and “Tour good to be true,” and “Tour many cooks spoil the broth.”
  • Two→ Tour: As in, “A bicycle built for tour,” and “As alike as tour peas in a pod,” and “Caught in tour minds,” and “Eating for tour,” and “Goody tour shoes,” and “In tour shakes of a lamb’s tail,” and “It takes tour to tango,” and “Tour steps forward, one step back.”
  • Tour*: As in, tournament and tourniquet

The following puns are about specific types of seasonal holiday, rather than about holidays in general.

  • Year → New Year: As in, “As bright as a new year,” and “Brand spanking new year,” and “Dawn of a new year,” and “Out with the old, in with the new year.”
  • Honeymoon: As in, “Honeymoon period.”
  • Honey → Honeymoon: As in, “A taste of honeymoon,” and “Land of milk and honeymoon.”
  • Moon → Honeymoon: As in, “Ask for the honeymoon,” and “Bark at the honeymoon,” and “A blue honeymoon,” and “Cry for the honeymoon,” and “Eclipse of the honeymoon,” and “Fly me to the honeymoon,” and “Many honeymoons ago,” and “Honeymoonlight serenade,” and “Over the honeymoon,” and “On the dark side of the honeymoon,” and “The man in the honeymoon,” and “Phases of the honeymoon,” and “To the honeymoon and back.”
  • *eve*: Make references to Christmas Eve and New Year’s Eve by emphasising the “eve” in certain words: “And they lived happily ever after,” and “An evening person,” and “Forever and a day,” and “Hardly ever,” and “Hello, good evening and welcome,” and “Nothing is ever free,” and “The greatest story ever told,” and “The key to a nice, relaxed evening,” and “An ace up your sleeve,” and “Believe it or not,” and “The blessed event,” and “Break even,” and “The eleventh hour,” and “Even the score,” and “Every inch,” and “Never mind,” and “Every cloud has a silver lining,” and “Question everything.”
  • Easter: As in, “Easter Island,” and “Easter parade,” and “The Easter bunny.”
  • East/Eastern → Easter: As in, “Easter of Eden,” and “Full of Easter promise.”
  • *east → *easter: As in, “At the very l-easter,” and “A f-easter for the eyes,” and “F-easter or famine,” and “The king of b-easters,” and “Last but not l-easter,” and “Nutritional y-easter is a good cheese substitute.”
  • Giving → Thanksgiving: As in, “The gift that keeps on Thanksgiving.” For more Thanksgiving-related puns, see our Thanksgiving list.
  • Christmas: As in, “A Christmas carol,” and “All I want for Christmas is you,” and “Christmas comes but once a year,” and “Done up like a Christmas tree,” and “Have yourself a merry little Christmas,” and “Lit up like a Christmas tree,” and “A white Christmas.” Note: If you’d like more Christmas-related puns, stay tuned for our Christmas list which is coming soon. 

Holiday-Related Words

To help you come up with your own holiday puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

General: holiday, vacation, staycation, retreat, travel, escape, trip, journey, leisure, recreation, break, rest, tourist, tourism, abroad, sabbatical, beach, sand, sea, resort, tropical, island, palm tree, surf, waves, tan, bathers, sunshine, sunscreen, country, mountain, canyon, food, culture, getaway, weekend, bed and breakfast, hotel, hostel, motel, villa, homestay, cabin, lodge, cottage, airbnb, adventure, destination, pack, bag, suitcase, luggage, ticket, airport, flight, car, bus, train, rail, airplane, aeroplane, ferry, boat, cruise, ship, helicopter, taxi, uber, flight, rickshaw, monorail, cable car, cab, caravan, rv (recreational vehicle), chairlift, jet, plane, sailboat, yacht, accommodation, backpacking, activities, transit, itinerary, pilot, flight attendant, business, first-class, economy, railway, sail, hiking, shopping, safari, roam, skiing, snowboard, dancing, diving, snorkeling, climbing, photo, photography, bird watching, festival, tour, family, honeymoon, romantic, solo, luxury

Specific holidays: new year’s, new year’s eve, good friday, easter, labor day, thanksgiving, christmas, diwali, eid, ramadan, hanukkah, chinese new year, yom kippur

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