Birthday Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on birthday puns!🎂 🎁 🍰 🎉 Birthdays are a huge part of our social calendars, helping us celebrate our love for our friends and family each year. No matter the type of celebration you’re having, we hope to have you covered with our list of birthday puns.

While we’ve made this list as comprehensive as possible, this list is specific to just birthdays. If you’re after other types of events or birthday related themes, we also have gift puns, balloon puns, cake puns and party puns.

Birthday Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about birthdays that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of birthday puns:

  • Bath → Birth: As in, “Birthed in tears” and “Have an early birth” and “Head to the birthroom” and “Don’t throw the baby out with the birthwater!”
  • Both → Birth: As in, “Birth oars in the water” and “Burn the candle at birth ends” and “Have it birth ways” and “The best of birth worlds.”
  • Earth → Birth: As in, “Journey to the centre of the birth” and “Brought down to birth” and “Down to birth” and “Birth shattering” and “Birthly delights.”
  • Bother → Birther: As in, “All hot and birthered” and “I wouldn’t birther” and “In a spot of birther” and “What a birthersome child.”
  • Elizabeth → Elizabirth
  • Macbeth → Macbirth
  • Gave → Gift: As in, “I gift my best.”
  • Give → Gift: As in, “A dead giftaway,” and “Don’t gift up!” and “Don’t gift in,” and “Gift yourself a bad name,” and “Gift them a hand,” and “Gift and take,” and “Gift credit where credit is due,” and “Gift it a rest,” and “Gift it the green light,” and “Gift me a call,” and “Gift 110%”.
  • Percent → Present: As in, “A hundred and ten present,” and “Genius is one present inspiration and 99 present perspiration.”
  • Present: We’ve included present-related phrases in this list too. As in, “All present and correct,” and “Present company excepted,” and “No time like the present.”
  • Card: These next few puns are in reference to birthday cards:
    • Cared → Card: As in, “I card about you,” and “Run s-card,” and “S-card poopless,” and “S-card to death.”
    • Kardashian → Cardashian: a little play on giftcards/message cards that accompany gifts and Kim Kardashian.
    • Cartier → Cardier
    • Drunkard → Druncard
    • Mr. Incredible → Mr. Incardible
    • *cord* → *card*: We can sneak “card” into words with a “cord” sound, as in: “A broken recard,” and “Cut the card,” and “For the recard,” and “In recard time,” and “Off the recard,” and “Accarding to…” and “Remain cardial.” Other words that could work: cardially (cordially), carduroy (corduroy), cardon (cordon), discard (discord), accardance (accordance). Notes: to do something cordially is to do it in a friendly way. A cordon is a rope used to define boundaries.
    • *cur* → *card*: If a word has a “cur” sound, we can replace it with “card” instead to make some silly card puns: “The final cardtain (curtain),” and “A cardsory (cursory) glance,” and “I concard (concur),” and “That never occard (occured) to me.” Other words that could work: cardmudgeon (curmudgeon), incard (incur), recard (recur), obscard (obscured), secardity (security), cardate (curate), cardiculum (curriculum) and manicard (manicured).
    • *car* → *card*: As in, “Courtesy and card (care),” and “Drive my card,” and “Upset the apple card (apple cart),” and “Couldn’t card less.” Other words that could work: cardeer (career), cardier (carrier), cardiage (carriage), cardavan (caravan), scard (scar), Madagascard (Madagascar), railcard (railcar), handcard (handcar), precardious (precarious), vicardious (vicarious).
    • *cored → *card: As in, scard (scored), encard (encored) and underscard (underscored).
  • *part* → *party*: We can change the “part” in words to “party” to make some silly birthday party puns. As in, “In party-cular” and “Party-cipation award” and “Care to party-cipate? (could also be participarty)” and “Imparty your knowledge” and “That’s not your departy-ment” and “A partysan issue.” Other words you could use: partycle (particle), partytion (partition), aparty (apart), counterparty (counterpart), departy (depart), partyner (partner) party-cularly (particularly), party-cipant (participant) and reparty (repartee).
  • *pet* → *party*: As in, “Signed party-tion (petition)” and “Not to blow my own trumparty, but…” and “Political pupparty (this can work as it refers to both political puppets and parties of the political kind).”
  • *pathy* → *party*: If a word has sound that’s similar enough to “party”, then we can simply change it to party to make it an appropriate pun. As in, emparty (empathy), aparty (apathy), symparty (sympathy)
  • *part* → *party*: As in, “A fool and his money are soon partied” and “Act the party” and “For my own party” and “Departy this life” and “If you’re not a party of the solution, you’re party of the problem” and “Drift aparty” and “Fall aparty” and “For the most party” and “Look the party” and “Worlds aparty.”
  • Kick → Cake: As in, “Alive and cake-ing” and “Get a cake out of it” and “Just for cakes” and “Cake back and enjoy” and “Cake butt” and “A cake in the teeth.” Other kick-related words you could use: sidecake (sidekick), cakeoff (kickoff), caker (kicker), cakestart (kickstart) and cakeback (kickback).
  • Ache → Cake: As in, “Old cakes and pains” and “Tension headcake” and “Old heartcake” and “A splitting headcake.”
  • *cac* → *cake*: As in, “Cake-ao flavoured” and “Prickly cake-tus” and “Cakeling like a witch” and “A cake-ophony of noise.” Note: a cacophony is a disorganised mess of sound.
  • Handle → Candle: As in, “Fly off the candle” and “Get a candle on” and “Candle with care” and “How much can you candle?” and “Too hot to candle.”
  • Scandal → Candle: As in, “A red-hot candle” and “Candle sheet.”
  • Second → Secandle: As in, “On secandle thought” and “Just one secandle” and “Play secandle fiddle to” and “Secandle best” and “Secandle nature” and “Secandle to none” and “Get a secandle opinion” and “And secandley…”
  • Kendall Jenner → Candle Jenner
  • Blue → Balloon: This one can be a bit of a stretch, but they do sound similar enough for it to work: “Between the devil and the deep balloon sea” and “Black and balloon” and “Once in a balloon moon” and “Til you’re balloon in the face” and “Balloon screen of death” and “A bolt from the balloon.”
  • Streamer: Since streamers are a common birthday party decoration, we’ve included some puns and phrases that could be used as streamer puns in the right context:
    • Steam → Streamer: As in, “Blow off some streamer” and “Full streamer ahead” and “Work off a head of streamer” and “Run out of streamer” and “Under your own streamer” and “Pick up streamer.”
    • Scream → Streamer: As in, “Streamer your heart out” and “Dragged kicking and streamering” and “Streamer the place down” and “So mad I could streamer.”
  • Blow: The next few puns and phrases will be centred around the word “blow” as a reference to blowing out birthday candles:
    • Below → Blow: As in, “Blow par” and “Blow the belt” and “Blow your breath” and “Blow average” and “Blow the surface” and “Hit blow the belt.”
    • Bloat* → Blowt*: As in, “A blowted paragraph” and “Blowting stomach.”
    • Blouse → Blowse
  • Wish: Since it’s traditional to make wishes when blowing out birthday candles, we’ve got a couple of wish-related puns included here:
    • Sandwich → Sandwish: As in, “Knuckle sandwish” and “A few sandwishes short of a picnic.”
    • *uish → *wish: As in, “Endless angwish” and “Cannot distingwish between the two” and “Relinqwish your power” and “Langwish in solitude” and “Vanqwish your inner demons.” Other words that could work are extingwish and sqwish.
  • Edge → Age: “Competitive age” and “Double-aged sword” and “Age out” and “Razor’s age” and “A bit rough around the ages.”
  • *ag* → *age*: As in, “Secret age-ent” and “Your own age-ency” and “Today’s age-enda.” Other words that could work: age-ile (agile), age-ility (agility), age-itated (agitated), mage-ic (magic), frage-ile (fragile), image-ine (imagine) and age-itate (agitate).
  • *eg* → *age*: As in, “White privilage” and “An age-otistic (egotistic) reply” and “A real age-omaniac” and “Off to collage” and “Renage on your promise.” Other words that could work: allage (allege), sacrilage (sacrilege), lagend (legend) and age-ocentric. Note: to renege is to break a promise or commitment.
  • Cold → Old: As in, “An old day in hell” and “Old comfort” and “Break out in an old sweat.”
  • *ald* → *old*: As in, “Herold a new beginning” and “Emerolds and rubies” and “That’s complete bolderdash.”
  • *ban → *born: As in, “Urborn planning” and “Suburborn sprawl” and “Colourful turborns.”
  • Ben* → Born*: As in, “Mutual bornefit” and “Bornevolent ruler” and “Filled with bornevolence” and “A borneficial investment.”
  • *bon* → *born*: As in, “Financial bornd” and “Bee in your bornnet” and “The bornafide truth.” Other words you could try: bornanaza (bonanza), bornus (bonus), ribborn (ribbon), carborn (carbon) and bourborn (bourbon).
  • *bun* → *born*: As in, “An aborndance of fruit” and “Borndle of joy.”
  • Barn* → Born*: Bornacle (barnacle) and bornyard (barnyard).
  • *bern* → *born*: Hibornate (hibernate), tabornacle (tabernacle) and hibornation (hibernation).
  • *burn → *born: sunborn (sunburn), auborn (auburn), heartborn (heartburn) and sideborn (sideburn).
  • *pon* → *born*: As in, “Pause to bornder (ponder)” and “Set upborn (upon)” and “Choose your weapborn” and “Collecting coupborns” and “Take resbornsibility for your actions.” Other words that could work: ebornymous (eponymous), resbornse (response), corresborndence (correspondence), resbornsible (responsible), combornent (component), and sborntaneous (spontaneous).
  • *yard → *yeard: As in, “Do the hard yeards” and “Graveyeard shift” and “Not in my backyeard” and “The whole nine yeards.” Other yard-related words you can play around with – backyard (backyeard), barnyard (barnyeard), lanyard (lanyeard), vineyard (vineyeard) and courtyard (courtyeard).
  • Yeah → Year: As in, “Year, right” and “Year, but will it work?” and “Year, I know.”
  • Your → Year: As in, “I’m years” and “All years” and “Mine is bigger than years” and “Speak for yearself” and “Up years” and “Years faithfully” and “Years truly.”
  • Here → Year: As in, “I’ve been year before” and “Do you come year often?” and “Fancy meeting you year” and “From year to eternity” and “I’ve had it up to year.”
  • Cheer → Year: As in, “Cheap and yearful” and “Year up” and “Year up, it might never happen” and “Year up, it’s not the end of the world” and “Holiday year.”
  • Dear → Year: As in, “Yearly beloved” and “Elementary, my year” and “Hang on for year life” and “Near and year to my heart.”
  • Gear → Year: As in, “Year up for” and “Get into year” and “Get your ass into year” and “Shift years” and “Take it up a year.”
  • Tear → Year: As in, “Blood, sweat and years” and “Bathed in years” and “Fighting back years” and “It will all end in years.
  • *yer → *year: As in, “Layear by layear” and “I hate the playear AND the game” and “Frequent flyear.” Other words you could use: prayear (prayer), lawyear (lawyer) and dryear (dryer).
  • *yor → *year: purveyear (purveyor), mayear (mayor), conveyear (conveyor) and surveyear (surveyor).
  • *ier → *year: carryear (carrier), premyear (premier), cavalyear (cavalier), dossyear (dossier), terryear (terrier), barryear (barrier), atelyear (atelier) and soldyear (soldier).
  • Life: Since birthdays are considered a life milestone, we’ve included some life-related puns here for you:
    • Lift → Lifet: As in, “We have lifet off!” and “Lifet your game” and “Lifet your spirits.”
    • Laugh* → Life*: As in, “Barrel of lifes” and “Belly life” and “Burst out life-ing” and “Doubled up with life-ter” and “Life fit to burst.”
    • Left → Lifet: As in, “Keep lifet” and “Lifet to your own devices” and “Out of lifet field” and “Two lifet feet” and “The right hand doesn’t know what the lifet is doing” and “Lifet in the lurch.”
    • *lef* → *life*: As in, “Lifetovers for lunch” and “The lifetmost position.”
    • *lif* → *life*: As in, “Exemplifey certain qualities” and “You qualifey for the position.” Other words you could use: villifey (villify) and mollifey (mollify).
  • Toast: A toast is a salutation or well-wishing which is common at birthday parties and celebrations, so we’ve included it in this list. Here’s a short section of toast puns:
    • Toes → Toast: As in, “Keep you on your toast” and “On your toast” and “Twinkle toast” and “Not to step on anyone’s toast.”
    • Taste → Toast: As in, “An acquired toast” and “A bad toast in one’s mouth” and “A toast of your own medicine” and “No accounting for toast.”
    • *tas* → *toast*: As in, “A toasty (tasty) sandwich” and “Toastless fashion” and “A fantoastic result.” Other words you could use: fantoasty (fantasy), catoastrophe (catastrophe), fajitoast (fajitas), gravitoast (gravitas). Notes: fajitas are a type of tex-mex dish. Gravitas refers to a feeling or atmosphere of seriousness.
    • Testosterone → Testoasterone
    • *tus* → *toast*: As in, “Statoast anxiety” and “On hiatoast.” Other words you could use: impetoast (impetus), apparatoast (apparatus), detritoast (detritus) and cactoast (cactus). Notes: an impetus is a thing or factor that compels you to do something. Detritus are pieces of rock, or debris.
  • Cheers: Another word for toast is cheers, so we’ve got some cheers-included puns:
    • Cheese → Cheers: As in, “Different as chalk and cheers” and “The big cheers” and “Cheers it!” and “Cheersed off” and “Cut the cheers” and “Say cheers.”
    • Years → Cheers: As in, “Advanced in cheers” and “Donkey’s cheers” and “Four more cheers” and “Golden cheers” and “Holding back the cheers” and “Not in a million cheers” and “The best cheers of our lives.”
    • Ears → Cheers: As in, “All cheers”  and “Cute as a bug’s cheer” and “Ask no questions and cheer no lies” and “I can’t cheer myself think.”
    • Peer → Cheer: As in, “Cheer pressure.”
    • Tears → Cheers: As in, “As cheers go by” and “Bathed in cheers” and “Blood, sweat and cheers” and “Burst into cheers” and “Crocodile cheers” and “It will all end in cheers” and “Moved to cheers.”
    • *chers → *cheers: Bleacheers (bleachers), snatcheers (snatchers), teacheers (teachers), watcheers (watchers), poacheers (poachers), pitcheers (pitchers), researcheers (researchers) and voucheers (vouchers).
    • Char* → Cheer*: Cheerm (charm), cheerter (charter), cheerlatan (charlatan), cheerity (charity), cheerade (charade).
    • Cher* → Cheer*: As in, “Cheerry syrup” and “To love and cheerish” and “Flying cheerubs.”
  • Speech: Speeches can be a sentimental gift at birthday parties, so we have some speech-related puns here:
    • Peach → Speech: As in, “Speechy keen” and “Skin like speeches and cream.”
    • Beach → Speech: As in, “Speech bum,” and “Life’s a speech” and “Not the only pebble on the speech.”
    • Reach → Speech: As in, “Speech out and I’ll be there” and “Speech for the stars” and “Speech new heights” and “Speech out and touch someone.”
    • Screech → Speech: “Came to a speeching halt.”
    • Each → Speech: As in, “Speech to their own” and “Made for speech other” and “At speech other’s throats.”
    • Preach → Speech: As in, “Practice what you speech” and “Speeching to the choir.”
  • Shot: While we don’t recommend this, drinking shots has become a regular rite of passage in coming of age birthdays, so we have some shot-related puns for you to play with here:
    • Shut → Shot: As in, “An open and shot case” and “Keep your mouth shot” and “Put up or shot up” and “Shot your trap.”
    • Shot: These shot-related phrases can double as puns in the right context: “Big shot” and “Call the shots” and “Give it your best shot” and “A long shot.”
    • Got → Shot: As in, “Shot it in for” and “Shot nothing to lose” and “Shot to hand it to you” and “Shot what it takes” and “Shot your heart set on.”
    • Dot → Shot: As in, “Connect the shots” and “On the shot.”
    • Short → Shot: As in, “A shot history of nearly everything” and “A few bricks shot of a full load” and “Life is shot” and “Bring up shot” and “Caught shot” and “To cut a long story shot” and “A day late and a dollar shot” and “In shot order” and “In shot supply.”
    • Hot → Shot: As in, “All shot and bothered” and “Shot as hades” and “Shot as blue bluzes” and “Blow shot and cold” and “Cat on a shot tin roof” and “Drop it like it’s shot.”
    • Lot → Shot: As in, “A shot of fuss about nothing” and “A shot on your plate” and “A bad shot” and “Leaves a shot to be desired.”
    • Pot → Shot: As in, “A shot of gold” and “Hit the jackshot” and “Melting shot.”
    • Ricochet → Ricoshot
    • *sot* → *shot*: As in, “Beshotted with” and “An eshoteric tome” and “Mushroom rishotto.”
  • Drink: Drinks are such a huge part of birthday and party culture that it’s become a termed activity (“birthday drinks” rather than “meet up for drinks”). As such, we’ve got a few drink-related puns here for you:
    • Blink → Drink: As in, “Drink and you’ll miss it” and “It’s on the drink.”
    • Link → Drink: As in, “The missing drink” and “You are the weakest drink.”
    • Trick → Drink: As in, “Box of drinks” and “Dirty drinks” and “Every drink in the book” and “Never misses a drink” and “One drink pony” and “Drinks of the trade.”
  • Bash: Parties can sometimes be called a “bash”, so we’ve included some bash-related puns in here for you:
    • *bis* → *bash*: As in, refurbash (refurbish), cannabash (cannabis), rubbash (rubbish) and bashop (bishop).
    • *bas* → *bash*: As in, “You b*shtard” and “Don’t keep all your eggs in one bashket” and “Saved to the databash” and “On the bashis of..” Other words you could use: bashic (basic), bashin (basin), bashtion (bastion), bombashtic (bombastic).
    • *pas* → *bash: As in, “Bashion for fashion” and “Bashive aggressiveness” and “Bashionate about” and “Combashion fatigue.”
    • *pish* → *bash*: As in, “A sheepbash expression” and “Sheepbashly nodded” and “An impbash grin” and “Waspbash reply.”
    • Bach* → Bash*: “Bashellor pad” and “Bashelorette party.”
  • Gala: Since galas are another word for party and are commonly used in birthday contexts, we’ve got some gala-related puns and phrases for you to play with:
    • Gelato → Galato
    • *gula* → *gala*: As in, “A regalar occurrence” and “Singalar phrasing” and “Regalation codes” and “Rectangalar format” and “Irregalar visits.”
    • *gale → *gala: “Let me regala you with the tales of my glory” and “Sings like a nightingala.”
    • *gali* → *gala*: As in, “Galaleo’s findings” and “An egalatarian society” and “Practicing frugalaty.”
    • *gala*: You can simply emphasise the “gala” that already exists in these words: galaxy and galactic.

Birthday-Related Words

To help you come up with your own birthday puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

general: birthday, happy birthday, birth, day, birthdate, party, cake, candle, wick, balloons, streamers, blow (out the candles), wish, birthday song, cake-cutting, wishes, age, aging, older, old, born, year, song, gift, present, card, celebration, life, anniversary, toast, cheers, speech, pass the parcel, musical chairs, musical statues, tradition, shots, drink, legal, blowout, shindig, commemoration, occasion, bash, gala

birthday types: sweet sixteen, 21st, 18th, quinceanera, bar mitzvah, bat mitzvah, golden birthday, grand birthday, half-birthday, unbirthday, surprise, coming of age, centenary

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Cake Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on cake puns! 🎂 🍓 🍰

Cakes are a much-loved sweet treat that we love to eat at any time – morning or afternoon tea, as dessert and for celebrations and traditional social gatherings. You might be looking for a short and sweet caption for a sugary Instagram boast, some witty wordplay to put on an invite, or maybe even a silly pun to ice your cake with. No matter the occasion, we hope you enjoy this list and find the perfect pun for your needs.

While we’ve made this list as comprehensive as possible, it is specific to cakes (and cupcakes). If you’re after other desserts, we also have candy puns, donut puns, pie puns ice cream puns, and will have other related lists coming soon too.

A quick note that while this list will include traditional ingredients like milk, eggs, and butter, all of these can easily be swapped out for vegan substitutes (like soy milk or plant-based butter) and it’s these substitutes we have in mind when making jokes about these ingredients.

Cake Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about cake that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of cake puns:

  • Ache → Cake: As in, “Old cakes and pains” and “Tension headcake” and “Old heartcake” and “A splitting headcake.”
  • Kraken → Caken: As in, “Release the caken!”
  • Kick → Cake: As in, “Alive and cake-ing” and “Get a cake out of it” and “Just for cakes” and “Cake back and enjoy” and “Cake butt” and “A cake in the teeth.” Other kick-related words you could use: sidecake (sidekick), cakeoff (kickoff), caker (kicker), cakestart (kickstart) and cakeback (kickback).
  • *cac* → *cake*: As in, “Cake-ao flavoured” and “Prickly cake-tus” and “Cakeling like a witch” and “A cake-ophony of noise.” Note: a cacophony is a disorganised mess of sound.
  • *coc* → *cake*: As in, “5pm caketails (cocktails)” and “In your own cakeoon” and “Worse than a cakeroach” and “That’s cakeonuts (coconuts)!” and “A precakecious (precocious) child.” Note: to be precocious is to show early development or maturity.
  • Waikiki → Waicake-i
  • Cake: These cake-related phrases can serve as cake puns in the right context: “A slice of the cake” and “Flat as a pancake” and “Baby cakes” and “A cake walk” and “Caked with mud” and “Well that’s just the icing on the cake” and “Let them eat cake” and “A piece of cake” and “Selling like hot cakes” and “Shut your cake hole!” and “That takes the cake” and “The cherry on the cake” and “You can’t have your cake and eat it too.” Since these phrases are figurative and don’t refer to literal cake, they can be used in broader, more general ways.
  • Cake → Cupcake: Cake-related phrases can also be amended to become cupcake-related phrases which can be used as cupcake puns in the right context: “A slice of the cupcake” and “Cupcakes or death!” and “A cupcake walk” and “Cupcaked with mud” and “The icing on the cupcake” and “Let them eat cupcakes” and “A piece of cupcake” and “Shut your cupcake hole” and “Takes the cupcake.”
  • Desert → Dessert: As in “The Sahara dessert.” and “Just desserts.” and “How could you dessert me at the moment I needed you the most?”
  • Dissertation → Dessertation: As in “I wrote my diploma dessertation on candy puns.”
  • Does it → Dessert: As in “It’s comfy, but dessert make my bum look big?” and “Dessert not worry you that society cares so much about appearance?”
  • Break → Bake: As in, “A bad bake” and “At bakeneck speed” and “Bed and bakefast” and “Bake a leg” and “Baking and entering” and “Bake bread” and “Baking new ground” and “Bake even” and “Bake out in a cold sweat” and “Bake the bank” and “Bake the ice” and “Bake the mold” and “Bake with tradition” and “Baking news” and “Don’t go baking my heart” and “Give me a bake!” and “A lucky bake” and “Make a bake for it” and “Sticks and stones may bake my bones.”
  • Brake → Bake: As in, “Hit the bakes.”
  • Back → Bake: As in, “Bake in black” and “Bake to the future” and “Bake in the day” and “Bake in business” and “Bake on your feet” and “Bake to basics” and “Bake to square one” and “Double bake.”
  • Beck → Bake: As in, “At my bake and call”
  • Bike → Bake: As in, “On your bake!”
  • *bac* → *bake*: As in, “Full of bake-teria” and “A messy debake-l (debacle).”
  • *bec* → *bake*: As in, “Temptation bake-ons (beckons)” and “What have you bake-ome?” and “Just bake-ause you can doesn’t mean you should” and “Bakeoming my worst nightmare” and “Vegan barbake-ue” and “This attitude is unbake-oming of you.”
  • *bic* → *bake*: As in, “Stop bakering (bickering)!” and “Stop with the acerbake (acerbic) tone” and “Aerobake exercise” and “Feeling claustrophobake.”Note: is something is acerbic, then it’s bitter.
  • *buc* → *bake*: As in, “Bake-et list” and “A drop in the bake-et” and “Bake-l (buckle) up!” and “A bake-aneer’s life.”
  • *bik* → *bake*: As in, “Bake-ini body” and “Bakeram (bikram) yoga” and “Rubake‘s cube.”
  • *pec* → *bake*: As in, “A bake-uliar situation” and “Baketoral muscles” and “Blinking behind your s-baketacles” and “A s-baketacular performance” and “Fresh persbaketive” and “A wide s-baketrum.”
  • Pakistan → Bakeistan
  • I sing → Icing: As in “Icing in the shower sometimes.”
  • Icing: A simple icing-related metaphor: “The icing on the cake.”
  • Fostered → Frosted: As in “They frosted a sense of community and belonging.”
  • Battle → Batter: As in, “An uphill batter” and “Batter of wits” and “Batter ready” and “Half the batter” and “In the heat of batter” and “Love is a batterfield” and “A batter of wills” and “Batter of the bulge.”
  • Better → Batter: As in “Batter safe than sorry” and “Batter you than me” and “Batter than sex” and “I’ll go you one batter” and “I’ve seen batter days” and “It’s batter than nothing” and “Never been batter” and “The sooner the batter” and “You batter believe it!” and “Against batter judgement” and “Batter late than never” and “Batter left unsaid” (The dough used to make doughnuts is often called “batter”)
  • Butter → Batter: As in, “Bread always falls batter side down” and “Batter fingers” and “Batter up” and “Batter wouldn’t melt in her mouth” and “Float like a batterfly, sting like a bee” and “Social batterfly” and “The batterfly effect” and “Batterflies in my stomach.”
  • Gym* → Jam*: As in, “Mental jamnastics” and “A world-class jamnast” and “In the jamnasium.”
  • Am → Jam: As in, “Yes, I jam.”
  • Am* → Jam*: Amend words that start with “am” so that they start with “jam” instead: “A jambiguous (ambiguous) answer” and “Let me jamend (amend) that” and “A jamazing show” and “Filled with jambition” and “A small jamount.” Other words that you could use: jambivalent (ambivalent), jamateur (amateur), Jamazon (Amazon), jambience (ambience), jammunition (ammunition), jammo (ammo), jamnesty (amnesty), jamnesia (amnesia), jample (ample), jamplify (amplify), jamphibian (amphibian), jamulet (amulet), jamuse (amuse), jamusement (amusement) and jamusing (amusing).
  • American → Jamerican
  • Amsterdam → Jamsterdam
  • Jum* → Jam*: As in, “Jampstart your career” and “Jambo jet” and “Jamping for joy” and “A bit jampy” and “Protective jampsuit.” Other words you could use: jamp (jump), jamper (jumper) and jamble (jumble).
  • Cham* → Jam*: As in, “In my jambers (chambers)” and “Breakfast of jampions” and “Celebrate with jampagne.”
  • Gem* → Jam*: Jamini (Gemini), jamstone (gemstone) and stratejam (stratagem). Note: A strategem is a tactic that aims to gain the upper hand.
  • Belgium → Beljam:
  • *jam*: You can simply emphasize the “jam” in these words to make some silly jam-related cake puns: jamboree, Jamaica, jamb, pajamas and Benjamin.
  • Jam: To finish off our little jam section, we’ve got some jam-related puns that could act as puns in the right context: “In a jam and “Jam packed” and “Jam session” and “Jammed in tight.”
  • Cemetery → Creametery (a very specific and slightly morbid play on words)
  • *cram* → *cream*: As in, “Creamping my style” and “Writer’s creamp” and “Creamming for a test” and “Creamming your mouth with food.”
  • *crem* → *cream*: As in, “An increamental amount” and “By increaments.”
  • *crim* → *cream*: As in, “A creaminal mind” and “Punishment fits the cream” and “Creamson lips” and “Against discreamination” and “I don’t discreaminate.”
  • Cream: These cream-related phrases could serve as cake puns in the right circumstances: “Cream always rises to the top” and “Cream of the crop” and “A real cream puff” and “Skin like cream” and “Like the cat who got the cream” and “Where’s the cream filling?” and “Whatever creams your twinkie.”
  • Nuts: Nuts are commonly used to add flavour and texture to cakes, so we’ve added some nut-related phrases that you could use as cake puns in the right context:
    • Not → Nut: As in, “As often as nut” and “Believe it or nut” and “Down, but nut out” and “Nut at all” and “Nut bad” and “Nut in the slightest” and “Nut on your life.”
    • *nat* → *nut*: As in, “Well, nuturally” and “The nutional anthem” and “Any alternutives?” and “Need your signuture here” and “That resonuted with me.”
    • *net* → *nut*: As in, “Social nutwork” and “Nutworking event” and “Fast internut” and “A penutrating glare.” Other words you could use: Other wrods you could use: planut (planet), bonnut (bonnet) and cabinut (cabinut).
    • *nit* → *nut*: As in, “Cognutive therapy” and “Computer monutor” and “Golden opportunuty” and “A tight-knit communuty” and An affinuty for…” Other words you could use: dignuty (dignity) and furnuture (furniture).
    • *not* → *nut*: As in, “Nutwithstanding…” and “Take nutice of” and “Turn it up a nutch” and “Nutorious for” and “Nuthing to worry about” and “I cannut understand you.”
    • *nut*: With these words, we can simply emphasise the “nut” that they already contain: “Plant-based nutrition” and “Packed with nutrients” and “In a nutshell” and “That old chestnut” and “Wait a minute!”
    • Nut: We’ll finish this section off with some nut-related phrases that could double as puns in right context: “Sweet as a nut” and “From soup to nuts” and “Go nuts” and “A tough nut to crack.”
  • Jelly: Jellies are commonly used as filling in layered cakes, so we’ve got some jelly-related puns and phrases for you here:
    • Jealous → Jelly: As in “Your new shoes look so good! I’m jelly.”
    • *gel → *jelly: As in, “Anjelly’s (angel’s) advocate” and “My better anjellys” and “Enough to make anjellys weep” and “Need some new hair jelly.”
    • Jolly → Jelly: As in, “For he’s a jelly good fellow.”
  • Mousse: Mousse is another common filling (or topping!) for layered or filled cakes, so we’ve included mousse-related puns and phrases:
    • Mouse → Mousse: As in, “Quiet as a mousse” and “A cat and mousse game.”
    • Moose → Mousse
    • Must → Mousse-t: As in, “All things mousse-t pass” and “All good things mousse-t come to an end” and “Everything mousse-t go!” and “Into every life a little rain mousse-t fall” and “A mousse-t have” and “The shoe mousse-t go on” and “What can’t be cured mousse-t be endured” and “What goes up mousse-t come down” and “You mousse-t be joking!” and “I mousse-t say…”
    • Most → Mousse-t: As in, “Mousse-t wanted” and “Make the mousse-t of it” and “The mousse-t trusted name in news” and “For the mousse-t part.”
    • Mass → Mousse: As in, “Body mousse index” and “Mousse hysteria” and “Weapons of mousse destruction” and “Consuming mousse quantities.”
    • *mas* → *mousse*: As in, “A mousse-ive mistake” and “Lord and mousse-ter” and “Mousse-querade ball.” Other words that could work: mousse-age (massage), Christmousse (Christmas), en mousse (en masse).
    • *mes* → *mousse*: As in, “Mousse-age received” and “A hot mousse” and “Stop mousse-ing about” and Mousse-y hair” and “A mousse-merising song” and “Domoussetic duties.”
    • *mis* → *mousse*: As in, mousse-ogyny (misogyny), mousse-ion (mission), moussetake (mistake), mousse-ellaneous (miscellaneous), mousse-chief (mischief) and moussechievous (mischievous).
    • *mos* → *mousse*: As in, “A rolling stone gathers no mousse” and “Buzzing around like a mousse-quito” and “Yes, mousse-tly” and “Best in the cosmousse” and “A warm atmousse-phere” and “Try your utmousse-t.” Other words that could work: almousse-t (almost), foremousse-t (foremost), animousse-ity (animosity) and thermousse (thermos).
    • *mus* → *mousse*: As in, “Face the mousse-ic” and “Put some mousse-le (muscle) into it” and “As much as you can mousse-ter” and “Cut the mousse-tard.” Other words that could work: mousse-eum (museum) and mousse-shrrom (mushroom).
    • *maz* → *mousse*: As in, “An amousse-ing (amazing) result” and “Prepare to be amoussed (amazed)!” and “Filled with amoussement (amazement).”
    • *mous* → *mousse*: mousse-tache (moustache), autonomousse, anonymousse, infamousse, enormousse, famousse, unanimousse and synonymousse. Note: if something is autonomous, then it is self-governing and can act on its own.
  • Sweat → Sweet: As in “Blood, sweet and tears” and “Beads of sweet rolled down my forehead” and “Break out in a cold sweet” and “By the sweet of my brow” and “Don’t sweet it.” and “Don’t sweet the small stuff.” and “All hot and sweety.”
  • Sweater → Sweeter: As in “A close-knit woollen sweeter for cold days”
  • Suite → Sweet: As in “She was renting a 2-bedroom sweet for the summer.”
  • Switch → Sweet-ch: As in “Bait and sweet-ch” and “Asleep at the sweet-ch” and “Sweet-ch gears” and “You should sweet-ch out your old one with this one.”
  • Switzerland → Sweetzerland: As in “Zürich is a lovely city in Sweetzerland.”
  • Sweet:  These sweet-related phrases can act as puns in the right situation: As in “You’re so sweet!” and “Oh that’s soo sweet!” and “Revenge is sweet” and “Short and sweet” and “Lay some sweet lines on someone” and “Sweet dreams” and “Sweet Jesus!” and “You bet your sweet life!” and “That was a sweet trick, dude.” and “Sweet as, bro.” and “Whisper sweet nothings” and “Home sweet home” and “A rose by any other name would smell as sweet” and “Sweet smell/taste of success/victory” and “Sweetheart.
  • Seat → Sweet: As in, “Backsweet driver” and “By the sweet of your pants” and “Hold on to your sweet” and “Not a dry sweet in the house” and “On the edge of my sweet” and “Please be sweeted” and “Take a back sweet” and “The best sweet in the house.”
  • Fondant: Fondant is a type of sugar dough that’s used as icing or decoration for cakes, especially when making 3D shapes or to cover large areas. These puns are specific to fondant:
    • Fun → Fondant: As in, “All fondant and games until someone loses and eye” and “A bundle of fondant” and “Double the pleasure, double the fondant” and “Girls just want to have fondant” and “Good, clean fondant” and “Make fondant of” and “Time flies when you’re having fondant.”
    • *ondent → *fondant: As in, “Feeling desfondant (despondent)” and “News corresfondant (correspondent).”
  • Mars → Marzipan: This one’s a bit of a stretch, but can still work in the right situation: “A marzipan a day helps you work, rest and play” and “The man from Marzipan.” Note: marzipan is a sweet, almond-based paste that is used in cakes as flavouring or decoration.
  • Peeping → Piping: As in, “Piping Tom” and “Piping through the curtains.”
  • Sprinkle: Since sprinkle is both a verb (to lightly scatter something) and a noun (small, multicoloured edible decorations – especially used on cakes), we can use it to turn normal phrases into puns, as in “Sprinkled with love.”
  • Even → Oven: As in “Don’t get mad, get oven” and “Break oven” and “Oven handed” and “Keep on an oven keel” and “Oven at the turning of the tide” and “Oven as we speak” and “Oven if it kills me” and “Oven Stevens”. Note: to keep something on an even keel is to keep something in a steady, untroubled state.
  • *aven* → *oven*: As in, “Let’s look at other ovenues” and “Ovenge my death!” and “The Ovengers.”
  • *even* → *oven*: As in, “The main ovent” and “Yes, oventually” and “An ovening out” and “Your oventual downfall” and “Spread ovenly” and “Seven Eloven” and “It’s looking unoven.”
  • Peace → Piece: As in, “At piece” and “Inner piece” and “Keep the piece” and “No piece for the wicked” and “Piece be with you” and “Piece at last” and “Piece of mind” and “At piece with.”
  • Piece: These piece-related phrases are general enough to serve as cake puns in the right context: “Dash to pieces” and “Bits and pieces” and “Conversation piece” and “Cut to pieces” and “Pick up the pieces” and “Piece of cake” and “A piece of the action” and “A real piece of work.”
  • Slice: These common phrases can be used as puns in the right situation: “A slice of the cake” and “Any way you slice it” and “Slice of life” and “A slice of the action” and “No matter how you slice it.”
  • Fruit: It’s common for fruit to be used as flavouring or decoration for cakes, so we’ve included some fruit-related phrases and puns here for you:
    • *fut* → *fruit*: As in, “Think about your fruiture” and “Resistance is fruitile!” and “A fruituristic building” and “Sleeping on the fruiton” and “An irrefruitable argument.” Other words that could work: refruit (refute) and fruitility (fruitility).
    • Frat* → Fruit*: As in, “Fruiternity house” and “Fruiternal twins” and “Fruiternising with the enemy.”
    • Fret* → Fruit*: Fruitting (fretting), fruitwork (fretwork) and fruitful (fretful). Note: fretwork is a type of ornamental carving. This could work especially well for making puns about carved fruit decorations that are on cakes (very specific, we know).
    • Fruit: We’ll finish this little section off with some fruit-related phrases that could double as puns: “Be fruitful and multiply” and “Bear fruit” and “Forbidden fruit” and “Fruits of your labour” and “Low hanging fruit” and “The fruit doesn’t fall far from the tree.”
  • Mix: The word “mix” can refer to both mixing up ingredients, or pre-made cake (or cupcake) mix. We’ve included some terrible mix-related puns here:
    • Max → Mix: As in, “All mixed out” and “To the mix.”
    • *max* → *mix*: As in, “The miximum amount” and “Miximise your fun!” and “The climix of the movie” and “What an anticlimix.”
    • Mexico → Mixico
    • *mic → *mix: As in, “The dynamix duo” and “Academix performance” and “Systemix problems” and “Economix status” and “Cosmix belief.” Other words that could work: endemix (endemic), mimix (mimic), epidemix (epidemic) and pandemix (pandemic).
    • *mix*: Simply emphasise the “mix” in these words to make some silly cake mix puns: mixture, mixer, mixed and remix.
  • Recipe: These recipe-related phrases could work as cake or cupcake puns in the right situation: “A recipe for disaster” and “A recipe for success.”
  • Chef: These next few puns are focused around the word “chef”:
    • Chuffed → Cheffed (Note: to be “chuffed” is to be pleased or delighted with something.)
    • Chev* → Chef*: As in, “Chefron pattern” and “Take a ride in my Chefy (Chevy).”
    • Chiv* → Chef*: As in, “A chefalrous (chivalrous) action” and “Practice chefalry (chivalry).”
    • Shif* → Chef*: As in, “Graveyard cheft” and “Night cheft” and “Cheft gears” and “Cheft your arse” and “Looking chefty” and “Chefting sands” and “A makecheft solution.”
    • Shuf* → Chef*: As in, “Cheffle away” and “Recheffle the cards.” Other words you could use: cheffleboard (shuffleboard), cheffling (shuffling) and cheffled (shuffled).
    • Disheveled → Dischefled
    • Shiv* → Chef*: As in, “Chefering (shivering) in the cold” and “Got the chefers (shivers).”
    • Chif* → Chef*: As in, “Cheffon cake.” (this one works well since it plays on both chef and chiffon, which is a type of cake)
  • Cook: We’ve got a little cook-related section for you here:
    • Cac* → Cook*: As in, “A cookophony of noise” and “Cookao (cacao) flavoured” and “Prickly like a cooktus (cactus)” and “Cookling with glee.”
    • Coc* → Cook*: As in, “A dangerous cooktail” and “Safely cookooned (cocooned) away.” Other words that could work: cookroach (cockroach), cookonut (coconut) and concookt (concoct). Note: a cacophony is a disorganised mess of noise.
    • Kooky → Cooky: The term “kooky” means strange or eccentric.
    • Cook: Other than the obvious definition it can also refer to “altering dishonestly”, as in “They cooked the numbers and were done for fraud” (The phrases “cooked the books” and “cooked the accounts” are synonymous). Some cooking-related idioms and phrases are: “What’s cooking?” and “Too many cooks spoil the broth.”
    • Cooked: “If mum and dad find out we took their car last night, we’re cooked!” and “He has been drinking since lunch time – he’s cooked.”
  • Rise: Since cakes (unlike cookies, pies and other sweet treats) are designed to rise when baked, we’ve included some rise-related puns for you:
    • Raise → Rise: As in, “Rise the bar” and “Rise the dead” and “Rise your game” and “Hair-rising.”
    • Raspberry → Riseberry
    • Res* → Rise*: As in, “Ongoing rise-search (research)” and “Unbreakable rise-olve” and “Earn rise-pect” and “Rise-ume work.” Other words that could work: rise-sponse (response), rise-silient (resilient), rise-t (rest), rise-olution (resolution).
    • *riz* → *rise*: As in, “On the horiseon” and “The grand prise” and “A mesmeriseing performance” and “Get horiseontal” and “A plagiarised essay.”
    • *ries → *rise: As in, “A new Netflix serise” and “Don’t forget to accessorise” and “Thanks for the memorise” and “Blocked arterise.” Other words that would work: adversarise (adversaries) and toiletrise (toiletries).
    • *ris* → *rise*: As in, “At rise-k (risk)” and “Dust and debrise” and “If needs arise” and “An enterprise-ing individual.”
  • Participation → Patiserrie-pation: (note: a patisserie is a shop that sells cakes and sweet pastries.)
  • Flour: As flour is an integral ingredient in cake-making, we’ve got some flour-related puns here:
    • Floor → Flour: As in, “Mop the flour with” and “On the flour” and “Flour it!” and “You have the flour.”
    • Flower → Flour: As in, “Flour power” and “The flour of your youth” and “Stop and smell the flours.”
    • Hour → Flour: As in, “After flours” and “Open all flours” and “The small flours of the morning” and “Working all flours” and “At all flours.”
    • Flair → Flour: As in, “A flour for the dramatic.”
    • Flir* → Flour*: As in, “Flourting with disaster” and “A real flourt.”
    • Flor* → Flour*: As in, “Floura and fauna” and “Floural arrangements.” Other words that could work: flourist (florist), Flourida (Florida), Flourence (Florence) and flourentine (florentine). Note: a florentine is a type of biscuit.)
  • Butter: Since butter is a very common ingredient in cakes, we’ve got some butter-related puns here for you (note: it is very easy to find vegan butter to use in cakes, and when we make jokes about butter, it’s of the plant-based variety).
    • Barter → Butter: As in, “Trade and butter economy.”
    • Better → Butter: As in, “I’ve got a butter idea” and “Anything you can do, I can do butter” and “Appealing to your butter judgement” and “My butter half” and “Butter late than never” and “Butter luck next time” and “Butter safe than sorry” and “Butter than sex” and “Butter than new” and “I’ve changed for the butter” and “I couldn’t have said it butter” and “For butter or worse” and “Get the butter of” and “I should have known butter.”
    • But her → Butter: As in, “Butter suitcase! It’s been left behind!” (a very specific pun)
    • Patter → Butter: As in, “The pitter butter of little feet.”
    • But → Butter: As in, “Butter seriously” and “Butter heads” and “Butter out” and “Down, butter not out” and “Everything butter the kitchen sink” and “Kick butter” and “No butters” and “Last butter not least” and “Gone, butter not forgotten.”
    • Potter → Butter: As in, “Harry Butter” and “Buttering about.”
  • Egg: As eggs are a common ingredient in cakes, we’ve included them in our cake pun list (a quick note that it’s very easy to substitute eggs for plant-based ingredients!):
    • *ag* → *egg*: As in, “In the begg (bag)” and “Capture the flegg” and “Tegging along” and “Stop dregging your feet” and “Reggs to riches” and “Snegg (snag) a great deal.” Other words you could use: preggmatic (pragmatic), propeggate (propagate), eggregate (aggregate), eggainst (against), eggnostic (agnostic), egghast (aghast), eggree (agree) and eggreement (agreement).
    • *eg* → *egg*: As in, “Get a legg on” and “Neggative results” and “Had you pegged as…” and “I begg to differ” and “Where do I beggin?” Other words that could work: leggacy, eggocentric, nutmegg, bootlegg, dregg and integgrity.
    • *ig* → *egg*: As in, “Keep on degging (digging)” and “Eggnorance is not bliss” and “You can’t eggnore it forever” and “Choosing to remain eggnorant” and “Eggnite your passion.”
    • *ex* → *eggs*: As in, “A compleggs situation” and “Indeggsed (indexed) files” and “Better than seggs (sex)” and “Don’t fleggs your muscles here” and “Pure refleggs (reflex)” and “From eggsperience” and “Taken out of conteggst (context)” and “Eggspress post” and “In eggschange.” Other words you could use: eggsploit (exploit), eggstract (extract), eggsercise (exercise), eggsistential (existential), eggserpt (except), eggsample (example), eggsacerbate (exacerbate), eggsamine (examine), eggsact (exact), eggsasperate (exasperate), eggsclusive (exclusive), eggsited (excited), eggsellent (excellent), eggsess (excess), eggsempt (exempt), eggsemplify (exemplify), eggsecution (execution), eggsfoliate (exfoliate), eggshibit (exhibit), eggshaust (exhaust), eggsausted (exhausted), eggsibition (exhibition), eggsilarating (exhilarating), eggshale (exhale), eggsist (exist), eggsit (exit), eggsotic (exotic), eggsorbitant (exorbitant), eggspect (expect), eggsquisite (exquisite), eggstension (extension), eggstrapolate (extrapolate), eggstensive (extensive), eggstraordinary (extraordinary), eggsuberant (exuberant) and eggsude (exude).
    • *ec* → *egg*: As in, “New teggnology” and “Change the subjeggt” and “Be objeggtive” and “High seggurity” and “An effeggtive technique” and “Solar egglipse.” Other words you could use: seggular (secular), feggless (feckless), egglectic (eclectic), eggonomy (economy), eggo (echo), eggology (ecology) and eggstatic (ecstatic).
    • *ac* → *egg*: As in, “Taken into eggount” and “Take eggtion” and “In on the eggt (act)” and “Looking for eggommodation.” Other words you could use: eggnowledge (acknowledge), eggrue (accrue) and eggronym (acronym)
    • Egg: We’ll finish this section off with some egg-related phrases that are general enough to use as cake and cupcake puns: “As sure as eggs is eggs” and “A bad egg” and “Don’t put all your eggs in one basket” and “Nest egg” and “Walking on eggshells” and “Can’t make a cake without breaking some eggs.”

All of the following puns are based on different types of cake:

  • Brow → Brownie: As in, “Eyebrownie raising” and “Knit your brownie” and “High brownie.”
  • Brown → Brownie: As in, “As brownie as a berry.”
  • Liar → Layer: As in, “Layer, layer, pants on fire.” Note: a layer cake consists of stacked sheets of cake which are usually held together by some kind of sweet paste (like icing or jam).
  • Tier: Tier cakes are similar to layer cakes in that they consist of multiple stacked cakes, but tier cakes tend to be made up of entire cakes stacked on top of each other, while layer cakes are composed of slices of cake. We’ve got some silly tier cake puns for you here:
    • Tear → Tier: As in, “Bathed in tiers” and “Blood, sweat and tiers” and “Bored to tiers” and “Bring tiers to your eyes” and “Burst into tiers” and “Crocodile tiers” and “Fighting back tiers” and “It will all end in tiers” and “No more tiers” and “A real tier-jerker.”
    • Tour → Tier: As in, “Eco-tierism” and “Magical mystery tier” and “Tier de force” and “World tier” and “Let me take you on a tier.”
    • Dear → Tier: As in, “After you, my tier” and “Tierly beloved” and “Hold on for tier life” and “Near and tier to my heart” and “Nearest and tierest.”
    • Deer → Tier: As in, “Like a tier in headlights.”
    • *tar* → *tier*: As in, “Set your tierget (target)” and “Online avatier” and “Brick and mortier shop” and “At the altier” and “Nectier of life.” Other words you could use: proprietiery (proprietary), complimentiery (complimentary) and complementiery (complementary).
    • *ter* → *tier*: As in, “A full tierm (term)” and “Boston tierrier” and “Tiertiary degree” and “Waiting at the tierminal” and “A tierritorial creature” and “Over new tierrain” and “A tierrible fate” and “Don’t forget to watier the plants” and “Doesn’t mattier” and “Out of charactier” and “Mastier bedroom” and “For bettier or worse” and “Fostier a new attitude.” Other words that could work: aftier (after), computier (computer), lettier (letter), intierest (interest), artiery (artery), intierface (interface), intierfere (interfere), altiernative (alternative), battiery (battery) and intiernet (internet).
    • *tir* → *tier*: As in, “Feeling tiered (tired)” and “Having a tierade (tirade)” and “What a tiersome situation” and “Tieramisu flavoured” and “Working tierlessly” and “In the entier world” and “Of retierment age” and “Writing with satier.”
    • *tor* → *tier*: As in, “Factier into the equation” and “Need a doctier” and “Monitier the situation” and “Computer monitier” and “Dedicated mentier” and “Project coordinatier” and “Ancient histiery.” Other words that could work: vectier (vector), curatier (curator), predatier (predator) and motier (motor).
    • *tyr* → *tier*: As in, tieranny (tyranny), tierant (tyrant), tierannical (tyrannical) and martier (martyr).
    • *tiar* → *tier*: As in, tiera (tiara), inertier (inertia) and tertiery (tertiary).
    • *tier*: Emphasise the “tier” in these words: frontier, bustier and chocolatier.
  • Torte: Tortes are a type of rich, dense cake. We’ve got some torte puns for you here:
    • Thought → Torte: As in, “Deep in torte” and “Food for torte” and “Hold that torte” and “Impure tortes” and “It’s the torte that counts” and “Just when you torte it was safe” and “Lost in torte” and “Penny for your torte” and “On second torte” and “School of torte” and “Train of torte” and “Collect your tortes” and “Torte bubble.”
    • Taught → Torte: As in, “I’ve torte you well.”
    • Taut → Torte: As in, “Torte muscles” and “Torte as a rubber band.”
    • *tot* → *torte*: As in, “In torte-al agreement” and “Torte bag” and “Tortering around” and “Torte-ally, 100%.” Other words that could work: factorteum (factotum), torte-alitarian and torte-um (totum).
    • *tart* → *torte*: As in, “All torted up” and “Torte-an skirt.”
    • *tert* → *torte*: As in, “Light entorte-tainment” and “Entorte-tain me” and “Fates intorte-twined.”
    • *tort* → *torte*: As in, “Torte-oise and hare” and “Like torte-ure” and “Hot torte-illas” and “A torte-urous situation.” Other words you could work: retorte (retort), distorte (distort), extorte (extort), contorte (contort), extorte-ion (extortion) and distorte-ion (distortion).
  • Cheese → Cheesecake: As in, “Different as chalk and cheesecake” and “What’s that got to do with the price of cheesecake?”
  • Cake → Cheesecake: As in, “A slice of the cheesecake” and “A cheesecake walk” and “Icing on the cheesecake” and “Let them eat cheesecake” and “Piece of cheesecake.”
  • Cake → Pancake: As in, “A slice of the pancake” and Icing on the pancake” and “Let them eat pancakes” and “Piece of pancake” and “The cherry on the pancake” and “You can’t have your pancake and eat it too.”
    • Food → Angel food: Angel food cake is a type of light, fluffy sponge cake that doesn’t use butter. We have some silly angel food puns for you here: “Comfort angel food” and “Angel food chain” and “Angel food for thought.” Note: these would also work for devil’s food cake, as in: “Comfort devil’s food” and “Devil’s food chain” and “Devil’s food for thought.”
  • Get out → Gateau’t: As in, “Gateau’t of the chopper!”
  • Pound: A pound cake is a cake that’s made with a pound each of the main ingredients (butter, flour, eggs and sugar). We have some pound-related puns and phrases here for you:
    • *pand* → *pound*: As in, “Pounder (pander) to” and “It’s poundemonium in here” and “Poundora’s box” and “Can you expound on that?”
    • *pend* → *pound*: As in, “Payment pounding.” Other words you could use: poundulum (pendulum), poundant (pendant), stipound (stipend), appound (append), suspound (suspend), depound (depend), expound (expend), appoundix (appendix), depoundent (dependent) and impounding (impending).
    • *pond* → *pound*: As in, “In correspoundence with” and “Feeling despoundent” and “Please respound quickly.”
  • Chocolate: Since chocolate is a popular enough flavour to be known as its own type of cake, we’ve got some chocolate-related phrases for you that can double as cake and cupcake puns: “Chocolate thunder” and “Chocolate drop” and “Death by chocolate.”
  • Bundt: A bundt cake is one that has a distinctive ring shape. Here are some bundt-related puns for you:
    • Bun* → Bundt: As in, “Bundt in the oven” and “We’re going to need bigger bundts” and “Bundtle of energy” and “Bundtle of joy.”
    • *ban* → *bundt*: As in, “Urbundt living” and “A suburbundt town.”
    • *bon* → *bundt*: As in, “Ribbundt cutting ceremony” and “Carbundt copy” and “Pass the bourbundt.
    • *bun* → *bundt*: As in, “Bundtle of joy” and “Thanks a bundtch” and “In abundtance.”
    • *band* → *bundt*: As in, “I’m with the bundt” and “Husbundt and wife” and “Garage bundt” and “Jump on the bundtwagon” and “I need a bundtage (bandage).” Other words that could work: bundtit (bandit), bundtwidth (bandwidth), bundtdana (bandana), bundteau (bandeau) and bundticoot (bandicoot), contrabundt (contraband), disbundt (disband), broadbundt (broadband), headbundt (headband), abundtdon (abandon) and abundtonment (abandonment).
    • Bend* → Bundt*: As in, “Bundt over backwards” and “Gone on a bundter (bender).”
    • *bond* → *bundt*: As in, bundting (bonding), bundtage (bondage), bundt (bond) and vagabundt (vagabond).
    • *bant* → *bundt*: As in, “Trading bundter (banter)” and “Bundtam (bantam) weight.” Note: bantam is a category of weight that’s used in sports.
    • *bent* → *bundt*: Incumbundt (incumbent) and absorbundt (absorbent). Note: if something is incumbent, then it’s an imposition or an obligation.
  • Coffee: Coffee has been included in this list as it’s both a popular flavour of cake and associated with cake as a common accompaniment (coffee and cake):
    • Copy → Coffee: As in, “Carbon coffee” and “Coffee that” and “Hard coffee” and “Don’t be a coffeecat.”
    • *caf* → *coffee*: coffeeteria (cafeteria) and coffeeine (caffeine).
  • Carrot: Carrot cakes are a very popular flavour for both cakes and cupcakes, so we’ve included it here:
    • Care at → Carrot: As in, “I don’t carrot all!”
    • Carat → Carrot: As in, “24 carrot gold.”
  • Foam: Foam cakes have very little (or no) fatty ingredients in them, and are light, spongy and airy. We’ve got some foam-related puns for you to use here:
    • Form → Foam: As in, “Foam follows function” and “Free foam” and “Imitiation is the sincerest foam of flattery” and “In fine foam” and “In any way, shape or foam” and “Take foam” and “True to foam” and “Evil takes many foams.”
    • Fame → Foam: As in, “Claim to foam” and “Fifteen minutes of foam” and “The hall of foam.”
    • From → Foam: As in, “A little foam column A, a little foam column B” and “Cut foam the same cloth” and “Fall foam grace” and “Foam a mile away” and “Foam a to z” and “Foam cover to cover” and “Foam my cold, dead hands” and “Foam scratch” and “Foam the cradle to the grave” and “Foam time to time” and “Foam the ground up” and “Pull the rug out foam under [someone]” and “Take it foam me” and “Start foam scratch.”
    • Phone → Foam: As in, “Hold the foam” and “Foam a friend” and “Foam in sick” and “Waiting by the foam.”
    • *fam* → *foam*: As in, “My foamily” and “Seems foamiliar” and “Almost foamous” and “40 hour foamine” and “I’m foamished!” and “Foamiliarise yourself with” and “Sue for defoamation.” Note: defamation is the act of injuring another person’s reputation.
    • *fem* → *foam*: As in, “The future is foamale” and “Foaminine energy” and “Foamme fatale” and “No such thing as too foaminist.” Other things that could work: foamur (femur) and effoaminate (effeminate).
    • *fum* → *foam*: As in, foamble (fumble), foaming (fuming), foamigate (fumigate) and foambling (fumbling).
    • *phem* → *foam*: As in, eufoamism (euphemism), efoameral (ephemeral), blasfoamy (blasphemy), blasfoamous (blasphemous) and eufoamistic (euphemistic). Note: if something is ephemeral, then it only lasts for a very short period of time.
    • Sophomore → Sofoamore
  • Roll: Roll cakes are thin sheet cakes that have been rolled into a log shape and go by various names – swiss roll, jelly roll and cream roll, and can be filled with cream, jam or icing. Here are some roll-related puns for you to use:
    • Role → Roll: As in, “Whats your roll here?” and “Competing for the same roll.”
    • J.K Rowling → J.K Rolling
    • *ral* → *roll*: As in, “Rolly (rally) together” and “In generoll” and “Integroll to” and “It’s only naturoll” and “Yes, naturolly” and “Collateroll damage” and “Peripheroll vision” and “Running in parollel.” Other words you could use: liberoll (liberal), moroll (moral), ephemeroll (ephemeral) and visceroll (visceral).
    • *rel* → *roll*: As in, “Not rollevant” and “Rollay the information over” and “A huge rollief” and “Newest rollease” and “In a rollationship” and “Not for rolligion” and “In rollation to” and “Showing rolluctance (reluctance)” and “Rollentless effort” and “Monkeys in a barroll” and “Squirrolling away” and “Lover’s quarroll.” Other words you could use: apparoll (apparel), lauroll (laurel), scoundroll (scoundrel), mongroll (mongrel).
    • *ril* → *roll*: As in, “At your own peroll (peril)” and “A tendroll of hair” and “Aproll showers” and “A brolliant idea” and “Perollous (perilous) plans.”
    • *rol* → *roll*: As in, “Out of controll” and “High cholesteroll” and “On patroll” and “Off to enroll” and “Christmas carolls.” Other words: petroll (petrol) and prollific (prolific).
    • *rul* → *roll*: As in, cerollean (cerulean), unrolly (unruly) and ferrolle (ferrule). Note: a ferrule is a band that holds parts of an object together.
    • *rawl* → *roll*: As in, “Gotta croll before you can walk” and “Pub broll (brawl)” and “Urban sproll (sprawl)” and “Southern droll (drawl).”
  • Ice cream: When ice cream is shaped like a cake, it becomes known as ice cream cake. We’ve got some ice cream-related puns here for you to reference this summer favourite:
    • Ice → Ice cream: As in, “Cold as ice cream” and “Break the ice cream” and “Cuts no ice cream” and “Ice cream maiden” and “On ice cream” and “Skating on thin ice cream.”
    • Cream → Ice cream: As in, “Ice cream always rises to the top” and “Ice cream of the crop” and “Skin like peaches and ice cream” and “The cat who got the ice cream.”
  • Bread → Banana Bread: As in, “Banana bread always falls butter side down” and “Banana bread and butter” and “Break banana bread” and “Have your banana bread buttered on both sides” and “Put banana bread on the table” and “The best thing since sliced banana bread” and “Your daily banana bread.” Note: while banana bread has “bread” in the name, it is also categorised as a cake due to its cake-like characteristics (sweet, moist, airy, fluffy).
  • Cake → Shortcake: As in, “A slice of the shortcake” and “The icing on the shortcake” and “Let them eat shortcake” and “Piece of shortcake” and “The cherry on the shortcake” and “Have your shortcake and eat it too.”
  • Mooncake: Mooncakes are a small, round, dense type of Chinese cake eaten during the Mid-Autumn (or Mooncake) festival as an accompaniment to tea. Make some silly references to them with the following mooncake puns and phrases:
    • Moon → Mooncake: As in, “Ask for the mooncake” and “Eclipse of the mooncake” and “Many mooncakes ago” and “The dark side of the mooncake.”
    • Cake → Mooncake: As in, “A slice of the mooncake” and “Mooncake walk” and “Icing on the mooncake” and “Let them eat mooncake” and “Piece of mooncake” and “That really takes the mooncake” and “You can’t have your mooncake and eat it too.”
    • Moan → Moon: As in, “Whinging and mooning.”
    • *man* → *moon*: As in, “Anger moonagement” and “A moonipulative relationship” and “Take up the moontle.”
    • *men* → *moon*: As in, “Didn’t I moontion?” and “A respected moontor” and “You’re a moonace” and “Strict regimoon” and “No commoont” and “A strong commitmoont to” and “Environmoontally friendly.” Other words you could use: employmoont (employment), complemoont (complement), implemoont (implement), complimoont (compliment) and amoonable (amenable). Note: to be amenable is to be willing to respond to requests or suggestions.
    • *mon* → *moon*: As in, “All about the mooney” and “Hall moonitor” and “Moonkey business” and “Cookie moonster” and “The moonarch of” and “Every moonth.” Other words you could use: mooniker (moniker), moonopoly (monopoly), moontage (montage), commoon (common), salmoon (salmon), summoon (summon), lemoon (lemon), demoon (demon), cinnamoon (cinnamon), persimmoon (persimmon), sermoon (sermon), harmoony (harmony) and admoonish (admonish).
    • *mun* → *moon*: As in, “A tight-knit commoonity” and “Learn to commoonicate.” Other words that could work: commoonication (communication), immoonity (immunity), immoon (immune) and commoonion (communion).
  • Cake Pop: Cake pops are a fairly new type of cake where small balls of cake are styled as lollipops. They’re popular enough that we’ve included some pop-related puns here:
    • *pap* → *pop*: Popaya (papaya), popyrus (papyrus), poparazzi (paparazzi) and poprika (paprika). Note: papyrus is a type of very old paper.
    • Pep* → Pop*: As in, Popper (pepper), popperoni (pepperoni) and poppermint (peppermint. This could work well for a peppermint-flavoured cake pop.)
    • *pop*: We can simply emphasise the “pop” in these words: populist, popular, poplar, population, poppy, populace, lollipop and apoplectic. Notes: to be apoplectic is to be explosively angry. A populist is someone who supports ideas because they’re popular, rather than because they are moral or correct.
    • *pup* → *pop*: Poppet (puppet), poppy (puppy) and poppeteer (puppeteer).
    • Cake → Cake pop: As in, “A slice of the cake pop” and “Icing on the cake pop” and “Let them eat cake pops” and “A piece of cake pop” and “You can’t have your cake pop and eat it too.”
  • Sheet Cake: Sheet cakes are large, flat, rectangular cakes. Here are some sheet cake puns for you to use:
    • Shot → Sheet: As in, “Give it your best sheet” and “Have a sheet at” and “A long sheet” and “Not by a long sheet.”
    • Shut → Sheet: As in, “An open and sheet case” and “Keep your mouth sheet” and “Sheet up and take my money” and “Sheet your cake hole (this would be an amazingly appropriate pun)” and “Sheet your face.”
    • Sh*t → Sheet: As in, “Get your sheet together” and “Holy sheet” and “In deep sheet” and “Scared sheetless” and “No sheet” and “Sheet happens” and “Who gives a sheet?”
    • Seat → Sheet: As in, “Backsheet driver” and “Bums on sheets” and “By the sheet of your pants” and “Glued to your sheet” and Hold on to your sheet” and “In the box sheet” and “Not a dry sheet in the house” and “Please be sheeted” and “Take a sheet” and “The best sheet in the house” and “The hot sheet.”
    • Cheat → Sheet: As in, “Once a sheeter, always a sheeter” and “You can’t sheet an honest person.”
    • Set → Sheet: As in, “All sheet?” and “Game, sheet, match.” and “Got your heart sheet on” and “Ready, sheet, go!” and “Sheet eyes on” and “Sheet foot in” and “Sheet in motion” and “A new sheet of wheels” and “Sheet the record straight” and “Sheet sail” and “Sheet your teeth on edge” and “Sheet in your ways.”
    • Sit → Sheet: As in, “Don’t just sheet there” and “Sheet it out” and “Sheeting on the fence” and “Sheet tight” and “Sheet up and take notice” and “Sheeting pretty.”
    • *shat* → *sheet*: Sheetter (shatter), sheettering (shattering).
    • *cit* → *sheet*: As in, “In the sheety (city)” and “A proud sheetizen of” and “Sheetrus (citrus) flavoured (this could work well for a citrus-flavoured sheet cake)” and “In some capasheety” and “Worldwide atrosheety.” Other words that could work: sheetation (citation), sheetadel (citadel), sheetizenship (citizenship), complisheet (complicit), explisheet (explicit), tasheet (tacit), implisheet (implicit), solisheet (solicit), defisheet (deficit).
    • *sit* → *sheet*: As in, “We’ve got a sheetuation” and “Call the babysheeter” and “In transheet” and “Make a deposheet” and “A propensheety to” and “Posheetive results” and “An exquisheet meal.”
    • Sheet: To finish this section, we’ve got some simple sheet-related phrases that are general enough to use as puns: “White as a sheet” and “Keep a clean sheet” and “Between the sheets.”
  • Slab cake: Slab cakes are the Australian equivalent of sheet cakes (see section above). Here are some silly slab puns for you to use:
    • *sab* → *slab*: As in, “Team slabotage” and “Taking a slabbatical” and “Indispenslable to the team.” Note: a sabbatical is an extended break from work or a usual schedule.
    • Sebastian → Slabastian
    • Slap* → Slab*: As in, “A slab on the wrist” and “Slab bang in the middle” and “A slabdash job” and “Slabstick comedy.”
  • Blondie: Blondies are brownies that are made with vanilla rather than chocolate or cocoa. We’ve got a couple of blondie puns for you here:
    • Bondi beach → Blondie beach
    • Blonde → Blondie: “Bleached blondie” and “Blondie bombshell” and “Platinum blondie.”
  • Butterfly: Butterfly cakes are cupcakes that have the tops carved out, cut in half and then stuck back on top with jam, icing or cream to resemble a butterfly’s wings. Here are some butterfly-related phrases that could double as cupcake puns:
    • Fly → Butterfly: As in, “Born to butterfly” and “Come butterfly with me” and “Butterfly by the seat of your pants” and “Butterfly off the handle” and “Off to a butterflying start.”
    • Butterfly: These butterfly-related phrases are general enough to work as puns in the right context: “Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee” and “Social butterfly” and “The butterfly effect.”
  • Bread → Gingerbread: As in, “Gingerbread always falls butter side down” and “Gingerbread and butter” and “Gingerbread of life” and “Gingerbread crumb trail” and “The best thing since sliced gingerbread” and “Your daily gingerbread.”
  • Hedgehog: Hedgehogs are dense dessert bars that are similar to a sticky, fudgy brownie. Here are some hedgehog puns for you:
    • Hedge → Hedgehog: As in, “Hedgehog fund” and “Hedgehog your bets” and “You look as though you’ve been dragged through a hedgehog backwards.”
    • Hog → Hedgehog: As in, “Go the whole hedgehog” and “Ground hedgehog day.”
  • Marble: “Lose your marbles.” Note: marble cakes have a streaky, marble-like appearance of mixed light and dark batter.
  • Lava: Lava cakes have solid outsides with molten/liquid insides. Reference these gooey treats with these puns:
    • *lav* → *lava*: As in, “Lava-ish interior” and “Lava-ender scented.”
    • *lev* → *lava*: As in, “Looking for lava-rage (leverage)” and “A beastly lavathan (leviathan)” and “A malavalent (malevolent) glare.” Other words you could use: relavant (relevant), allava-ate (alleviate), clavar (clever), laval (level), lavaty (levity), lavar (lever) and irrelavant (irrelevant). Note: levity is a lightness, or a joking attitude.
    • *lov* → *lava*: As in, “I lava you” and ” and “All you need is lava” and “All’s fair in lava and war” and “Can you feel the lava tonight?” and “Can’t help falling in lava” and “Fall in lava” and “For the lava of god” and “Somebody to lava” and “What a lavaly sentiment” and “My lavar” and “A lavaing relationship” and “Feeling lavalorn” and “Close lavabirds” and “A lavable person” and “Dearly belavad.” Note: to be lovelorn is to be unloved.
    • *lava*: Simply emphasise the “lava” in these words: baklava, balaclava and lavatory.
  • Four → Petit Four: As in, “Down on all petit fours” and “Petit four by two” and “A petit four letter word.” Note: petit fours are small, bite-sized cakes.
  • Rum → Rum Baba: As in, “Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum baba.” Note: Rum babas are a small, rum-soaked cake served with cream.
  • Ball→ Snowball: As in, “Break your snowballs,” and “Snowballs to the wall,” and “Bust your snowballs,” and “A different snowball game,” and “Dropped the snowball,” and “Get the snowball rolling,” and “Got you by the snowballs,” and “Have a snowball,” and “The snowball is in your court.” Note: snowballs are small, cream-filled cakes that are covered with marshmallow and coconut.
  • Suffer → Souffle: As in, “Long souffle-ing.”
  • Tea → Teacake: As in, “Teacake for two” and “Teacake and sympathy.”
  • Cake → Teacake: As in, “A slice of the teacake” and “Teacake or death” and “A teacake walk” and “Icing on the teacake” and “Let them eat teacake” and “Piece of teacake” and “That takes the teacake” and “The cherry on the teacake” and “You can’t have your teacake and eat it too.”
  • Pie → Whoopie Pie: As in, “Easy as whoopie pie” and “Sweet as whoopie pie” and “A finger in many whoopie pies” and “A piece of the whoopie pie.” Note: whoopie pies are two cookie-shaped cakes that have been sanwiched together with icing or cream.
  • Yule Log: Yule logs are traditional Christmas cakes that resemble a firelog. Here are some puns that could be used to reference these:
    • You’ll → Yule: As in “Yule never guess” and “Ask a silly question and yule get a silly answer” and “Yule know how” and “Yule take care of it.” Note: although not commonly used in everyday/colloquial conversation, yule is now used to refer to the Christmas period.
    • You log → Yule log: As in, “Have yule logged on yet?” This is a very specific pun that refers to yule logs (large logs that are burned on Christmas Eve).
  • Fairy cake: Fairy cakes are another word for butterfly cakes. They’re small cupcakes with a section of the top cut out, then fashioned to look like wings on top of the cake. The next few puns are centred around the idea of fairy cakes:
    • *fair* → *fairy*: Swap “fair” for “fairy”, like so: “Affairy of the heart”, “An affairy to remember”, “All the fun of the fairy,” and “All’s fairy in love and war”, “By fairy means or foul”, “Faint heart never won fairy lady”, “Fairy trade”, “Fairy and square”, “Fairy dinkum”, “Fairy enough”, “Fairy game”, “A family affairy,” and “My fairy lady”, “No fairy!” and “Savoir fairy.” 
    • Far → Fairy: Swap “far” for “fairy” to create some witty magic puns like so: “As fairy as it goes”, “As fairy as the eye can see”, “Few and fairy between”, and “Over the hills and fairy away”, “So fairy so good”, “Thursday’s child has fairy to go” and “The fruit does not fall fairy from the tree”. 
    • Very → Fairy: As in, “Be afraid, be fairy afraid”, “Before your fairy eyes”, “How fairy dare you!”, “It was a fairy good year”, “Thank you fairy much”, “Fairy interesting, but stupid”, “All fairy well” and “At the fairy least”.
    • Fiery → Fairy: As in, “Fairy red hair,” and “Fairy rage,” and “Filled with fairy enthusiasm.”
    • Four → Fairy: As in, “Twenty-fairy seven,” and “A fairy-letter word.”
    • Forty → Fairy-ty: As in, “Fairy-ty winks,” and “Life begins at fairy-ty.”
    • Firing → Fairy-ing: As in, “Fairy-ing blanks,” and “Fairy-ing on all cylinders,” and “The fairy-ing line.”
    • Fury → Fairy: As in, “Bright red with fairy,” and “Filled with sorrow and fairy,” and “Blinded with fairy,” and “Pent-up fairy.”
    • Hairy → Fairy: As in, “A fairy situation,” and “Give it the fairy eyeball.” Note: to give someone the hairy eyeball is to look at someone disdainfully.
    • *fare* → *fairy*: As in, “Fairynheit 451,” and “Welfairy reform,” and “Fairy-thee-well!” and “I bid you fairywell!” and “Celebration and fanfairy.” Note: Fahrenheit 451 is a dystopian novel that’s been made into a movie.
    • *fer* → *fairy*: As in, “A fairyocious effort,” and “Your highest offairy (offer),” and “Buffairy (buffer) zone,” and “Long suffairying (suffering),” and “What’s the diffairyence (difference)?” and “Transfairy the funds,” and “A good refairyence,” and  “Taking the fairy (ferry),” and “Defairy (defer) your admission,” and “Infairyority (inferiority) complex,” and “Well, if you’re offairying.”
    • *for* → *fairy*: As in, “Going fairyward,” and “Insider infairymation,” “Too much infairymation,” and “Peak perfairymance,” and “Fairyeign (foreign) exchange,” and “The fairycast for today,” and “Why hast thou fairysaken me?” and “In reference (or refairyence) to the afairymentioned…”
    • *fur* → *fairy*: As in, “Hell hath no fairy (fury) like..” and “An infairyating (infuriating) situation,” and “A part of the fairyniture,” and “Fairytive (furtive) glances,” and “And fairythermore…” and “A blazing fairynace (furnace).”
    • Fast and Furious → Fast and Fairyous
    • Fairy: We’ll finish this section off with fairy-related puns: “Airy fairy,” and “Fairytale ending” and “Nobody loves a fairy when she’s forty”.
  • Mug Cake: Mug cakes are a fairly new type of cupcake where ingredients are put in a mug then microwaved, rather than being cooked in an oven. The following are centred around mug cakes and can be used as cupcake puns:
    • Mag* → Mug*: As in, “The mugnitude of” and “A mugnificent ending” and “Self-help mugazine” and “My mugnum opus.” Note: a magnum opus is considered to be a person’s greatest work.
    • *meg* → *mug*: As in, “Pomugranate flavoured” and “The alpha and the omuga.”
    • Cake → Mug cake: As in, “A slice of the mug cake” and “A mug cake walk” and “Icing on the mug cake” and “Let them eat mug cake” and “A piece of mug cake” and “Selling like mug cakes” and “That really takes the mug cake” and “The cherry on the mug cake” and “You can’t have your mug cake and eat it too.”

Cake-Related Words

To help you come up with your own cake puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

general: cake, cupcake, sweet, dessert, baked, bake, baking,  batter, milk, egg, butter, flour, sugar, icing, frosting, cream, buttercream,  jam, vanilla, marzipan, fondant, piping, sprinkles, fruit, jelly, mousse, cocoa, nuts, recipe, mix,  ingredients, baking powder, baking soda, cook, chef, oven, nuts, slice, piece, ramekin, patty pan/case, rise, hundreds and thousands, patisserie, bakery, baker

cake types: sponge, layer, tier, fruit, torte, cheesecake, pancake, birthday, angelfood, angel, chiffon, gateau, pound, flourless, chocolate, wedding, bundt, decorative, black forest, coffee, carrot, roulade, foam, shortened, roll, ice cream, upside-down, cassata, german, babka, banana bread, battenberg, shortcake, mooncake, cake pop, cake balls, madeleines , swiss roll, sheet cake, blondie, brownie, butterfly, charlotte, devil’s food, eccles, funnel, gingerbread, hedgehog, jaffa, lamington, marble, mille-feuille, lava, muffin, opera, pavlova, petit gâteau, petit fours, princess, red velvet, rum baba, snowball, souffle, teacake, tiramisu, whoopie pie, yule log, fairy cake, mug cake

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Party Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on party puns! 🎉🎶🥤

Whether it’s a birthday, holiday event or a celebration in someone’s honour, make any social gathering you’re invited to (or hosting) a pun-filled time with our list of party puns. Should you be thinking of witty quips for your invites, Instagram captions or beverage list, we hope that you enjoy this list and find the perfect pun.

This list is specific to parties, but if you’re after some other party related puns, we have entries on firework puns, balloon puns, gift puns, New Year’s puns and birthday puns.

Party Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about parties that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of party puns:

  • *part* → *party*: We can change the “part” in words to “party” to make some silly party puns. As in, “In party-cular” and “Party-cipation award” and “Care to party-cipate? (could also be participarty)” and “Imparty your knowledge” and “That’s not your departy-ment” and “A partysan issue.” Other words you could use: partycle (particle), partytion (partition), aparty (apart), counterparty (counterpart), departy (depart), partyner (partner) party-cularly (particularly), party-cipant (participant) and reparty (repartee).
  • *pathy* → *party*: If a word has sound that’s similar enough to “party”, then we can simply change it to party to make it an appropriate pun. As in, emparty (empathy), aparty (apathy), symparty (sympathy), teleparty (telepathy) and antiparty (antipathy). Note: to feel antipathy is to feel dislike.
  • *pet* → *party*: As in, “Signed party-tion (petition)” and “Not to blow my own trumparty, but…” and “Political pupparty (this can work as it refers to both political puppets and parties of the political kind).”
  • *pert* → *party*: As in, partynent (pertinent), partynence (pertinence), exparty (expert) and proparty (property).
  • Serendipity → Serendiparty (Note: serendipity refers to unexpected and fortunate accidents.)
  • *port* → *party*: As in, “Financial partyfolio” and “You have my supparty” and “Public transparty” and “An unexpected oppartynity” and “A suppartyve (supportive) atmosphere” and “A sparty (sporty) person.”
  • *part* → *party*: As in, “A fool and his money are soon partied” and “Act the party” and “For my own party” and “Departy this life” and “If you’re not a party of the solution, you’re party of the problem” and “Drift aparty” and “Fall aparty” and “For the most party” and “Look the party” and “Worlds aparty.”
  • *vent* → *event*: eventure (venture), eventricle (ventricle), eventilation (ventilation), eventilate (ventilate), eventilator (ventilator), adevent (advent), circumevent (circumvent), prevent, coneventional (conventional).
  • Event: Some event-related phrases that could work in your party wordplay: “Current events” and “Happy event” and “The main event” and “Motion picture event” and “Turn of events.”
  • *vant* → *event*: As in, relevent (relevant) and irrelevent (irrelevant).
  • Bruise → Booze: As in, “A boozed ego” and “You can’t protect your kids from every bump and booze.”
  • *bas* → *booze*: As in, “On a first-name boozeis (basis)” and “Back to boozeics (basics)” and “Yes, boozeically” and “The boozelisk in the Chamber of Secrets (I’m sure many people will find ways to make boozy pickup lines out of this one…so use it and similar puns with your best judgement).”
  • *bes* → *booze*: As in, “All the boozet (best)” and “Boozet (best) friends forever” and “Boozet of all” and “Boozepoke suit” and “Boozetow your wisdom” and “Sit boozeside me.” Other words you could use: booze-seech (beseech), booze-sotted (besotted), booze-siege (besiege). Notes: to beseech is to beg.
  • *bos* → *booze*: As in, booze-om (bosom), rooibooze (rooibos) and verbooze (verbose). Note: rooibos is a type of tea.
  • *bus* → *booze*: As in, “Thrown under the booze” and “Walk or take the booze” and “None of your boozeiness” and “Boozey bee” and “Course syllabooze.” Other words you could use: nimbooze (nimbus), omnibooze (omnibus) and abooze (abuse). Notes: a nimbus is a circle of light, or a halo.
  • *baz* → *booze*: As in, boozear (bazaar), booze-ooka (bazooka), booze-illion (bazillion).
  • *biz* → *booze*: As in, “Boozear (bizarre) circumstances,” and “That’s showbooze.”
  • *buz* → *booze*: As in, “Booze me in” and “Booze off” and “Booze-ing with excitement” and “Boozewords.” Other words you could use: booze-ard (buzzard), booze-ing (boozing) and boozer (buzzer).
  • *bows* → *booze*: As in, “Chasing rainbooze” and “Rainbooze and unicorns” and “Rub elbooze with.”
  • Dear → Beer: As in “Oh beer me” and “Hang on for beer life” and “Near and beer to my heart” and “Elementary, my beer Watson.”
  • Ear → Beer: As in “Grin from beer to beer.” and “Let’s play it by beer.” and “Lend a beer” and “In one beer and out the other.”
  • Peer → Beer: As in “Beer pressure” and “It’s like she was beering into my soul.” Other words you could use: beerless (peerless), beered (peered).
  • Bear → Beer: As in “Grizzly beer” and “Beer a resemblance” and “The right to beer arms” and “Beer down upon” and “Bear witness to …” and “Beer false witness” and “Beer fruit” and “Beer in mind that …” and “Bring to beer“. Other bear-related or inclusive words you could use: beerings (bearings), beerer (bearer), forbeer (forbear), overbeering (overbearing), forbeerance (forbearance).
  • *pear* → *beer*: As in, “A beerlescent (pearlescent) glow” and “Abeer (appear) from thin air” and “Watch me disabeer” and “Make an abeerance.” Other words you could use: s’beerhead (spearhead), re-abeer (reappear).
  • Shakespeare → Shakesbeer
  • Pier → Beer: As in “Take a long walk off a short beer” and “Ear beercing” and “Never been habbeer (happier).”
  • Bare → Beer: As in “The beer necessities” and “Beer one’s teeth” and “Laid beer” and “The beer bones” and “The cupboard was beer“. You can also replace the “bare” in these words: barely (“beerly there”), threadbare (“A threadbeer toy”), cabaret (cabeeret), barefoot (beerfoot).
  • *bier* → *beer*: As in, grubbeer (grubbier), stubbeer (stubbier), tubbeer, scabbeer and chubbeer.
  • *pare* → *beer*: As in, “Beerent-teacher meeting” and “In beerenthesis” and “Like combeering apples and oranges” and “Be prebeered (prepared)” and “Abbeerently (apparently) so.” Other words you could use: abbeerel (apparel) and transbeerent (transparent).
  • *bar* → *beer*: As in, “Beer none” and “Behind beers” and “Language beerier” and “Raise the beer” and “Beerrelling (barreling) in” and “Beergain basement.” Other words you could use: beeren (barren), beerista (barista) and sidebeer (sidebar).
  • *ber* → *beer*: As in, “Strawbeery flavoured” and “Going beerserk” and “Got your numbeer” and “Sobeer up (this one’s a bit ironic)” and “A membeer of..” Other words you could use: beereft (bereft), beerate (berate), beerth (berth), beereavement (bereavement), chambeer (chamber), ambeer (amber), membeer, cybeer, remembeer, delibeerate, libeeral, libeerty, abeerration (aberration) and cumbeersome. Notes: to be bereft is to be deprived of something.
  • *bir* → *beer*: As in, “A little beerd told me” and “Beerthday suit” and “The early beerd.”
  • *bor* → *beer*: As in, “Beered out of your mind” and “Labeer of love” and “Harbeer a grudge” and “Good neighbeers” and “Please elabeerate” and “Collabeerate with.”
  • *bur* → *beer*: As in, “A heavy beerden.” Other words you could use: beereaucracy (bureaucracy), beergeoning (burgeoning) and excalibeer (excalibur).
  • *per* → *beer*: As in, “A different beerspective” and “Third beerson” and “Motivation and beerseverance.” Other words you could use: beertinent (pertinent), beeriod (period), beerception (perception), beernicious (pernicious), beercieve (perceive), beerformance (performance), beerfect (perfect), imbeerative (imperative) and obeeration (operation).
  • Hot → Shot: As in, “Drop it like it’s shot” and “Shot and bothered” and “Shot and heavy” and “Shot enough for you?” and “A shot mess” and “Shot stuff” and “Too shot to handle.”
  • Shut → Shot: As in, “An open and shot case” and “Put up or shot up.” You can also replace the “shut” in these words: shotdown (shutdown), shottle (shuttle), shotter (shutter), shotterbug (shutterbug) and shoteye (shuteye).
  • *shot*: You can emphasise the “shot” in some words: screenshot, hotshot, snapshot, upshot, headshot, slingshot, shotgun and mugshot.
  • Give → Gift: As in, “A dead giftaway” and “Don’t gift up!” and “Don’t gift in” and “Gift yourself a bad name” and “Gift them a hand” and “Gift and take” and “Gift credit where credit is due” and “Gift it a rest” and “Gift it the green light” and “Gift me a call” and “Gift 110%”.
  • Gave → Gift: As in, “I gift my best.”
  • Present: We’ve included present-related phrases in this list too. As in, “All present and correct” and “Present company excepted” and “No time like the present.”
  • Percent → Present: As in, “A hundred and ten present” and “Genius is one present inspiration and 99 present perspiration.”
  • Dig → Shindig: Since shindig is another word for party, we’ve included shindig in this list: “Shindig your own grave” and “Shindig yourself into a hole” and “Shindig up dirt” and “Shindig deep.”
  • Bash: Since “bash” is another word for party, we’ve got some bash-related puns and phrases for you to use here:
    • *bas* → *bash*: As in, “You b*shtard” and “Don’t keep all your eggs in one bashket” and “Saved to the databash” and “On the bashis of..” Other words you could use: bashic (basic), bashin (basin), bashtion (bastion), bombashtic (bombastic).
    • *bis* → *bash*: As in, refurbash (refurbish), cannabash (cannabis), rubbash (rubbish) and bashop (bishop).
    • *bus → *bash: As in, “Part of the syllabash” and “Collector’s omnibash.” Note: an omnibus is a collection of work.
    • *bush → *bash: As in, “Feeling ambashed” and “Filled with rosebashes” and “Babashka doll.”
    • *pas* → *bash: As in, “Bashion for fashion” and “Bashive aggressiveness” and “Bashionate about” and “Combashion fatigue.”
  • Blowout: Blowout is another word for a party or social function (particularly those with plenty of food), so we’ve included some blowout-related puns and phrases here:
    • Out → Blowout: As in, “Ins and blowouts.”
    • Blow → Blowout: As in, “Blowout hot and cold” and “Blowout some steam” and “Blowout the lid off” and “Blowout to smithereens” and “Blowout your mind.”
  • Card: Since cards (like birthday cards) can be given at parties, we’ve included some card-related puns:
    • *cred* → *card*: As in, “Street card” and “Take cardit for” and “Nothing is sacard” and “Not cardible (credible)” and “Ruined cardibility.” Other words that could work: cardentials (credentials), cardence (credence), massacard (massacred), incardulous (incredulous). Notes: credence is a mental acceptance of something as being true or real. Being incredulous is not wanting to believe something.
    • *cur* → *card*: As in, “The final cardtain (curtain)” and “A cardsory (cursory) glance” and “I concard (concur)” and “That never occard (occured) to me.” Other words that could work: cardmudgeon (curmudgeon), incard (incur), recard (recur), obscard (obscured), secardity (security), cardate (curate), cardiculum (curriculum) and manicard (manicured).
    • *cor* → *card*: As in, “Cardespondence course” and “Cut the card (cord)” and “In your cardner (corner)” and “The final scard (score)” and “For the recard.” Other words that could work in the right context: cardporation (corporation), cardoborate (corroborate), cardelation (correlation), decard (decor), rancard (rancor), accard (accord), incardporate (incorporate). Note: to corroborate is to add proof to an account. Rancor is a bitter, deeply-ingrained ill-feeling.
    • *cured* → *card*: As in, “What can’t be card (cured) must be endured” and “Her face was obscard (obscured)” and “Perimeter secard (secured)” and “Procard (procured) the goods” and “Manicard (manicured) lawns.”
    • Certain → Cardtain: As in, “In no uncardtain terms” and “Know for cardtain.”
    • *curd* → *card*: As in, card (curd), cardle (curdle) and bloodcardling (bloodcurdling).
    • Drunkard → Druncard
    • *cord* → *card*: As in, “A broken recard and “Cut the card” and “For the recard” and “In recard time” and “Off the recard” and “Accarding to…” and “Remain cardial.” Other words that could work: cardially (cordially), carduroy (corduroy), cardon (cordon), discard (discord), accardance (accordance). Notes: to do something cordially is to do it in a friendly way. A cordon is a rope used to define boundaries.
    • *car* → *card*: As in, “Courtesy and card (care)” and “Drive my card” and “Upset the apple card (apple cart)” and “Couldn’t card less.” Other words that could work: cardeer (career), cardier (carrier), cardiage (carriage), cardavan (caravan), scard (scar), Madagascard (Madagascar), railcard (railcar), handcard (handcar), precardious (precarious), vicardious (vicarious).
    • Cartier → Cardier
    • Cared → Card: As in, “I card about you” and “Run s-card” and “S-card poopless,” and “S-card to death.”
    • Card: Some card-related phrases to play with: “A few cards short of a full deck” and “Calling card” and “Card up your sleeve” and “Deck of cards” and “Get out of jail free card” and “Hold all the cards” and “Holding your cards close to your chest” and “House of cards” and “Lay your cards on the table” and “On the cards” and “Pick a card, any card” and “Play your cards right.”
    • Card*: Some card-related/inclusive words: cardinal, cardboard, cardio, cardigan, cardiac, discard, placard, wildcard, timecard, postcard and scorecard.
  • Guessed → Guest: As in, “Never would have guest” and “You guest correctly.”
  • Gist → Guest: As in, “Got the guest of it.”
  • Ghost → Guest: As in, “White as a guest” and “Guestbusters” and “Give up the guest” and “Not a guest of a chance” and “You look as though you’ve seen a guest” and “Guest from the past.” Other ghost-related words: guestly (ghostly), guestwriter (ghostwriter), guested (ghosted), guesting (ghosting).
  • Ghost in the Shell → Guest in the Shell (Ghost in the Shell is a popular Japanese manga that was whitewashed when it was adapted to film).
  • *ghast* → *guest*: As in, “Looking guestly” and “Aguest at the situation.” Note: to be aghast is to be horrified.
  • *gast* → *guest*: guestronomy (gastronomy), guestronomical (gastronomical) and flabberguested (flabbergasted).
  • *gest* → *guest*: As in, “An empty guesture” and “What do you sugguest?” and “Let me diguest” and “Sugguestive looks.” Other words you could use: conguestion (congestion), sugguestion (suggestion), longuest (longest), larguest (largest), bigguest (biggest), inguest (ingest), guestural (gestural), guesticulate (gesticulate), guestation (gestation).
  • *gust* → *guest*: As in, “With guesto” and “Disguested with your behaviour.”
  • August → Auguest
  • *gist* → *guest*: As in, “A reguestered (registered) voter” and “Professional psychologuest.” Other words you could use: meteorologuest (meteorologist), reguestration (registration), neurologuest (neurologist), anthropologuest (anthropologist), maguestrate (magistrate), loguestics (logistics).
  • *hast* → *host*: As in, “Beat a hosty retreat” and “Make hoste” and “Hostily working.”
  • History → Hostory: As in, “Making hostory” and “A short hostory of nearly everything” and “Ancient hostory” and “Hostory repeating” and “Hostory repeating” and “The rest is hostory” and “Of hostorical importance.”
  • *hust* → *host*: As in, “Hostle and bustle” and “Moving and hostling.”
  • *host*: Emphasise the “host” in certain words: hostile, hostage, hostel and hostility.
  • Toast: A toast is a salutation or well-wishing which is common at parties and celebrations, so we’ve included it in this list. Here’s a short section of toast puns:
    • Taste → Toast: As in, “An acquired toast” and “A bad toast in one’s mouth” and “A toast of your own medicine” and “No accounting for toast.”
    • Toes → Toast: As in, “Keep you on your toast” and “On your toast” and “Twinkle toast” and “Not to step on anyone’s toast.”
    • *tas* → *toast*: As in, “A toasty (tasty) sandwich” and “Toastless fashion” and “A fantoastic result.” Other words you could use: fantoasty (fantasy), catoastrophe (catastrophe), fajitoast (fajitas), gravitoast (gravitas). Notes: fajitas are a type of tex-mex dish. Gravitas refers to a feeling or atmosphere of seriousness.
    • *test* → *toast*: As in, “A toastament to” and “Give toastimony to” and “Toasting the limits of” and “Online toastimonials” and “It’s not a contoast” and “Street protoasts” and “Attoast (attest) to.”
    • *tis* → *toast*: As in, “Online advertoastments” and “Acute arthritoast.”
    • *tos* → *toast*: As in, asbestoast (asbestos), memontoast (mementos), mosquitoast (mosquitoes), photoastsynthesise (photosynthesise), comatoast (comatose), stratoastphere (stratosphere), fructoast (fructose), lactoast (lactose), halitoastsis (halitosis). Note: halitosis is bad breath.
    • *tus* → *toast*: As in, “Statoast anxiety” and “On hiatoast.” Other words you could use: impetoast (impetus), apparatoast (apparatus), detritoast (detritus) and cactoast (cactus). Notes: an impetus is a thing or factor that compels you to do something. Detritus are pieces of rock, or debris.
    • *tist* → *toast*: As in, “Scam artoast (artist)” and “Census statoastics.” Other words you could use: egotoastical (egotistical), dentoast (dentist), statoastic (statistic), pragmatoast (pragmatist), scientoast (scientist) and elitoast (elitist).
    • Testosterone → Testoasterone
    • *toes* → *toast*: As in, “Small potatoast” and “Red as a tomatoast” and “On tiptoast (tiptoes).”
    • Toast: We’ll finish this section off with some toast-related phrases that you can use as puns: “Toast of the town” and “You’re toast.”
  • *fed* → *food*: As in, foodback (feedback), fooderal (federal), foodora (fedora), confooderate (confederate), fooderation (federation).
  • Befuddled → Befoodled
  • Daffodil → Daffoodil
  • *fid* → *food*: As in, “Walk with confoodence” and “Feeling confoodent” and “High foodelity.” Other words you could use: diffoodent (diffident), fooddle (fiddle) and affoodavit (affidavit).
  • Nibble: Finger food and nibbles (or “nibblies”) are a common type of food at parties, so we’ve included them in this list. Here’s a short section of puns about nibbling:
    • *nable* → *nibble*: As in, “Be reasonibble” and “An unsustainibble work relationship.” Other words you could use: untenibble (untenable), amenibble (amenable), unconscionibble (unconscionable) and abominibble (abominable).
    • *nibl* → *nibble*: Discernibble (discernible) and indiscernibble (indiscernible).
  • As entertainment and social interaction is the main reason for parties, we’ve included some fun-related puns in this list too:
    • *fan* → *fun*: As in, “Funtastic news!” and “All a big funtasy” and “A solid funbase.” Other words that could work: funatic (fanatic), funciful (fanciful), funfare (fanfare), infunt (infant), profunity (profanity), funatically (fanatically).
    • *fen* → *fun*: As in, “Funder-bender” and “On the funce” and “In my defunce” and “On the offunsive” and “A deafuning roar.” Other words you could use: defundant (defendant), stiffun (stiffen), ibuprofun (ibuprofen) and funnel (fennel).
    • *fin* → *fun*: As in, “Close to the funish line” and “Choc chip muffun” and “By defunition.” Other words you could use: funancial (financial), funally (finally), elfun (elfin) and defunitely (definitely).
    • *fon* → *fun*: As in, “A fundness (fondness) for” and “Fundly remember” and “Chiffun skirt.” Other words that could work: fundue (fondue), fundle (fondue), fundant (fondant).
    • *fun*: Emphasise the “fun” in these words: “The fundamentals of” and “In a deep funk” and “A social function.” Other words that could work: fungus, fungi, funnel and perfunctory.
    • *van* → *fun*: As in, “A relefunt point” and “Carafun park” and “To your adfuntage” and “That’s irrelefunt.” Other words you could use: efunescent (evanescent), griefunce (grievance), nerfuna (nirvana) and funity (vanity).
    • Vanessa → Funessa
    • *phan* → *fun*: As in, “The funtom menace” and “The elefunt in the room” and “In alfunumeric order.” Other words that could work: epifuny (epiphany), orfunage (orphanage).
    • *phen* → *fun*: funomenon (phenomenon), funomenal (phenomenal), hyfun (hyphen) and hyfunate (hyphenate).
    • *phin* → *fun*: Dolfun (dolphin), endorfun (endorphin).
    • *phon* → *fun*: Funetics (phonetics), sifun (siphon), cacofuny (cacophony), homofun (homophone) and symfuny (symphony).
  • Bass: Music with heavy bass is popular at parties (especially casual or celebratory ones), so we’ve included some bass-related puns and phrases in this list:
    • Base → Bass: As in, “Caught off bass” and “Cover your basses” and “Off bass” and “Touch bass.”
    • *bes* → *bass*: As in, “A basspoke suit” and “All for the basst” and “Basst friends forever” and “Basstow your knowledge” and “Basset (beset) with doubts.” Other words you could use: bassides (besides), basseech (beseech), bassotted (bessotted), bassiege (besiege).
    • Rooibos → Rooibass (note: rooibos is a type of tea.)
    • *bos* → *bass*: As in, verbass (verbose), probasscis (proboscis), embassed (embossed).
    • Bus → Bass: As in, “Park the bass” and “Take the bass” and “The wheels on the bass go round and round.”
    • *bus* → *bass*: As in, “Not your bassiness” and “This is a place of bassiness” and “Bassy as a bee.” Other words that could work: nimbass (nimbus), syllabass (syllabus), omnibass (omnibus), inbubass (incubus), rhombass (rhombus) and robasst (robust).
    • Herbaceous → Herbasseous
    • *bic* → *bass*: basseps (biceps), bassentennial (bicentennial) and bassentenary (bicentenary).
    • *pes* → *bass*: As in, “Famine and basstilence (pestilence)” and “You’re being a basst (pest)” and “Being bassimistic (pessimistic).” Other words that could work: basster (pester), tembasst (tempest), tabasstry (tapestry) and tembasstuous (tempestuous).
    • *pis* → *bass*: As in, “The newest ebassode (episode)” and “Basstachio flavoured” and “A prolific philanthrobasst.”
    • *pace* → *bass*: bassmaker (pacemaker), worksbass (workspace), headsbass (headspace) and backsbass (backspace).
    • *bas* → *bass*: As in, “Back to bassics” and “Bargain bassment” and “Don’t let the basstards get you down.” Other words that could be used: bassin (basin), bassball (baseball), bassline (baseline), bassket (basket), bombasstic (bombastic), databass.
    • *bass*: Emphasise the “bass” in these words: bassinet, basset, bassoon, ambassador, embassy, embassador. Notes: a bassinet is a type of cradle.
  • *den* → *dance*: As in, “Rose gardance” and “Ice maidance” and “Beholdance to” and “Dancely (densely) packed” and “You’re goldance.” Other words you could use: wardance (warden), dance-ity (density), condancesation (condensation), burdancesome (burdensome), condancesate (condensate), condanced (condensed).
  • *dence* → *dance*: As in, “Where’s the evidance?” and “Overflowing with confidance” and “In correspondance with” and “Setting precedance.” Other words that could work: residance, prudance, providance and candance.
  • *tans* → *dance*: As in, “Good samaridance (samaritans)” and “A bunch of charladance (charlatans).” Note: a charlatan is a trickster.
  • *tens* → *dance*: As in, “Sexual dance-ion” and “Dance (tens) of thousands of” and “Could cut the danceion with a knife” and “By exdanceion” and “An indance situation.” Other words that could work: indance-ive (intensive), hyperdance-ion (hypertension).
  • *tance* → *dance*: As in, “Subsdance abuse” and “Pleased to make your acquaindance” and “For insdance” and “Respect exisdance or expect resisdance” and “Unfortunate circumsdances” and “Keep your disdance” and “Provide assisdance.”
  • Dance: A few dance-related phrases that could serve as party puns in the right context: “Dance around the problem” and “Dancing with wolves” and “Lead a merry dance” and “Make a song and dance about.”
  • Favour → Party favour: As in, “Call in a party favour” and “Curry party favours with” and “Owe a party favour” and “Without fear or party favours.”
  • Animal → Party animal: As in, “A whole different party animal” and “Party animal instinct” and “Party animal magnetism” and “The party animal kingdom.”
  • House: The word “house” can have multiple meanings when it comes to parties – it can refer to the type of party (house party), a specific location (Jack’s house) or a type of music (house music). We’ve got some terrible house-related puns and phrases for you here:
    • Host → House-t: As in, “Our generous house-t” and “The house-tess with the mostess.”
    • Has → House: As in, “Word house it” and “What house come over you?” and “House a heart of gold.”
    • *has* → *house*: As in, “A big house-le (hassle)” and “A frivolous purchouse.”
    • *hos* → *house*: As in, “Taken housetage” and “Generous housepitality” and “Faced with housetility” and “In the housepital.”
    • *hus* → *house*: As in, “House-tle and bustle” and “Newlywed houseband” and “Filled with enthouse-iasm.”
    • Massachusetts → Massachouse-etts
    • His* → House*: As in, “Filled with house-tory” and “Ancient house-tory” and “House-torial documents” and “A house-toric party.”
  • Birth* → Barth*: As in, “Barthday party” and “In your barthday suit” and “Give barth to..” Note: these puns could work particularly well for a birthday party that’s happening at a bar.
  • *ber* → *bar*: As in, “Daylight robbary” and “Numbar one” and “Sweet as a barry” and “Going barserk” and “Do you remembar? (this one is a bit tongue-in-cheek as there’s a trope of not remembering much the night after going to a bar)” and “I’ve got your numbar” and “Call me when you’re sobar” and “From a deep slumbar” and “A membar of…” Other words you could use: rubbar, chambar, libarty and bareft (bereft). Note: to be bereft is to be pained or deprived.
  • Berlin → Barlin
  • Bermuda → Barmuda
  • December → Decembar: Note that October (Octobar) and November (Novembar) work as well.
  • *bor* → *bar*: As in, “Bared out of your mind” and “Barn and bred” and “On barrowed time” and “A labar of love” and “Friendly neighbars” and “On the barder.” Other words that could work: baring (boring), baredom (boredom) and harbar (harbor).
  • *bur* → *bar*: As in, “On the back-barner” and “Baried treasure” and “Barn one’s bridges” and “Barst into tears/out laughing” and “Barst someone’s bubble” and “Bary your head in the sand” and “Shoulder the barden” and “Barning with desire.”
  • *par* → *bar*: Some of these puns could work really well for a party that’s happening at a bar, or a bar-crawl style party: “Fight for the right to barty” and “Below bar” and “Drift abart” and “Fool’s baradise” and “For the most bart” and “Housewarming barty” and “Life of the barty” and “Look the bart” and “Bartner in crime” and “Hit it out of the bark.” Other words you could use: Baris (Paris), sbar (spar) and sub-bar (subpar).
  • *per* → *bar*: As in, “That’s barfect” and “Barson of interest” and “Expect barfection” and “As bar usual” and “A hundred and ten barcent” and “Cast asbarsions (aspersions)” and “Not a morning barson” and “Barmanent changes” and “Sunny barsonality” and “From a different barspective” and “Overpowering barfume” and “Barsonal questions” and “Seasoned barfectly” and “Whisbared confession.”
  • Inspiration → Insbaration
  • Bahamas → Barhamas
  • Kuala Lumpur → Kuala Lumpbar
  • *bar*: Emphasise the “bar” in certain words: “Born in a barn” and “Barrel of monkeys” and “Over the barrier” and “Bargain basement.” Other words that work: barren, embarassed, Barbados, barbarian, barbecue, barbell, barbershop, Barcelona, baritone, barnacle and barricade.
  • Since a lot of parties are held in bars and clubs, we’ve included some club-related puns and phrases for you:
    • Clap → Club: As in, “Clubbed eyes on” and “If you’re happy and you know it, club your hands.”
    • Cub → Club: As in, “Club scout” and “All club-hunting should be illegal.”
    • Recyclable → Recycluble
    • *clap* → *club*: As in, “Well that’s just clubtrap (claptrap)” and “Thunderclub.”
    • *clip* → *club*: As in, clubboard (clipboard), paperclub (paperclip) and eclubse (eclipse).
    • Encyclopedia → Encyclubpedia
    • Kleptomania → Clubtomania: (note: kleptomania is a disorder where a person obsessively steals.)
  • Beach: Since beaches are popular locations for parties (enough to be considered a type of party on their own), we’ve got some beach-related puns and phrases here for you:
    • B*tch → Beach: As in, “Bow down, beaches” and “Payback’s a beach” and “Resting beach face.”
    • Breach → Beach: As in, “A beach of trust.”
    • Breech → Beach: As in, “Too big for your beaches.” Note: breeches are a very old word for pants.
    • Bleach → Beach: As in, “Beached blonde.”
    • Peach → Beach: As in, “Beachy keen” and “What a beach” and “Skin like beaches and cream.”
    • Preach → Beach: As in, “Practice what you beach” and “Beaching to the choir” and “Beaching to the converted” and “Papa, don’t beach. (note: this is also a reference to a pop song by Madonna).”
    • Bachelor → Beachelor: As in, “Beachelor pad” and “Beachelorette party” and “The Beachelor (note: this one is also a reference to the dating show, The Bachelor).”
    • Bechamel → Beachamel (note: bechamel is a type of white, cream-based sauce.)
    • Bichon Frise → Beachon Frise: (note: a bichon frise is a breed of dog.)
    • Batch → Beach: As in, “Fresh beach of cookies” and “Maybe in the next beach.”
    • Benedict Cumberbatch → Benedict Cumberbeach
    • You betcha → You beacha
    • Botch → Beach: As in, “A beached job.”
    • *patch* → *beach*: As in, “Not a beach on” and “Going through a rough beach” and “Beachouli (patchouli) scented” and “From disbeach (dispatch).”
    • Pitch → Beach: As in, “Fever beach” and “Lower your beachforks.”
    • Betray → Beachray: As in, “You have beachrayed me for the last time” and “Don’t beachray me.”
    • Ambition → Ambeachion
  • Streamer: Since streamers are a common party decoration, we’ve included some puns and phrases that could be used as streamer puns in the right context:
    • Scream → Streamer: As in, “Streamer your heart out” and “Dragged kicking and streamering” and “Streamer the place down” and “So mad I could streamer.”
    • Steam → Streamer: As in, “Blow off some streamer” and “Full streamer ahead” and “Work off a head of streamer” and “Run out of streamer” and “Under your own streamer” and “Pick up streamer.”
  • Plan: Having plans and making plans are a big part of making a party happen, so we’ve included plan-related phrases and puns here:
    • *pan* → *plan*: As in, “Flat as a plancake” and “Out of the frying plan, into the fire” and “Things didn’t plan out” and “Bad complany” and “Caught with your plants down” and “Present complany excepted” and “A splanner in the works” and “Plander to” and “Running ramplant.” Other words you could use: plantheon (pantheon), planda (panda), splan (span), lifesplan (lifespan), deadplan (deadpan), timesplan (timespan), marziplan (marzipan), complany (company), discreplancy (discrepancy), planel (panel) and expland (expand).
    • Pen → Plan: As in, “The plan is mightier than the sword.”
    • Pants → Plans: As in, “Ants in your plans” and “Fly by the seat of your plans.”
    • *pen* → *plan*: As in, “A planchant for” and “A planetrating stare” and “Give planance for” and “Oplan bar” and “Damplan your spirits” and “A deeplaning relationship.” Other words that could work: happlan (happen), sharplan (sharpen), proplansity (propensity), applandix (appendix), indeplandent (independent), indisplansible (indispensible) and deplandent (dependent).
    • *plen* → *plan*: As in, “Planty more fish in the sea” and “A splandid thing” and “Full of splandor.” Other words you can use: resplandent (resplendent), plantiful (plentiful) and replanish (replenish).
    • *plin* → *plan*: planth (plinth), disciplan (discipline) and splanter (splinter).
    • *ban* → *plan*: As in, “Money in the plan-k” and “A subur-plan family” and “Aplan-don ship.” Other words that could work: tur-plan (turban), ur-plan (urban), planter (banter).
    • *blan* → *plan*: As in, “Looking plan-k” and “A plan-k sheet of paper” and “Baby planket” and “Plan-d (bland) tasting” and “Bears a resemplance to…”
    • *ann* → *plan*: As in, “Happy planniversary” and “Plannotated notes” and “Plannihilate the competition.”
    • *ana* → *plan*: plan-alysis (analysis), plan-alogy (analogy) and plan-alog (analog).
    •  *plan*: Emphasise the “plan” in these words: plant, plane, planet, planning, plangent, explanation.

This section is dedicated to different types of parties:

  • Tea: These tea-related puns and phrases can stand in as tea-party puns in the right context:
    • *tie* → *tea*: As in “Black tea” and “Equal opportuniteas” and “Necktea party” and “Tea the knot” and “Tea up the loose ends” and “Tea yourself in knots.”
    • To → Tea: As in, “An accident waiting tea happen” and “According tea” and “All dressed up and nowhere tea go” and “Not all it’s cracked up tea be.”
    • Too → Tea: As in, “About time tea” and “Never tea late to” and “You know tea much” and “Life’s tea short.”
    • Tree → Tea: As in, “Can’t see the wood for the teas” and “Family tea.”
    • *tee* → *tea*: As in, “To the teath” and “Smells like tean spirit” and “Teaming with energy” and “100% guarantea” and “Self-esteam.” Other words you could use: teanager (teenager), committea (committee), repartea (repartee), trustea, mentea, devotea, esteam (esteem), voluntear and cantean.
    • *tei* → *tea*: As in, “Protean shake” and “Frankenstean.”
    • *teo* → *tea*: As in, courteaous, righteaous, meteaor and oesteaoporosis.
    • *teu* → *tea*: As in, “An amateaur performance” and “Agent provocateaur.”
    • *tey* → *tea*: As in, “Okay then matea” and “A chocolatea taste.”
    • *tie* → *tea*: sortea (sortie), auntea (auntie), sweetea, sentea-ent (sentient), frontea-er (frontier), ameniteas, faciliteas.
    • Tiara → Tea-ara
    • *tyi* → *tea*: As in, “Partea-ing ’til morning” and “Emptea-ing your cup” and “A pitea-ing look.”
    • *ty → *tea: As in, “Work with integritea” and “A citea mouse” and “Your dutea as a party animal” and “Filled with beautea.” Other words you could use: teapical (typical), tea-ranny (tyranny), qualitea (quality), entitea (entity), facilitea (facility), serendipitea (serendipity) and equitea (equity).
    • *dee → *tea: As in, “Party attenteas” and “The awar-teas (awardees) are…”
    • *deo* → *tea*: As in, “Vi-teao (video) star” and “A hitea-ous day” and “Opposing itea-ologies.”
    • *die* → *tea*: As in, “A captive autea-ence” and “Obetea-ent puppies.”
    • *tea*: We’ll finish this section off with words that already have the word “tea” in them: “Teamwork makes the dream work” and “Making me tear up” and “Experience is the best teacher” and “Teach someone a lesson.”
  • Birthday: Since birthdays are one of the biggest reasons to throw a party, we’ve included some birth and birthday-related phrases for you:
    • Day → Birthday: As in, “A birthday in the life,” and “A birthday without orange juice is like a birthday without sunshine,” and “After all, tomorrow is another birthday,” and “All in a birthday’s work,” and “As true as the birthday is long,” and “At the end of the birthday,” and “Call it a birthday,” and “For ever and a birthday,” and “Go on punk, make my birthday.”
    • Birthday: We’ll finish up this birthday section with some direct birthday-related puns: “Happy birthday to you,” and “In your birthday suit.”
  • Prize → Surprise: Surprise parties are a another type of party we’ve got covered in this list: “Booby surprise” and “Keep your eyes on the surprise” and “A surprise catch” and “No surprises for guessing.”
  • Cocktail: Cocktail parties are popular enough to have made our pun list:
    • Cock → Cocktail: As in, “A cocktail and bull story” and “At half cocktail.”
    • Tail → Cocktail: As in, “Can’t make head or cocktail of it” and “Chasing cocktails” and “Heads I win, cocktails I lose” and “Nose to cocktail” and “The devil is in the cocktails.”
  • Dress → Fancy Dress: As in, “All fancy-dressed up and nowhere to go” and “Fancy dress code” and “Fancy dress for success” and “Fancy dressed to kill” and “In a state of fancy dress” and “You’re never fully fancy-dressed without a smile.”
  • Well, come → Welcome: Welcome parties are usually saved for when someone moves country or starts a new job. As in, “Welcome in!”
  • Pool: Make some terrible pool party puns with these puns and phrases:
    • Pull → Pool: As in, “Like pooling teeth” and “Pool a face” and “Pool a fast one” and “Pool out all the stops” and “Pool through” and “Want to pool my hair out” and “Pooling your punches” and “Stop pooling my leg.”
    • *pal* → *pool*: As in, “Principool players” and “A pooltry amount.”
    • *pel* → *pool*: As in, “A compoolling argument” and “My doppoolganger” and “The gospool truth.” Note: a doppelganger is someone who looks like a double of another person.
    • *pol* → *pool*: As in, “Poolitical atmosphere” and “Grammar poolice” and “Poolish up your skills” and “I apoologise” and “An open-door poolicy.” Other words that could work: extrapoolate and anthropoology.
    • *pul* → *pool*: As in, “On impoolse” and “The popoolar choice” and “Rising popoolation” and “It’s compoolsory.” Other words that could work: opoolent (opulent), popoolist (populist), stipoolate (stipulate) and manipoolate (manipulate). Note: a populist is someone who advocates policies simply because they’re popular, rather than because they’re correct, moral, or socially good.
    • *poll* → *pool*: As in, poollution (pollution), poollen (pollen) and poollutant (pollutant).
    • *bal* → *pool*: As in, “A glopool problem” and “Herpool (herbal) tea” and “A verpool (verbal) argument.”
    • *bol* → *pool*: As in, “A sympool of hope” and “Fast metapoolism.”
    • *bul* → *pool*: As in, “A fapoolous outfit” and “Nepoolous (nebulous) ideas” and “An extensive vocapoolary.” Note: nebulous means hazy or ill-defined.
    • *ple* → *pool*: As in, “A second bite of the appool” and “On principool” and “A peopool person” and “A simpool solution for a simpool problem” and “Stapool foods” and ” For exampool” and “Multipool options” and “Power coupool.”
  • Mix → Mixer: Mixers are parties with the intention of meeting new people and making new connections. As in, “In the mixer” and “Mixer and match” and “Mixer it up” and “Pick ‘n’ mixer.”
  • Rave: Raves are types of dance parties that are associated with electronic dance music and drug use. We can make some puns about these with these rave-related puns and phrases:
    • *rav* → *rave*: As in, “Rave-aged by time” and “Rave-n black hair” and “Unrave-ling lies” and “A rave-ishing dress” and “Ranting and rave-ing.” Other words you could use: rave-ine (ravine), rave-enous, rave-ioli (ravioli), trave-l, trave-erse (traverse), grave-itas (gravitas), trave-esty (travesty), grave, brave, grave-ity, carave-an (caravan). Note: gravitas is an atmosphere or attitude of seriousness.
    • *rev* → *rave*: As in, “A rave rave-iew (double pun!)” and “In rave-erse” and “Rave-ert to past behaviour” and “Part of the rave-olution” and “The big rave-eal” and “Rave-oked privileges.” Other words you could use: rave-el (revel), rave-enue (revenue), rave-erie (reverie), rave-oke (revoke), prave-elent (prevalent). Note: to revel is to celebrate.
    • *riv* → *rave*: As in, “Cry me a rave-er” and “A rave-eting performance” and “Sibling rave-lry.”
  • Party → Afterparty: As in, “Fight for the right to afterparty” and “It’s my afterparty and I’ll cry if I want to” and “Life and soul of the afterparty” and “Afterparty animal” and “Afterparty on!”
  • Lan: Lan parties are social events based around playing multiplayer computer games.
    • *lan*: Emphasise the “lan” in these words: “Like speaking another language” and “On land” and “A whole different landscape” and “A landmark location” and “According to plan.” Other words you could use: languish, languid and lantern. Note: to languish is to be in a state of weakness.
    • *len* → *lan*: As in, “A lanient parenting style” and “Style over langth” and “A langthy conversation” and “Hoping for laniency” and “Looking through a different lans (lens)” and “A sullan disposition.” Other words that you could use: swollan (swollen), pollan (pollen), crestfallan, stolan (stolen), challange (challenge), ambivalant, condolances, benevolant (benevolent), prevalant (prevalent) and calandar. Note: to be lenient is to be forgiving or soft-hearted.
    • *lin* → *lan*: As in, “You little goblan” and “Running on adrenalan.” Other words you could use: insulan (insulin), disciplan (discipline), delaneate (delineate).
    • *lun* → *lan*: As in, “Utter lanacy” and “A fundraising lancheon” and “Volanteering for.”
  • Buck: Buck’s nights/parties are another word for bachelor parties, so we’ve included buck-related phrases and puns here for you:
    • Back → Buck: As in, “Answer buck” and “As soon as my buck is turned” and “At the buck of my mind” and “Buck at it” and “Never buck down” and “Buck in the day” and “Buck on your feet” and “Buck to square one” and “Buck to the drawing board” and “A buckhanded compliment” and “Bending over buckwards” and “Comebuck king” and “Doubling buck” and “Fed up to the buck teeth” and “Fighting buck tears.” Other words that have “back” in them: buckslide (backslide), buckup (backup), buckground (background), bucklash (backlash), buckdrop (backdrop) and feedbuck (feedback).
    • Back to the Future → Buck to the Future
    • Back in Black → Buck in Black
    • *bac* → *buck*: buckteria (bacteria), buck-chelor (bachelor) and debuckle (debacle).
    • *bec* → *buck*: As in, “What have you buckome?” and “Well, buckause…” and “Your attitude isn’t buckoming” and “Buckame (became) my worst nightmare.”
    • *bic* → *buck*: As in, “Aerobuck exercise” and “Feeling claustrophobuck” and “Cubuckle farm.”
    • *buc* → *buck*: As in, “A drop in the bucket” and “Buckle up!” and “Buck-aneer life” and “A buckolic (bucolic) scene.” Note: if something is bucolic, then it’s of or relating to the countryside.
    • *bak* → *buck*: As in, “A bucker’s dozen” and “Half-bucked.”
    • *bik* → *buck*: “Rubuck‘s cube” and “Buckini shoot.”
    • *buk* → *buck*: As in, “A fresh persbucktive” and “Earned my resbuckt” and “Every asbuckt of” and “Exciting prosbuckts (prospects)” and “A wide s-bucktrum (spectrum)” and “A prosbucktive employee.” Other words you could use: circumsbuckt (circumspect), desbuckable (despicable), bucktoral (pectoral) and combuckt (compact). Note: to be circumspect is to be aware and considerate of all circumstances.
    • Barbecue → Barbuckue: This one could work particularly well for a buck’s party that’s happening at a barbecue (although very specific).
    • Buck: We’ll finish this section with some buck-related phrases: “A bigger bang for your buck” and “A buck well spent” and “The big bucks” and “Buck naked” and “Buck the system” and “Buck up your ideas” and “An honest buck” and “Looking like a million bucks.”
  • Hen: Hen’s parties/nights are another word for bachelorette parties, so we’ve included hens-related phrases and puns here for you:
    • *han* → *hen*: As in, “Here’s looking at you, hensome” and “Get a hendle on the situation” and “Experiencing an epipheny.”
    • *hin* → *hen*: As in, “Hendering my efforts” and “In hendsight” and “Give me a hent (hint)” and “You’re a hendrance” and “The beauty withen” and “Street urchen” and “Filled with endorphens.”
    • *hon* → *hen*: As in, “But henestly” and “Smooth as heney” and “An henourable person” and “A real marathen.”
    • *hun* → *hen*: As in, “A hendred and ten percent” and “Hengry enough to eat an entire country.”
    • *hen*: We’ll finish this section off with words that already have the word “hen” in them: hence, Henessy, Henry, henceforth, henchman, henhouse, comprehensive and apprehensive.
  • Block: Block parties are held in the street of a city block and are generally only open to residents of that block. We’ve included some puns and phrases that could serve as block party puns here:
    • Black → Block: As in, “Block and blue” and “Not a block and white issue” and “Block magic” and “On the block list” and “A block mark” and “On the block market” and “Block out” and “Block tie” and “Little block book” and “Not as block as you are painted.” Other black-related words you could use: blockbird (blackbird), blockmail (blackmail), blockout (blackout) and blocksmith (blacksmith).
    • *blic* → *block*: As in, “A publock menace” and “Going publock” and “Publock enemy number one” and “A fresh publockation (publication)” and “Publockally announce.”
  • Sorry → Soiree: As in, “Better safe than soiree” and “Soiree seems to be the hardest word” and “A soiree sight.” Note: a soiree is a formal evening party.

Party-Related Words

To help you come up with your own party puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

General: party, toast, guest, host, event, alcohol, booze, beer, shots, cocktail, food, nibbles wasted, fun, music, bass, beat, dance, dancing, party pooper, party favour, party animal, invite, house, bar, club, beach, balloon, planner, plans, rsvp, designated driver, exclusive, gathering, social, celebrate, get together, hang out, bash, shindig, blowout

Types of party: tea, search, political, slumber, dinner, birthday, surprise, garden, cocktail, soiree, block, costume, fancy dress, welcome, farewell, house, pool, mixer, housewarming, rave, surprise, afterparty, lan, toga, bachelor/buck, bachelorette/hens, reunion

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