Valentine’s Day Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on Valentine’s Day puns! 💘 😘 🍬

While Valentine’s Day may be celebrated differently in every country, it always has the same meaning: a celebration of love. While Valentine’s Day may have originated from a recognition of romantic love specifically, today we celebrate and appreciate all of the different types of loves we experience in our lives, including that felt between family and friends – even teachers will get platonic Valentine’s gifts from students, and Galentine’s day (where women celebrate their female friendships, recognised on the 13th of Feb) is becoming more popular too.

In past years, Valentine’s Day celebrations have excluded love that doesn’t fit a romantic heterosexual stereotype. Many cultures and countries are slowly becoming more aware and accepting of all types of love from all types of people, and that’s what we hope to celebrate with our cheesy, lovey-dovey pun list. Whether you’re gay, bi, poly, aromantic, demigray, non-binary, homoromantic but heterosexual, or in the process of figuring things out, we welcome you here and hope that you enjoy our Valentine’s Day pun list.

While this list is as thorough as we could make it, it is specific to puns relating to Valentine’s Day. We also have lists of chocolate puns and holiday puns, and have a lists of love puns and friendship puns in the works too!

Note: if you’d like social support, here’s a list of LGBT rights organisations. For social support, there’s TherapyTribe, who specialise in LGBTQ mental health.  If you’d like to learn more, there’s the LGBT Foundation.

Valentine’s Day Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about Valentine’s Day that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of Valentine’s Day puns:

  • Alive → Alove: As in, “Alove and kicking” and “Alove and well” and “Eaten alove” and “Half alove” and “Keep hope alove.”
  • Live → Love: As in, “Love and let die” and “Love your life” and “Love and learn” and “Love dangerously” and “Love for the moment” and “Love like a king” and “Love long and prosper” and “Love to fight another day.”
  • Laugh → Love: As in, “Belly love” and “Burst out love-ing” and “Doubled up with loveter” and “Fall about love-ing” and “Good for a love” and “Have a love” and “Split your sides with loveter.”
  • Left → Loved: As in, “Exit stage loved” and “Loved the building” and “Keep loved” and “Loved hanging” and “Loved out in the cold” and “Loved, right and centre” and “Loved to your own devices” and “Out of loved field” and “Two loved feet.”
  • Is → Kiss: As in, “As kiss” and “As the day kiss long” and “This kiss how it is.”
  • Guess → Kiss: As in, “Anybody’s kiss” and “Kiss who’s coming to dinner” and “Kiss what?” and “Kissing game” and “Have a kiss” and “Hazard a kiss” and “Your kiss is as good as mine.”
  • Kismet → Kissmet
  • Ruckus → Ruckiss
  • Hog → Hug: As in, “Go the whole hug” and “Hug tied” and “Hug wild.”
  • *cas* → *kiss*: If a word has a “cas” sound in it, we can replace it with “kiss” to make some love-related puns. As in, “A kisscade of water” and “Smart kissual” and “At the kissino.”
  • Crystal → Kisstal: As in, “The finest kisstal” and “Clear as kisstal.”
  • *cus → *kiss/es: Replace “cus” sounds with “kiss” to make some silly romantic puns. As in, “Don’t lose fokiss (focus)” and “Lokiss of control (locus)” and “Filled with mukiss (mucus).” Other words you could use: caukiss (caucus), cirkiss/es (circus/es), abakiss (abacus), hibiskiss (hibiscus), hokiss (hocus).
  • *hag* → *hug*: As in, “A huggard appearance” and “Huggle over the price.”
  • *hog* → *hug*: As in, “Mahugany table” and “Chocolate hedgehug.”
  • *hec* → *hug*: hugtic (hectic), hugkle (heckle), Hugtor (Hector), hugtare (hectare) and apothugary (apothecary).
  • *hic* → *hug*: “Please step out of the vehugle (vehicle)” and “The wrong demographug” and “Ethugal decisions.”
  • Cattle → Cuddle: As in, “Cuddle show.”
  • Puddle → Cuddle: As in, “Melt into a cuddle.”
  • Muddle → Cuddle: As in, “Cuddle headed” and “Cuddle along.”
  • Blurt → Flirt: As in, “Flirt it out” and “Flirt out the first thing that comes to mind.”
  • Hurt → Flirt: As in, “You only flirt the one you love” and “What you don’t know can’t flirt you” and “The truth flirts” and “Do you really want to flirt me?” and “Flirt feelings.”
  • *flat* → *flirt*: flirtter (flatter), flirtulence (flatulence), flirttery (flattery), flirttered (flattered) and inflirte (inflate).
  • Leaflet → Leaflirt
  • *flot* → *flirt*: flirtsam (flotsam), flirtilla (flotilla) and flirtation (flotation).
  • *fert* → *flirt*: As in, “Flirtile land” and “The right flirtiliser” and “Flirtility tests” and “In vitro flirtilisation” and “Inflirtile by choice.”
  • *fort* → *flirt*: As in, “Maximum efflirt” and “Creature comflirts” and “Filled with discomflirt” and “Mental flirtitude” and “Fame and flirtune” and “Living comflirtably” and “A flirtuitous situation” and “Every flirtnight.”
  • *furt* → *flirt*: As in, “Flirtive looks” and “Moving flirtively.” Note: to be furtive is to be secretive or stealthy.
  • *skirt* → *flirt*: As in, “Flirting the issue.”
  • Luck → Like: As in, “As good like would have it” and “Beginner’s like” and “Better like next time” and “Don’t push your like” and “Hard like.”
  • *lac* → *like*: As in, “A like-onic response” and “Looking likelustre.” Other words that could work: like-adaisical (lackadaisical), likey (lackey), shellike (shellac), cadillike (cadillac), plike-ate (placate).
  • *lec* → *like*: As in, “Giving a liketure” and “Standing at the liketern” and “University liketurer” and “Ecliketic taste” and “Building your colliketion” and “Refliket on your behaviour.” Other words that could work: infliketion (inflection), refliketion (reflection), apopliketic (apoplectic), dialiketic (dialectic), intelliketual (intellectual), negliket (neglect) and colliket (collect). Notes: to be apoplectic is to be furiously angry. A dialectic is a formal system of reasoning or logic.
  • *lic* → *like*: like-orice (licorice), republike (republic), bucolike (bucolic), publike (public), relike (relic), catholike (catholic), idyllike (idyllic), frolike (frolic), hyperbolike (hyperbolic), vitriolike (vitriolic), implike-ation (implication), confliket (conflict), applikeation (application).
  • *lyc* → *like*: likera (lycra) and like-anthrope (lycanthrope).
  • Crash → Crush: As in, “Crush and burn” and “Crush course” and “Crush pad” and “Train crush.”
  • Rush → Crush: As in, “Beat the crush” and “A crush job” and “Crush of blood” and “Sugar crush” and “In a mad crush.”
  • Cross → Crush: As in, “Acrush the board” and “Come acrush” and “Crush as two sticks” and “Crush to the other side” and “Crush my heart and hope to die” and “Crush purposes” and “Crush swords with” and “Crush the line” and “Crush your fingers” and “Crush your mind” and “Double crush.”
  • *lav* → *love*: If a word has a “lav” sound that’s similar to “love”, we can replace it with “love”: “Molten love-a (lava)” and “Love-ished with gifts” and “Lovender scented” and “Where’s the love-atory?” and “Love-ishly presented.”
  • *lev* → *love*: We can sneak “love” into words that have a “lev” sound: “Use your loverage” and “On the same lovel” and “A love-iathan for your love” and “A malovelent being” and “That’s not a relove-ant topic.” Other words that could work: allove-iate (alleviate), clover (clever), irreloveant (irrelevant).
  • *liv* → *love*: loving (living), love-id (livid), lovely (lively), lovelihood (livelihood), lovestock (livestock), delover (deliver), delovery (delivery), oblove-ious (oblivious), oblove-ion (oblivion), olove (olive).
  • *lef* → *love*: As in, “What’s lovet (left)?” and “Eating lovetovers.”
  • *lif* → *love*: lovestyle (lifestyle), lovelong (lifelong), lovetime (lifetime), lovespan (lifespan), loveline (lifeline), lovecycle (lifecycle), loveguard, lovesaver, prolove-ic (prolific), proloveration (proliferation), exemplovey (exemplify), qualovey (qualify).
  • Loft* → Lovet*: As in, “A lovety goal” and “Artist’s lovet.”
  • Cus* → Crush*: As in, “A happy crushtomer” and “Cultural crushtom” and “In crushtody” and “Crushtoms officer” and “Sole crushtodian” and “A crushtomary ritual.”
  • Cross* → Crush*: crushbreed (crossbreed), crushover, crushword, crushroad, crushhairs, crush-section.
  • Hurt → Heart: As in, “You only heart the one you love” and “What you don’t know can’t heart you.”
  • Hate → Heart: As in, “Heart mail” and “Love-heart relationship” and “Man hearter” and “Heart someone’s guts.”
  • Art → Heart: As in, “Heart of war” and “Heart imitating life” and “Heart going one step too far”and “Heartistic triumph” and “Hearts and crafts” and “Hearty farty.”
  • Chart → Cheart: As in, “Cheart a course” and “Growth flowchearts.”
  • *het* → *heart*: hearterosexual (heterosexual), epitheart (epithet), propheart (prophet) and apatheartic (apathetic).
  • Bait → Date: As in, “Date and switch” and “Click date” and “Rise to the date” and “Take the date.”
  • *dat* → *date*: As in, “In the date-a” and “Check the date-aset” and “Charity foundate-tion” and “Mandate-ory sentencing.”
  • *det* → *date*: As in, “Date-termining your best options” and “Down to the last date-tail” and “More date-termined than ever.” Other words that could work: date-trimental (detrimental), date-teriorate (deteriorate) and cadate (cadet).
  • *dit* → *date*: As in, “Credate check” and “Audate (audit) appointment.” Other words you could try: bandate (bandit), discredate (discredit), expedate (expedite), erudate (erudite) and commodatey (commodity). Note: if someone is erudite, then they are learned or scholarly.
  • *dot* → *date*: As in, “A tired anecdate” and “Anecdate-al evidence” and “A universal antidate” and “Peridate jewelry.”
  • *did → *date: “Candate camera” and “The sordate truth” and “Splendate effort.”
  • *dating: We can simply emphasise the “dating” in certain words to make references to romantic dates: accommodating, intimidating, elucidating, updating, validating, consolidating and backdating.
  • Woo: To woo someone is to court or romance them, so we’ve got some woo-related puns here:
    • Who → Woo: As in, “Abandon all hope ye woo enter here” and “All things to those woo wait” and “Woo’s coming to dinner?” and “Ladies woo lunch.”
    • Boo → Woo: As in, “Woo hoo” and “Wouldn’t say woo to a ghost.”
    • Rue → Woo: As in, “Woo the day!”
    • Too → Woo: As in, “A step woo far” and “About time, woo” and “Woo sexy for my shirt” and “Never woo late” and “You know woo much” and “All over woo soon.”
    • Two → Woo: As in, “Alike as woo peas in a pod” and “Cross as woo sticks” and “In woo minds” and “Eating for woo.”
    • View → Woo: As in, “Room with a woo” and “Bird’s eye woo” and “Come into woo” and “A dim woo” and “Point of woo” and “How’s the woo from the top?”
    • You → Woo: As in, “As woo know” and “Back at woo” and “Believe woo me” and “Bless woo.”
    • *rue* → *woo*: wooful (rueful), woofully (ruefully), accwoo (accrue), twoo (true), constwoo (construe), miscontwoo (misconstrue) and gwoosome (gruesome).
    • *wo* → *woo*: As in, “Get to woork” and “The final woord” and “Out of this woorld” and “What woould you do?” Other words that could work: woonky (wonky), woorth (worth) and woolf (wolf).
    • *wou* → *woo*: As in, “You woond (wound) me” and “Could have, woold have, should have” and “Feeling woonded.”
    • Wing → Wooing: As in, “Clip your wooings” and “Earned their wooings” and “Gives you wooings” and “Left wooing” and “Spread your wooings.”
  • Adversary → Anniversary
  • Field → Feel: As in, “In the feeld” and “A feeld day” and “From left feeld” and “Play the feeld” and “A level playing feeld.”
  • Heal → Feel: As in, “Feeling hands” and “Time is a great feeler.”
  • Deal → Feel: As in, “Not a big feel” and “Cut a feel” and “Feel breaker” and “Feel from the bottom of the deck” and “Feel me in” and “Feel or no feel?” and “A done feel” and “Seal the feel.”
  • Fuel → Feel: As in, “Add feel to the flames” and “Feel for thought” and “Feel the controversy.”
  • Heel → Feel: As in, “Achilles’ feel” and “Cool your feels” and “Dig your feels in” and “Head over feels in love” and “Hot on your feels.”
  • *fel* → *feel*: As in, “My good feellow” and “Charged feelony” and “I feelt that.” Other words that could work: feelicity (felicity), feellowship (fellowship), feellatio (fellatio), feelicitous, feeline, feelon, feelafel (or felafeel), duffeel and Eiffeel.
  • *fil* → *feel*: As in, “Action feelm” and “Instagram feelter.” Other words you can try: feelibuster (filibuster), feelial (filial), feelthy (filthy), feelament (filament), fulfeel (fulfil) and affeeliate (affiliate).
  • *ful → *feel: beautifeel, gratefeel, awfeel, wonderfeel, wistfeel, thoughtfeel, successfeel, dreadfeel, faithfeel and insightfeel.
  • *val* → *feel*: As in, “An ambifeelent mind” and “Prefeelent issues” and “Let me efeeluate.” Other words you could try: cafeelier (cavalier) and equifeelent.
  • *vel* → *feel*: As in, “With increasing feelocity” and “Chocolate feelvet” and “Your lefeel best” and “Ambition to trafeel (travel)” and “Unrafeeling lies.” Other words you could try: marfeel (marvel), grafeel (gravel), drifeel (drivel), defeelop (develop), defeelopment (development), nofeel (novel) and enfeelope (envelope).
  • *vil* → *feel*: feellain (villain), feelify (villify), feellage (village), cifeel (civil), efeel (evil), defeel (devil), prifeelege (privilege), cifeelisation (civilisation) and pafeelion (pavilion).
  • *field* → *feeld*: As in, “Feelding your questions” and “Research and feeldwork” and “On the battlefeeld.”
  • Ceiling → Feeling: As in, “Glass feeling” and “Hit the feeling.”
  • Wheeling → Feeling: As in, “Feeling and dealing.”
  • Dinner: Since dinner dates are a popular option for Valentine’s Day, we’ve included dinner-related puns here too:
    • Inner → Dinner: As in, “Dinner city” and “Dinner peace” and “Dinner sanctum” and “My dinner voice.”
    • *den → *dinner: As in, “Beast of burdinner” and “Gardinner of earthly delights” and “Garden of Edinner.” Other words that could also work: maidinner (maiden), beholdinner (beholden), goldinner (golden) and wardinner (warden).
  • Bore → Adore: As in, “Adore the pants off someone” and “Adored stiff” and “Adored to death” and “Adored out of your mind.”
  • *dar* → *adore*: As in, “Deep, adore-k secret” and “If you adore (dare)” and “Eyes adore-ting (darting) around the room.”
  • *der* → *adore*: adore-ive (derive), adore-ivative (derivative), adore-rogatory (derogatory), adore-rision (derision), adore-lict (derelict), adore-ide (deride), adore-ranged (deranged) and adore-risive (derisive).
  • *dir* → *adore*: As in, “Ships adorect from the warehouse” and “Point in the right adore-ction” and “Adore-ctor of photography” and “Down and adore-ty” and “Dish the adore-t.” Other words that could work: adorective (directive), adorectory (directory) and adorectly (directly).
  • *dor* → *adore*: As in, “Lying adoremant” and “Don’t be adorek (a dork)” and “Finding Adorey” and “Girl’s only adore-mitory” and “Adoresal fin.” Other words you could try: ambassadore and corri-adore (corridor).
  • Kitte → Smitten: As in, “Smitten heels” and “Sex smitten.”
  • Written → Smitten: As in, “Smitten all over your face” and “Smitten off.”
  • Bitten → Smitten: As in, “Smitten by the bug” and “Once smitten, twice shy.”
  • Sittin’ → Smitten: As in, “A smitten duck” and “Smitten pretty.”
  • Rose: Roses are a traditionally romantic gift that are commonly given on Valentine’s Day, so we’ve included some rose-related puns in this list:
    • Rouse → Rose: “Rose your interest.”
    • Rise → Rose: As in, “Early roser” and “Rose and shine” and “Rose from the ashes” and “Rose to the challenge.”
    • Raise → Rose: As in, “Rose the bar” and “Rose the dead” and “Rose your game.”
    • Rows → Rose: As in, “Rose upon rose” and “Rose of chairs.”
    • *ras* → *rose*: rosecal (rascal), rosepberry (raspberry), sassafrose (sassafras), pythagorose (pythagoras) and infrosetructure (infrastructure).
    • *res* → *rose*: As in, “Rose-search and development” and “Steely rose-olve” and “Equal reprosentation” and “Deserves rosepect.” Other words you could use: roseume (resume), rose-ponse (response), rose-silient (resilient), roset (rest), rose-olution (resolution), rose-ilience (resilience), interoset (interest), comprose (comprise), heurosetic (heuristic) and enterprose (enterprise).
    • *ros* → *rose*: As in, “Work roseter” and “Like a charging rhinocerose” and “Come acrose” and “An exciting prosepect” and “A grose miscalculation” and “Prosepective buyer.”
    • *rus* → *rose*: As in, “A rosetic (rustic) dinner” and “Filled with roset (rust)” and “See what I can rosetle up.” Other words that could work: Rose-sian (Russian), thesaurose (thesaurus), virose (virus), chorose (chorus), papyrose (papyrus), uterose (uterus), citrose (citrus) and perose-al.
    • Froze → Frose
    • *roce* → *rose*: As in, “In the prose-cess of” and “You may prose-ceed” and “International atrose-cities” and “Standard prose-cedure.”
    • *rows* → *rose*: As in, “Raise your eyebrose” and “Bows and arrose” and “Free throse.” Other words that could work: furrose (furrows), crose (crows), sorrose (sorrows), narrose (narrows).
    • *roas* → *rose*: As in, “Roset vegies” and “Rosety in here.”
    • *rous* → *rose*: onerose (onerous), ludicrose (ludicrous), preposterose (preposterous), generose (generous), cantankerose (cantankerous), rigorose (rigorous), treacherose (treacherous), amorose (amorous), carose-sel (carousel).
  • Yearn: For you to best convey your affections and longings in the most terrible way possible, we have some yearn/yearning related puns for you:
    • Yarn → Yearn: “Yearn bombing” and “Spin a yearn.”
    • *yan* → *yearn*: himalayearn (himalayan), cyearn (cyan), conveyearnce (conveyance), flamboyearnt (flamboyant), buoyearnt (buoyant), clairvoyearnt (clairvoyant).
    • *yon* → *yearn*: Canyearn (canyon), crayearn (crayon), rayearn (rayon) and beyearnd (beyond).
  • Motion → Emotion: As in, “Emotion picture” and “Going through the emotions” and “Poetry in emotion” and “Set in emotion” and “Slow emotion” and “The emotion of the ocean.”
  • Notion → Emotion: As in, “I second that emotion.”
  • Fend → Fond: As in, “Fond for yourself” and “Fond off” and “Fonder bender.”
  • Fund → Fond: As in, “Crowd fonding” and “Hedge fond” and “Mutual fond” and “Slush fond.”
  • Fun → Fond: As in, “All fond and games” and “All the fond of the fair” and “Bundle of fond” and “Good, clean fond.”
  • Fawned → Fond: As in, “Fond over.”
  • *fand* → *fond*: fondango (fandango), fondom (fandom) and fondangle (fandangle).
  • *fend* → *fond*: As in, “Didn’t mean to offond” and “Came to defond you” and “The defondant.”
  • *fund* → *fond*: fondamental (fundamental), fondraising (fundraising), fondamentally (fundamentally) and refond (refund).
  • Flowers: Flowers in general (not just roses) are a traditional Valentine’s Day gift, so we’ve included them in this list:
    • Flow → Flower: As in, “Ebb and flower” and “Get the creative juices flowering” and “Go with the flower” and “In full flower.”
    • Hour → Flower: “Happy flower” and “A late flower” and “In a few flowers.”
    • Flaw → Flower: As in, “Design flower” and “Vital flower.”
    • Floor → Flower: As in, “Cross the flower” and “Hold the flower” and “Mop the flower” and “Wipe the flower with” and “The top flower.”
  • Gave → Gift: As in, “I gift my best.”
  • Give → Gift: As in, “A dead giftaway,” and “Don’t gift up!” and “Don’t gift in,” and “Gift yourself a bad name,” and “Gift them a hand,” and “Gift and take,” and “Gift credit where credit is due,” and “Gift it a rest,” and “Gift it the green light,” and “Gift me a call,” and “Gift 110%”.
  • Percent → Present: As in, “A hundred and ten present,” and “Genius is one present inspiration and 99 present perspiration.”
  • Present: We’ve included present-related phrases in this list too, as they can double as puns in the right thread or context. As in, “All present and correct,” and “Present company excepted,” and “No time like the present.”
  • Poem: Love poems are a much-loved gift on Valentine’s Day, so we’ve got some poem-related puns here:
    • *pom* → *poem*: As in, “Poempous attitude” and “Celebration and poemp” and “Poemegranate juice.” Other words you could use: poemade (pomade), poempadour (pompadour), poemelo (pomelo), anthropoemorphic (anthropomorphic). Notes: Pomp is a display or celebration. Pomade is a type of styling gel.
    • *pum* → *poem*: As in, “A poempkin at midnight” and “Under the poemp” and “Poemmel the competition” and “Poemice stone.”
  • Chocolate: Chocolates are seen as a romantic gift, so we’ve included chocolate puns in this list:
    • Check → Choc: As in, “Choc it out!” and “Choc your sources” and “Double choc everything” and “Keep in choc” and “Make a list, choc it twice” and “Take a rainchoc” and “Reality choc” and “Choc-ing up on.”
    • Chalk → Choc: As in, “Different as choc and cheese” and “Choc it up to experience.”
    • Chuck → Choc: As in, “Choc a sickie” and “Choc-ed out” and “Choc overboard.”
  • Sweet: This can be used in two ways – to refer to a sweet candy (which are another popular Valentine’s treat) or to describe someone as sweet. Here are some related puns:
    • Suite → Sweet: As in “She was renting a 2-bedroom sweet for the summer.”
    • Sweat → Sweet: As in “Blood, sweet and tears” and “Beads of sweet rolled down my forehead” and “Break out in a cold sweet” and “By the sweet of my brow” and “Don’t sweet it.” and “Don’t sweet the small stuff.” and “All hot and sweety
    • Sweater → Sweeter: As in “A close-knit woollen sweeter for cold days”
    • Seat → Sweet: As in, “Backsweet driver” and “By the sweet of your pants” and “Hold on to your sweet” and “Not a dry sweet in the house” and “On the edge of my sweet” and “Please be sweeted” and “Take a back sweet” and “The best sweet in the house.”
    • Switch → Sweet-ch: As in “Bait and sweet-ch” and “Asleep at the sweet-ch” and “Sweet-ch gears” and “You should sweet-ch out your old one with this one.”
    • Sweet: These sweet-related phrases are general enough to be used as puns: As in “You’re so sweet!” and “Oh that’s soo sweet!” and “Revenge is sweet” and “Short and sweet” and “Lay some sweet lines on someone” and “Sweet dreams” and “Sweet Jesus!” and “You bet your sweet life!” and “That was a sweet trick, dude.” and “Sweet as, bro.” and “Whisper sweet nothings” and “Home sweet home” and “A rose by any other name would smell as sweet” and “Sweet smell/taste of success/victory” and “Sweetheart.
  • Sake → Keepsake: As in, “For heaven’s keepsake” and “For goodness keepsake.”
  • Keep → Keepsake: As in, “Keepsake a low profile” and “Keepsake an eye on” and “Keepsake an open mind.”
  • Sediment → Sentiment
  • Sauce/Saucy: Since a lot of Valentine’s Day is about expressing physical (as well as emotional) affection and attraction towards one another, we’ve got some saucy-related puns for you to use:
    • *sas* → *sauce*: As in, “Veggie sauce-shimi” and “Natural disauceter” and “A disaucetrous outcome.” Other words that could work: Arkansauce (Arkansas), Kansauce (Kansas) and disauceter (disaster).
    • *ses* → *sauce*: As in, “Sauce-ame seeds” and “A precise assauce-ment” and “Nervous obsauce-sion.”
    • *sis* → *sauce*: As in, “Critical analysauce” and “Scientific hypothesauce” and “Arch nemesauce” and “On the basauce of” and “Midlife crisauce” and “Book synpopsauce.”
    • *sus* → *sauce*: As in, “Hard to saucetain” and “Environmentally saucetainable” and “Barely sauce-ceptible” and “The main saucepect.” Other words that could work: sauce-picious (suspicious), sauce-pend (suspend), sauce-tainability (sustainability), sauce-pense (suspense), sauce-pension (suspension), sauce-tenance (sustenance), sauce-pension (suspension), sauce-tenance (sustenance), consensauce (consensus), versauce (versus), censauce (census), Jesauce (Jesus), colossauce (colossus), narcissauce (narcissus).
    • *soc* → *saucy*: As in, “Mainstream saucy-ety” and “Saucy-al attitudes” and “Studying saucy-ology.” Other words you could try: saucy-opath (sociopath), saucy-al (social), saucy-alist (socialist), assaucy-ate (associate), assaucy-ation (association).
    • Assasin → Assaucyn
    • Session → Saucyon
  • Steam/Steamy: As things can get a bit steamy on Valentine’s Day, we have some steam-related puns for you to play around with:
    • Team → Steam: As in, “Dream steam” and “Go steam!” and “Take one for the steam” and “Steam player” and “Steam spirit” and “Together we make a great steam.”
    • Seam → Steam: As in, “Bulging at the steams” and “Come apart at the steam.”
    • Stem → Steam: As in, “Steam the tide.”
    • Seem → Steam: As in, “Sorry steams to be the hardest word.”
    • *stam* → *steam*: As in, “Steamp of approval” and “Out of steamina” and “Raging steampede” and “Did I steammer?” and “A testeament to…”
    • *stem* → *steam*: As in, “Systeam thinking” and “Functional ecosysteam.” Other words that could work: episteamology (epistemology) and systeamic (systemic). Note: epistemology is the study of knowledge.
  • Sex/sexy: We know a lot of Valentine’s Day dates end with a bit of hanky panky, so we have some related puns for you:
    • Six → Sex: As in, “Sex degrees of separation” and “Sexth sense.”
    • Saxophone → Sexophone
    • *sac* → *sex*: As in, “Not worth the sexrifice” and “Down the cul-de-sex” and “Financial transexion” and “Safety and sexurity.” Other words you could use: sexion (section), consexutive (consecutive), sextor (sector), dissext (dissect) and intersexion (intersection).
    • *sics* → *sex*: As in, “The classex” and “Everyday physex” and “Back to basex” and “Working in forensex.”
    • *suc* → *sex*: Sexinct (succinct), sexess (success), sexeed (succeed), sexessful (successful) and sexession (succession).
  • Lust: For our cheekier users, we’ve got some lust-related puns to play with:
    • Last → Lust: As in, “At long lust” and “At the lust minute” and “Breathe your lust” and “Built to lust” and “Lust resort” and “Fame at lust” and “Famous lust words” and “Free at lust” and “To the lust drop” and “Hear the lust of” and “Lust but not least” and “Lust call” and “Lust chance” and “Lust ditch effort” and “Lust in, first out” and “The lust straw.”
    • List → Lust: As in, “On the short lust” and “Top ten lust” and “Bucket lust.”
    • Lost → Lust: As in, “All is not lust” and “Get lust” and “Long lust” and “Lust in translation” and “Lust and found” and “A lust cause” and “Lust in thought” and “A lust soul.”
    • Least → Lust: As in, “Last but not lust” and “Lust common denominator” and “Lust worst option” and “Line of lust resistance” and “Not in the lust” and “At the very lust” and “To say the lust.”
    • *lis* → *lust*: Chrysalust (chrysalis), metropolust (metropolis), borealust (borealis), acropolust (acropolis), holustic (holistic).
    • *lus* → *lust*: As in, “A surplust of” and “Mental calculust” and “Pen stylust.”
    • *last* → *lust*: As in, “Blust from the past” and “Plustic surgery” and “Elustic thinking” and “Everlusting love.”
    • *lest* → *lust*: As in, “The absolute coollust” and “Live life to the fullust” and “The simplust solution” and “Tallust tree” and “Celustial beings” and “Watching your cholusterol.”
    • *list* → *lust*: populust (populist), evangelust (evangelist), journalust (journalist), specialust (specialist), checklust (checklist), holustic (holistic) and ballustic (ballistic).
  • Passing → Passion: As in, “Just passion through” and “Passion in the night.”
  • Fashion → Passion: As in, “Passionably late” and “The height of passion” and “The old-passioned way” and “Passions may come and go, but good manners never go out of style.”
  • Essential → Essensual: As in, “Essensually, yes” and “The bare essensuals.”
  • Sense → Sensual: As in, “Come to your sensuals” and “Common sensual” and “Make sensual of.”
  • Cent → Sensual: As in, “Give your two sensuals” and “A hundred per sensual.”
  • Use → Seduce: As in, “Put to good seduce” and “So easy to seduce” and “Things aren’t what they seduced to be” and “Seducer friendly.”
  • Far → Affair: As in, “Few and affair between” and “So affair, so good” and “Affair cry.”
  • Fair → Affair: As in, “All’s affair in love and war” and “By affair means or foul” and “Affair trade” and “Affair and above board.”
  • Flair → Affair: As in, “Got an affair for”
  • Cup → Couple: As in, “Not my couple of tea” and “Storm in a tea-couple.”
  • Affliction → Affection
  • Part → Partner: As in, “Act the partner” and “For my partner” and “Good in partners” and “If you’re not a partner of the solution, you’re a partner of the problem.”
  • Ship → Partnership: As in, “Abandon partnership” and “Don’t give up the partnership” and “From chips to partnerships” and “Go down with the partnership” and “Jump partnership” and “Loose lips sink partnerships” and “My partnership has come in.”
  • *part* → *partner*: partner-isan (partisan), partner-ticular (particular), partnertake (partake), partner-icle (particle), partner-icipate (participate), apartner (apart), counterpartner (counterpart), impartner (impart), rampartner (rampart), departner (depart).
  • Stupid → Cupid: As in, “Criminal cupidity” and “I’m with cupid” and “Keep it simple, Cupid” and “Cupid is as Cupid does” and “Interesting, but Cupid.” Note: “stupid” is an ableist term. This replacement is a nice way to involve Valentine’s Day and make these previously stupid-related phrases a little more acceptable.
  • Simple → Symbol: As in, “It’s so symbol” and “Keep it symbol” and “Symbol pleasures” and “Pure and symbol” and “Symbol yet effective” and “Symbol as that.” Note: Valentine’s Day is one of heavy romantic and personal emotional symbolism, which is why symbol-related puns have been included.
  • Ring: Rings are a heavily symbolic item for romance, and people may trade them as a symbol of commitment to their relationship on Valentine’s Day. Here are some related puns:
    • Wing → Ring: As in, “Earned your rings” and “Ring it” and “Ringman” and “Draw-ring lots” and “Taken under [someone’s] ring.”
    • Wrong → Ring: As in, “Barking up the ring tree” and “Born on the ring side of the tracks” and “Get off on the ring foot” and “On the ring side of the bed.”
    • *rang* → *ring*: As in, “Boomering effect” and “Oringe flavoured” and “Estringed family members.”
    • *rink* → *ring-k*: As in, “Skating ring-k” and “Dring-k like a fish” and “On the bring-k of” and “Shringking violet” and “Binge dringking.” Other words you could use: spring-kle (sprinkle), springkling (sprinkling), wring-kle (wrinkle) and tring-ket (trinket).
  • Card → Greeting Card: As in, “A few greeting cards short of a full deck” and “Greeting card up your sleeve” and “Deck of greeting cards” and “Hold all the greeting cards.”
  • Ship → Friendship: As in, “Don’t give up the friendship” and “From chips to friendships” and “Loose lips sink friendships.” Note: While Valentine’s Day is historically about romantic love, platonic love is important to celebrate too!
  • Court: To court someone is to “woo” or interact with them with the intention of building a romantic relationship. Here are some related puns:
    • Cart → Court: As in, “A la courte” and “Courted away” and “Crash court” and “In the court.”
    • Quarter → Courter: As in, “A bad courter of an hour” and “Give no courter” and “Show no courter” and “Courter past” and “Close courters.”
    • Got → Court: As in, “You’ve court to do what you’ve court to do” and “I think you’ve court it” and “Cat court your tongue?” and “Give it all you’ve court” and “Court a flair for.”
    • Caught → Court: As in, “Court in the act” and “Court in two minds” and “Court off-base” and “Court short” and “Court up in the moment” and “Wouldn’t be court dead.”
    • *cart* → *court*: courtridge (cartridge), courtilege (cartilege) and courton (carton).
    • *cort* → *court*: courtex (cortex), courtisol (cortisol) and escourt (escort).
    • *curt* → *court*: As in, “Behind the courtain” and “Deep courtsey” and “Courtail the topic.” Note: to curtail something is to shorten it.
    • *cot* → *court*: As in, “100% courtton” and “Holiday courttage” and “Apricourt flavoured” and “Company mascourt” and “Boycourtting the brand.”
  • Trend → Tender: As in, “Buck the tender” and “On tender.”

The next section is dedicated to endearments – some romantic, all very affectionate:

  • *dling → *darling: As in, “Not han-darling it that well” and “You med-darling kids!” and “Light the kin-darling” and “Dwindarling in number” and “Fresh seedarling.”
  • Bae: The word “bae” is a fairly new term and is a shortened version of “babe” or “baby”. Here are related puns:
    • Bay → Bae: As in, “Bae for blood” and “Hold at bae” and “Keep at bae.”
    • Buy → Bae: As in, “Bae into” and “Bae now, pay later” and “Bae one, get one free” and “Bae some time” and “Can’t bae me love” and “The best money can bae.”
    • Bye → Bae: As in, “Kiss goodbae to” and “Can never say goodbae” and “Time to say goodbae” and “You can kiss that one goodbae.”
    • Day → Bae: As in, “A bae in the life” and “A hard bae’s night” and “All in a bae’s work” and “All the livelong bae” and “Tomorrow is another bae.”
    • Pay → Bae: As in, “Buy now, bae later” and “Crime doesn’t bae” and “Hell to bae” and “Bae as you go.”
    • Be → Bae: As in, “Bae who you want to bae” and “What would you like to bae?” and “That wouldn’t bae real.”
    • *ba → *bae: Amoebae (amoeba), marimbae (marimba), sambae (samba), mambae (mamba), urbaen (urban), exacerbaete (exacerbate), debaecle (debacle), verbaetim (verbatim) and baese (base).
    • *be* → *bae*: As in, “What have you baecome?” and “Where to baegin?” and “Mutual baenefit.”
    • *bi* → *bae*: As in, “False alibae” and “Wasabae flavoured.” Other words you could use: ubaequitous (ubiquitous), arbaetrary (arbitrary), forbaed (forbid), liabaelity (liability) and phobae-a (phobia).
    • *bu* → *bae*: As in, “Down to bae-siness” and “Get baesy” and “Favourite attribaete.”
    • *ba* → *bae*: As in, “Be left holding the baeby” and “Waiting in the lobbae” and “Rubae coloured.” Other words you could use: therbae (thereby), shabbae (shabby), wherebae (whereby), hobbae (hobby), abbaess (abyss), baegone (bygone), baepass (bypass) and baeproduct (byproduct).
  • Maybe → Baby: As in, “Baby she’s born with it” and “Call me baby.”
  • Aby* → Baby*: As in, “Babysmal (abysmal) performance” and “Down in the babyss.”
  • Abi* → Baby*: As in, “Within your babylity (ability) to” and “Doesn’t suit your babylities.”
  • Deer → Dear: As in, “A dear in headlights.”
  • Dare → Dear: As in, “Dear for more” and “Dear to be different” and “How dear you!”
  • Eerie → Dearie: “A dearie atmosphere.”
  • There → Dear: As in, “Ahoy dear!” and “Not all dear” and “Are we dear yet?” and “Be dear for” and “Be dear or be square” and “Don’t go dear.”
  • Their → Dear: And “..and dear toys” and “Cut down in dear prime” and “Swept off dear feet.”
  • Idea → Idear: As in, “A better idear” and “Bounce idears off” and “A bright idear” and “Put across an idear” and “The spark of an idear” and “What’s the big idear?”
  • Deal → Dearl: As in, “A big dearl” and “Cut a dearl” and “Dearl breaker” and “Dearl from the bottom of the deck” and “Dearl me in” and “Dearl or no dearl?” and “Dearl with it” and “A done dearl” and “If life dearls you lemonds, make lemonade” and “Seal the dearl.”
  • Tear → Dear: As in, “Bathed in dears” and “Blood, sweat and dears” and “Bored to dears” and “Brings dears to your eyes” and “Fighting back dears” and “It will all end in dears” and “Melt into dears” and “Moved to dears” and “No more dears.”
  • *tary → *deary: As in, “Proprideary cable” and “Complemendeary colours” and “New secredeary job” and “A sedendeary lifestyle.” Other words that could work: rudimendeary (rudimentary), documendeary (documentary), monedeary (monetary) and solideary (solitary).
  • *dar* → *dear*: As in, “New calendear year” and “On my radear” and “Cedear scented” and “Get that cheddear.”
  • *der* → *dear*: As in, “Law and ordear” and “In the lardear” and “Graphic rendearing” and “Love me tendear” and “Disordearly conduct.” Other words you could use: wondear (wonder), considear (consider), leadear (leader), hindear (hinder), spidear (spider), dearive (derive), dearivative (derivative), dearogatory (derogatory), dearision (derision), dearelict (derelict), dearide (deride), undearstand (understand) and considearation (consideration).
  • *dir* → *dear*: As in, “Honest and dearect” and “Clear and dearect orders” and “In the right dearection” and “Credit to the dearector” and “Down and dearty” and “New dearectives” and “Go dearectly to the source.”
  • *dur* → *dear*: “Emotional dearess (duress)” and “Dearing the war” and “For the full dearation.” Other words you could use: dearable (durable), dearability (durability), dearian (durian), endear (endure), endearance (endurance), endearing (enduring).
  • Epiphany → Epiphoney
  • Sunny → Honey: As in, “On the honey side of the street” and “Honey side up.”
  • Money → Honey: As in, “A fool and his honey are soon parted” and “A ton of honey” and “Easy honey” and “For love or honey” and “Get your honey’s worth” and “Not made of honey” and “In the honey.”
  • *hony → *honey: As in, “In symphoney” and “A cacophoney of noise.”
  • Pat → Pet: As in, “Got it down pet” and “A pet on the back.”
  • Pit → Pet: As in, “Bottomless pet” and “In the pet of your stomach” and “Mosh pet” and “Pet your wits against.”
  • Put → Pet: As in, “Hard pet to” and “Couldn’t pet it down” and “Don’t pet all your eggs in one basket” and “Feel a bit pet out” and “Wouldn’t pet it past him.”
  • Bet → Pet: As in, “All pets are off” and “Pet your bottom dollar.”
  • Get → Pet: As in, “As good as it pets” and “Buy one, pet one free” and “Come and pet it” and “Don’t pet me started it” and “Can’t pet enough of this.”
  • *pat* → *pet*: As in, “Follows a pettern” and “Petent pending” and “A pethetic effort” and “Wouldn’t have anticipeted it” and “Not a petch on.”
  • *pet*: We can simply emphasise the “pet” that already exists in these words: petty, petulant, petition, petite, carpet, parapet, trumpet, puppet, snippet, limpet, crumpet, impetus, perpetual, competent and competition.
  • *pit* → *pet*: cockpet (cockpit), pulpet (pulpit), armpet (armpit), capetal (capital), epetome (epitome) and serendipety (serendipity).
  • *pot* → *pet*: As in, “Fulfill your petential” and “Mashed petatoes” and “Gained through nepetism” and “I’m not omnipetent.”
  • *bat* → *pet*: compet (combat), acropet (acrobat), numpet (numbat), wompet (wombat), exacerpet (exacerbate) and verpetim (verbatim).
  • *bet* → *pet*: As in, “Petter yourself” and “You can do petter” and “Read petween the lines” and “Deep petrayal” and “To be petrothed” and “Alphapet soup” and “Sherpet flavoured.”
  • *bit* → *pet*: inhipet (inhibit), gampet (gambit), exhipet (exhibit), hapet (habit), orpet (orbit), prohipet (prohibit) and arpetrary (arbitrary).
  • *ped* → *pet*: petantic (pedantic), petigree (pedigree), petestrian (pedestrian), petestal (pedestal), expetition (expedition) and impetiment (impediment).
  • Podiatrist → Petiatrist (Note: this is very specific yes, but whatever works.)
  • Lamb: Lamb is an intimate term of endearment generally used for romantic partners, children or pets. Here are related puns:
    • Limb → Lamb: As in, “Go out on a lamb” and “Risk life and lamb” and “Lamber up.”
    • *lam* → *lamb*: As in, “Lambenting your troubles” and “Bedside lamb-p” and “Lambinated document.” Other words you could use: slamb (slam), clamb (clam), bedlamb (bedlam), salambander (salamander).
    • *lem* → *lamb*: As in, “Lamb-on (lemon) sorbet” and “Make lambonade” and “Add lambongrass” and “Problamb-solving attitude” and “Family emblamb.” Other words that could work: golamb (golem), complamb-ent (complement), implamb-ent (implement), dilamba (dilemma), elamb-ent (element), supplamb-ent (supplement), solamb (solemn) and implamb-entation (implementation).
    • *lim* → *lamb*: “There’s a lambit (limit) for everything” and “Stuck in lambo” and “Walking with a lamb-p (limp).” Other words that could work: lambited (limited), lamber (limber), slamb (slim), complamb-ent (compliment), complamb-entary (complimentary), prelamb-inary (preliminary) and elambinate (eliminate).
    • *lum* → *lamb*: lambinous (luminous), lambinary (luminary), curriculamb (curriculum), asylamb (asylum), pendulamb (pendulum), hoodlamb (hoodlum), colamb (column) and alamb-ni (alumni).
  • Treasure: This is another endearment that is usually reserved for closer, more familial ties like pets, lovers, children or close friends. Here are related puns for you to play with:
    • Measure → Treasure: As in, “Desperate treasures” and “Half treasures” and “Treasure up.”
    • Pleasure → Treasure: As in, “Business before treasure” and “Business or treasure?” and “Double your treasure” and “Guilty treasure.”
  • Beauty → Cutie: As in, “Age before cutie” and “Cutie and the beast.”
  • Duty → Cutie: As in, “Beyond the call of cutie” and “Double cutie” and “Cutie bound” and “Reporting for cutie!”
  • *cuti* → *cutie*: cutie-cle (cuticle), executie-ve (executive), consecutie-ve (consecutive) and consecutie-vely (consecutively).
  • *cute → *cutie: As in, “Acutie appendicitis” and “Executie the plan.” Other words: prosecutie (prosecute), persecutie and electrocutie.
  • Amor: This means “love”, and is sometimes combined with “mi” (mi amor) to mean “my love”. Here are related puns for you play with:
    • *amar* → *amor*: amoranth (amaranth), amoryllis (amaryllis), camoraderie (camaraderie), tamorind (tamarind), samoritan (samaritan), aquamorine (aquamarine) and rigamorole (rigamarole).
    • *amer* → *amor*: Amorican (American), gossamor (gossamer) and camora (camera).
  • Flame: Referring to someone as your flame is to call them your lover and has connotations specifically of physical love and affection. Here are related puns:
    • Fame → Flame: As in, “Claim to flame” and “Fifteen minutes of flame” and “Hall of flame.”
    • Aim → Flame: As in, “Flame high” and “Take flame” and “Flame to please.”
    • Blame → Flame: As in, “Flame game” and “Lay the flame on” and “Flame culture.”
    • Came → Flame: As in, “I flame, I saw, I conquered” and “As it flame to pass.”
    • Frame → Flame: As in, “Freeze flame” and “In the flame.”
    • *fam* → *fame*: As in, “Friends and fame-ily” and “A fame-iliar place” and “Almost flameous” and “40 hour flame-ine.” Other words that could work: flame-ilial (familial), flame-ished (famished), inflame-ous (infamous) and deflame-ation (defamation).
    • Flam* → Flame*: As in, “Flame-boyant event” and “Plastic flame-ingo” and “Dance the flame-enco.”
  • Palaver → Palover (Note: a palaver is an unecessary fuss)
  • Lever* → Lover*: Loverage (leverage) and lover (lever).
  • Deliver → Delover: As in, “Delover the goods” and “Express delovery” and “Undeloverable to your address” and “Seek deloverance.”
  • Wifi → Wife-i
  • Space → Spouse: As in, “Personal spouse” and “Office spouse” and “Deep spouse.”
  • *spos* → *spouse*: As in, “Dispouse of what you don’t need” and “A sunny dispouse-ition” and “Rubbish dispouse-al” and “Dispouse-able plastics” and “Predispoused with other matters.”
  • Spacious → Spouseious: “A spouseious house.”

Valentine’s Day-Related Words

To help you come up with your own Valentine’s Day puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

general: valentine, valentine’s, love, loved, loved one, loving, lovely, romance, romantic, crush, fancy, infatuation, dating, together, woo, wooing, flirt, flirting, flirtatious, like, confess, confession, anniversary, feelings, heart, dinner, date, roses, flowers, bouquet,  gift, present, poem, poetry, love letter, chocolate, keepsake, sentimental, kiss, hug, cuddle, desire, saucy, sexy, sex, lust, passion, erotic, intimate, sensual, seductive, adore, admire, smitten, yearning, relationship, affair, couple, endearment, significant other, better half, affection, partner, partnership, boyfriend, girlfriend, husband, wife, cupid, symbol, ring, jewelry, commitment, monogamous, monogamy, polyamory, polyamorous, greeting card, lingerie, devotion, emotion, fond, friendship, cherish, devoted, celebration, court, courting, tender

endearments: darling, bae, baby, dear, sweetheart, sweetie, honey, sugar, pet, muffin, lamb, treasure, cutie, cutie pie, beautiful, amor, flame, lover

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Party Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on party puns! 🎉🎶🥤

Whether it’s a birthday, holiday event or a celebration in someone’s honour, make any social gathering you’re invited to (or hosting) a pun-filled time with our list of party puns. Should you be thinking of witty quips for your invites, Instagram captions or beverage list, we hope that you enjoy this list and find the perfect pun.

This list is specific to parties, but if you’re after some other party related puns, we have entries on firework puns, balloon puns, gift puns, New Year’s puns and birthday puns.

Party Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about parties that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of party puns:

  • *part* → *party*: We can change the “part” in words to “party” to make some silly party puns. As in, “In party-cular” and “Party-cipation award” and “Care to party-cipate? (could also be participarty)” and “Imparty your knowledge” and “That’s not your departy-ment” and “A partysan issue.” Other words you could use: partycle (particle), partytion (partition), aparty (apart), counterparty (counterpart), departy (depart), partyner (partner) party-cularly (particularly), party-cipant (participant) and reparty (repartee).
  • *pathy* → *party*: If a word has sound that’s similar enough to “party”, then we can simply change it to party to make it an appropriate pun. As in, emparty (empathy), aparty (apathy), symparty (sympathy), teleparty (telepathy) and antiparty (antipathy). Note: to feel antipathy is to feel dislike.
  • *pet* → *party*: As in, “Signed party-tion (petition)” and “Not to blow my own trumparty, but…” and “Political pupparty (this can work as it refers to both political puppets and parties of the political kind).”
  • *pert* → *party*: As in, partynent (pertinent), partynence (pertinence), exparty (expert) and proparty (property).
  • Serendipity → Serendiparty (Note: serendipity refers to unexpected and fortunate accidents.)
  • *port* → *party*: As in, “Financial partyfolio” and “You have my supparty” and “Public transparty” and “An unexpected oppartynity” and “A suppartyve (supportive) atmosphere” and “A sparty (sporty) person.”
  • *part* → *party*: As in, “A fool and his money are soon partied” and “Act the party” and “For my own party” and “Departy this life” and “If you’re not a party of the solution, you’re party of the problem” and “Drift aparty” and “Fall aparty” and “For the most party” and “Look the party” and “Worlds aparty.”
  • *vent* → *event*: eventure (venture), eventricle (ventricle), eventilation (ventilation), eventilate (ventilate), eventilator (ventilator), adevent (advent), circumevent (circumvent), prevent, coneventional (conventional).
  • Event: Some event-related phrases that could work in your party wordplay: “Current events” and “Happy event” and “The main event” and “Motion picture event” and “Turn of events.”
  • *vant* → *event*: As in, relevent (relevant) and irrelevent (irrelevant).
  • Bruise → Booze: As in, “A boozed ego” and “You can’t protect your kids from every bump and booze.”
  • *bas* → *booze*: As in, “On a first-name boozeis (basis)” and “Back to boozeics (basics)” and “Yes, boozeically” and “The boozelisk in the Chamber of Secrets (I’m sure many people will find ways to make boozy pickup lines out of this one…so use it and similar puns with your best judgement).”
  • *bes* → *booze*: As in, “All the boozet (best)” and “Boozet (best) friends forever” and “Boozet of all” and “Boozepoke suit” and “Boozetow your wisdom” and “Sit boozeside me.” Other words you could use: booze-seech (beseech), booze-sotted (besotted), booze-siege (besiege). Notes: to beseech is to beg.
  • *bos* → *booze*: As in, booze-om (bosom), rooibooze (rooibos) and verbooze (verbose). Note: rooibos is a type of tea.
  • *bus* → *booze*: As in, “Thrown under the booze” and “Walk or take the booze” and “None of your boozeiness” and “Boozey bee” and “Course syllabooze.” Other words you could use: nimbooze (nimbus), omnibooze (omnibus) and abooze (abuse). Notes: a nimbus is a circle of light, or a halo.
  • *baz* → *booze*: As in, boozear (bazaar), booze-ooka (bazooka), booze-illion (bazillion).
  • *biz* → *booze*: As in, “Boozear (bizarre) circumstances,” and “That’s showbooze.”
  • *buz* → *booze*: As in, “Booze me in” and “Booze off” and “Booze-ing with excitement” and “Boozewords.” Other words you could use: booze-ard (buzzard), booze-ing (boozing) and boozer (buzzer).
  • *bows* → *booze*: As in, “Chasing rainbooze” and “Rainbooze and unicorns” and “Rub elbooze with.”
  • Dear → Beer: As in “Oh beer me” and “Hang on for beer life” and “Near and beer to my heart” and “Elementary, my beer Watson.”
  • Ear → Beer: As in “Grin from beer to beer.” and “Let’s play it by beer.” and “Lend a beer” and “In one beer and out the other.”
  • Peer → Beer: As in “Beer pressure” and “It’s like she was beering into my soul.” Other words you could use: beerless (peerless), beered (peered).
  • Bear → Beer: As in “Grizzly beer” and “Beer a resemblance” and “The right to beer arms” and “Beer down upon” and “Bear witness to …” and “Beer false witness” and “Beer fruit” and “Beer in mind that …” and “Bring to beer“. Other bear-related or inclusive words you could use: beerings (bearings), beerer (bearer), forbeer (forbear), overbeering (overbearing), forbeerance (forbearance).
  • *pear* → *beer*: As in, “A beerlescent (pearlescent) glow” and “Abeer (appear) from thin air” and “Watch me disabeer” and “Make an abeerance.” Other words you could use: s’beerhead (spearhead), re-abeer (reappear).
  • Shakespeare → Shakesbeer
  • Pier → Beer: As in “Take a long walk off a short beer” and “Ear beercing” and “Never been habbeer (happier).”
  • Bare → Beer: As in “The beer necessities” and “Beer one’s teeth” and “Laid beer” and “The beer bones” and “The cupboard was beer“. You can also replace the “bare” in these words: barely (“beerly there”), threadbare (“A threadbeer toy”), cabaret (cabeeret), barefoot (beerfoot).
  • *bier* → *beer*: As in, grubbeer (grubbier), stubbeer (stubbier), tubbeer, scabbeer and chubbeer.
  • *pare* → *beer*: As in, “Beerent-teacher meeting” and “In beerenthesis” and “Like combeering apples and oranges” and “Be prebeered (prepared)” and “Abbeerently (apparently) so.” Other words you could use: abbeerel (apparel) and transbeerent (transparent).
  • *bar* → *beer*: As in, “Beer none” and “Behind beers” and “Language beerier” and “Raise the beer” and “Beerrelling (barreling) in” and “Beergain basement.” Other words you could use: beeren (barren), beerista (barista) and sidebeer (sidebar).
  • *ber* → *beer*: As in, “Strawbeery flavoured” and “Going beerserk” and “Got your numbeer” and “Sobeer up (this one’s a bit ironic)” and “A membeer of..” Other words you could use: beereft (bereft), beerate (berate), beerth (berth), beereavement (bereavement), chambeer (chamber), ambeer (amber), membeer, cybeer, remembeer, delibeerate, libeeral, libeerty, abeerration (aberration) and cumbeersome. Notes: to be bereft is to be deprived of something.
  • *bir* → *beer*: As in, “A little beerd told me” and “Beerthday suit” and “The early beerd.”
  • *bor* → *beer*: As in, “Beered out of your mind” and “Labeer of love” and “Harbeer a grudge” and “Good neighbeers” and “Please elabeerate” and “Collabeerate with.”
  • *bur* → *beer*: As in, “A heavy beerden.” Other words you could use: beereaucracy (bureaucracy), beergeoning (burgeoning) and excalibeer (excalibur).
  • *per* → *beer*: As in, “A different beerspective” and “Third beerson” and “Motivation and beerseverance.” Other words you could use: beertinent (pertinent), beeriod (period), beerception (perception), beernicious (pernicious), beercieve (perceive), beerformance (performance), beerfect (perfect), imbeerative (imperative) and obeeration (operation).
  • Hot → Shot: As in, “Drop it like it’s shot” and “Shot and bothered” and “Shot and heavy” and “Shot enough for you?” and “A shot mess” and “Shot stuff” and “Too shot to handle.”
  • Shut → Shot: As in, “An open and shot case” and “Put up or shot up.” You can also replace the “shut” in these words: shotdown (shutdown), shottle (shuttle), shotter (shutter), shotterbug (shutterbug) and shoteye (shuteye).
  • *shot*: You can emphasise the “shot” in some words: screenshot, hotshot, snapshot, upshot, headshot, slingshot, shotgun and mugshot.
  • Give → Gift: As in, “A dead giftaway” and “Don’t gift up!” and “Don’t gift in” and “Gift yourself a bad name” and “Gift them a hand” and “Gift and take” and “Gift credit where credit is due” and “Gift it a rest” and “Gift it the green light” and “Gift me a call” and “Gift 110%”.
  • Gave → Gift: As in, “I gift my best.”
  • Present: We’ve included present-related phrases in this list too. As in, “All present and correct” and “Present company excepted” and “No time like the present.”
  • Percent → Present: As in, “A hundred and ten present” and “Genius is one present inspiration and 99 present perspiration.”
  • Dig → Shindig: Since shindig is another word for party, we’ve included shindig in this list: “Shindig your own grave” and “Shindig yourself into a hole” and “Shindig up dirt” and “Shindig deep.”
  • Bash: Since “bash” is another word for party, we’ve got some bash-related puns and phrases for you to use here:
    • *bas* → *bash*: As in, “You b*shtard” and “Don’t keep all your eggs in one bashket” and “Saved to the databash” and “On the bashis of..” Other words you could use: bashic (basic), bashin (basin), bashtion (bastion), bombashtic (bombastic).
    • *bis* → *bash*: As in, refurbash (refurbish), cannabash (cannabis), rubbash (rubbish) and bashop (bishop).
    • *bus → *bash: As in, “Part of the syllabash” and “Collector’s omnibash.” Note: an omnibus is a collection of work.
    • *bush → *bash: As in, “Feeling ambashed” and “Filled with rosebashes” and “Babashka doll.”
    • *pas* → *bash: As in, “Bashion for fashion” and “Bashive aggressiveness” and “Bashionate about” and “Combashion fatigue.”
  • Blowout: Blowout is another word for a party or social function (particularly those with plenty of food), so we’ve included some blowout-related puns and phrases here:
    • Out → Blowout: As in, “Ins and blowouts.”
    • Blow → Blowout: As in, “Blowout hot and cold” and “Blowout some steam” and “Blowout the lid off” and “Blowout to smithereens” and “Blowout your mind.”
  • Card: Since cards (like birthday cards) can be given at parties, we’ve included some card-related puns:
    • *cred* → *card*: As in, “Street card” and “Take cardit for” and “Nothing is sacard” and “Not cardible (credible)” and “Ruined cardibility.” Other words that could work: cardentials (credentials), cardence (credence), massacard (massacred), incardulous (incredulous). Notes: credence is a mental acceptance of something as being true or real. Being incredulous is not wanting to believe something.
    • *cur* → *card*: As in, “The final cardtain (curtain)” and “A cardsory (cursory) glance” and “I concard (concur)” and “That never occard (occured) to me.” Other words that could work: cardmudgeon (curmudgeon), incard (incur), recard (recur), obscard (obscured), secardity (security), cardate (curate), cardiculum (curriculum) and manicard (manicured).
    • *cor* → *card*: As in, “Cardespondence course” and “Cut the card (cord)” and “In your cardner (corner)” and “The final scard (score)” and “For the recard.” Other words that could work in the right context: cardporation (corporation), cardoborate (corroborate), cardelation (correlation), decard (decor), rancard (rancor), accard (accord), incardporate (incorporate). Note: to corroborate is to add proof to an account. Rancor is a bitter, deeply-ingrained ill-feeling.
    • *cured* → *card*: As in, “What can’t be card (cured) must be endured” and “Her face was obscard (obscured)” and “Perimeter secard (secured)” and “Procard (procured) the goods” and “Manicard (manicured) lawns.”
    • Certain → Cardtain: As in, “In no uncardtain terms” and “Know for cardtain.”
    • *curd* → *card*: As in, card (curd), cardle (curdle) and bloodcardling (bloodcurdling).
    • Drunkard → Druncard
    • *cord* → *card*: As in, “A broken recard and “Cut the card” and “For the recard” and “In recard time” and “Off the recard” and “Accarding to…” and “Remain cardial.” Other words that could work: cardially (cordially), carduroy (corduroy), cardon (cordon), discard (discord), accardance (accordance). Notes: to do something cordially is to do it in a friendly way. A cordon is a rope used to define boundaries.
    • *car* → *card*: As in, “Courtesy and card (care)” and “Drive my card” and “Upset the apple card (apple cart)” and “Couldn’t card less.” Other words that could work: cardeer (career), cardier (carrier), cardiage (carriage), cardavan (caravan), scard (scar), Madagascard (Madagascar), railcard (railcar), handcard (handcar), precardious (precarious), vicardious (vicarious).
    • Cartier → Cardier
    • Cared → Card: As in, “I card about you” and “Run s-card” and “S-card poopless,” and “S-card to death.”
    • Card: Some card-related phrases to play with: “A few cards short of a full deck” and “Calling card” and “Card up your sleeve” and “Deck of cards” and “Get out of jail free card” and “Hold all the cards” and “Holding your cards close to your chest” and “House of cards” and “Lay your cards on the table” and “On the cards” and “Pick a card, any card” and “Play your cards right.”
    • Card*: Some card-related/inclusive words: cardinal, cardboard, cardio, cardigan, cardiac, discard, placard, wildcard, timecard, postcard and scorecard.
  • Guessed → Guest: As in, “Never would have guest” and “You guest correctly.”
  • Gist → Guest: As in, “Got the guest of it.”
  • Ghost → Guest: As in, “White as a guest” and “Guestbusters” and “Give up the guest” and “Not a guest of a chance” and “You look as though you’ve seen a guest” and “Guest from the past.” Other ghost-related words: guestly (ghostly), guestwriter (ghostwriter), guested (ghosted), guesting (ghosting).
  • Ghost in the Shell → Guest in the Shell (Ghost in the Shell is a popular Japanese manga that was whitewashed when it was adapted to film).
  • *ghast* → *guest*: As in, “Looking guestly” and “Aguest at the situation.” Note: to be aghast is to be horrified.
  • *gast* → *guest*: guestronomy (gastronomy), guestronomical (gastronomical) and flabberguested (flabbergasted).
  • *gest* → *guest*: As in, “An empty guesture” and “What do you sugguest?” and “Let me diguest” and “Sugguestive looks.” Other words you could use: conguestion (congestion), sugguestion (suggestion), longuest (longest), larguest (largest), bigguest (biggest), inguest (ingest), guestural (gestural), guesticulate (gesticulate), guestation (gestation).
  • *gust* → *guest*: As in, “With guesto” and “Disguested with your behaviour.”
  • August → Auguest
  • *gist* → *guest*: As in, “A reguestered (registered) voter” and “Professional psychologuest.” Other words you could use: meteorologuest (meteorologist), reguestration (registration), neurologuest (neurologist), anthropologuest (anthropologist), maguestrate (magistrate), loguestics (logistics).
  • *hast* → *host*: As in, “Beat a hosty retreat” and “Make hoste” and “Hostily working.”
  • History → Hostory: As in, “Making hostory” and “A short hostory of nearly everything” and “Ancient hostory” and “Hostory repeating” and “Hostory repeating” and “The rest is hostory” and “Of hostorical importance.”
  • *hust* → *host*: As in, “Hostle and bustle” and “Moving and hostling.”
  • *host*: Emphasise the “host” in certain words: hostile, hostage, hostel and hostility.
  • Toast: A toast is a salutation or well-wishing which is common at parties and celebrations, so we’ve included it in this list. Here’s a short section of toast puns:
    • Taste → Toast: As in, “An acquired toast” and “A bad toast in one’s mouth” and “A toast of your own medicine” and “No accounting for toast.”
    • Toes → Toast: As in, “Keep you on your toast” and “On your toast” and “Twinkle toast” and “Not to step on anyone’s toast.”
    • *tas* → *toast*: As in, “A toasty (tasty) sandwich” and “Toastless fashion” and “A fantoastic result.” Other words you could use: fantoasty (fantasy), catoastrophe (catastrophe), fajitoast (fajitas), gravitoast (gravitas). Notes: fajitas are a type of tex-mex dish. Gravitas refers to a feeling or atmosphere of seriousness.
    • *test* → *toast*: As in, “A toastament to” and “Give toastimony to” and “Toasting the limits of” and “Online toastimonials” and “It’s not a contoast” and “Street protoasts” and “Attoast (attest) to.”
    • *tis* → *toast*: As in, “Online advertoastments” and “Acute arthritoast.”
    • *tos* → *toast*: As in, asbestoast (asbestos), memontoast (mementos), mosquitoast (mosquitoes), photoastsynthesise (photosynthesise), comatoast (comatose), stratoastphere (stratosphere), fructoast (fructose), lactoast (lactose), halitoastsis (halitosis). Note: halitosis is bad breath.
    • *tus* → *toast*: As in, “Statoast anxiety” and “On hiatoast.” Other words you could use: impetoast (impetus), apparatoast (apparatus), detritoast (detritus) and cactoast (cactus). Notes: an impetus is a thing or factor that compels you to do something. Detritus are pieces of rock, or debris.
    • *tist* → *toast*: As in, “Scam artoast (artist)” and “Census statoastics.” Other words you could use: egotoastical (egotistical), dentoast (dentist), statoastic (statistic), pragmatoast (pragmatist), scientoast (scientist) and elitoast (elitist).
    • Testosterone → Testoasterone
    • *toes* → *toast*: As in, “Small potatoast” and “Red as a tomatoast” and “On tiptoast (tiptoes).”
    • Toast: We’ll finish this section off with some toast-related phrases that you can use as puns: “Toast of the town” and “You’re toast.”
  • *fed* → *food*: As in, foodback (feedback), fooderal (federal), foodora (fedora), confooderate (confederate), fooderation (federation).
  • Befuddled → Befoodled
  • Daffodil → Daffoodil
  • *fid* → *food*: As in, “Walk with confoodence” and “Feeling confoodent” and “High foodelity.” Other words you could use: diffoodent (diffident), fooddle (fiddle) and affoodavit (affidavit).
  • Nibble: Finger food and nibbles (or “nibblies”) are a common type of food at parties, so we’ve included them in this list. Here’s a short section of puns about nibbling:
    • *nable* → *nibble*: As in, “Be reasonibble” and “An unsustainibble work relationship.” Other words you could use: untenibble (untenable), amenibble (amenable), unconscionibble (unconscionable) and abominibble (abominable).
    • *nibl* → *nibble*: Discernibble (discernible) and indiscernibble (indiscernible).
  • As entertainment and social interaction is the main reason for parties, we’ve included some fun-related puns in this list too:
    • *fan* → *fun*: As in, “Funtastic news!” and “All a big funtasy” and “A solid funbase.” Other words that could work: funatic (fanatic), funciful (fanciful), funfare (fanfare), infunt (infant), profunity (profanity), funatically (fanatically).
    • *fen* → *fun*: As in, “Funder-bender” and “On the funce” and “In my defunce” and “On the offunsive” and “A deafuning roar.” Other words you could use: defundant (defendant), stiffun (stiffen), ibuprofun (ibuprofen) and funnel (fennel).
    • *fin* → *fun*: As in, “Close to the funish line” and “Choc chip muffun” and “By defunition.” Other words you could use: funancial (financial), funally (finally), elfun (elfin) and defunitely (definitely).
    • *fon* → *fun*: As in, “A fundness (fondness) for” and “Fundly remember” and “Chiffun skirt.” Other words that could work: fundue (fondue), fundle (fondue), fundant (fondant).
    • *fun*: Emphasise the “fun” in these words: “The fundamentals of” and “In a deep funk” and “A social function.” Other words that could work: fungus, fungi, funnel and perfunctory.
    • *van* → *fun*: As in, “A relefunt point” and “Carafun park” and “To your adfuntage” and “That’s irrelefunt.” Other words you could use: efunescent (evanescent), griefunce (grievance), nerfuna (nirvana) and funity (vanity).
    • Vanessa → Funessa
    • *phan* → *fun*: As in, “The funtom menace” and “The elefunt in the room” and “In alfunumeric order.” Other words that could work: epifuny (epiphany), orfunage (orphanage).
    • *phen* → *fun*: funomenon (phenomenon), funomenal (phenomenal), hyfun (hyphen) and hyfunate (hyphenate).
    • *phin* → *fun*: Dolfun (dolphin), endorfun (endorphin).
    • *phon* → *fun*: Funetics (phonetics), sifun (siphon), cacofuny (cacophony), homofun (homophone) and symfuny (symphony).
  • Bass: Music with heavy bass is popular at parties (especially casual or celebratory ones), so we’ve included some bass-related puns and phrases in this list:
    • Base → Bass: As in, “Caught off bass” and “Cover your basses” and “Off bass” and “Touch bass.”
    • *bes* → *bass*: As in, “A basspoke suit” and “All for the basst” and “Basst friends forever” and “Basstow your knowledge” and “Basset (beset) with doubts.” Other words you could use: bassides (besides), basseech (beseech), bassotted (bessotted), bassiege (besiege).
    • Rooibos → Rooibass (note: rooibos is a type of tea.)
    • *bos* → *bass*: As in, verbass (verbose), probasscis (proboscis), embassed (embossed).
    • Bus → Bass: As in, “Park the bass” and “Take the bass” and “The wheels on the bass go round and round.”
    • *bus* → *bass*: As in, “Not your bassiness” and “This is a place of bassiness” and “Bassy as a bee.” Other words that could work: nimbass (nimbus), syllabass (syllabus), omnibass (omnibus), inbubass (incubus), rhombass (rhombus) and robasst (robust).
    • Herbaceous → Herbasseous
    • *bic* → *bass*: basseps (biceps), bassentennial (bicentennial) and bassentenary (bicentenary).
    • *pes* → *bass*: As in, “Famine and basstilence (pestilence)” and “You’re being a basst (pest)” and “Being bassimistic (pessimistic).” Other words that could work: basster (pester), tembasst (tempest), tabasstry (tapestry) and tembasstuous (tempestuous).
    • *pis* → *bass*: As in, “The newest ebassode (episode)” and “Basstachio flavoured” and “A prolific philanthrobasst.”
    • *pace* → *bass*: bassmaker (pacemaker), worksbass (workspace), headsbass (headspace) and backsbass (backspace).
    • *bas* → *bass*: As in, “Back to bassics” and “Bargain bassment” and “Don’t let the basstards get you down.” Other words that could be used: bassin (basin), bassball (baseball), bassline (baseline), bassket (basket), bombasstic (bombastic), databass.
    • *bass*: Emphasise the “bass” in these words: bassinet, basset, bassoon, ambassador, embassy, embassador. Notes: a bassinet is a type of cradle.
  • *den* → *dance*: As in, “Rose gardance” and “Ice maidance” and “Beholdance to” and “Dancely (densely) packed” and “You’re goldance.” Other words you could use: wardance (warden), dance-ity (density), condancesation (condensation), burdancesome (burdensome), condancesate (condensate), condanced (condensed).
  • *dence* → *dance*: As in, “Where’s the evidance?” and “Overflowing with confidance” and “In correspondance with” and “Setting precedance.” Other words that could work: residance, prudance, providance and candance.
  • *tans* → *dance*: As in, “Good samaridance (samaritans)” and “A bunch of charladance (charlatans).” Note: a charlatan is a trickster.
  • *tens* → *dance*: As in, “Sexual dance-ion” and “Dance (tens) of thousands of” and “Could cut the danceion with a knife” and “By exdanceion” and “An indance situation.” Other words that could work: indance-ive (intensive), hyperdance-ion (hypertension).
  • *tance* → *dance*: As in, “Subsdance abuse” and “Pleased to make your acquaindance” and “For insdance” and “Respect exisdance or expect resisdance” and “Unfortunate circumsdances” and “Keep your disdance” and “Provide assisdance.”
  • Dance: A few dance-related phrases that could serve as party puns in the right context: “Dance around the problem” and “Dancing with wolves” and “Lead a merry dance” and “Make a song and dance about.”
  • Favour → Party favour: As in, “Call in a party favour” and “Curry party favours with” and “Owe a party favour” and “Without fear or party favours.”
  • Animal → Party animal: As in, “A whole different party animal” and “Party animal instinct” and “Party animal magnetism” and “The party animal kingdom.”
  • House: The word “house” can have multiple meanings when it comes to parties – it can refer to the type of party (house party), a specific location (Jack’s house) or a type of music (house music). We’ve got some terrible house-related puns and phrases for you here:
    • Host → House-t: As in, “Our generous house-t” and “The house-tess with the mostess.”
    • Has → House: As in, “Word house it” and “What house come over you?” and “House a heart of gold.”
    • *has* → *house*: As in, “A big house-le (hassle)” and “A frivolous purchouse.”
    • *hos* → *house*: As in, “Taken housetage” and “Generous housepitality” and “Faced with housetility” and “In the housepital.”
    • *hus* → *house*: As in, “House-tle and bustle” and “Newlywed houseband” and “Filled with enthouse-iasm.”
    • Massachusetts → Massachouse-etts
    • His* → House*: As in, “Filled with house-tory” and “Ancient house-tory” and “House-torial documents” and “A house-toric party.”
  • Birth* → Barth*: As in, “Barthday party” and “In your barthday suit” and “Give barth to..” Note: these puns could work particularly well for a birthday party that’s happening at a bar.
  • *ber* → *bar*: As in, “Daylight robbary” and “Numbar one” and “Sweet as a barry” and “Going barserk” and “Do you remembar? (this one is a bit tongue-in-cheek as there’s a trope of not remembering much the night after going to a bar)” and “I’ve got your numbar” and “Call me when you’re sobar” and “From a deep slumbar” and “A membar of…” Other words you could use: rubbar, chambar, libarty and bareft (bereft). Note: to be bereft is to be pained or deprived.
  • Berlin → Barlin
  • Bermuda → Barmuda
  • December → Decembar: Note that October (Octobar) and November (Novembar) work as well.
  • *bor* → *bar*: As in, “Bared out of your mind” and “Barn and bred” and “On barrowed time” and “A labar of love” and “Friendly neighbars” and “On the barder.” Other words that could work: baring (boring), baredom (boredom) and harbar (harbor).
  • *bur* → *bar*: As in, “On the back-barner” and “Baried treasure” and “Barn one’s bridges” and “Barst into tears/out laughing” and “Barst someone’s bubble” and “Bary your head in the sand” and “Shoulder the barden” and “Barning with desire.”
  • *par* → *bar*: Some of these puns could work really well for a party that’s happening at a bar, or a bar-crawl style party: “Fight for the right to barty” and “Below bar” and “Drift abart” and “Fool’s baradise” and “For the most bart” and “Housewarming barty” and “Life of the barty” and “Look the bart” and “Bartner in crime” and “Hit it out of the bark.” Other words you could use: Baris (Paris), sbar (spar) and sub-bar (subpar).
  • *per* → *bar*: As in, “That’s barfect” and “Barson of interest” and “Expect barfection” and “As bar usual” and “A hundred and ten barcent” and “Cast asbarsions (aspersions)” and “Not a morning barson” and “Barmanent changes” and “Sunny barsonality” and “From a different barspective” and “Overpowering barfume” and “Barsonal questions” and “Seasoned barfectly” and “Whisbared confession.”
  • Inspiration → Insbaration
  • Bahamas → Barhamas
  • Kuala Lumpur → Kuala Lumpbar
  • *bar*: Emphasise the “bar” in certain words: “Born in a barn” and “Barrel of monkeys” and “Over the barrier” and “Bargain basement.” Other words that work: barren, embarassed, Barbados, barbarian, barbecue, barbell, barbershop, Barcelona, baritone, barnacle and barricade.
  • Since a lot of parties are held in bars and clubs, we’ve included some club-related puns and phrases for you:
    • Clap → Club: As in, “Clubbed eyes on” and “If you’re happy and you know it, club your hands.”
    • Cub → Club: As in, “Club scout” and “All club-hunting should be illegal.”
    • Recyclable → Recycluble
    • *clap* → *club*: As in, “Well that’s just clubtrap (claptrap)” and “Thunderclub.”
    • *clip* → *club*: As in, clubboard (clipboard), paperclub (paperclip) and eclubse (eclipse).
    • Encyclopedia → Encyclubpedia
    • Kleptomania → Clubtomania: (note: kleptomania is a disorder where a person obsessively steals.)
  • Beach: Since beaches are popular locations for parties (enough to be considered a type of party on their own), we’ve got some beach-related puns and phrases here for you:
    • B*tch → Beach: As in, “Bow down, beaches” and “Payback’s a beach” and “Resting beach face.”
    • Breach → Beach: As in, “A beach of trust.”
    • Breech → Beach: As in, “Too big for your beaches.” Note: breeches are a very old word for pants.
    • Bleach → Beach: As in, “Beached blonde.”
    • Peach → Beach: As in, “Beachy keen” and “What a beach” and “Skin like beaches and cream.”
    • Preach → Beach: As in, “Practice what you beach” and “Beaching to the choir” and “Beaching to the converted” and “Papa, don’t beach. (note: this is also a reference to a pop song by Madonna).”
    • Bachelor → Beachelor: As in, “Beachelor pad” and “Beachelorette party” and “The Beachelor (note: this one is also a reference to the dating show, The Bachelor).”
    • Bechamel → Beachamel (note: bechamel is a type of white, cream-based sauce.)
    • Bichon Frise → Beachon Frise: (note: a bichon frise is a breed of dog.)
    • Batch → Beach: As in, “Fresh beach of cookies” and “Maybe in the next beach.”
    • Benedict Cumberbatch → Benedict Cumberbeach
    • You betcha → You beacha
    • Botch → Beach: As in, “A beached job.”
    • *patch* → *beach*: As in, “Not a beach on” and “Going through a rough beach” and “Beachouli (patchouli) scented” and “From disbeach (dispatch).”
    • Pitch → Beach: As in, “Fever beach” and “Lower your beachforks.”
    • Betray → Beachray: As in, “You have beachrayed me for the last time” and “Don’t beachray me.”
    • Ambition → Ambeachion
  • Streamer: Since streamers are a common party decoration, we’ve included some puns and phrases that could be used as streamer puns in the right context:
    • Scream → Streamer: As in, “Streamer your heart out” and “Dragged kicking and streamering” and “Streamer the place down” and “So mad I could streamer.”
    • Steam → Streamer: As in, “Blow off some streamer” and “Full streamer ahead” and “Work off a head of streamer” and “Run out of streamer” and “Under your own streamer” and “Pick up streamer.”
  • Plan: Having plans and making plans are a big part of making a party happen, so we’ve included plan-related phrases and puns here:
    • *pan* → *plan*: As in, “Flat as a plancake” and “Out of the frying plan, into the fire” and “Things didn’t plan out” and “Bad complany” and “Caught with your plants down” and “Present complany excepted” and “A splanner in the works” and “Plander to” and “Running ramplant.” Other words you could use: plantheon (pantheon), planda (panda), splan (span), lifesplan (lifespan), deadplan (deadpan), timesplan (timespan), marziplan (marzipan), complany (company), discreplancy (discrepancy), planel (panel) and expland (expand).
    • Pen → Plan: As in, “The plan is mightier than the sword.”
    • Pants → Plans: As in, “Ants in your plans” and “Fly by the seat of your plans.”
    • *pen* → *plan*: As in, “A planchant for” and “A planetrating stare” and “Give planance for” and “Oplan bar” and “Damplan your spirits” and “A deeplaning relationship.” Other words that could work: happlan (happen), sharplan (sharpen), proplansity (propensity), applandix (appendix), indeplandent (independent), indisplansible (indispensible) and deplandent (dependent).
    • *plen* → *plan*: As in, “Planty more fish in the sea” and “A splandid thing” and “Full of splandor.” Other words you can use: resplandent (resplendent), plantiful (plentiful) and replanish (replenish).
    • *plin* → *plan*: planth (plinth), disciplan (discipline) and splanter (splinter).
    • *ban* → *plan*: As in, “Money in the plan-k” and “A subur-plan family” and “Aplan-don ship.” Other words that could work: tur-plan (turban), ur-plan (urban), planter (banter).
    • *blan* → *plan*: As in, “Looking plan-k” and “A plan-k sheet of paper” and “Baby planket” and “Plan-d (bland) tasting” and “Bears a resemplance to…”
    • *ann* → *plan*: As in, “Happy planniversary” and “Plannotated notes” and “Plannihilate the competition.”
    • *ana* → *plan*: plan-alysis (analysis), plan-alogy (analogy) and plan-alog (analog).
    •  *plan*: Emphasise the “plan” in these words: plant, plane, planet, planning, plangent, explanation.

This section is dedicated to different types of parties:

  • Tea: These tea-related puns and phrases can stand in as tea-party puns in the right context:
    • *tie* → *tea*: As in “Black tea” and “Equal opportuniteas” and “Necktea party” and “Tea the knot” and “Tea up the loose ends” and “Tea yourself in knots.”
    • To → Tea: As in, “An accident waiting tea happen” and “According tea” and “All dressed up and nowhere tea go” and “Not all it’s cracked up tea be.”
    • Too → Tea: As in, “About time tea” and “Never tea late to” and “You know tea much” and “Life’s tea short.”
    • Tree → Tea: As in, “Can’t see the wood for the teas” and “Family tea.”
    • *tee* → *tea*: As in, “To the teath” and “Smells like tean spirit” and “Teaming with energy” and “100% guarantea” and “Self-esteam.” Other words you could use: teanager (teenager), committea (committee), repartea (repartee), trustea, mentea, devotea, esteam (esteem), voluntear and cantean.
    • *tei* → *tea*: As in, “Protean shake” and “Frankenstean.”
    • *teo* → *tea*: As in, courteaous, righteaous, meteaor and oesteaoporosis.
    • *teu* → *tea*: As in, “An amateaur performance” and “Agent provocateaur.”
    • *tey* → *tea*: As in, “Okay then matea” and “A chocolatea taste.”
    • *tie* → *tea*: sortea (sortie), auntea (auntie), sweetea, sentea-ent (sentient), frontea-er (frontier), ameniteas, faciliteas.
    • Tiara → Tea-ara
    • *tyi* → *tea*: As in, “Partea-ing ’til morning” and “Emptea-ing your cup” and “A pitea-ing look.”
    • *ty → *tea: As in, “Work with integritea” and “A citea mouse” and “Your dutea as a party animal” and “Filled with beautea.” Other words you could use: teapical (typical), tea-ranny (tyranny), qualitea (quality), entitea (entity), facilitea (facility), serendipitea (serendipity) and equitea (equity).
    • *dee → *tea: As in, “Party attenteas” and “The awar-teas (awardees) are…”
    • *deo* → *tea*: As in, “Vi-teao (video) star” and “A hitea-ous day” and “Opposing itea-ologies.”
    • *die* → *tea*: As in, “A captive autea-ence” and “Obetea-ent puppies.”
    • *tea*: We’ll finish this section off with words that already have the word “tea” in them: “Teamwork makes the dream work” and “Making me tear up” and “Experience is the best teacher” and “Teach someone a lesson.”
  • Birthday: Since birthdays are one of the biggest reasons to throw a party, we’ve included some birth and birthday-related phrases for you:
    • Day → Birthday: As in, “A birthday in the life,” and “A birthday without orange juice is like a birthday without sunshine,” and “After all, tomorrow is another birthday,” and “All in a birthday’s work,” and “As true as the birthday is long,” and “At the end of the birthday,” and “Call it a birthday,” and “For ever and a birthday,” and “Go on punk, make my birthday.”
    • Birthday: We’ll finish up this birthday section with some direct birthday-related puns: “Happy birthday to you,” and “In your birthday suit.”
  • Prize → Surprise: Surprise parties are a another type of party we’ve got covered in this list: “Booby surprise” and “Keep your eyes on the surprise” and “A surprise catch” and “No surprises for guessing.”
  • Cocktail: Cocktail parties are popular enough to have made our pun list:
    • Cock → Cocktail: As in, “A cocktail and bull story” and “At half cocktail.”
    • Tail → Cocktail: As in, “Can’t make head or cocktail of it” and “Chasing cocktails” and “Heads I win, cocktails I lose” and “Nose to cocktail” and “The devil is in the cocktails.”
  • Dress → Fancy Dress: As in, “All fancy-dressed up and nowhere to go” and “Fancy dress code” and “Fancy dress for success” and “Fancy dressed to kill” and “In a state of fancy dress” and “You’re never fully fancy-dressed without a smile.”
  • Well, come → Welcome: Welcome parties are usually saved for when someone moves country or starts a new job. As in, “Welcome in!”
  • Pool: Make some terrible pool party puns with these puns and phrases:
    • Pull → Pool: As in, “Like pooling teeth” and “Pool a face” and “Pool a fast one” and “Pool out all the stops” and “Pool through” and “Want to pool my hair out” and “Pooling your punches” and “Stop pooling my leg.”
    • *pal* → *pool*: As in, “Principool players” and “A pooltry amount.”
    • *pel* → *pool*: As in, “A compoolling argument” and “My doppoolganger” and “The gospool truth.” Note: a doppelganger is someone who looks like a double of another person.
    • *pol* → *pool*: As in, “Poolitical atmosphere” and “Grammar poolice” and “Poolish up your skills” and “I apoologise” and “An open-door poolicy.” Other words that could work: extrapoolate and anthropoology.
    • *pul* → *pool*: As in, “On impoolse” and “The popoolar choice” and “Rising popoolation” and “It’s compoolsory.” Other words that could work: opoolent (opulent), popoolist (populist), stipoolate (stipulate) and manipoolate (manipulate). Note: a populist is someone who advocates policies simply because they’re popular, rather than because they’re correct, moral, or socially good.
    • *poll* → *pool*: As in, poollution (pollution), poollen (pollen) and poollutant (pollutant).
    • *bal* → *pool*: As in, “A glopool problem” and “Herpool (herbal) tea” and “A verpool (verbal) argument.”
    • *bol* → *pool*: As in, “A sympool of hope” and “Fast metapoolism.”
    • *bul* → *pool*: As in, “A fapoolous outfit” and “Nepoolous (nebulous) ideas” and “An extensive vocapoolary.” Note: nebulous means hazy or ill-defined.
    • *ple* → *pool*: As in, “A second bite of the appool” and “On principool” and “A peopool person” and “A simpool solution for a simpool problem” and “Stapool foods” and ” For exampool” and “Multipool options” and “Power coupool.”
  • Mix → Mixer: Mixers are parties with the intention of meeting new people and making new connections. As in, “In the mixer” and “Mixer and match” and “Mixer it up” and “Pick ‘n’ mixer.”
  • Rave: Raves are types of dance parties that are associated with electronic dance music and drug use. We can make some puns about these with these rave-related puns and phrases:
    • *rav* → *rave*: As in, “Rave-aged by time” and “Rave-n black hair” and “Unrave-ling lies” and “A rave-ishing dress” and “Ranting and rave-ing.” Other words you could use: rave-ine (ravine), rave-enous, rave-ioli (ravioli), trave-l, trave-erse (traverse), grave-itas (gravitas), trave-esty (travesty), grave, brave, grave-ity, carave-an (caravan). Note: gravitas is an atmosphere or attitude of seriousness.
    • *rev* → *rave*: As in, “A rave rave-iew (double pun!)” and “In rave-erse” and “Rave-ert to past behaviour” and “Part of the rave-olution” and “The big rave-eal” and “Rave-oked privileges.” Other words you could use: rave-el (revel), rave-enue (revenue), rave-erie (reverie), rave-oke (revoke), prave-elent (prevalent). Note: to revel is to celebrate.
    • *riv* → *rave*: As in, “Cry me a rave-er” and “A rave-eting performance” and “Sibling rave-lry.”
  • Party → Afterparty: As in, “Fight for the right to afterparty” and “It’s my afterparty and I’ll cry if I want to” and “Life and soul of the afterparty” and “Afterparty animal” and “Afterparty on!”
  • Lan: Lan parties are social events based around playing multiplayer computer games.
    • *lan*: Emphasise the “lan” in these words: “Like speaking another language” and “On land” and “A whole different landscape” and “A landmark location” and “According to plan.” Other words you could use: languish, languid and lantern. Note: to languish is to be in a state of weakness.
    • *len* → *lan*: As in, “A lanient parenting style” and “Style over langth” and “A langthy conversation” and “Hoping for laniency” and “Looking through a different lans (lens)” and “A sullan disposition.” Other words that you could use: swollan (swollen), pollan (pollen), crestfallan, stolan (stolen), challange (challenge), ambivalant, condolances, benevolant (benevolent), prevalant (prevalent) and calandar. Note: to be lenient is to be forgiving or soft-hearted.
    • *lin* → *lan*: As in, “You little goblan” and “Running on adrenalan.” Other words you could use: insulan (insulin), disciplan (discipline), delaneate (delineate).
    • *lun* → *lan*: As in, “Utter lanacy” and “A fundraising lancheon” and “Volanteering for.”
  • Buck: Buck’s nights/parties are another word for bachelor parties, so we’ve included buck-related phrases and puns here for you:
    • Back → Buck: As in, “Answer buck” and “As soon as my buck is turned” and “At the buck of my mind” and “Buck at it” and “Never buck down” and “Buck in the day” and “Buck on your feet” and “Buck to square one” and “Buck to the drawing board” and “A buckhanded compliment” and “Bending over buckwards” and “Comebuck king” and “Doubling buck” and “Fed up to the buck teeth” and “Fighting buck tears.” Other words that have “back” in them: buckslide (backslide), buckup (backup), buckground (background), bucklash (backlash), buckdrop (backdrop) and feedbuck (feedback).
    • Back to the Future → Buck to the Future
    • Back in Black → Buck in Black
    • *bac* → *buck*: buckteria (bacteria), buck-chelor (bachelor) and debuckle (debacle).
    • *bec* → *buck*: As in, “What have you buckome?” and “Well, buckause…” and “Your attitude isn’t buckoming” and “Buckame (became) my worst nightmare.”
    • *bic* → *buck*: As in, “Aerobuck exercise” and “Feeling claustrophobuck” and “Cubuckle farm.”
    • *buc* → *buck*: As in, “A drop in the bucket” and “Buckle up!” and “Buck-aneer life” and “A buckolic (bucolic) scene.” Note: if something is bucolic, then it’s of or relating to the countryside.
    • *bak* → *buck*: As in, “A bucker’s dozen” and “Half-bucked.”
    • *bik* → *buck*: “Rubuck‘s cube” and “Buckini shoot.”
    • *buk* → *buck*: As in, “A fresh persbucktive” and “Earned my resbuckt” and “Every asbuckt of” and “Exciting prosbuckts (prospects)” and “A wide s-bucktrum (spectrum)” and “A prosbucktive employee.” Other words you could use: circumsbuckt (circumspect), desbuckable (despicable), bucktoral (pectoral) and combuckt (compact). Note: to be circumspect is to be aware and considerate of all circumstances.
    • Barbecue → Barbuckue: This one could work particularly well for a buck’s party that’s happening at a barbecue (although very specific).
    • Buck: We’ll finish this section with some buck-related phrases: “A bigger bang for your buck” and “A buck well spent” and “The big bucks” and “Buck naked” and “Buck the system” and “Buck up your ideas” and “An honest buck” and “Looking like a million bucks.”
  • Hen: Hen’s parties/nights are another word for bachelorette parties, so we’ve included hens-related phrases and puns here for you:
    • *han* → *hen*: As in, “Here’s looking at you, hensome” and “Get a hendle on the situation” and “Experiencing an epipheny.”
    • *hin* → *hen*: As in, “Hendering my efforts” and “In hendsight” and “Give me a hent (hint)” and “You’re a hendrance” and “The beauty withen” and “Street urchen” and “Filled with endorphens.”
    • *hon* → *hen*: As in, “But henestly” and “Smooth as heney” and “An henourable person” and “A real marathen.”
    • *hun* → *hen*: As in, “A hendred and ten percent” and “Hengry enough to eat an entire country.”
    • *hen*: We’ll finish this section off with words that already have the word “hen” in them: hence, Henessy, Henry, henceforth, henchman, henhouse, comprehensive and apprehensive.
  • Block: Block parties are held in the street of a city block and are generally only open to residents of that block. We’ve included some puns and phrases that could serve as block party puns here:
    • Black → Block: As in, “Block and blue” and “Not a block and white issue” and “Block magic” and “On the block list” and “A block mark” and “On the block market” and “Block out” and “Block tie” and “Little block book” and “Not as block as you are painted.” Other black-related words you could use: blockbird (blackbird), blockmail (blackmail), blockout (blackout) and blocksmith (blacksmith).
    • *blic* → *block*: As in, “A publock menace” and “Going publock” and “Publock enemy number one” and “A fresh publockation (publication)” and “Publockally announce.”
  • Sorry → Soiree: As in, “Better safe than soiree” and “Soiree seems to be the hardest word” and “A soiree sight.” Note: a soiree is a formal evening party.

Party-Related Words

To help you come up with your own party puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

General: party, toast, guest, host, event, alcohol, booze, beer, shots, cocktail, food, nibbles wasted, fun, music, bass, beat, dance, dancing, party pooper, party favour, party animal, invite, house, bar, club, beach, balloon, planner, plans, rsvp, designated driver, exclusive, gathering, social, celebrate, get together, hang out, bash, shindig, blowout

Types of party: tea, search, political, slumber, dinner, birthday, surprise, garden, cocktail, soiree, block, costume, fancy dress, welcome, farewell, house, pool, mixer, housewarming, rave, surprise, afterparty, lan, toga, bachelor/buck, bachelorette/hens, reunion

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Thanksgiving Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on Thanksgiving puns! 🍁🙌💕🌽

While Thanksgiving is a much-loved holiday and we’re happy to celebrate it with a list of terrible puns, we do also need to recognise that this celebration is a painful time for many. The land was not shared between settlers and Native Americans as is generally taught – it was taken violently, and so many Native Americans think of Thanksgiving as a day of celebrating the colonisation of their land and the mass killing of their people. To try and respectfully approach this holiday, we’re going to curate this pun list to cover only puns which show the original, non-religious Thanksgiving celebration so a lot of these puns will be about the food traditionally eaten during harvest festivals.

While we’ve made this list as thorough as possible, this entry is for Thanksgiving in general. We also have more specific entries for pumpkin puns, holiday puns and turkey puns in the works. While you’re waiting on those, you might like to check out our food puns, vegetable puns or corn puns.

Thanksgiving Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about Thanksgiving that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of Thanksgiving puns:

  • Giving → Thanksgiving: As in, “The gift that keeps on Thanksgiving.”
  • Harvest: As in, “Reap the harvest,” and “Harvest moon.” Note: the harvest moon is the full moon which appears closest to the autumn equinox.
  • Turkey: As in, “Cold turkey,” and “Talk turkey.” Notes: Cold turkey refers to the abrupt and complete quitting of something. To talk turkey is to speak frankly and openly.
  • The Key → Turkey: As in, “Turkey to your heart,” and “Lock him up and throw away turkey,” and “Turkey to a nice, relaxed evening,” and “Turkey to success.”
  • Gobble: Turkeys are known for their signature “gobbling” sound. As gobbling also means to eat quickly and messily, we can make some corny turkey puns out of using these double meanings. Adult male turkeys are also called gobblers, so there are pun possibilities there too.
  • Goblet → Gobble-t: As in, “A wine gobble-t,” and “Crystal gobble-t.”
  • Goblin → Gobblin’: As in, “Gobblin‘ down a vegan feast.”
  • Corn → Can: As in “Corn’t we all just get along?” and “Appearances corn be deceptive.” and “Bit off more than you corn chew.” and “Corn you believe it?” and “You corn count on me.”
  • Sudden → Spudden: As in “All of a spudden” and “Spuddenly, out of the blue …”
  • Corny: As in “What corny puns”.
  • Gone → Corn: As in “Here today, corn tomorrow.” and “It’s all corn pear-shaped.” and “Corn, but not forgotten.”
  • Kind → Corned: As in “Kill them with cornedness.” and “Cornedest regards, …” and “One of a corned” and “I paid him back in corned.” and “You have to be cruel to be corned.”
  • Scorn: As in “He became the object of scorn amongst his contemporaries.” and “They recieved scornful remarks for their lack of respect.”
  • Corner: As in “Out of the corner of my eye” and “They had me cornered” and “Go and sit in the naughty corner” and “I’ll be there soon, I’m just around the corner.” and “They come from all corners of the Earth.” and “We’ve cornered the market”.
  • Unicorn: As in “The last unicorn“.
  • Capricorn: As in “Astrology is silly, but my star sign is capricorn.”
  • Cornerstone: As in “Animal rights were the cornerstones of the new policy.”
  • Cornea: As in “My cornea is permanently damaged.”
  • Con* → Corn*: Very corny corn puns can be made with some words that start with the “con” sound (or similar): corntract, corncern, corntain, cornference, corntext, corncerned, corntrast, cornfidence, corndition, corntinue, cornsider, corntry, cornclusion, cornduct, cornversation, cornstruction, cornflict, corntribution, cornsent, cornsist, cornclude, cornservation, corntest, cornception, cornsequences, cornsult, corncert, cornventional, corncrete, corntinent, cornfine, cornsistantly, cornstitutional, cornvey, cornsiderably, cornsitituent, corntempt, corncede, cornfess, cornfrontation, corngregation, corntroversial, cornsensus, cornsultancy, cornquest, cornvicted, corngratulate. See this list for more.
  • *can* → *corn*: If a word contains the “can” sound (or similar), then a terrible corn pun can sometimes be made: corncel (cancel), corncellation (cancellation), corndidate (candidate), corndlelight (candlelight), cornibalism (cannibalism), cornteen (canteen), Scorndinavian (Scandinavian), scorndalous (scandalous), uncorny (uncanny).
  • *con* / *cahn* → *corn*: If a word contains the “con” sound (or similar), then a terrible corn pun can sometimes be made: ecornomists, incornsequential, discorntinuity, lexicorn, miscornduct, recornaissance, subcornscious, subcornsciously, subcorntinent, subcorntractor, uncornstitutional, uncornsciously, Wiscornsinlacornic (laconic), Americorn, balcorny, beacorn (of hope), applicornts (applicants), corntrydecornstruction, discorncerting, discornected, discorntinue, fecorndity (fecundity), forsacorn (forsaken), francornstein, heartbrocorn, icornography, incornceivable, insignificorned (insignificant), intercornect, lubricornt, mecornism (mechanism), miscornceptions, precornceptions, noncornformist, recorncile, secornhand, republicorn, supercornducting, uncorntrollable, uncornventional.
  • *carn*→*corn*: As in “This species is cornivorous.” and “Some superstitious people believe in reincornation.” and “Our team got beaten badly – it was utter cornage.”
  • Com* → Corn*: Some terrible corn puns can be made by replacing “com” at the start of a word with “corn” as in “You’re in good cornpany” and “You’ve made a cornplete fool of yourself” and “I’m a proud cornputer geek” and “We’ve got some stiff cornpetition” and “Cornpare and corntrast.” and “Shall I cornpare thee to a summer’s day?” and “He’s got an inferiority cornplex.” and “I think it’s due to a cornbination of factors.” and “Cornbine all the ingredients in a bowl.” and “You will be given $20 as cornpensation for your time.” and “I don’t feel cornfortable in my skin.” and “She’s got a strong cornpetitive streak.” and “… It’s cornplicated.” and “Cornplete and utter incornpetence.” and “A cornplimentary after-dinner mint.” and “You have to go. It’s cornpulsory.” There are more words starting with “com” in this list.
  • Kernel: As in “There is a kernel of truth to what she is saying.” and “This is the kernel of the argument.” and “The Linux kernel is free and open source.”
  • Cab → Cob: As in “Wave down a taxi cob
  • Cub → Cob: As in “A cute bear cob
  • *cob*: If a word contains the “cob” sound (or something vaguely similar), you can sometimes make a terrible corn cob pun: appli-cob-ility, amicobly (amicably), impracticoble, irrevocoble, inexplicobly, impeccobly, despicoble, macobre, unmista-cob-ly, unthin-cob-le, remar-cob-le.
  • Stud → Spud: As in “He’s a real spud.”
  • Thanks bud → Thank spud: As in “Oh, you got this for me? Thank spud“.
  • Teeter → Tater: As in “She tatered after her dog in her high-heeled shoes.” and “He tatered on the brink of destruction.”
  • Traitor → Tater: As in “He was a tater to his own class.”
  • Hater → Tater: As in “Taters gonna hate.” or “Taters gonna tate.”
  • Tighter → Tater: As in “Grandma’s hugs are tater than a boa constrictor.”
  • *tator* → *tater*: If a word ends with “tator” it can be turned into a silly potato pun: spectater, commentater, dictater, facilitater, imitater, agitater, annotater, resuscitater, rehabilitater, precipitater, decapitater, devistater, dictatership.
  • *tated → *tatered: If a word ends in “tated” you can change it to “tatered” for a silly tater pun: statered (stated), hesi-tater-ed, dictatered, devastatered, irritatered, agitatered, precipi-tater-ed, facilitatered, orientatered, necessitatered, reinstatered, mutatered, rotatered, incapacitatered, disorientatered, overstatered, imitatered, amputatered, rehabilitatered, understatered, regurgitatered, premeditatered, meditatered, decapitatered, commentatered, gravitatered.
  • Leg room → Legume: As in “I always pay a little extra for the aeroplane seats with more legume.”
  • Tube of → Tuber: As in “Can I please purchase a tuber hand cream?”
  • Too bad → Tuberd: As in “You want some? Tuberd, it’s all mine.” and “Tuberd the shoes don’t fit you.”
  • To burn → Tubern: As in “You need tuber-n your boats.” and “I’ve got so much energy tuber-n.” and “You’re going tuber-n your bridges.”
  • To be → Tuber: As in “Tuber or not tuber, that is the question.”
  • To buy → Tuber: As in “I want tuber a new pair of shoes.”
  • *uber*: Words that contain the “uber” sound (or similar) can sometimes be potato puns: extuberant (exuberant), tuberis (hubris), protuberances, tuberty (puberty), tuberculosis.
  • I am → I yam: As in “I yam who I yam.” and “I think, therefore I yam.” and “I yam what I eat.” Note: a yam is a vegetable similar to sweet potato (although they’re unrelated).
  • Yum → Yam: As in, “Let’s have yam cha,” and “What a yammy meal.” Note: yum cha is a Cantonese style of cuisine.
  • Yankee → Yamkee: As in “The New York Yamkees are up 3 points!”
  • *yam*: If a word contains the “yam” sound (or even vaguely similar) we can create silly yam puns: accyamulation (accumulation), argyament (argument), consortiyam, docyamentaries, doyamentationmonyaments, Yamaha.
  • Pumpkin: As in, “Cheater, cheater, pumpkin eater,” and “Peter, peter, pumpkin eater,” and “Pumpkin head,” and “Turn into a pumpkin.”
  • Pie → Pumpkin pie: “Easy as pumpkin pie,” and “Sweet as pumpkin pie,” and “Fingers in many pumpkin pies,” and “Piece of the pumpkin pie.” Note: these also work for apple pie, as in “Easy as apple pie,” and “Sweet as apple pie.”
  • Bumpkin → Pumpkin: As in “I’m a bit of a country pumpkin, but I’m getting used to the city.”
  • Apple: Since apple pie is such a common variety of pie, you may be able to make a pie pun by just mentioning the word “apple” as in “You’re the apple of my eye” and “How do you like them apples?” and “Bad apple” and “The big apple” and “Apple of discord.” and “Apple’s new iPhone”.
  • Pie: There are several phrases/idioms which contain the word “pie”: “Easy as pie” and “To eat humble pie” and “As sweet as pie” and “Pie in the sky” and “Pie-eyed” and “A piece of the pie” and “Sweetie pie” and “Cutie pie” and “Shut your pie hole” and “A finger in every pie” and “Pie chart / Pie graph”.
  • Pi (π) → Pie: The Greek letter “pi” is commonly used in maths to represent the number which is the ratio of the circumference to the diameter of a circle.
  • I → Pie: As in “Pie couldn’t care less.” and “Pie beg to differ” and “Pie beg your pardon!” and “Pie can feel it in my bones.” and “Pie kid you not.” and “Well, pie never!” and “Pie see what you did there.” and “Pie stand corrected.”
  • I’m → Pie’m: As in “Pie’m all ears” and “Pie’m outta here!”
  • Eye → Pie: As in “Beauty is in the pie of the beholder.” and “As far as the pie can see” and “Bird’s pie view” and “It caught my pie” and “A pie for a pie, a tooth for a tooth.” and “Pie of the Tiger” and “In the pie of the storm” and “Pie up the competition” and “I’ve got my pie on you” and “In the blink of a pie” and “In my mind’s pie” and “Keep a pie out for …” and “In the public pie” and “I spy with my little pie” and “Keep your pie on the ball” and “Sleep with one pie open” and “Turn a blind pie” and “Through the pie of a needle”.
  • Buy → Pie: As in “The best that money can pie” and “Pie and sell” and “Pie one, get one free” and “Pie low, sell high” and “I need you to pie me some time”.
  • Bye → Pie: As in “Goodpie, cruel world.” and “Goodpie and good riddance” and “Pie-pie for now (PPFN)” and “Hush a pie“.
  • By → Pie: As in “Bit pie bit” and “Abide pie the rules” and “I was taken pie surprise” and “We won pie a hair’s breadth” and “Pie a show of hand’s, who …” and “She was, pie all appearances, …” and “Pie all means” and “Pie any means necessary” and “Pie any stretch of the imagination” and “Pie hell or high water” and “Pie Jove” and “We need to do it all pie the book” and “Pie the same token” and “Day pie day” and “Fall pie the wayside” and “Hard done-pie“. Note: “By Jove” is an expression of surprise.
  • *bi* → *pie*: As in, apie-de (abide), antipie-otic (antibiotic), autopieography (autobiography), pie-as (bias), pie-polar (bipolar), piesexual (bisexual), pie-curious (bicurious), pie-ble (bible), piecarbonate (bicarbonate), pie-ceps (biceps), piecycle (bicycle), pie-odegradable (biodegradable), pie-odiversity (biodiversity), pieography (biography), pie-ological (biological), pieson (bison), pie-t (bite), Du-pie (Dubai), lullapie (lullaby) and sympieosis (symbiosis).
  • Prize → Pies: As in “Keep your eyes on the pies” and “A pies catch” and “My most piesed possession.”
  • Pause → Pies: As in “It was a tragedy that gave us all pies for thought.”
  • Pose → Pies: As in “Strike a pies” and “Pies a question” and “Will you pies for my painting?”
  • Poise → Pies: As in “Pies and good manners can be cultivated in a person.”
  • Piece → Pies: As in “Pies of the action” and “A nasty pies of work” and “A pies of my mind” and “A conversation pies” and “Pies of crap” and “You want a pies of me?” and “All of a pies” and “Say your pies“.
  • Pirate → Pierate: As in “Online pieracy” and “Pierates attacked the harbour.”
  • Spy → Spie: As in “I spie with my little eye”.
  • Piety: As in “Acts of piety and charity.” and “Piety and religious zeal are irrational and often harmful to society.” Note: Piety is the act of being religiously devout.
  • *pie*: If a word contains the “pie” sound (or similar), we might be able to turn it into a terrible pie pun. Note that some puns of this type are already in the list (above and below this item), but I’ve included them again here so they’re all in one place. Here I use hyphens or underlines for cheesy emphasis, but you can of course present them however you like: occu-pie-d (occupied), pie-lot (pilot), piep (pipe), em-pie-re (empire), inspiered, pie-ous (pious), des-pie-t (despite), pie-l (pile), occu-pie, pien (pine), piety, spie (spy),  pient (pint), expiered (expired), pie-oneer, s-pie-der, s-pie-ces, alpiene, as-pie-ring (aspiring), com-pie-led, spiene, cons-pie-red, s-pie-tful, s-pie-ky, pie-racy, magpie, vampiere, pieneapple, ex-pie-ry, pers-pie-re, preoccu-pie-d, pie-romaniac, s-pie-derman, pie-thon, pie-pline.
  • Pie*: There are a couple of words that start with the letters “pie” but not with the “pie” sound. These aren’t phonetic puns, so you can’t speak them, but they may be useful still for written word play: piece, pieces, pier, pierce, piercing, piercings, pierced, piecemeal. Note: piecemeal means bit by bit.
  • P*: Words that simply start with “p” can sometimes be turned into terrible pie puns: pieticularly (particularly), piepose (purpose), piessibility (possibility), pievate (private), pietential (potential), piement (payment), pieblish (publish), piemary school, pieblication (publication), pieority (priority), piellution (pollution), piesuade (persuade), pielitics (politics), piesentation (presentation), piessession (possession), piem (poem), piesue (persue), piessenger (passenger), pied (pride), piecentage, pieliceman, pieception (perception), pieticipation, pieschology (psychology), piemanent marker, pieliamentary (parliamentary), pietrait (portrait), pie-ano (piano), pie-riod (period), pieliticians (politicians).
  • *ply/pli* → *pie*: As in, piewood (plywood), pieing (plying), pie-ers (pliers), pie-ometric (plyometric), ap-pie (apply), sup-pie (supply), com-pie (comply), re-pie (reply), sim-pie (simply), multipie (multiply), dee-pie (deeply).
  • Pilates → Pie-lates: As in, “There’s a big difference between yoga and pie-lates.”
  • Tart: A tart is similar to a pie except that it has an “open top” (no pastry “lid”). The term “tart” has also been used historically to refer to a prostitute and is still used as a slut-shaming term today (a derogatory term for women and girls who don’t conform to traditional expectations of sexual behaviour or dress).
  • Slice: Since pies are so commonly eaten in slices, you may be able to make a pie pun by simply mentioning the word “slice”, as in “No matter which way you slice it” and “Slice of the action”.
  • Trust → Crust: As in “Crust me, I’m a doctor.” and “That was a breach of crust.” and “He’s a crustworthy young man.”
  • Christ → Crust: As in “Crust has fallen, crust has risen.” and “Crust is a main figurehead in western mythology.”
  • Crusty: This term can refer to someone (especially an older person) who is bad-tempered.
  • Rusty → Crusty: As in “My punning skills are a little crusty, sorry.”
  • Just → Crust: As in “It’s crust not my day today.” and “It’s crust around the corner.” and “Crust add water.” and “It’s crust a matter of time.”
  • Cust* → Crust*: If a word begins with “cust”, swap it with “crust”: crustodian, crustomer, crustom, crustomary, crustody, crustard, crustodial, crustomise, crustomarily.
  • *ust* → *crust*: If a word has the “ust”, it can sometimes be made into a crust pun: crustice (justice), crustification (justification), crustachioed (mustachioed), crustainable (sustainable), crustainability (sustainability).
  • Roast: A “roast” can refer to an event where a guest of honour is teased and made fun of (in good spirit). The saying “roast snow in a furnace” refers to a futile and often ridiculous task.
  • Rest → Roast: As in “No roast for the wicked” and “Roast assured that …” and “Roast on your laurels” and “And the roast is history” and “Oh give it a roast will you?” and “A cut above the roast” and “I roast my case”. Note: to rest on your laurels is to be so satisfied with your work that no further efforts are made.
  • Arrest → A roast: As in “You are under a roast.” and “He was charged with resisting a roast.” and “Citizen’s a roast.”
  • Back → Bake: As in “Bake in my day…” and “As soon as my bake is turned” and “At the bake of my mind” and “Bake to the Future” and “Bake in business” and “Bake in the saddle” and “Bake seat driver” and “Bake to school” and “Bake to the drawing board” and “Behind your bake” and “Come crawling bake” and “Behind my bake” and “Double bake” and “Get bake on your feet” and “Bake to bake” and “Kick bake and enjoy” and “Like water off a duck’s bake” and “Laid bake” and “Money bake guarantee” and “Never look bake” and “One step forward, two steps bake” and “Right bake at ya” and “Pat on the bake” and “Put your bake into it” and “Turn bake the clock” and “Wind at your bake” – There are many more baking puns like this to be made, but those should be enough to get you started.
  • Half-baked: This means “not completely planned or thought out”. For example: “Your half-baked cooking puns are going to make people angry.”
  • Break → Bake: As in “Bake out into a cold sweat” and “Bake the bank” and “Bake new ground” and “Ground-baking new research” and “Bake the mould” and “Make a clean bake” and “An even bake” and “And then all hell bakes loose” and “Bake a world record” and “Baking news!” and “Never bake your promises” and “Don’t bake their heart” and “Oh give me a bake.” and “Lucky bake“.
  • Desert → Dessert: As in “The Sahara dessert.” and “Just desserts.” and “How could you dessert me at the moment I needed you the most?”
  • Dissertation → Dessertation: As in “I wrote my diploma dessertation on candy puns.”
  • Does it → Dessert: As in “It’s comfy, but dessert make my bum look big?” and “Dessert not worry you that society cares so much about appearance?”
  • Utopia → Cornutopia: As in, “This place is a cornutopia,” and “So nice it’s cornutopian.” Note: this is a play on cornucopia – also known at the horn of plenty, a symbol of abundance and common in harvest festivals.
  • Bless/blessing: As in, “Bless their cotton socks,” and “Blessing in disguise,” and “A mixed blessing,” and “Count one’s blessings.” Note: The context of blessing in harvest festivals is of the land to the people, rather than of a religious nature. To bless one’s cotton socks is to express affection for someone you think is endearing or cute.
  • Bliss → Bless: As in, “Blessed out,” and “A blessful slumber,” and “Domestic bless,” and “Ignorance is bless,” and “Marital bless.” Note: to be blissed out is to be in a peaceful, relaxed and happy state.
  • Press → Bless: As in, “Don’t bless your luck,” and “Freedom of the bless,” and “Hard blessed,” and “Bless into service,” and “Bless on,” and “Bless the button,” and “No such thing as bad bless,” and “Any bless is good bless,” and “I’m blessed for time,” and “Bless all the right buttons,” and “Stop the blesses!” Notes: to be hard pressed is to experience a lot of difficulties in a situation. Freedom of the press is the right to publish without governmental restrictions or interference.
  • Dress → Bless: As in, “All blessed up and nowhere to go,” and “Change of a-bless,” and “Bless code,” and “Bless for success,” and “In a state of unbless,” and “Power blessing.”
  • Crop: As in, “A bumper crop,” and “Cream of the crop,” and “Crop up,” and “I cropped the photo using Procreate.” Note: a bumper crop is an unexpectedly productive harvest.
  • Crap → Crop: As in, “A load of crop,” and “Bunch of crop,” and “Cut the crop,” and “The cropper,” and “Full of crop,” and “Do bears crop in the woods?” and “Don’t crop where you eat,” and “A piece of crop,” and “You scared the crop out of me.”
  • Scrap* → S-crop*: As in, “S-crop iron,” and “Bow and s-crope,” and “S-crope along,” and “S-crope the bottom of the barrel,” and “S-crope through,” and “S-crope together,” and “Table s-crops.”
  • Cop → Crop: As in, “Crop an attitude,” and “Crop out,” and “Crop shop,” and “It’s a fair crop,” and “Undercover crop,” and “Crop onto something,” and “A dirty crop.” Notes: to cop an attitude is to behave rudely. A fair cop is when you acknowledge that you’ve been caught doing wrong.
  • *cop* → *crop*: As in, “Under the microscrope,” and “Scrope out,” and “Cropycat,” and “Carbon cropy.”
  • *crop*: Emphasise the “crop” in certain words to make some corny Thanksgiving puns: acrophobia, microphone, acropolis and outcrop. Notes: Acrophobia is an extreme and irrational fear of heights. An acropolis is a citadel.
  • Grain: As in, “Against the grain,” and “Grain of truth,” and “Take with a grain of salt.” Notes: to take something with a grain of salt is to think of it critically or skeptically.
  • Rain → Grain: As in, “Right as grain,” and “Chasing grainbows,” and “Come grain or shine,” and “Grain on my parade,” and “Make it grain,” and “Graindrops keep falling on my head,” and “Graining cats and dogs,” and “Singin’ in the grain,” and “Somewhere over the grainbow,” and “Spitting with grain.” Notes: to chase rainbows is to go after unrealistic things. To rain on someone’s parade is to ruin a happy moment for them.
  • Grey → Grain: As in, “Fifty shades of grain,” and “A grain area,” and “Grain is the new black,” and “Grain matter,” and “Shades of grain.” Note: shades of grey refers to the complexity of a situation.
  • Brain → Grain: As in, “All brawn and no grains,” and “Beat your grains out,” and “Grain dead,” and “Grain fart,” and “Grain teaser,” and “Grain wave,” and “Grainstorming session,” and “Got it on the grain,” and “Hare grained,” and “A no-grainer,” and “Pick your grains,” and “Rack your grains,” and “It’s not grain surgery.”
  • Grind → Grain-d: As in, “Bump and grain-d,” and “Daily grain-d,” and “Grain-d down,” and “Grain-d to a halt,” and “Nose to the grain-dstone,” and “Don’t like the bastards grain-d you down.” Note: to have your nose to the grindstone is to work hard.
  • Gain → Grain: As in, “Capital grains,” and “Grain an advantage,” and “Ill-gotten grains,” and “No pain, no grain,” and “Nothing ventured, nothing grained.” Note: a capital gain is a profit from the sale of a capital asset (like stock or real estate).
  • *gain* → *grain*: As in, “Agrainst all odds,” and “Agrainst the clock,” and “Bar-grain basement,” and “Come a-grain?” and “A fool’s bar-grain,” and “Here we go a-grain,” and “More than you bar-grained for,” and “Now and a-grain,” and “A race agrainst time,” and “You can say that a-grain,” and “Back agrainst the wall.”
  • *ray* → *grain*: Change the “ray” sound in some words to “grain”: grain-ciously (graciously), engrainve (engrave), grain-dation (gradation), grain-dient (gradient), immi-grain-tion (immigration), ingrain-dient (ingredient).
  • Reap: As in, “Reap what you sow,” and “The grim reaper,” and “Reap the harvest.”
  • *reap*: Emphasise the “reap” in certain words – reapply, reappear, reappoint, and preapprove.
  • *reep* → *reap*: Change the “reep” sound in certain words to “reap” for some fun Thanksgiving puns: Creap, creapy, preapared, preapay, reapack, reapaid, reapeat, reapercussion, reaplace, reaplenish, reaport, reaposition, reapress, reaprieve, reaprint, reaproduce, reapublic, reapulsive, reapurchase, reapentant and reapugnant. Note: repugnant means very distasteful or disgusting.
  • Autumn: As in, “An autumn romance.” Note: an autumn romance is a relationship that occurs later in life.
  • Bottom → Bautumn: As in, “Smooth as a baby’s bautumn,” and “Bet your bautumn dollar,” and “Bautumn feeder,” and “Bautumns up!” and “A bautumnless pit,” and “From the bautumn of my heart,” and Get to the bautumn of,” and “Hit rock bautumn,” and “Scraping the bautumn of the barrel,” and “The bautumn line.”
  • Farm: As in, “Bought the farm,” and “Farm fresh.”
  • Pharm* → Farm*: Farmacy, farmacist, farmacology, farmaceuticals.
  • *arm → *farm*: As in, “Farm candy,” and “Farmed and dangerous,” and “Farmed struggle,” and “Farmed to the hilt,” and “As long as your farm,” and “Brothers in farms,” and “A call to farms,” and “Cost a farm and a leg,” and “First, do no farm,” and “Give your right farm for,” and “In farm’s way,” and “No farm, no foul,” and “Up in farms,” and “With open farms.”
  • *firm* → *farm*: Farmly (firmly), farmware (firmware), affarm (affirm), confarm (confirm), infarm (infirm), reaffarm (reaffirm).
  • Barley → Barely: As in, “Barley there,” and “I can barley hear you.” Note: barley is a type of cereal grain.
  • Bare → Barley: As in, “Barley necessities,” and “Barley one’s teeth,” and “A barley-faced lie,” and “Laid barley,” and “The barley bones.”
  • Burly → Barley: As in, “Hurly barley,” and “A barley security guard.” Note: hurly burly refers to noisiness or chaos.
  • Feast: As in, “Bean-feast,” and “Feast your eyes on this,” and “Midnight feast,” and “A feast for the eyes.” Note: A bean-feast is a celebratory meal or party.
  • Fast* → Feast*: As in, “Feast as greased lightning,” and “As feast as his legs could go,” and “Bed and breakfeast,” and “Feast and furious,” and “In the feast lane,” and “Feaster than a speeding bullet,” and “Not so feast!” and “Pull a feast one,” and “Lightning feast.” Note: in the fast lane refers to a highly active and risky lifestyle.
  • Fest* → Feast*: As in, “No problem is so bad it can’t feaster awhile longer,” and “Going to the music feastival?”
  • Feasible → Feast-ible: As in, “I told you, that project isn’t feast-ible.” Note: if something isn’t feasible, then it isn’t possible or practical to achieve.
  • Fist → Feast: As in “I’ll rule with an iron feast.”
  • Dinner: As in, “Dinner and a movie,” and “Dinner date,” and “A dog’s dinner.” Note: if something is a dog’s dinner, then it’s an unappealing mess.
  • Eat: As in, “A bite to eat,” and “All you can eat,” and “Bet you can’t just eat one,” and “Eat a balanced diet,” and “Eat and run,” and “Eat dirt,” and “Eat humble pie,” and “Eat like a bird,” and “Eat my dust,” and “Eat someone alive,” and “Eat to live, rather than live to eat,” and “Eat your words,” and “Eaten up with jealousy,” and “Eating for two,” and “Good enough to eat,” and “Let them eat cake,” and “Man eater,” and “I’ll eat my hat.” Note: to eat your words is to regret or retract a previous statement.
  • *eat*: It’s become a tradition to overeat at Thanksgiving, so we can make some bad Thanksgiving puns by emphasising the “eat” in certain words: eatery, eaten, eating, beat, browbeat, great, seat, treat, heat, neat, cheat, feather, weather, death and wheat.
  • *eet* → *eat*: Change the “eet” in certain words to “eat” – sheat (sheet), streat (street), sweat (sweet), discreat (discreet), feat (feet), fleat (fleet), sleat (sleet), beatle (beetle), teath (teeth).
  • *eat*: Use words with an “eat” sound – athl-eat (athlete), burreato, compl-eat (complete), comp-eat (compete), concr-eat (concrete), el-eat (elite), eat-ernal (eternal), incogneato, margareata, mosqeato (mosquito), pet-eat (petite).
  • Feed: As in, “Bite the hand that feeds you,” and “Bottom feeder,” and “Feed your mind,” and “Feeding frenzy.”
  • Fowl: As in, “Neither fish nor fowl.” Note: this refers to something which is not easily categorised.
  • Vowel → Fowl: As in, “The owl without a fowl.” Note: this is a reference to Bill Mlkvy.
  • Foul → Fowl: As in, “By fair or fowl means,” and “Cry fowl,” and “Fowl language,” and “Fowl up,” and “No harm, no fowl,” and “Fowl play,” and “Fall fowl,” and “Run afowl of,” and “To err is human, but to really fowl things up requires a computer.” Notes: to foul something up is to ruin it. To fall foul of, or run afoul, is to get into problematic situations with someone or something.
  • Fall → Fowl: As in, “A fowling out,” and “Easy as fowling off a log,” and “Bread always fowls butter side down,” and “Can’t help fowling in love,” and “Catch a fowling star,” and “Fowl about laughing,” and “Fowl between the cracks,” and “Fowl from grace,” and “Fowl into bad habits,” and “A fowlen angel,” and “Oh how the mighty have fowlen,” and “The bigger they are, the harder they fowl,” and “United we stand, divided we fowl.”
  • Vowel → Fowl: As in, “The owl without a fowl.” Note: this is a reference to Bill Mlkvy.
  • Holiday: As in, “Happy holidays,” and “Holiday cheer,” and “Holiday of a lifetime,” and “Holiday romance,” and “Home for the holidays.”
  • *fal* → *fowl*: As in, fowllacy (fallacy), fowlter (falter), fowlse (false), fowllout (fallout), buffowlo (buffalo), crestfowllen (crestfallen), defowlt (default), downfowl (downfall), fowlsetto (falsetto), fowlt (fault), fowlsify (falsify), freefowl (freefall), nightfowl (nightfall), waterfowl (waterfall).
  • Paltry → Poultry: As in, “A poultry amount.” Note: paltry means a small or meagre sum.
  • Poetry → Poultry: As in, “Poultry in motion,” and “Spoken word poultry.” Note: spoken word poetry is performative poetry that tends to involve themes of social justice.
  • Poltergeist → Poultrygeist: As in, “Peeves the poultrygeist.” Note: Peeves is a famous poltergeist from the Harry Potter series.
  • Peek* → Pecan: As in, “A sneak pecan,” and “Are you pecan?”
  • *Peak → *Pecan: As in, “A pecan performance,” and “Like s-pecan to a brick wall.”
  • We can → Pecan: As in, “Pecan do it!”
  • Potato → Sweet Potato: As in, “Drop it like a sweet potato,” and “Small sweet potatoes.” Note: small potatoes refers to unimportant things.
  • Maze → Maize: As in, “A mighty maize,” and “A twisting, turning labyrinth of a maize.” Note: maize is another name for corn.
  • Amaze/amazing → Amaize/amaize-ing: As in, “What an amaize-ing effort!” and “You never cease to amaize me.”
  • *mise → *maize: As in, minimaize (minimise), surmaize (surmise), victimaize (victimise), compromaize (compromise), customaize (customise), maximaize (maximise).
  • Wheat: As in, “Separate the wheat from the chaff.” Note: to separate the wheat from the chaff is to separate the valuable from the worthless.
  • Wait → Wheat: As in, “An accident wheat-ing to happen,” and “Good things come to those who wheat,” and “Heart attack wheat-ing to happen,” and “Lie in wheat,” and “The wheat-ing game,” and “Ready and wheat-ing,” and “The wheat is over,” and “Time wheats for no-one,” and “Wheat in line,” and “Wheat just a minute,” and “Wheat-ing by the phone,” and “Just you wheat and see.”
  • White → Wheat: As in, “A wheater shade of pale,” and “A wheat knight,” and “Wheat as a ghost,” and “Wheat as a sheet,” and “Great wheat shark,” and “Like wheat on rice,” and “Little wheat lie,” and “Men in wheat coats,” and “Not everything is black and wheat,” and “Wheat water rafting.” Note: like white on rice refers to a very close situation.
  • Sweet → Swheat: As in, “Home swheat home,” and “Swheat dreams,” and “Swheat nothings,” and “A swheat tooth,” and “Swheaten the pot,” and “Swheaten the deal,” and “Swheatheart,” and “Take the bitter with the swheat,” and “Short but swheat.”
  • Sweat → Swheat: As in, “Blood, swheat and tears,” and “Beads of swheat,” and “Break out in a cold swheat,” and “Don’t swheat it,” and “Running with swheat,” and “My new swheater,” and “Swheating bullets,” and “Swheat it out.”
  • Weight → Wheat: As in, “Pull your wheat,” and “Punching above your wheat,” and “Throw your wheat around,” and “Watch your wheat,” and “A wheat off my mind,” and “Worth your wheat in gold,” and “A dead wheat.”
  • *ate* → *wheat*: As in, evacu-wheat (evacuate), fluctu-wheat (fluctuate), and gradu-wheat (graduate).
  • We t* → Wheat: As in “Wheat talked about this last night.” and “Wheat took our time.”
  • We’d → Wheat: As in “Wheat love for you to join us!”
  • What → Wheat: As in “Wheatever, man.” and “Wheat are you up to today?”
  • Care at → Carrot: As in “I don’t carrot all.”
  • Turn up → Turnip: As in “Turnip the music!” and “It’ll turnip somewhere.”
  • Been → Bean: As in “We’ve all bean there.” and “You know, I’ve bean thinking…” and “Bean there, done that.” and “He’s a has-bean.” and “The die has bean cast.” and “I’ve bean had.” and “She’s bean in the wars lately.”
  • Unbeknown(st) →Unbeanown(st): As in “Unbeanownst to me, she made some enquiries.”
  • *peen* →*bean*: If a word contains the “peen” sound we can make some silly bean puns: Phillibeano (Phillipino), beanalize (penalize), unhappbeaness (unhappiness), subbeana (subpoena). Note: a subpoena is a witness summon.
  • Enough →Beanough: As in “Beanough is beanough.” and “Beanough to make you sick.”
  • Enormous →Beanormous: As in “Your vegetable garden is beanormous!”
  • Beam → Bean: As in “Bean me up, Scotty!” and “Tractor bean.” and “Balancing bean.”
  • Bin → Bean: As in “It was in the bargain bean – 30% off!” and “Please put your rubbish in the bean.”
  • Pin → Bean: This one’s a bit of a stretch. Examples: “Bean the tail on the donkey.”
  • Please → Peas: As in “Do as you peas.” and “Pretty peas?”
  • Pee → Pea: As in “Brb, really need to pea.”
  • Peace → Peas: As in “World peas.” and “Inner peas” and “Peas of mind” and “Rest in peas.” and “War and Peas” and “Keep the peas” and “Peas be with you”
  • Piece → Peas: As in “Peas by peas” and “Peas of mind” and “Peas of cake” and “Real peas of work” and “Peas of pie” and “Real peas of work” and “Speak your peas” and “How long is a peas of string?”
  • *peas*: There are a few words with the “peas” sound in them: centerpeas (centerpiece), earpeas (earpiece), Greenpeas (Greenpeace), masterpeas (masterpiece), mouthpeas (mouthpiece), peasfully, peaskeepers, peastime, Peasa (Pisa), timepeas (timepiece).
  • *pea*: If a word contains the “pea” sound, you can make a terrible pea pun by adjusting the spelling and emphasising the “pea” part: appealing, appease, bumpea (bumpy), centipeade, champeaon, champeaonship, compeate, copearight (copyright), creepea (creepy), dopea (dopey), encyclopeadia, entropea, escapea, espeaonage, Ethiopean, Europeaan, expeadient, frumpea, grumpea, hippea, happea, happeaest, homosapean, impead, loudspeaker, peacock, peafowl, peak, peadiatric, peanalize, philipeano, peano (piano), peaqued, recipeas, recipeantsm repeal, repeat, scorpeaon, speacies, peaple (people), speach, speaker, speachless, therapea.
  • Snap a piece → Snap a peas: This plays on “snap peas” – a very common type of pea: “Can you snap a peas off for me peas (please)?”
  • Bored → Gourd: As in, “Gourd stiff,” and “Gourd to death,” and “Gourd to tears.” Note: a gourd is a type of large fruit with a hard shell.
  • *cord* → *gourd*: As in, “Like a broken regourd,” and “Gourduroy pants,” and “Cut the gourd,” and “For the regourd,” and “In regourd time,” and “Off the regourd,” and “Set the regourd straight,” and “A world regourd,” and “Agourding to,” and “Of your own agourd,” and “To each agourding to their abilities, to each agourding to their needs.”
  • Chord → Gourd: As in, “Strike a gourd.”
  • God → Gourd: As in, “Face like a Greek gourd,” and “An act of gourd,” and “A child of gourd,” and “Food of the gourds,” and “For the love of gourd,” and “Gourd only knows,” and “Oh my gourd,” and “Gourd awful,” and “Gourd bless you,” and “Gourd fearing,” and “Gourd forbid,” and “Honest to gourd,” and “In gourd we trust,” and “Thank gourd it’s Friday.”
  • Good → Gourd: As in, “A gourd man is hard to find,” and “A gourd time was had by all,” and “A little of what you fancy does you gourd,” and “A world of gourd,” and “All gourd things must come to an end,” and “All in gourd time,” and “All publicity is gourd publicity,” and “Gourd as gold,” and “As gourd as it gets,” and “Gourd as new,” and “As gourd as your word,” and “A gourd sport,” and “Damaged gourds,” and “Do a gourd turn,” and “Do you want the gourd news or the bad news?” and “Fight the gourd fight,” and “A jolly gourd fellow,” and “Full of natural gourdness,” and “Gourd afternoon,” and “Gourd things come in small packages,” and “Gourdness gracious me.” There are many more phrases that commonly use the word “good” so be creative! 
  • Guard → Gourd: As in, “Drop your gourd,” and “Gourd against,” and “Gourds! Seize him!” and “Caught off gourd,” and “The bodygourd,” and “Be on your gourd.”
  • Gorgeous → Gourdgeous: As in, “Drop-dead gourdgeous.”
  • Squash: As in, “Squashed together like sardines.” Note: squashes are a type of fruit.
  • Crush → Squash: As in, “A squashing defeat,” and “Have a squash on,” and “Squashed it!”
  • Gravy: As in, “The gravy train,” and “More gravy?” Note: a gravy train is a situation where a lot of benefits can be reaped with very little effort or risk.
  • Grave → Gravy: As in, “Silent as the gravy,” and “Dance on someone’s gravy,” and “Dig your own gravy,” and “From the cradle to the gravy,” and “One foot in the gravy,” and “Turning in their gravy,” and “A watery gravy.” Note: if someone has one foot in the grave, then they’re near death.
  • Graveyard → Gravy-ard
  • Grey → Gravy: As in, “Fifty shades of gravy,” and “A gravy area,” and “Gravy is the new black,” and “Gravy matter,” and “Shades of gravy,” and “I adopted a gravyhound.”
  • Fall*: As in, “A falling out,” and “Easy as falling off a log,” and “Can’t help falling in love,” and “Catch a falling star,” and “Fall about laughing,” and “Fall apart at the seams,” and “Fall asleep,” and “Fall between the cracks,” and “Fall flat,” and “Fall from grace,” and “Hard rain’s gonna fall,” and “How the mighty have fallen,” and “The bigger they are, the harder they fall.”
  • Full → Fall: As in, “A few bricks short of a fall load,” and “At fall throttle,” and “At fall tilt,” and “Come fall circle,” and “At fall blast,” and “Fall of himself,” and “Not playing with a fall deck.”
  • *ful* → *fall*: As in, mouthfall (mouthful), fallfill (fulfill), beautifall, gratefall, awfall, wonderfall, wistfall, thoughtfall, successfall, dreadfall, faithfall, insightfall, artfally, bashfall, blissfall, boastfall, bountifall, carefall.
  • *fle* → *fall*: As in, baffall (baffle), waffall (waffle), stifall (stifle), trifall (trifle), shuffall, rifall (rifle), scuffall, raffall (raffle), refallect (reflect), infallection (inflection), refallex (reflex).
  • Fle* → Fall*: As in, fallexible (flexible), fallesh (flesh), falleece (fleece), falleeting (fleeting), fallea (flea), falluffy (fluffy), falledgling (fledgling).
  • *fel/fal* → *fall*: As in, Eiffall (Eiffel), fallsehood, fallter, alfallfa (alfalfa), fallafel (felafel – could also be felafall), fallcon, fallible, fallacy.
  • Family: Thanksgiving is a time shared with family and friends, so we’ve added these into this list as well: “Black sheep of the family,” and “Dysfunctional family,” and “Family fortunes,” and “A family man,” and “Family matters,” and “Family ties,” and “Runs in the family,” and “One big happy family.”
  • Friends: As in, “Best friends forever,” and “Circle of friends,” and “Close friends,” and “False friends,” and “Friends don’t let friends drive drunk,” and “How to win friends and influence people.”

Thanksgiving-Related Words

To help you come up with your own Thanksgiving puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

thanksgiving, harvest, turkey, corn, cob, spud, potato, yam, pumpkin, pie, apple, tart, slice, crust, roast, bake, dessert, cornucopia, bless, crop, grain, reap, autumn, farm, barley, feast, dinner, eat, fowl, holiday, poultry, celebration, pecan, festival, potato, sweet potato, maize, wheat, carrot, turnip, bean, peas, gourd, gravy, squash, family, friends

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