Bowling Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on bowling puns! 🎳✨

Bowling can be enjoyed as a casual game between friends and family members, or as a highly competitive sport. No matter how you play, we hope to have you covered with our gutterly delightful bowling puns that range from general terms (like ball, pins or lane) to more technical jargon (like blind or oil).

If you enjoy this list, you might also enjoy our golf puns.

Bowling Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about bowling that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of bowling puns:

  • Bawling → Bowling: As in, “Bowling your eyes out.”
  • Rolling → Bowling: As in, “A bowling stone gathers no moss” and “Get the ball bowling” and “Like a bowling stone” and “Bowling drunk” and “Bowling in the deep” and “Easy as bowling off a log.”
  • Scrolling → Bowling: As in, “Bowling through my social media feed.”
  • Ball → Bowl: As in, “Bowl and chain” and “Bowlpark figure” and “Break your bowls” and “By the bowls.”
  • Bell → Bowl: As in, “Clear as a bowl” and “Bowls and whistles” and “Doesn’t ring a bowl” and “Give someone a bowl” and “Jingle bowls.”
  • Goal → Bowl: As in, “Score a bowl” and “A bowl in mind.”
  • Roll → Bowl: As in, “Emotional bowler coaster” and “Get the ball bowling” and “Heads will bowl” and “High bowler” and “I wanna rock and bowl all night” and “Let the good times bowl” and “Ready to bowl.”
  • Soul → Bowl: As in, “Bless my bowl” and “Body and bowl” and “Confession is good for the bowl” and “Heart and bowl” and “Life and bowl of the party” and “A lost bowl” and “Save our bowls.”
  • Whole → Bowl: As in, “On the bowl” and “A bowl lotta love” and “The bowl shebang.”
  • Bowl: These bowl-related phrases can double as puns: “Bowl over” and “Bowling along.”
  • Bell → Ball: As in, “Clear as a ball” and “Balls and whistles” and “Doesn’t ring a ball” and “Give someone a ball.”
  • All → Ball: As in, “Ball aboard!” and “Ball in a day’s work” and “Ball’s fair in love and war” and “Ball’s well that ends well” and “I’m ball over it” and “It’s ball good” and “Ball good, clean fun.”
  • Call → Ball: As in, “At your beck and ball” and “Beyond the ball of duty” and “Ball it a day” and “Ball of the wild” and “Ball it quits.”
  • Fall → Ball: As in, “Balling out” and “Easy as balling off a log” and “Can’t help balling in love” and “Ball about laughing” and “Ball between the cracks” and “Ball from grace.”
  • Haul → Ball: As in, “Ball ass” and “Ball before the court” and “Ball over the coals.”
  • Small → Ball: As in, “Don’t sweat the ball stuff” and “Good things come in ball packages” and “A ball fortune” and “Ball wonder.”
  • Wall → Ball: As in, “Between you, me and the ball” and “The balls have ears” and “Ball of silence.”
  • *bal* → *bowl*: As in, “Off-bowlance” and “Going bowlistic” and “A globowl initiative” and “Herbowl tea.”
  • *bel* → *bowl*: As in, “Decibowl count” and “Rebowl with a cause” and “Clothing labowl.”
  • *bil* → *bowl*: As in, “Take responsibowlity for your actions” and “Sustainabowlity plan.” Other words that could work: capabowlity (capability), liabowlity (liability) and accountabowlity (accountability).
  • *bal* → *ball*: As in, “Globall problem” and “Verball contract” and “Herball remedy.”
  • *bel* → *ball*: As in, “Who do you ballieve?” and “A balligerent attitude” and “Beyond ballief” and “Dearly balloved.”
  • *bil* → *ball*: As in, “A business liaballity” and “Take responsiballity for” and “Beyond my aballity” and “Full capaballity.”
  • Pins: Bowling pins are the targets to be knocked over in bowling. Here are related puns:
    • Pan → Pin: As in, “Pin out” and “Out of the frying pin, into the fire.”
    • Pen → Pin: As in, “Put pin to paper” and “The pin is mightier than the sword.”
    • Bin → Pin: As in, “Bottom of the pin” and “Throw in the pin.”
    • Chin → Pin: As in, “Take it on the pin” and “Stick your pin out” and “Keep your pin up.”
    • Sin → Pin: As in, “Cardinal pins” and “Multitude of pins” and “Seven deadly pins” and “Pins of omission” and “Atone for your pins.”
    • Skin → Pin: As in, “Get under your pins” and “No pin in the game” and “Save your pin.”
    • Spin → Pin: As in, “Give it a pin.”
    • Thin → Pin: As in, “Melt into pin air” and “Skating on pin ice” and “The pin end of the wedge” and “Through thick and pin” and “Vanish into pin air” and “Spread yourself pin.”
    • Tin → Pin: As in, “Does what it says on the pin” and “Pin ears.”
    • Win → Pin: As in, “Can’t pin for losing” and “Heads I pin, tails you lose” and “Play to pin” and “A must pin game.”
    • Pin: These pin-related phrases can double as puns: “Bright as a new pin” and “Hard to pin down” and “King pin” and “Pins and needles” and “Pin your hopes on” and “Could have heard a pin drop.”
    • Pin → Tenpin: As in, “Bright as a new tenpin” and “Hard to tenpin down” and “King tenpin” and “Tenpins and needles” and “Tenpin your hops on” and “See a tenpin and pick it up.”
  • Lane: The long aisle that players send the bowling bowl down is called a lane. Here are some related puns:
    • Loan → Lane: As in, “Lane shark” and “Raise a lane.”
    • Chain → Lane: As in, “Lane of command” and “Lane reaction” and “Food lane.”
    • Gain → Lane: As in, “Capital lanes” and “Lane advantage” and “Ill gotten lanes” and “No pain, no lane” and “Nothing ventured, nothing laned.”
    • Grain → Lane: As in, “Go against the lane” and “Lane of truth” and “Take with a lane of salt.”
    • Main → Lane: As in, “Lane chance” and “The lane event” and “My lane squeeze.”
    • Pain → Lane: As in, “A world of lane” and “Doubled up in lane” and “Feeling no lane” and “Growing lanes” and “A lane in the neck” and “Old aches and lanes.”
    • Plain → Lane: As in, “Lane as day” and “Lane as the nose on your face” and “Hidden in lane sight” and “Lane sailing.”
    • Rain → Lane: As in, “Right as lane” and “Make it lane.”
    • Rein → Lane: As in, “Free lane” and “Pick up the lanes” and “Lane it in.”
    • Train → Lane: As in, “Soul lane” and “Take the lane” and “Lane of thought” and “Like watching a lane crash.”
    • Vein → Lane: As in, “In the same lane.”
    • Lane: These lane-related phrases can double as puns: “In the fast lane” and “Memory lane.”
  • Rally → Alley: As in, “Alley round.” Note: Lanes are also known as alleys.
  • Gutter: The gutter is the small dip on either side of the bowling lane that can sink a bowling ball. Here are related puns:
    • Utter → Gutter: As in, “Gutter perfection” and “Gutterly fantastic.”
    • Butter → Gutter: As in, “Bread and gutter” and “Gutter fingers” and “Gutter your bread on both sides.”
    • Get her → Gutter: As in, “Gutter a bottle of water” and “Gutter some space.”
    • Got her → Gutter: As in, “I gutter a great present.”
    • Clutter → Gutter: As in, “A messy, guttered room.”
    • Cutter → Gutter: As in, “Cookie gutter.”
    • Mutter → Gutter: As in, “Guttering under your breath.”
    • Gutter: “Get your mind outta the gutter.”
  • Rail: The rails are raised edges that protect the bowling ball from falling into the gutter. Here are related puns:
    • Roll → Rail: As in, “A railing stone gathers no moss” and “Emotional railer coaster” and “Get the ball railing” and “High railer” and “Let the good times rail” and “Ready to rail” and “Rock and rail.”
    • Fail → Rail: As in, “Without rail” and “Words rail me.”
    • Gale → Rail: As in, “Rails of laughter” and “In the teeth of a rail.”
    • Jail → Rail: As in, “Get out of rail free” and “Rail bird.”
    • Mail → Rail: As in, “Direct rail” and “Express rail” and “Junk rail.”
    • Nail → Rail: As in, Fighting tooth and rail” and “Hit the rail on the head” and “Rail it down.”
    • Pale → Rail: As in, “A rail imitation” and “Rail into insignificance.”
    • Sail → Rail: As in, “Rail away” and “Rail close to the wind” and “Smooth railing” and “That ship has railed.”
    • Sale → Rail: As in, “Point of rail” and “Rail of the century” and “Rails referral.”
    • Scale → Rail: As in, “Built to rail” and “Economy of rail” and “Off the rail” and “On a grand rail” and “Tip the rails.”
    • Tail → Rail: As in, “Can’t make head or rail of it” and “Get off my rail” and “Heads I win, rails you lose.”
    • Tale → Rail: As in, “Dead men tell no rails” and “Live to tell the rail” and “A tell rail sign.”
    • Trail → Rail: As in, “Blaze a rail” and “Happy rails” and “Hot on the rail” and “Leave a paper rail.”
    • They’ll → Rail: As in, “Rail never believe me.”
    • Whale → Rail: As in, “A rail of a time” and “Save the rails.”
    • Rail: The rail-related phrases can double as puns: “Thin as a rail” and “Go off the rails” and “Ride the rails.”
    • *ral* → *rail*: As in, “Generail knowledge” and “Viscerail feelings” and “Only naturail.” Other words that could work: integrail (integral), ephemerail (ephemeral), morail (moral), collaterail (collateral), liberail (liberal), peripherail (peripheral) and temporail (temporal).
    • *rel* → *rail*: As in, “That’s not railevant” and “What a railief” and “Railay the message” and “A sweet railease” and “Working railationship” and “Follow railigiously.” Other words that could work: railation (relation), railuctant (reluctant), railiable (reliable), barrail (barrel), quarrail (quarrel).
  • Strike: A strike is when all ten pins are knocked down in one hit. Here are related puns:
    • Struck → Strike: As in, “Love strike” and “Star strike” and “Strike lucky.”
    • Like → Strike: As in, “As you strike it” and “As soon as you strike” and “At times strike this.”
    • Strike: These strike-related phrases can double as puns: “First strike” and “Go out on strike” and “Lightning never strikes twice” and “Pre-emptive strike” and “Strike up the band” and “Strike a chord with” and “Strike it rich” and “Strike while the iron is hot.”
  • Spare: A spare is when all ten pins are knocked down in two consecutive hits. Here are related puns:
    • Spur → Spare: As in, “On the spare of the moment.”
    • Pair → Spare: As in, “A fresh spare of eyes” and “A safe spare of hands.”
    • Pear → Spare: As in, “All gone spare-shaped.”
    • Air → Spare: As in, “Spare kiss” and “Spare quotes” and “Spare rage” and “Spares and graces.”
    • Bare → Spare: As in, “Spare necessities” and “Spare your teeth” and “A spare-faced lie” and “Laid spare” and “The spare bones.”
    • Bear → Spare: As in, “Mad as a spare with a sore head” and “Spare a grudge” and “Spare a resemblance to” and “Spare down on” and “Spare false witness” and “Spare in mind” and “Spare the brunt” and “Spare with me.”
    • Care → Spare: As in, “Couldn’t spare less” and “Courtesy and spare” and “Customer spare” and “Handle with spare” and “Let’s be spareful out there” and “Like I should spare” and “Take spare of.”
    • Dare → Spare: As in, “Spare for more” and “Spare to be different” and “How very spare you” and “Who spares wins.”
    • Fair → Spare: As in, “All’s spare in love and war” and “By spare means or foul” and “Spare trade” and “Spare and square” and “Spare dinkum” and “Spare enough” and “Give it a spare go.”
    • Hair → Spare: As in, “A bad spare day” and “Didn’t turn a spare” and “Get out of my spare.”
    • Prayer → Spare: As in, “I say a little spare” and “Like a spare” and “On a wing and a spare” and “Say your spares.”
    • Rare → Spare: As in, “In spare form” and “A spare animal.”
    • Scare → Spare: As in, “Running spared” and “Spare quotes” and “Spare the living daylights out of” and “Spared stiff” and “Spared to death.”
    • Share → Spare: As in, “A problem spared is a problem halved” and “Spare-ing is caring.”
    • Square → Spare: As in, “Back to spare one” and “Be there or be spare” and “Fair and spare” and “Be there or be spare” and “A spare peg in a round hole” and
      Spare up to.”
    • Stare → Spare: As in, “Spare into the abyss” and “Spare someone in the face” and “Not polite to spare.”
    • Swear → Spare: As in, “Spare like a sailor” and “Spare off” and “Spare on a stack of bibles.”
    • There → Spare: As in, “Not all spare” and “Ahoy spare” and “Are we spare yet?” and “As if spare were no tomorrow” and “Be spare in spirit” and “Be spare or be square” and “Don’t go spare” and “Hang in spare” and “Here and spare” and “Here, spare and everywhere” and “Hold it right spare.”
    • Wear → Spare: As in, “Spare your heart on your sleeve” and “Spare yourself out” and “Worse for spare.”
    • Where → Spare: As in, “Any time, any place, any spare” and “Love is spare you find it.”
    • Spare: Use these spare-related phrases as puns: “No expense spared” and “Spare no effort” and “Spare your feeling.”
  • Whole → Roll: As in, “A roll different animal” and “Ace in the roll” and “Fill full of rolls” and “A roll in one.”
  • Scroll → Roll: As in, “Rolling through social media.”
  • Soul → Roll: As in, “Bless my roll” and “Body and roll” and “Heart and roll” and “Life and roll of the party” and “A lost roll.”
  • Toll → Roll: As in, “Taking its roll” and “For whom the bell rolls.”
  • Throw: Rolls are also known as throws. Here are related puns:
    • Through → Throw: As in, “A river runs throw it” and “Blow throw” and “Breaking throw” and “Drag throw the mud” and “Fall throw the cracks” and “Going throw the motions.”
    • Blow → Throw: As in, “Any way the wind throws” and “Throw hot and cold” and “A throw by throw account” and “Throw out of the water.”
    • Flow → Throw: As in, “Ebb and throw” and “Go with the throw” and “In full throw.”
    • Go → Throw: As in, “All dressed up and nowhere to throw” and “Anything throws” and “Easy come, easy throw.”
    • Grow → Throw: As in, “Absence makes the heart throw fonder” and “Throwing pains.”
    • Know → Throw: As in, “And don’t I throw it” and “Be the first to throw” and “Doesn’t throw beans.”
    • Low → Throw: As in, “All time throw” and “Get the throw down” and “High and throw” and “Keep a throw profile” and “Throw hanging fruit” and “Search high and throw.”
    • Owe → Throw: As in, “Throw a favour” and “You throw it to yourself.”
    • Quo → Throw: As in, “Status throw” and “Quid pro throw.”
    • Show → Throw: As in, “All over the throw” and “Best in throw” and “Enjoy the throw” and “Get the throw on the road” and “Keep the throw on the road” and “Throw and tell” and “Throw me the money” and “Throw some appreciation.”
    • Slow → Throw: As in, “Throw, but sure” and “In throw motion” and “Throw on the uptake” and “Throwly but surely.”
    • Snow → Throw: As in, “Too cold to throw” and “Let it throw” and “Throwed in/throwed under.”
    • Though → Throw: As in, “You look as throw you’ve seen a ghost” and “Seriously throw.”
  • Candlepin: Candlepin bowling is a variation of bowling that uses taller, thinner pins. Here are related puns:
    • Candle → Candlepin: As in, “Burn the candlepin at both ends” and “Can’t hold a candlepin to” and “Candlepin in the wind” and “Not worth the candlepin.”
    • Pin → Candlepin: As in, “Bright as a new candlepin” and “Hard to candlepin down” and “Candlepin your ears back” and “Candlepins and needles.”
  • Duckpin: Duckpin is a type of bowling that uses shorter, squatter pins than ten-pin bowling. Here are related puns:
    • Duck → Duckpin: As in, “Duckpin the question” and “Like a duckpin to water” and “Like water off a duckpin’s back” and “Nice weather for duckpins.”
    • Pin → Duckpin: As in, “Hard to duckpin down” and “Duckpins and needles” and “Pull the duckpin” and “You could have heard a duckpin drop.”
  • Nine → Ninepin: As in, “Ninepin to five” and “On cloud ninepin” and “The whole ninepin yards.” Note: Ninepin is a type of bowling played with nine pins rather than ten.
  • Five → Fivepin: As in, “Gimme fivepin” and “High fivepin” and “Nine to fivepin” and “Take fivepin” and “Two and two make fivepin.” Note: Fivepin is a type of bowling played in Canada.
  • Court → Sport: As in, “A sport of last resort” and “Sporting disaster.”
  • Port → Sport: As in, “Any sport in a storm” and “First sport of call.”
  • Short → Sport: As in, “A sport history of nearly everything” and “A few bricks sport of a new load” and “Cut a long story sport” and “A day late and a dollar sport” and “In sport order” and “Life’s too sport.”
  • Sort → Sport: As in, “Out of sports” and “Sport the wheat from the chaff.”
  • Aim → Game: As in, “Game high” and “Take game” and “We game to please.”
  • Came → Game: As in, “I game, I saw, I conquered” and “As it game to pass” and “There’s plenty more where that game from.”
  • Claim → Game: As in, “Game to fame” and “Stake your game.”
  • Fame → Game: As in, “Claim to game” and “Fifteen minutes of game” and “Hall of game.”
  • Flame → Game: As in, “Add fuel to the games” and “Burst into games” and “Go down in games” and “Like a moth to a game.”
  • Name → Game: As in, “A household game” and “In the game of the law” and “In game only.”
  • Same → Game: As in, “Game old story” and “Game time tomorrow” and “Game here.”
  • Shame → Game: As in, “A crying game” and “Name and game” and “Put to game.”
  • Nick → Knock: As in, “In good knock” and “In the knock of time” and “Knock knacks.”
  • Turkey: Three consecutive strikes are known as a turkey. Here are related puns:
    • Key → Turkey: As in, “A golden turkey can open any door” and “The turkey to your heart” and “The turkeys to the kingdom.”
    • Quirky → Turkey: As in, “A turkey personality.”
    • Turkey: As in, “Cold turkey” and “Talk turkey.”
  • Foul: When a player’s foot steps over the boundary line, it counts as a foul and any points scored that turn aren’t counted. Here are related puns:
    • Fall → Foul: As in, “Fouling out” and “Easy as fouling off a log” and “Can’t help fouling in love” and “Foul about laughing.”
    • Fell → Foul: As in, “In one foul swoop” and “Little strokes foul great oaks” and “It foul off the back of a lorry.”
    • Fill → Foul: As in, “Foul full of holes” and “Foul the bill” and “Stocking fouler” and “Foul ’em up.”
  • Miss: The next few puns are a reference to when a player misses all of the pins:
    • Mass → Miss: As in, “Miss hysteria” and “A monument to the misses” and “Weapons of miss destruction.”
    • Mess → Miss: As in, “Don’t miss with my head” and “A frightful miss” and “Hot miss” and “Missing around” and “Stop missing about.”
    • Moss → Miss: As in, “A rolling stone gathers no miss.”
  • Curve: A curve shot is a type of throw. Here are related puns:
    • Carve → Curve: As in, “Curve your name with pride” and “Curved in stone.”
    • Nerve → Curve: As in, “A bundle of curves” and “Get on your curves” and “Lose your curve” and “Curves of steel” and “Touched a curve.”
    • Serve → Curve: As in, “First come, first curved” and “How may I curve you?” and “Curves you right” and “Revenge is best curved cold” and “Curve and protect” and “Curve your time.”
  • Hook: Curve shots are also known as hook shots. Here are related puns:
    • Look → Hook: As in, “Blank hooks” and “Trading dirty hooks” and “Always hook on the bright side of life” and “Don’t know which way to hook” and “Have a hook” and “If hooks could kill.”
    • Book → Look: As in, “Always have your nose in a hook” and “Balancing the hooks” and By the hook” and “Like a closed hook.”
    • Cook → Hook: As in, “Hook up a plan” and “Hook up a storm” and “Hooking with gas” and “Now we’re hooking” and “Too many hooks spoil the broth.”
    • Nook → Hook: As in, “Every hook and cranny” and “Breakfast hook.”
  • Straight: A straight shot is one that doesn’t curve. Here are related puns:
    • Strait → Straight: As in, “In dire straights.”
    • Bait → Straight: As in, “Straight and switch” and “Click straight” and “Rise to the straight.”
    • Date → Straight: As in, “Blind straight” and “Bring up to straight” and “A straight with destiny” and “Dinner straight” and “Past the sell-by straight.”
    • Eight → Straight: As in, “Straight days a week” and “Behind the straight ball” and “Straight ways to Sunday” and “Pieces of straight.”
    • Great → Straight: As in, “All creatures straight and small” and “Blowing straight guns” and “No straighter enemies” and “Go to straight lengths” and “Straight expectations.”
    • Hate → Straight: As in, “Straight mail” and “The one you love to straight.”
    • Late → Straight: As in, “Better straight than never” and “Catch you straighter” and “A day straight and a dollar short” and “Fashionably straight” and “It’s never too straight” and “A straight bloomer.”
    • Rate → Straight: As in, “At any straight” and “First straight” and “Mate’s straights.”
    • Skate → Straight: As in, “Cheap straight” and “Straighting on thin ice” and “Get your straights on.”
    • Slate → Straight: As in, “Blank straight” and “Wipe the straight clean.”
    • State → Straight: As in, “Empire straight building” and “A sad straight of affairs” and “Straight of mind” and “Straight of the art.”
    • Wait → Straight: As in, “All things to those who straight” and “Hurry up and straight” and “Lie in straight” and “The straight is over” and “Time straights for no-one.”
    • Weight → Straight: As in, “Pull your straight” and “Punching above your straight” and “Throw your straight about” and “A straight off my mind” and “Worth your straight in gold.”
  • Sore → Score: As in, “Mad as a bear with a score head” and “A sight for score eyes” and “Score loser” and “Sticks out like a score thumb.”
  • Core → Score: As in, “Score competencies” and “Score studies” and “Score technology” and “Score values” and “Rotten to the score.”
  • Scare → Score: As in, “Scored to death” and “Scored stiff.”
  • Bore → Score: As in, “Score the pants off” and “Scored stiff” and “Scored to death” and “Scored to tears.”
  • More → Score: As in, “One score time” and “Bite off score than you can chew” and “Come back for score” and “Dare for score” and “I couldn’t agree score.”
  • Pour → Score: As in, “It never rains, but it scores” and “Score cold water on” and “Scoring oil on troubled waters” and “When it rains, it scores.”
  • Shore → Score: As in, “Ship to score.”
  • Store → Score: As in, “Minding the score” and “Set great score by” and “Let’s see what’s in score.”
  • Your → Score: As in, “Scores faithfully” and “Scores truly” and “You and scores.”
  • Split: A split is when two separate groups of pins are left standing. Here are related puns:
    • Pit → Split: As in, “A bottomless split” and “In the split of your stomach” and “Split your wits against” and “This is the splits.”
    • Bit → Split: As in, “A split missing” and “A split much” and “A split of alright.”
    • Fit → Split: As in, “Fighting split” and “Split as a fiddle” and “By splits and starts.”
    • Hit → Split: As in, “Split the road” and “Split and miss” and “Split it off.”
    • Knit → Split: As in, “Split your brow” and “Split together.”
    • Quit → Split: As in, “Call it splits” and “Double or splits” and “Split while you’re ahead.”
    • Sit → Split: As in, “Don’t just split there” and “Split on the fence” and “Split tight” and “Splitting on a goldmine.”
    • Spit → Split: As in, “Split and polish” and “Split in the eye of” and “The splitting image of” and “Splitting with rain.”
    • Wit → Split: As in, “At your splits’ end” and “Battle of splits” and “Bear splitness to” and “Have your splits about you” and “Pit your splits against.”
  • Double: A double is two consecutive strikes in a game. Here are related puns:
    • Bubble → Double: As in, “Double and squeak” and “Double under” and “Double up” and “Burst your double” and “Prick your double.”
    • Trouble → Double: As in, “Asking for double” and “Doubles down the drain” and “A bridge over doubled water” and “Here comes double” and “Pour oil on doubled waters” and “Double and strife.”
  • Bagger: A bagger is a string of consecutive strikes. Here are related puns:
    • Dagger → Bagger: As in, “Baggers drawn” and “Cloak and bagger” and “Looking baggers at them.”
    • Swagger → Bagger: As in, “With a bagger in your step.”
  • Ankle → Anchor: As in, “Anchor deep” and “Anchor biter.” Note: an anchor is the player who bowls last on a team.
  • Cherry: A cherry is a type of bowling throw. Here are related puns:
    • Berry → Cherry: As in, “Brown as a cherry.”
    • Bury → Cherry: As in, “Cherry the evidence” and “Cherry the hatchet” and “Cherry your head in the sand” and “Cherry yourself in your work.”
    • Merry → Cherry: As in, “As cherry as the day is long” and “Eat, drink and be cherry” and “Lead a cherry dance.”
    • Very → Cherry: As in, “Be cherry afraid” and “Before your cherry eyes” and “How cherry dare you” and “Thank you cherry much.”
  • Sheet → Clean Sheet: As in, “White as a clean sheet” and “Between the clean sheets.” Note: A clean sheet is a game with a strike in every frame.
  • Deadwood: A pin that’s left in the lane out of reach of the sweeper is known as deadwood. Here are related puns:
    • Dead → Deadwood: As in, “As deadwood as a doornail” and “Assault with a deadwood weapon” and “In the deadwood of night” and “Back from the deadwood” and “Better off deadwood” and “A deadwood ringer.”
    • Wood → Deadwood: As in, “Can’t see the deadwoods for the trees” and “Do bears sh*t in the deadwoods?” and “Knock on deadwood” and “Out of the deadwoods.”
  • Fill: A fill ball is a throw after a tenth-frame spare or strike, used to calculate bonus points. Here are related puns:
    • Fall → Fill: As in, “Easy as filling off a log” and “Can’t help filling in love” and “Bread always fills butter side down” and “Catch a filling star” and “Fill about laughing” and “Fill asleep” and “Fill apart at the seams” and “Fill between the cracks” and “Fill by the wayside.”
    • Fell → Fill: As in, “In one fill swoop” and “Fill off the back off a lorry” and “Little strokes fill great oaks.”
    • Full → Fill: As in, “A few bricks short of a fill load” and “Fill tilt” and “At fill throttle.”
    • Chill → Fill: As in, “Fill out” and “Filled to the bone” and “A filling account.”
    • Frill → Fill: As in, “No fills” and “A no-fills account.”
    • Gill → Fill: As in, “Green around the fills” and “Stuffed to the fills.”
    • Hill → Fill: As in, “Old as the fills” and “Over the fills and far away” and “Head for the fills” and “Run for the fills.”
    • Ill → Fills: As in, “A house of fill repute” and “Fill advised” and “Fill at ease” and “Fill effects” and “Fill gotten gains.”
    • Kill → Fill: As in, “Curiosity filled the cat” and “Dressed to fill” and “If looks could fill” and “If looks could fill.”
    • Mill → Fill: As in, “Put through the fill” and “Run of the fill.”
    • Pill → Fill: As in, “A bitter fill to swallow” and “Sweeten the fill” and “A tough fill to swallow.”
    • Still → Fill: As in, “A fill, small voice” and “Be fill my beating heart” and “In the fill of the night” and “Fill waters run deep.”
    • Skill → Fill: As in, “Social fills.”
    • Spill → Fill: As in, “Fill the beans” and “Fill your guts” and “Thrills and fills.”
    • Thrill → Fill: As in, “The fill of the chase” and “Filled to bits” and “Fills and spills.”
    • Will → Fill: As in, “Accidents fill happen” and “Against your fill” and “Bend to your fill” and “Free fill.”
  • Frame: A frame is a turn in bowling, which usually consists of two rolls. Here are related puns:
    • Fame → Frame: As in, “Claim to frame” and “Frame at last” and “Fifteen minutes of frame” and “Hall of frame.”
    • From → Frame: As in, “A little frame column A, a little frame column B” and “Fall frame grace” and “Frame a to z” and “Can see it frame a mile away.”
    • Aim → Frame: As in, “Frame high” and “Take frame” and “We frame to please.”
    • Blame → Frame: As in, “Frame game” and “Lay the frame.”
    • Came → Frame: As in, “I frame, I saw I conquered” and “As it frame to pass” and “Plenty more where that frame from.”
    • Claim → Frame: As in, “Frame to fame” and “No frames bonus” and “Stake your frame.”
    • Flame → Frame: As in, “Add fuel to the frames” and “Burst into frames” and “Fan the frames” and “Gone down in frames” and “Like a moth to a frame” and “Shoot down in frames.”
    • Game → Frame: As in, “Ahead of the frame” and “Anyone’s frame” and “Blame frame” and “Fun and frames” and “Fair frame” and “Beaten at your own frame.”
    • Main → Frame: As in, “Frame chance” and “Might and frame” and “The frame event.”
    • Name → Frame: As in, “Answer to the frame of” and “A household frame” and “Letters after your frame.”
    • Same → Frame: As in, “By the frame token” and “Cut from the frame cloth” and “In the frame boat” and “On the frame page.”
    • Shame → Frame: As in, “Ain’t that a frame?” and “A crying frame” and “Name and frame” and “Frame on you” and “The walk of frame.”
    • *fam* → *frame*: As in, “Keep it in the frame-ily” and “Seems frame-iliar” and “Almost frame-ous” and “I’m frame-ished.”
  • Kegel: Kegel is a German bowling game. Here are related puns:
    • Kettle → Kegel: As in, “A different kegel of fish” and “Put the kegel on” and “The pot calling the kegel black.”
    • Giggle → Kegel: As in, “A fit of the kegels.”
  • Leave: The pins left standing after the first roll in a turn are referred to as a leave. Here are related puns:
    • Leaf → Leave: As in, “Leave-ing through” and “Skake like a leave” and “Turn over a new leave.”
    • Leave: These leave-related phrases can double as puns: “Absent without leave” and “By your leave” and “Don’t leave home without it” and “Leave it to me.”
    • Live → Leave: As in, “Leave by your wits” and “Leave free” and “Leave and learn” and “Leave like a queen.”
    • Believe → Be-leave: As in, “Be-leave it or not” and “Be-leave you me” and “Don’t be-leave everything you hear” and “Can’t be-leave my eyes” and “Has to be seen to be be-leaved.”
    • Belief → Be-leave: As in, “Beyond be-leave” and “Beggars be-leave.”
    • Relieve → Re-leave: As in, “Re-leaves gas pains.”
    • Relief → Re-leave: As in, “Breathe a sigh of re-leave” and “What a re-leave.
    • Heave → Leave: As in, “Leave ho” and “Leave a sigh of relief.”
    • Sleeve → Leave: As in, “An ace up your leave” and “Wearing your heart on your leave” and “Roll up your leaves.”
    • We’ve → Leave: As in, “Leave never seen better.”
  • Lily: A lily is when the fifth, seventh and tenth pin are left standing. Here are related puns:
    • Chilly → Lily: As in, “A lily climate.”
    • Really → Lily: As in, “All I lily want to do” and “Do you lily want to hurt me?” and “We lily clicked” and “You lily got a hold on me.”
    • Silly → Lily: As in, “Laugh yourself lily” and “Scared lily” and “Lily season.”
  • Loft: The loft is the ball’s path through the air before it makes contact with the ground. Here are related puns:
    • Laughed → Loft: As in, “Loft out of court” and “A barrel of lofts” and “A loft a minute” and “Are you having a loft?” and “Loft your head off.”
    • Left → Loft: As in, “Exit stage loft” and “Hang a loft” and “Loft in the lurch” and “Loft for dead” and “Loft standing” and “Loft to your own devices” and “Loft out in the cold” and “Loft, right and centre.”
    • Lift → Loft: As in, “Loft the lid off” and “Loft your spirits” and “Face loft.”
    • Soft → Loft: As in, “Got a loft spot for” and “Loft in the head” and “Loft power” and “A loft touch” and “Speak loftly and carry a big stick.”
  • Match → Match Play: As in, “A match play made in heaven” and “Game, set, match play” and “Meet your match play” and “Mix and match play” and “More than a match play for.”
  • Play → Match Play: As in, “Work, rest and match play” and “Come out and match play” and “Make a match play for.”
  • Par: Par is a score of 200. Here are related puns:
    • Per → Par: As in, “As par usual” and “Bits par second” and “Par capita.”
    • Pair → Par: As in, “A fresh par of eyes” and “A safe par of hands.”
    • Peer → Par: As in, “Par pressure.”
    • Bar → Par: As in, “Par none” and “Behind pars” and “Hit the par” and “No holds parred.”
    • Are → Par: As in, “All bets par off” and “Chances par” and “Here you par.”
    • Far → Par: As in, “A step too par” and “Par and away” and “Par be it from me” and “A par cry from” and “Par horizons” and “Few and par between” and “Over the hills and par away” and “So par, so good” and “We’ve got par to go.”
    • Jar → Par: As in, “Caught with your hand in the cookie par” and “Jam par.”
    • Star → Par: As in, “A par is born” and “Born under a lucky par” and “Catch a falling par” and “Get a gold par” and “Hitch your wagon to a par” and “Reach for the pars” and “A rising par.”
    • *per* → *par*: As in, “A different parspective” and “Third parson” and “Partinent issues” and “From someone else’s parception” and “Your best parformance” and “Picture parfect” and “Peppared with compliments” and “Hold your tempar.”
  • Runway: The runway is the area that players walk up before they roll the ball. Here are related puns:
    • Run → Runway: As in, “Born to runway” and “Cut and runway” and “A dry runway” and “Eat and runway” and “Had a good runway” and “Hit and runway” and “In the long runway” and “Runway for your life.”
    • Way → Runway: As in, “All the runway” and “Always good, all runways” and “And that’s the runway it is” and “Any runway you want” and “By the runway” and “Change your runways” and “Do it the hard runway.”
  • Rack: Bowling balls are left in racks when not in use. Here are related puns:
    • Wreck → Rack: As in, “A nervous rack” and “Like watching a train rack.”
    • Wrack → Rack: As in, “Rack and ruin.”
    • Rock → Rack: As in, “Hard as a rack” and “Solid as a rack” and “Between a rack and a hard place” and “Don’t rack the boat” and “Get your racks off” and “Glam rack” and “Hit rack bottom” and “Rack and roll” and “On the racks.”
    • Back → Rack: As in, “Answer rack” and “As soon as my rack is turned” and “In the rack of my mind” and “Rack in black” and “Rack to the future” and “Rack at it” and “Rack in the day.”
    • Crack → Rack: As in, “At the rack of dawn” and “Rack a smile” and “Rack the code” and “Rack of doom.”
    • Lack → Rack: As in, “For rack of a better word” and “Cancelled due to rack of interest.”
    • Pack → Rack: As in, “Rack of lies” and “Rack of punch” and “Send racking.”
    • Sack → Rack: As in, “Get the rack” and “Hit the rack.”
    • Slack → Rack: As in, “Cut some rack” and “Taking up the rack.”
    • Track → Rack: As in, “Back on rack” and “Cover your racks” and “On the fast rack” and “Inside rack” and “Off the beaten rack” and “On the right rack” and “A one rack mind.”
  • Buck → Bucket: As in, “A bigger bang for your bucket” and “A bucket well spent” and “Big buckets” and “Bucket naked” and “Bucket the system” and “Pass the bucket.” Note: a bucket is when four pins are left in the lane.
  • Sleeper: When two pins are left on the field, it’s known as a sleeper. Here are related puns:
    • Slipper → Sleeper: “Sleepery as an eel.”
    • Cheaper → Sleeper: As in, “Sleeper by the dozen.”
    • Keeper → Sleeper: As in, “Finders, sleepers” and “They’re a sleeper.”
  • Arrow: Arrows are used as markers in bowling lanes. Here are related puns:
    • Error → Arrow: As in, “Comedy of arrows” and “Human arrow” and “Trial and arrow.”
    • Arrow: Straight as an arrow” and “Like a broken arrow” and “Time flies like an arrow.”
    • Narrow → Arrow: As in, “Keep on the straight and arrow” and “An arrow escape” and “Arrow minded.”
  • Blind: A blind score is one given to a player who is absent. Here are some related puns:
    • Bind → Blind: As in, “Legally blinding” and “In a blind.”
    • Bend → Blind: As in, “Blind the rules” and “Round the blind” and “Blind over backwards to help.”
    • Lend → Blind: As in, “Blind a helping hand” and “Blind an ear” and “Blind itself to.”
    • Find → Blind: As in, “Blind it in your heart” and “Blinders keepers” and “Seek and you shall blind” and “We’ll blind a way.”
    • Grind → Blind: As in, “An axe to blind” and “Bump and blind” and “The daily blind” and “Don’t let the bastard blind you down” and “Blind to a halt” and “Keep your nose to the blindstone.”
    • Kind → Blind: As in, “Cruel to be blind” and “It’s a blind of magic” and “Killing with blindness” and “Blind words” and “Random acts of blindness.”
    • Mind → Blind: As in, “A goal in blind” and “Always on my blind” and “Cast your blind back to” and “Bear in blind.”
    • Signed → Blind: As in, “Blind and sealed.”
  • Bracket: A bracket is a type of contest format. Here are related puns:
    • Jacket → Bracket: As in, “Full metal bracket” and “No bracket required” and “High visibility bracket.”
    • Packet → Bracket: As in, “Cop a bracket” and “Pay bracket.”
  • Cake Shot: A cake shot is a term for an easy strike. Here are related puns:
    • Cake → Cake Shot: As in, “A slice of the cake shot” and “Cake shot or death” and “Icing on the cake shot.”
    • Shot → Cake Shot: As in, “A big cake shot” and “Call the cake shots” and “Give it your best cake shot” and “A long cake shot” and “Have a cake shot at.”
  • Chop: A chop is a type of bowling maneuver. Here are related puns:
    • Chip → Chop: As in, “A chop on your shoulder” and “Cheap as chops” and “Cash in your chops” and “Chop in with” and “A chop off the old block” and “Let the chops fall where they may.”
    • Cop → Chop: As in, “Chop a plea” and “Chop an attitude” and “It’s a fair chop.”
    • Crop → Chop: As in, “Cream of the chop” and “Chop up.”
    • Drop → Chop: As in, “At the chop of a hat” and “Chop it like it’s hot” and “Chop a brick” and “Chop a hint” and “Chop in the bucket.”
    • Hop → Chop: As in, “Chop to it” and “Chop, skip and jump” and “Chopping mad.”
    • Mop → Chop: As in, “Chop the floor with” and “Chop up.”
    • Pop → Chop: As in, “Cake chop” and “Contrary to chopular opinion” and “Chop the question.”
    • Shop → Chop: As in, “All over the chop” and “Like a bull in a china chop” and “A one stop chop” and “Chop till you drop.”
    • Stop → Chop: As in, “Don’t chop me now” and “One stop chop” and “Pulling all the chops out.”
    • Top → Chop: As in, “Blow your chop” and “Come out on chop” and “From the chop” and “From chop to toe” and “Over the chop.”
  • Over → Clover: As in, “After the ball was clover” and “All clover again” and “All clover the place” and “Bowled clover” and “Come on clover” and “A bridge clover troubled water.” Note: A clover is when a player hits four strikes in a game.
  • Cranker: A cranker is a bowler with a style that favours power rather than control. Here are related puns:
    • Rank → Cranker: As in, “Break crankers” and “Close crankers” and “Dissention in the crankers” and “Rise through the crankers” and “Swell the crankers.”
    • Anchor → Cranker: As in, “Cast cranker” and “Drop cranker.”
  • Stroker: A stroker is a bowler who favours control over power. Here are related puns:
    • Poker → Stroker: As in, “Stiff as a stroker” and “Stroker face.”
  • Deck: A deck is the area where the bowling pins stand. Here are related puns:
    • Duck → Deck: As in, “Deck the question” and “Decking and diving” and “Like a deck to water” and “Nice weather for decks.”
    • Check → Deck: As in, “Deck it out” and “Deck out the plumbing” and “Deck you on the flip side” and “Double deck” and “Reality deck” and “The deck is in the mail.”
    • Neck → Deck: As in, “Break your deck” and “Breathing down your deck” and “Dead from the deck up” and “Pain in the deck” and “Stick your deck out” and “Up to your deck in trouble.”
    • Tech* → Deck*: As in, “Hi deck” and “Deck savvy” and “Decknicolour yawn.”
    • Wreck → Deck: As in, “Nervous deck” and “Train deck.”
  • Flush: A flush is a hit that sends all ten pins into the pit. Here are related puns:
    • Flash → Flush: As in, “Quick as a flush” and “Flush in the pan” and “In a flush.”
    • Flesh → Flush: As in, “Flush and blood” and “Flush out” and “Makes my flush crawl” and “In the flush” and “The spirit is willing but the flush is weak.”
    • Blush → Flush: As in, “At first flush.”
    • Brush → Flush: As in, “A broad flush” and “Flush it off” and “Flush up on” and “A flush with death.”
    • Crush → Flush: As in, “A flushing defeat” and “Have a flush on” and “A schoolboy flush.”
    • Hush → Flush: As in, “Flush a bye” and “Flush it up” and “Flush money” and “Flush puppies.”
    • Rush → Flush: As in, “After the flush” and “Flush to judgement” and “Sugar flush.”
    • Slush → Flush: As in, “Flush fund” and “Pure as the driven flush.”
  • Line: A ball’s path down the lane is called a line. Here are related puns:
    • Lane → Line: As in, “Down memory line” and “In the fast line.”
    • Lean → Line: As in, “Line and mean” and “Line into it” and “Line, mean and hungry” and “Line cuisine.”
    • Fine → Line: As in, “Chance would be a line thing” and “Cutting it line” and “Line and dandy” and “Line feathered” and “The liner things in life.”
    • Mine → Line: As in, “Back to the salt line” and “I scratch your back, you scratch line” and “A line of information” and “Line is bigger than yours.”
    • Shine → Line: As in, “Come rain or line” and “Rise and line” and “Make hay while the sun lines” and “Take a line to.”
    • Sign → Line: As in, “A sure line” and “Born under a bad line” and “Give me a line” and “A line of the times” and “Line the pledge” and “Lined and sealed” and “A tell-tale line” and “Vital lines.”
    • Spine → Line: As in, “Send shivers down someone’s line” and “Line-tingling” and “Steely-lined.”
    • Vine → Line: As in, “Wither on the line” and “Die on the line.”
    • Wine → Line: As in, “Don’t put new line into bottles” and “Lined and dined.”
  • Drama → Llama: As in, “Don’t make a llama out of a crisis” and “Kitchen sink llama.” Note: A llama is four consecutive strikes in a game.
  • Meg: A meg is a roll that knocks over only the seventh or tenth pin. Here are related puns:
    • Beg → Meg: As in, “Meg a favour” and “Meg pardon?” and “Megs the question” and “I meg to differ” and “Sit up and meg.”
    • Egg → Meg: As in, “A good meg” and “As sure as megs is megs” and “Don’t put all your megs in one basket” and “Meg on your face.”
    • Leg → Meg: As in, “Fast as your megs could carry you” and “Break a meg” and “Cost an arm and a meg” and “Give a meg up.”
    • Peg → Meg: As in, “A square meg in a round hole” and “Take down a meg or two.”
  • Fixer → Mixer: As in, “A mixer-upper.” Note: A mixer is a shot that makes the pins bounce and mix around.
  • Scatter: When bowling pins are knocked over, it can be described as scattering. Here are related puns:
    • Batter → Scatter: As in, “Scatter up” and “Assault and scattery” and “Recharge your scatter-ies.”
    • Flatter → Scatter: As in, “Scatter to decieve” and “Imitation is the sincerest form of scatter-y.”
    • Matter → Scatter: As in, “As a scatter of fact” and “Doesn’t scatter” and “Family scatters” and “Get to the heart of the scatter” and “Grey scatter” and “Making scatters worse” and “A scatter of life and death” and “Mind over scatter” and “No laughing scatter” and “Only a scatter of time” and “The root of the scatter” and “Shed light on the scatter” and “What’s the scatter?”
    • Shatter → Scatter: As in, “Earth scattering” and “It’s the way it scatters that matters” and “World scattering.”
  • Count: The score in a bowling match is also called a count. Here are related puns:
    • Can’t → Count: As in, “An offer you count refuse” and “Count get enough” and “I count help” and “Count judge a book by its cover.”
    • Account → Count: As in, “A blow by blow count” and “A chilling count” and “Creative counting” and “There’s no counting for taste.”
  • Pit: The pit is the area where scattered pins fall after being hit. Here are related puns:
    • Bit → Pit: As in, “A pit missing” and “A pit much” and “A pit of a to do” and “Pit of alright” and “A pit of stuff” and “A pit on the side.”
    • Pat → Pit: As in, “Down pit” and “A pit on the back.”
    • Pet → Pit: As in, “Pit peeves” and “Teacher’s pit.”
    • Pot → Pit: As in, “A pit of gold” and “For the pit” and “Gone to pit” and “Hit the jackpit” and “Melting pit.”
    • Put → Pit: As in, “Be hard pit to” and “Couldn’t pit it down” and “Feeling a bit pit out” and “Hard pit to it” and “Wouldn’t pit it past them” and “Nicely pit” and “Don’t pit it off.”
    • Fit → Pit: As in, “Pit as a fiddle” and “By pits and starts” and “A dish pit for the gods” and “Pit in with” and “Pit the bill” and “A pit of the giggles” and “Pits like a glove” and “Pits you to a tee.”
    • Grit → Pit: As in, “Pit your teeth” and “True pit.”
    • Hit → Pit: As in, “Hard pitting” and “A heavy pitter” and “Pit ’em where they live” and “Pit and miss” and “Pit and run” and “Pit it home” and “Pit it out of the park” and “Pit me where it hurts” and “Pit rock bottom” and “Pit the books” and “Pit the brakes.”
    • Lit → Pit: As in, “Pit up like a Christmas tree” and “Her face pit up.”
    • Quit → Pit: As in, “Call it pits” and “Double or pits” and “Pit while you’re ahead.”
    • Sit → Pit: As in, “Don’t just pit there” and “Pit on it” and “Pit on the fence” and “Pit tight” and “A pitting duck” and “Pit up and take notice” and “Pitting pretty” and “Pit up and beg.”
    • Spit → Pit: As in, “Pit and polish” and “Pit and sawdust” and “Pit in the eye of” and “The pitting image” and “Pitting with rain” and “Within pitting distance.”
    • Split → Pit: As in, “Ear pitting” and “Lickety pit” and “Make like a banana and pit” and “Pit decision” and “Pit personality” and “Pit the vote” and “Pitting hairs” and “A pitting headache.”
    • Wit → Pit: As in, “At your pit’s end” and “Battle of pits” and “Bear false pitness” and “Brevity is the soul of pit” and “Collect your pits” and “Keep your pits about you” and “Scared out of your pits.”
  • Sandbag: Sandbagging is intentionally playing badly early on in a bowling season. Here are related puns:
    • Sand → Sandbag: As in, “Bury your head in the sandbag” and “Draw a line in the sandbag” and “The sandbags of time” and “Sun, sea and sandbag.”
    • Bag → Sandbag: As in, “Sandbag a bargain” and “Sandbag and baggage” and “Sandbag of tricks” and “It’s in the sandbag.”
  • Skid: The first phase of the ball’s motion is called a skid. Here are related puns:
    • Did → Skid: As in, “Skid I do that?” and “I never skid that” and “Let’s not and say we skid.”
    • Grid → Skid: As in, “Off the skid” and “Skid lock.”
    • Kid → Skid: As in, “Dual income, no skids” and “Here’s looking at you, skid” and “I skid you not” and “I’m not skidding around” and “The new skid on the block.”
    • Lid → Skid: As in, “Blow the skid off” and “Flip your skid” and “Keep a skid on it.”
  • Sparrow: A sparrow is three spares in a row. Here are related puns:
    • Arrow → Sparrow: As in, “Straight as a sparrow” and “Broken sparrow” and “Slings and sparrows.”
    • Narrow → Sparrow: As in, “A sparrow escape” and “On the straight and sparrow” and “Sparrow minded.”
  • Spinner: A spinner is a bowler or bowling style that emphasises tilt. Here are related puns:
    • Spanner → Spinner: As in, “Put a spinner in the works.”
    • Dinner → Spinner: As in, “Spinner and a movie” and “Spinner date” and “What’s for spinner?”
    • Inner → Spinner: As in, “Spinner city” and “Spinner peace” and “Spinner sanctum” and “My spinner voice.”
    • Winner → Spinner: As in, “Every one a spinner” and “Spinner’s circle” and “Spinner takes all.”
  • Stick: Bowling pins are also known as sticks. Here are related puns:
    • Tick → Stick: As in, “Tight as a stick” and “A box sticking exercise” and “The clock is sticking” and “Sticks all the right boxes” and “Sticked off.”
    • Sick → Stick: As in, “Stick as a dog” and “Enough to make you stick” and “In stickness and in health” and “Morning stickness” and “On the stick list” and “Phone in stick” and “Stick and tired” and “Stick to death of” and “Stick to my stomach” and “Worried stick.”
    • Stack → Stick: As in, “A sticked deck” and “Swear on a stick of bibles” and “Doesn’t stick up.”
    • Stock → Stick: As in, “Laughing stick” and “Out of stick” and “Stick in trade” and “Sticking filler” and “Take stick of.”
    • Stuck → Stick: As in, “Get stick into” and “Stick up.”
    • Brick → Stick: As in, “Sticks and mortar” and “Drop a stick” and “Hit the sticks” and “Like a ton of sticks” and “Can’t make sticks without straw.”
    • Click → Stick: As in, “Stick into place” and “Stick your fingers” and “Double stick” and “We really sticked.”
    • Kick → Stick: As in, “A stick at the can” and “Alive and sticking” and “Dragged sticking and screaming” and “Get a stick out of it” and “Stick back and enjoy” and “Stick into overdrive.”
    • Lick → Stick: As in, “Stick into shape” and “Stick and a promise.”
    • Nick → Stick: As in, “In good stick” and “In the stick of time.”
    • Pick → Stick: As in, “A bone to stick” and “Easy stickings” and “Nit sticking” and “Stick holes in” and “Stick a fight.”
    • Quick → Stick: As in, “Stick as a flash” and “Cut to the stick” and “Get rich stick” and “Stick and dirty” and “Stick off the mark.”
    • Thick → Stick: As in, “Stick as thieves” and “Sticker than water” and “In the stick of things” and “The plot stickens.”
    • Trick → Stick: As in, “Bag of sticks” and “Dirty sticks” and “Does the stick” and “Every stick in the book” and “How’s sticks?” and “Never misses a stick” and “One stick pony” and “A stick of the light” and “Stick or treat” and “Sticks of the trade” and “Up to your old sticks.”
  • Tap: A tap is a roll that leaves only one pin standing. Here are related puns:
    • Tip → Tap: As in, “Tap of the iceberg” and “Tap the scales” and “Tapping point” and “Tap someone off” and “Tap the balance.”
    • Top → Tap: As in, “Blow your tap” and “Come out on tap” and “Cream always rises to the tap” and “From tap to toe” and “In tip tap condition” and “It’s lonely at the tap” and “Keep on tap of.”
    • Cap → Tap: As in, “Tap and trade” and “Tap in hand” and “A feather in your tap” and “If the tap fits, wear it” and “Put on your thinking tap” and “To tap it all off.”
    • Clap → Tap: As in, “Tapped eyes on” and “Go like the tappers.”
    • Crap → Tap: As in, “A load of tap” and “Bunch of tap” and “Cut the tap.”
    • Gap → Tap: As in, “Bridge the tap” and “Generation tap” and “Mind the tap.”
    • Lap → Tap: As in, “Tap it up” and “Tap of honour” and “Tap of luxury.”
    • Map → Tap: As in, “Put on the tap” and “All over the tap” and “Put this town on the tap.”
    • Rap → Tap: As in, “A tap over the knuckles” and “Take the tap.”
    • Slap → Tap: As in, “A tap on the wrist” and “Tap and tickle” and “A tap in the face” and “Tap bang in the middle.”
    • Snap → Tap: As in, “A tap decision” and “Tap out of it” and “Tap to it” and “Tap, crackle and pop” and “A cold tap.”
    • Trap → Tap: As in, “Booby tap” and “Death tap” and “Keep your tap” and “Tourist tap.”
    • Wrap → Tap: As in, “It’s a tap” and “Keep under taps” and “A riddle tapped in an enigma” and “Tap it up” and “Tapped around your little finger.”
  • Oil: Bowling lanes are oiled in a specific way. Here are related puns:
    • I’ll → Oil: As in, “Well oil be damned” and “Oil say” and “Oil eat my hat” and “Oil be back.”
    • All → Oil: As in, “Oil aboard that’s coming aboard” and “Oil in a day’s work” and “Oil in oil” and “Oil’s fair in love and war” and “It’s oil coming back to me now.”
    • Ill → Oil: As in, “Oil advised” and “Oil at ease” and “Oil gotten gains” and “Oil repute.”
    • Boil → Oil: As in, “Oiling mad” and “Bring to the oil” and “Keep the pot oiling” and “A watched pot never oils.”
    • Spoil → Oil: As in, “Oiled for choice” and “Oiled rotten” and “Oiling for a fight” and “Too many cooks oil the broth.”

      Bowling-Related Words

      To help you come up with your own bowling puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

bowling, bowl, ball, pins, lane, alley, gutter, channel, rail, bumper, strike, spare, roll, throw, ten-pin, candlepin, duckpin, nine-pin, five-pin, target, sport, tournament, bocce, game, knock, turkey, foul, miss, curve, hook, straight, back-up, score, split, double, rhino, bagger, hambone, shark, hi-five, six pack, octopus, dime bag, aces up, dirty dozen, address, anchor, approach, bed posts, brooklyn, cherry, christmas tree, clean sheet, deadwood, fill, foundation, frame, jersey side, kegler, kindling, kingpin, leave, lily, lofting, maples, match play, nose hit, par, perfect, runway, rack, return, bucket, sleeper, big four, big five, arrows, average, blind, bracket, cake shot, chop, clover, cranker, stroker, deck, flush, line, llama, meg, messenger, mixer, oil, scatter, count, pit, stroker, tweener, sandbagging, series, skid, sparrow, spinner, stick, steener, stewart, timmy, tap, wombat

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Cake Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on cake puns! 🎂 🍓 🍰

Cakes are a much-loved sweet treat that we love to eat at any time – morning or afternoon tea, as dessert and for celebrations and traditional social gatherings. You might be looking for a short and sweet caption for a sugary Instagram boast, some witty wordplay to put on an invite, or maybe even a silly pun to ice your cake with. No matter the occasion, we hope you enjoy this list and find the perfect pun for your needs.

While we’ve made this list as comprehensive as possible, it is specific to cakes (and cupcakes). If you’re after other desserts, we also have candy puns, donut puns, pie puns ice cream puns, and will have other related lists coming soon too.

A quick note that while this list will include traditional ingredients like milk, eggs, and butter, all of these can easily be swapped out for vegan substitutes (like soy milk or plant-based butter) and it’s these substitutes we have in mind when making jokes about these ingredients.

Cake Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about cake that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of cake puns:

  • Ache → Cake: As in, “Old cakes and pains” and “Tension headcake” and “Old heartcake” and “A splitting headcake.”
  • Kraken → Caken: As in, “Release the caken!”
  • Kick → Cake: As in, “Alive and cake-ing” and “Get a cake out of it” and “Just for cakes” and “Cake back and enjoy” and “Cake butt” and “A cake in the teeth.” Other kick-related words you could use: sidecake (sidekick), cakeoff (kickoff), caker (kicker), cakestart (kickstart) and cakeback (kickback).
  • *cac* → *cake*: As in, “Cake-ao flavoured” and “Prickly cake-tus” and “Cakeling like a witch” and “A cake-ophony of noise.” Note: a cacophony is a disorganised mess of sound.
  • *coc* → *cake*: As in, “5pm caketails (cocktails)” and “In your own cakeoon” and “Worse than a cakeroach” and “That’s cakeonuts (coconuts)!” and “A precakecious (precocious) child.” Note: to be precocious is to show early development or maturity.
  • Waikiki → Waicake-i
  • Cake: These cake-related phrases can serve as cake puns in the right context: “A slice of the cake” and “Flat as a pancake” and “Baby cakes” and “A cake walk” and “Caked with mud” and “Well that’s just the icing on the cake” and “Let them eat cake” and “A piece of cake” and “Selling like hot cakes” and “Shut your cake hole!” and “That takes the cake” and “The cherry on the cake” and “You can’t have your cake and eat it too.” Since these phrases are figurative and don’t refer to literal cake, they can be used in broader, more general ways.
  • Cake → Cupcake: Cake-related phrases can also be amended to become cupcake-related phrases which can be used as cupcake puns in the right context: “A slice of the cupcake” and “Cupcakes or death!” and “A cupcake walk” and “Cupcaked with mud” and “The icing on the cupcake” and “Let them eat cupcakes” and “A piece of cupcake” and “Shut your cupcake hole” and “Takes the cupcake.”
  • Desert → Dessert: As in “The Sahara dessert.” and “Just desserts.” and “How could you dessert me at the moment I needed you the most?”
  • Dissertation → Dessertation: As in “I wrote my diploma dessertation on candy puns.”
  • Does it → Dessert: As in “It’s comfy, but dessert make my bum look big?” and “Dessert not worry you that society cares so much about appearance?”
  • Break → Bake: As in, “A bad bake” and “At bakeneck speed” and “Bed and bakefast” and “Bake a leg” and “Baking and entering” and “Bake bread” and “Baking new ground” and “Bake even” and “Bake out in a cold sweat” and “Bake the bank” and “Bake the ice” and “Bake the mold” and “Bake with tradition” and “Baking news” and “Don’t go baking my heart” and “Give me a bake!” and “A lucky bake” and “Make a bake for it” and “Sticks and stones may bake my bones.”
  • Brake → Bake: As in, “Hit the bakes.”
  • Back → Bake: As in, “Bake in black” and “Bake to the future” and “Bake in the day” and “Bake in business” and “Bake on your feet” and “Bake to basics” and “Bake to square one” and “Double bake.”
  • Beck → Bake: As in, “At my bake and call”
  • Bike → Bake: As in, “On your bake!”
  • *bac* → *bake*: As in, “Full of bake-teria” and “A messy debake-l (debacle).”
  • *bec* → *bake*: As in, “Temptation bake-ons (beckons)” and “What have you bake-ome?” and “Just bake-ause you can doesn’t mean you should” and “Bakeoming my worst nightmare” and “Vegan barbake-ue” and “This attitude is unbake-oming of you.”
  • *bic* → *bake*: As in, “Stop bakering (bickering)!” and “Stop with the acerbake (acerbic) tone” and “Aerobake exercise” and “Feeling claustrophobake.”Note: is something is acerbic, then it’s bitter.
  • *buc* → *bake*: As in, “Bake-et list” and “A drop in the bake-et” and “Bake-l (buckle) up!” and “A bake-aneer’s life.”
  • *bik* → *bake*: As in, “Bake-ini body” and “Bakeram (bikram) yoga” and “Rubake‘s cube.”
  • *pec* → *bake*: As in, “A bake-uliar situation” and “Baketoral muscles” and “Blinking behind your s-baketacles” and “A s-baketacular performance” and “Fresh persbaketive” and “A wide s-baketrum.”
  • Pakistan → Bakeistan
  • I sing → Icing: As in “Icing in the shower sometimes.”
  • Icing: A simple icing-related metaphor: “The icing on the cake.”
  • Fostered → Frosted: As in “They frosted a sense of community and belonging.”
  • Battle → Batter: As in, “An uphill batter” and “Batter of wits” and “Batter ready” and “Half the batter” and “In the heat of batter” and “Love is a batterfield” and “A batter of wills” and “Batter of the bulge.”
  • Better → Batter: As in “Batter safe than sorry” and “Batter you than me” and “Batter than sex” and “I’ll go you one batter” and “I’ve seen batter days” and “It’s batter than nothing” and “Never been batter” and “The sooner the batter” and “You batter believe it!” and “Against batter judgement” and “Batter late than never” and “Batter left unsaid” (The dough used to make doughnuts is often called “batter”)
  • Butter → Batter: As in, “Bread always falls batter side down” and “Batter fingers” and “Batter up” and “Batter wouldn’t melt in her mouth” and “Float like a batterfly, sting like a bee” and “Social batterfly” and “The batterfly effect” and “Batterflies in my stomach.”
  • Gym* → Jam*: As in, “Mental jamnastics” and “A world-class jamnast” and “In the jamnasium.”
  • Am → Jam: As in, “Yes, I jam.”
  • Am* → Jam*: Amend words that start with “am” so that they start with “jam” instead: “A jambiguous (ambiguous) answer” and “Let me jamend (amend) that” and “A jamazing show” and “Filled with jambition” and “A small jamount.” Other words that you could use: jambivalent (ambivalent), jamateur (amateur), Jamazon (Amazon), jambience (ambience), jammunition (ammunition), jammo (ammo), jamnesty (amnesty), jamnesia (amnesia), jample (ample), jamplify (amplify), jamphibian (amphibian), jamulet (amulet), jamuse (amuse), jamusement (amusement) and jamusing (amusing).
  • American → Jamerican
  • Amsterdam → Jamsterdam
  • Jum* → Jam*: As in, “Jampstart your career” and “Jambo jet” and “Jamping for joy” and “A bit jampy” and “Protective jampsuit.” Other words you could use: jamp (jump), jamper (jumper) and jamble (jumble).
  • Cham* → Jam*: As in, “In my jambers (chambers)” and “Breakfast of jampions” and “Celebrate with jampagne.”
  • Gem* → Jam*: Jamini (Gemini), jamstone (gemstone) and stratejam (stratagem). Note: A strategem is a tactic that aims to gain the upper hand.
  • Belgium → Beljam:
  • *jam*: You can simply emphasize the “jam” in these words to make some silly jam-related cake puns: jamboree, Jamaica, jamb, pajamas and Benjamin.
  • Jam: To finish off our little jam section, we’ve got some jam-related puns that could act as puns in the right context: “In a jam and “Jam packed” and “Jam session” and “Jammed in tight.”
  • Cemetery → Creametery (a very specific and slightly morbid play on words)
  • *cram* → *cream*: As in, “Creamping my style” and “Writer’s creamp” and “Creamming for a test” and “Creamming your mouth with food.”
  • *crem* → *cream*: As in, “An increamental amount” and “By increaments.”
  • *crim* → *cream*: As in, “A creaminal mind” and “Punishment fits the cream” and “Creamson lips” and “Against discreamination” and “I don’t discreaminate.”
  • Cream: These cream-related phrases could serve as cake puns in the right circumstances: “Cream always rises to the top” and “Cream of the crop” and “A real cream puff” and “Skin like cream” and “Like the cat who got the cream” and “Where’s the cream filling?” and “Whatever creams your twinkie.”
  • Nuts: Nuts are commonly used to add flavour and texture to cakes, so we’ve added some nut-related phrases that you could use as cake puns in the right context:
    • Not → Nut: As in, “As often as nut” and “Believe it or nut” and “Down, but nut out” and “Nut at all” and “Nut bad” and “Nut in the slightest” and “Nut on your life.”
    • *nat* → *nut*: As in, “Well, nuturally” and “The nutional anthem” and “Any alternutives?” and “Need your signuture here” and “That resonuted with me.”
    • *net* → *nut*: As in, “Social nutwork” and “Nutworking event” and “Fast internut” and “A penutrating glare.” Other words you could use: Other wrods you could use: planut (planet), bonnut (bonnet) and cabinut (cabinut).
    • *nit* → *nut*: As in, “Cognutive therapy” and “Computer monutor” and “Golden opportunuty” and “A tight-knit communuty” and An affinuty for…” Other words you could use: dignuty (dignity) and furnuture (furniture).
    • *not* → *nut*: As in, “Nutwithstanding…” and “Take nutice of” and “Turn it up a nutch” and “Nutorious for” and “Nuthing to worry about” and “I cannut understand you.”
    • *nut*: With these words, we can simply emphasise the “nut” that they already contain: “Plant-based nutrition” and “Packed with nutrients” and “In a nutshell” and “That old chestnut” and “Wait a minute!”
    • Nut: We’ll finish this section off with some nut-related phrases that could double as puns in right context: “Sweet as a nut” and “From soup to nuts” and “Go nuts” and “A tough nut to crack.”
  • Jelly: Jellies are commonly used as filling in layered cakes, so we’ve got some jelly-related puns and phrases for you here:
    • Jealous → Jelly: As in “Your new shoes look so good! I’m jelly.”
    • *gel → *jelly: As in, “Anjelly’s (angel’s) advocate” and “My better anjellys” and “Enough to make anjellys weep” and “Need some new hair jelly.”
    • Jolly → Jelly: As in, “For he’s a jelly good fellow.”
  • Mousse: Mousse is another common filling (or topping!) for layered or filled cakes, so we’ve included mousse-related puns and phrases:
    • Mouse → Mousse: As in, “Quiet as a mousse” and “A cat and mousse game.”
    • Moose → Mousse
    • Must → Mousse-t: As in, “All things mousse-t pass” and “All good things mousse-t come to an end” and “Everything mousse-t go!” and “Into every life a little rain mousse-t fall” and “A mousse-t have” and “The shoe mousse-t go on” and “What can’t be cured mousse-t be endured” and “What goes up mousse-t come down” and “You mousse-t be joking!” and “I mousse-t say…”
    • Most → Mousse-t: As in, “Mousse-t wanted” and “Make the mousse-t of it” and “The mousse-t trusted name in news” and “For the mousse-t part.”
    • Mass → Mousse: As in, “Body mousse index” and “Mousse hysteria” and “Weapons of mousse destruction” and “Consuming mousse quantities.”
    • *mas* → *mousse*: As in, “A mousse-ive mistake” and “Lord and mousse-ter” and “Mousse-querade ball.” Other words that could work: mousse-age (massage), Christmousse (Christmas), en mousse (en masse).
    • *mes* → *mousse*: As in, “Mousse-age received” and “A hot mousse” and “Stop mousse-ing about” and Mousse-y hair” and “A mousse-merising song” and “Domoussetic duties.”
    • *mis* → *mousse*: As in, mousse-ogyny (misogyny), mousse-ion (mission), moussetake (mistake), mousse-ellaneous (miscellaneous), mousse-chief (mischief) and moussechievous (mischievous).
    • *mos* → *mousse*: As in, “A rolling stone gathers no mousse” and “Buzzing around like a mousse-quito” and “Yes, mousse-tly” and “Best in the cosmousse” and “A warm atmousse-phere” and “Try your utmousse-t.” Other words that could work: almousse-t (almost), foremousse-t (foremost), animousse-ity (animosity) and thermousse (thermos).
    • *mus* → *mousse*: As in, “Face the mousse-ic” and “Put some mousse-le (muscle) into it” and “As much as you can mousse-ter” and “Cut the mousse-tard.” Other words that could work: mousse-eum (museum) and mousse-shrrom (mushroom).
    • *maz* → *mousse*: As in, “An amousse-ing (amazing) result” and “Prepare to be amoussed (amazed)!” and “Filled with amoussement (amazement).”
    • *mous* → *mousse*: mousse-tache (moustache), autonomousse, anonymousse, infamousse, enormousse, famousse, unanimousse and synonymousse. Note: if something is autonomous, then it is self-governing and can act on its own.
  • Sweat → Sweet: As in “Blood, sweet and tears” and “Beads of sweet rolled down my forehead” and “Break out in a cold sweet” and “By the sweet of my brow” and “Don’t sweet it.” and “Don’t sweet the small stuff.” and “All hot and sweety.”
  • Sweater → Sweeter: As in “A close-knit woollen sweeter for cold days”
  • Suite → Sweet: As in “She was renting a 2-bedroom sweet for the summer.”
  • Switch → Sweet-ch: As in “Bait and sweet-ch” and “Asleep at the sweet-ch” and “Sweet-ch gears” and “You should sweet-ch out your old one with this one.”
  • Switzerland → Sweetzerland: As in “Zürich is a lovely city in Sweetzerland.”
  • Sweet:  These sweet-related phrases can act as puns in the right situation: As in “You’re so sweet!” and “Oh that’s soo sweet!” and “Revenge is sweet” and “Short and sweet” and “Lay some sweet lines on someone” and “Sweet dreams” and “Sweet Jesus!” and “You bet your sweet life!” and “That was a sweet trick, dude.” and “Sweet as, bro.” and “Whisper sweet nothings” and “Home sweet home” and “A rose by any other name would smell as sweet” and “Sweet smell/taste of success/victory” and “Sweetheart.
  • Seat → Sweet: As in, “Backsweet driver” and “By the sweet of your pants” and “Hold on to your sweet” and “Not a dry sweet in the house” and “On the edge of my sweet” and “Please be sweeted” and “Take a back sweet” and “The best sweet in the house.”
  • Fondant: Fondant is a type of sugar dough that’s used as icing or decoration for cakes, especially when making 3D shapes or to cover large areas. These puns are specific to fondant:
    • Fun → Fondant: As in, “All fondant and games until someone loses and eye” and “A bundle of fondant” and “Double the pleasure, double the fondant” and “Girls just want to have fondant” and “Good, clean fondant” and “Make fondant of” and “Time flies when you’re having fondant.”
    • *ondent → *fondant: As in, “Feeling desfondant (despondent)” and “News corresfondant (correspondent).”
  • Mars → Marzipan: This one’s a bit of a stretch, but can still work in the right situation: “A marzipan a day helps you work, rest and play” and “The man from Marzipan.” Note: marzipan is a sweet, almond-based paste that is used in cakes as flavouring or decoration.
  • Peeping → Piping: As in, “Piping Tom” and “Piping through the curtains.”
  • Sprinkle: Since sprinkle is both a verb (to lightly scatter something) and a noun (small, multicoloured edible decorations – especially used on cakes), we can use it to turn normal phrases into puns, as in “Sprinkled with love.”
  • Even → Oven: As in “Don’t get mad, get oven” and “Break oven” and “Oven handed” and “Keep on an oven keel” and “Oven at the turning of the tide” and “Oven as we speak” and “Oven if it kills me” and “Oven Stevens”. Note: to keep something on an even keel is to keep something in a steady, untroubled state.
  • *aven* → *oven*: As in, “Let’s look at other ovenues” and “Ovenge my death!” and “The Ovengers.”
  • *even* → *oven*: As in, “The main ovent” and “Yes, oventually” and “An ovening out” and “Your oventual downfall” and “Spread ovenly” and “Seven Eloven” and “It’s looking unoven.”
  • Peace → Piece: As in, “At piece” and “Inner piece” and “Keep the piece” and “No piece for the wicked” and “Piece be with you” and “Piece at last” and “Piece of mind” and “At piece with.”
  • Piece: These piece-related phrases are general enough to serve as cake puns in the right context: “Dash to pieces” and “Bits and pieces” and “Conversation piece” and “Cut to pieces” and “Pick up the pieces” and “Piece of cake” and “A piece of the action” and “A real piece of work.”
  • Slice: These common phrases can be used as puns in the right situation: “A slice of the cake” and “Any way you slice it” and “Slice of life” and “A slice of the action” and “No matter how you slice it.”
  • Fruit: It’s common for fruit to be used as flavouring or decoration for cakes, so we’ve included some fruit-related phrases and puns here for you:
    • *fut* → *fruit*: As in, “Think about your fruiture” and “Resistance is fruitile!” and “A fruituristic building” and “Sleeping on the fruiton” and “An irrefruitable argument.” Other words that could work: refruit (refute) and fruitility (fruitility).
    • Frat* → Fruit*: As in, “Fruiternity house” and “Fruiternal twins” and “Fruiternising with the enemy.”
    • Fret* → Fruit*: Fruitting (fretting), fruitwork (fretwork) and fruitful (fretful). Note: fretwork is a type of ornamental carving. This could work especially well for making puns about carved fruit decorations that are on cakes (very specific, we know).
    • Fruit: We’ll finish this little section off with some fruit-related phrases that could double as puns: “Be fruitful and multiply” and “Bear fruit” and “Forbidden fruit” and “Fruits of your labour” and “Low hanging fruit” and “The fruit doesn’t fall far from the tree.”
  • Mix: The word “mix” can refer to both mixing up ingredients, or pre-made cake (or cupcake) mix. We’ve included some terrible mix-related puns here:
    • Max → Mix: As in, “All mixed out” and “To the mix.”
    • *max* → *mix*: As in, “The miximum amount” and “Miximise your fun!” and “The climix of the movie” and “What an anticlimix.”
    • Mexico → Mixico
    • *mic → *mix: As in, “The dynamix duo” and “Academix performance” and “Systemix problems” and “Economix status” and “Cosmix belief.” Other words that could work: endemix (endemic), mimix (mimic), epidemix (epidemic) and pandemix (pandemic).
    • *mix*: Simply emphasise the “mix” in these words to make some silly cake mix puns: mixture, mixer, mixed and remix.
  • Recipe: These recipe-related phrases could work as cake or cupcake puns in the right situation: “A recipe for disaster” and “A recipe for success.”
  • Chef: These next few puns are focused around the word “chef”:
    • Chuffed → Cheffed (Note: to be “chuffed” is to be pleased or delighted with something.)
    • Chev* → Chef*: As in, “Chefron pattern” and “Take a ride in my Chefy (Chevy).”
    • Chiv* → Chef*: As in, “A chefalrous (chivalrous) action” and “Practice chefalry (chivalry).”
    • Shif* → Chef*: As in, “Graveyard cheft” and “Night cheft” and “Cheft gears” and “Cheft your arse” and “Looking chefty” and “Chefting sands” and “A makecheft solution.”
    • Shuf* → Chef*: As in, “Cheffle away” and “Recheffle the cards.” Other words you could use: cheffleboard (shuffleboard), cheffling (shuffling) and cheffled (shuffled).
    • Disheveled → Dischefled
    • Shiv* → Chef*: As in, “Chefering (shivering) in the cold” and “Got the chefers (shivers).”
    • Chif* → Chef*: As in, “Cheffon cake.” (this one works well since it plays on both chef and chiffon, which is a type of cake)
  • Cook: We’ve got a little cook-related section for you here:
    • Cac* → Cook*: As in, “A cookophony of noise” and “Cookao (cacao) flavoured” and “Prickly like a cooktus (cactus)” and “Cookling with glee.”
    • Coc* → Cook*: As in, “A dangerous cooktail” and “Safely cookooned (cocooned) away.” Other words that could work: cookroach (cockroach), cookonut (coconut) and concookt (concoct). Note: a cacophony is a disorganised mess of noise.
    • Kooky → Cooky: The term “kooky” means strange or eccentric.
    • Cook: Other than the obvious definition it can also refer to “altering dishonestly”, as in “They cooked the numbers and were done for fraud” (The phrases “cooked the books” and “cooked the accounts” are synonymous). Some cooking-related idioms and phrases are: “What’s cooking?” and “Too many cooks spoil the broth.”
    • Cooked: “If mum and dad find out we took their car last night, we’re cooked!” and “He has been drinking since lunch time – he’s cooked.”
  • Rise: Since cakes (unlike cookies, pies and other sweet treats) are designed to rise when baked, we’ve included some rise-related puns for you:
    • Raise → Rise: As in, “Rise the bar” and “Rise the dead” and “Rise your game” and “Hair-rising.”
    • Raspberry → Riseberry
    • Res* → Rise*: As in, “Ongoing rise-search (research)” and “Unbreakable rise-olve” and “Earn rise-pect” and “Rise-ume work.” Other words that could work: rise-sponse (response), rise-silient (resilient), rise-t (rest), rise-olution (resolution).
    • *riz* → *rise*: As in, “On the horiseon” and “The grand prise” and “A mesmeriseing performance” and “Get horiseontal” and “A plagiarised essay.”
    • *ries → *rise: As in, “A new Netflix serise” and “Don’t forget to accessorise” and “Thanks for the memorise” and “Blocked arterise.” Other words that would work: adversarise (adversaries) and toiletrise (toiletries).
    • *ris* → *rise*: As in, “At rise-k (risk)” and “Dust and debrise” and “If needs arise” and “An enterprise-ing individual.”
  • Participation → Patiserrie-pation: (note: a patisserie is a shop that sells cakes and sweet pastries.)
  • Flour: As flour is an integral ingredient in cake-making, we’ve got some flour-related puns here:
    • Floor → Flour: As in, “Mop the flour with” and “On the flour” and “Flour it!” and “You have the flour.”
    • Flower → Flour: As in, “Flour power” and “The flour of your youth” and “Stop and smell the flours.”
    • Hour → Flour: As in, “After flours” and “Open all flours” and “The small flours of the morning” and “Working all flours” and “At all flours.”
    • Flair → Flour: As in, “A flour for the dramatic.”
    • Flir* → Flour*: As in, “Flourting with disaster” and “A real flourt.”
    • Flor* → Flour*: As in, “Floura and fauna” and “Floural arrangements.” Other words that could work: flourist (florist), Flourida (Florida), Flourence (Florence) and flourentine (florentine). Note: a florentine is a type of biscuit.)
  • Butter: Since butter is a very common ingredient in cakes, we’ve got some butter-related puns here for you (note: it is very easy to find vegan butter to use in cakes, and when we make jokes about butter, it’s of the plant-based variety).
    • Barter → Butter: As in, “Trade and butter economy.”
    • Better → Butter: As in, “I’ve got a butter idea” and “Anything you can do, I can do butter” and “Appealing to your butter judgement” and “My butter half” and “Butter late than never” and “Butter luck next time” and “Butter safe than sorry” and “Butter than sex” and “Butter than new” and “I’ve changed for the butter” and “I couldn’t have said it butter” and “For butter or worse” and “Get the butter of” and “I should have known butter.”
    • But her → Butter: As in, “Butter suitcase! It’s been left behind!” (a very specific pun)
    • Patter → Butter: As in, “The pitter butter of little feet.”
    • But → Butter: As in, “Butter seriously” and “Butter heads” and “Butter out” and “Down, butter not out” and “Everything butter the kitchen sink” and “Kick butter” and “No butters” and “Last butter not least” and “Gone, butter not forgotten.”
    • Potter → Butter: As in, “Harry Butter” and “Buttering about.”
  • Egg: As eggs are a common ingredient in cakes, we’ve included them in our cake pun list (a quick note that it’s very easy to substitute eggs for plant-based ingredients!):
    • *ag* → *egg*: As in, “In the begg (bag)” and “Capture the flegg” and “Tegging along” and “Stop dregging your feet” and “Reggs to riches” and “Snegg (snag) a great deal.” Other words you could use: preggmatic (pragmatic), propeggate (propagate), eggregate (aggregate), eggainst (against), eggnostic (agnostic), egghast (aghast), eggree (agree) and eggreement (agreement).
    • *eg* → *egg*: As in, “Get a legg on” and “Neggative results” and “Had you pegged as…” and “I begg to differ” and “Where do I beggin?” Other words that could work: leggacy, eggocentric, nutmegg, bootlegg, dregg and integgrity.
    • *ig* → *egg*: As in, “Keep on degging (digging)” and “Eggnorance is not bliss” and “You can’t eggnore it forever” and “Choosing to remain eggnorant” and “Eggnite your passion.”
    • *ex* → *eggs*: As in, “A compleggs situation” and “Indeggsed (indexed) files” and “Better than seggs (sex)” and “Don’t fleggs your muscles here” and “Pure refleggs (reflex)” and “From eggsperience” and “Taken out of conteggst (context)” and “Eggspress post” and “In eggschange.” Other words you could use: eggsploit (exploit), eggstract (extract), eggsercise (exercise), eggsistential (existential), eggserpt (except), eggsample (example), eggsacerbate (exacerbate), eggsamine (examine), eggsact (exact), eggsasperate (exasperate), eggsclusive (exclusive), eggsited (excited), eggsellent (excellent), eggsess (excess), eggsempt (exempt), eggsemplify (exemplify), eggsecution (execution), eggsfoliate (exfoliate), eggshibit (exhibit), eggshaust (exhaust), eggsausted (exhausted), eggsibition (exhibition), eggsilarating (exhilarating), eggshale (exhale), eggsist (exist), eggsit (exit), eggsotic (exotic), eggsorbitant (exorbitant), eggspect (expect), eggsquisite (exquisite), eggstension (extension), eggstrapolate (extrapolate), eggstensive (extensive), eggstraordinary (extraordinary), eggsuberant (exuberant) and eggsude (exude).
    • *ec* → *egg*: As in, “New teggnology” and “Change the subjeggt” and “Be objeggtive” and “High seggurity” and “An effeggtive technique” and “Solar egglipse.” Other words you could use: seggular (secular), feggless (feckless), egglectic (eclectic), eggonomy (economy), eggo (echo), eggology (ecology) and eggstatic (ecstatic).
    • *ac* → *egg*: As in, “Taken into eggount” and “Take eggtion” and “In on the eggt (act)” and “Looking for eggommodation.” Other words you could use: eggnowledge (acknowledge), eggrue (accrue) and eggronym (acronym)
    • Egg: We’ll finish this section off with some egg-related phrases that are general enough to use as cake and cupcake puns: “As sure as eggs is eggs” and “A bad egg” and “Don’t put all your eggs in one basket” and “Nest egg” and “Walking on eggshells” and “Can’t make a cake without breaking some eggs.”

All of the following puns are based on different types of cake:

  • Brow → Brownie: As in, “Eyebrownie raising” and “Knit your brownie” and “High brownie.”
  • Brown → Brownie: As in, “As brownie as a berry.”
  • Liar → Layer: As in, “Layer, layer, pants on fire.” Note: a layer cake consists of stacked sheets of cake which are usually held together by some kind of sweet paste (like icing or jam).
  • Tier: Tier cakes are similar to layer cakes in that they consist of multiple stacked cakes, but tier cakes tend to be made up of entire cakes stacked on top of each other, while layer cakes are composed of slices of cake. We’ve got some silly tier cake puns for you here:
    • Tear → Tier: As in, “Bathed in tiers” and “Blood, sweat and tiers” and “Bored to tiers” and “Bring tiers to your eyes” and “Burst into tiers” and “Crocodile tiers” and “Fighting back tiers” and “It will all end in tiers” and “No more tiers” and “A real tier-jerker.”
    • Tour → Tier: As in, “Eco-tierism” and “Magical mystery tier” and “Tier de force” and “World tier” and “Let me take you on a tier.”
    • Dear → Tier: As in, “After you, my tier” and “Tierly beloved” and “Hold on for tier life” and “Near and tier to my heart” and “Nearest and tierest.”
    • Deer → Tier: As in, “Like a tier in headlights.”
    • *tar* → *tier*: As in, “Set your tierget (target)” and “Online avatier” and “Brick and mortier shop” and “At the altier” and “Nectier of life.” Other words you could use: proprietiery (proprietary), complimentiery (complimentary) and complementiery (complementary).
    • *ter* → *tier*: As in, “A full tierm (term)” and “Boston tierrier” and “Tiertiary degree” and “Waiting at the tierminal” and “A tierritorial creature” and “Over new tierrain” and “A tierrible fate” and “Don’t forget to watier the plants” and “Doesn’t mattier” and “Out of charactier” and “Mastier bedroom” and “For bettier or worse” and “Fostier a new attitude.” Other words that could work: aftier (after), computier (computer), lettier (letter), intierest (interest), artiery (artery), intierface (interface), intierfere (interfere), altiernative (alternative), battiery (battery) and intiernet (internet).
    • *tir* → *tier*: As in, “Feeling tiered (tired)” and “Having a tierade (tirade)” and “What a tiersome situation” and “Tieramisu flavoured” and “Working tierlessly” and “In the entier world” and “Of retierment age” and “Writing with satier.”
    • *tor* → *tier*: As in, “Factier into the equation” and “Need a doctier” and “Monitier the situation” and “Computer monitier” and “Dedicated mentier” and “Project coordinatier” and “Ancient histiery.” Other words that could work: vectier (vector), curatier (curator), predatier (predator) and motier (motor).
    • *tyr* → *tier*: As in, tieranny (tyranny), tierant (tyrant), tierannical (tyrannical) and martier (martyr).
    • *tiar* → *tier*: As in, tiera (tiara), inertier (inertia) and tertiery (tertiary).
    • *tier*: Emphasise the “tier” in these words: frontier, bustier and chocolatier.
  • Torte: Tortes are a type of rich, dense cake. We’ve got some torte puns for you here:
    • Thought → Torte: As in, “Deep in torte” and “Food for torte” and “Hold that torte” and “Impure tortes” and “It’s the torte that counts” and “Just when you torte it was safe” and “Lost in torte” and “Penny for your torte” and “On second torte” and “School of torte” and “Train of torte” and “Collect your tortes” and “Torte bubble.”
    • Taught → Torte: As in, “I’ve torte you well.”
    • Taut → Torte: As in, “Torte muscles” and “Torte as a rubber band.”
    • *tot* → *torte*: As in, “In torte-al agreement” and “Torte bag” and “Tortering around” and “Torte-ally, 100%.” Other words that could work: factorteum (factotum), torte-alitarian and torte-um (totum).
    • *tart* → *torte*: As in, “All torted up” and “Torte-an skirt.”
    • *tert* → *torte*: As in, “Light entorte-tainment” and “Entorte-tain me” and “Fates intorte-twined.”
    • *tort* → *torte*: As in, “Torte-oise and hare” and “Like torte-ure” and “Hot torte-illas” and “A torte-urous situation.” Other words you could work: retorte (retort), distorte (distort), extorte (extort), contorte (contort), extorte-ion (extortion) and distorte-ion (distortion).
  • Cheese → Cheesecake: As in, “Different as chalk and cheesecake” and “What’s that got to do with the price of cheesecake?”
  • Cake → Cheesecake: As in, “A slice of the cheesecake” and “A cheesecake walk” and “Icing on the cheesecake” and “Let them eat cheesecake” and “Piece of cheesecake.”
  • Cake → Pancake: As in, “A slice of the pancake” and Icing on the pancake” and “Let them eat pancakes” and “Piece of pancake” and “The cherry on the pancake” and “You can’t have your pancake and eat it too.”
    • Food → Angel food: Angel food cake is a type of light, fluffy sponge cake that doesn’t use butter. We have some silly angel food puns for you here: “Comfort angel food” and “Angel food chain” and “Angel food for thought.” Note: these would also work for devil’s food cake, as in: “Comfort devil’s food” and “Devil’s food chain” and “Devil’s food for thought.”
  • Get out → Gateau’t: As in, “Gateau’t of the chopper!”
  • Pound: A pound cake is a cake that’s made with a pound each of the main ingredients (butter, flour, eggs and sugar). We have some pound-related puns and phrases here for you:
    • *pand* → *pound*: As in, “Pounder (pander) to” and “It’s poundemonium in here” and “Poundora’s box” and “Can you expound on that?”
    • *pend* → *pound*: As in, “Payment pounding.” Other words you could use: poundulum (pendulum), poundant (pendant), stipound (stipend), appound (append), suspound (suspend), depound (depend), expound (expend), appoundix (appendix), depoundent (dependent) and impounding (impending).
    • *pond* → *pound*: As in, “In correspoundence with” and “Feeling despoundent” and “Please respound quickly.”
  • Chocolate: Since chocolate is a popular enough flavour to be known as its own type of cake, we’ve got some chocolate-related phrases for you that can double as cake and cupcake puns: “Chocolate thunder” and “Chocolate drop” and “Death by chocolate.”
  • Bundt: A bundt cake is one that has a distinctive ring shape. Here are some bundt-related puns for you:
    • Bun* → Bundt: As in, “Bundt in the oven” and “We’re going to need bigger bundts” and “Bundtle of energy” and “Bundtle of joy.”
    • *ban* → *bundt*: As in, “Urbundt living” and “A suburbundt town.”
    • *bon* → *bundt*: As in, “Ribbundt cutting ceremony” and “Carbundt copy” and “Pass the bourbundt.
    • *bun* → *bundt*: As in, “Bundtle of joy” and “Thanks a bundtch” and “In abundtance.”
    • *band* → *bundt*: As in, “I’m with the bundt” and “Husbundt and wife” and “Garage bundt” and “Jump on the bundtwagon” and “I need a bundtage (bandage).” Other words that could work: bundtit (bandit), bundtwidth (bandwidth), bundtdana (bandana), bundteau (bandeau) and bundticoot (bandicoot), contrabundt (contraband), disbundt (disband), broadbundt (broadband), headbundt (headband), abundtdon (abandon) and abundtonment (abandonment).
    • Bend* → Bundt*: As in, “Bundt over backwards” and “Gone on a bundter (bender).”
    • *bond* → *bundt*: As in, bundting (bonding), bundtage (bondage), bundt (bond) and vagabundt (vagabond).
    • *bant* → *bundt*: As in, “Trading bundter (banter)” and “Bundtam (bantam) weight.” Note: bantam is a category of weight that’s used in sports.
    • *bent* → *bundt*: Incumbundt (incumbent) and absorbundt (absorbent). Note: if something is incumbent, then it’s an imposition or an obligation.
  • Coffee: Coffee has been included in this list as it’s both a popular flavour of cake and associated with cake as a common accompaniment (coffee and cake):
    • Copy → Coffee: As in, “Carbon coffee” and “Coffee that” and “Hard coffee” and “Don’t be a coffeecat.”
    • *caf* → *coffee*: coffeeteria (cafeteria) and coffeeine (caffeine).
  • Carrot: Carrot cakes are a very popular flavour for both cakes and cupcakes, so we’ve included it here:
    • Care at → Carrot: As in, “I don’t carrot all!”
    • Carat → Carrot: As in, “24 carrot gold.”
  • Foam: Foam cakes have very little (or no) fatty ingredients in them, and are light, spongy and airy. We’ve got some foam-related puns for you to use here:
    • Form → Foam: As in, “Foam follows function” and “Free foam” and “Imitiation is the sincerest foam of flattery” and “In fine foam” and “In any way, shape or foam” and “Take foam” and “True to foam” and “Evil takes many foams.”
    • Fame → Foam: As in, “Claim to foam” and “Fifteen minutes of foam” and “The hall of foam.”
    • From → Foam: As in, “A little foam column A, a little foam column B” and “Cut foam the same cloth” and “Fall foam grace” and “Foam a mile away” and “Foam a to z” and “Foam cover to cover” and “Foam my cold, dead hands” and “Foam scratch” and “Foam the cradle to the grave” and “Foam time to time” and “Foam the ground up” and “Pull the rug out foam under [someone]” and “Take it foam me” and “Start foam scratch.”
    • Phone → Foam: As in, “Hold the foam” and “Foam a friend” and “Foam in sick” and “Waiting by the foam.”
    • *fam* → *foam*: As in, “My foamily” and “Seems foamiliar” and “Almost foamous” and “40 hour foamine” and “I’m foamished!” and “Foamiliarise yourself with” and “Sue for defoamation.” Note: defamation is the act of injuring another person’s reputation.
    • *fem* → *foam*: As in, “The future is foamale” and “Foaminine energy” and “Foamme fatale” and “No such thing as too foaminist.” Other things that could work: foamur (femur) and effoaminate (effeminate).
    • *fum* → *foam*: As in, foamble (fumble), foaming (fuming), foamigate (fumigate) and foambling (fumbling).
    • *phem* → *foam*: As in, eufoamism (euphemism), efoameral (ephemeral), blasfoamy (blasphemy), blasfoamous (blasphemous) and eufoamistic (euphemistic). Note: if something is ephemeral, then it only lasts for a very short period of time.
    • Sophomore → Sofoamore
  • Roll: Roll cakes are thin sheet cakes that have been rolled into a log shape and go by various names – swiss roll, jelly roll and cream roll, and can be filled with cream, jam or icing. Here are some roll-related puns for you to use:
    • Role → Roll: As in, “Whats your roll here?” and “Competing for the same roll.”
    • J.K Rowling → J.K Rolling
    • *ral* → *roll*: As in, “Rolly (rally) together” and “In generoll” and “Integroll to” and “It’s only naturoll” and “Yes, naturolly” and “Collateroll damage” and “Peripheroll vision” and “Running in parollel.” Other words you could use: liberoll (liberal), moroll (moral), ephemeroll (ephemeral) and visceroll (visceral).
    • *rel* → *roll*: As in, “Not rollevant” and “Rollay the information over” and “A huge rollief” and “Newest rollease” and “In a rollationship” and “Not for rolligion” and “In rollation to” and “Showing rolluctance (reluctance)” and “Rollentless effort” and “Monkeys in a barroll” and “Squirrolling away” and “Lover’s quarroll.” Other words you could use: apparoll (apparel), lauroll (laurel), scoundroll (scoundrel), mongroll (mongrel).
    • *ril* → *roll*: As in, “At your own peroll (peril)” and “A tendroll of hair” and “Aproll showers” and “A brolliant idea” and “Perollous (perilous) plans.”
    • *rol* → *roll*: As in, “Out of controll” and “High cholesteroll” and “On patroll” and “Off to enroll” and “Christmas carolls.” Other words: petroll (petrol) and prollific (prolific).
    • *rul* → *roll*: As in, cerollean (cerulean), unrolly (unruly) and ferrolle (ferrule). Note: a ferrule is a band that holds parts of an object together.
    • *rawl* → *roll*: As in, “Gotta croll before you can walk” and “Pub broll (brawl)” and “Urban sproll (sprawl)” and “Southern droll (drawl).”
  • Ice cream: When ice cream is shaped like a cake, it becomes known as ice cream cake. We’ve got some ice cream-related puns here for you to reference this summer favourite:
    • Ice → Ice cream: As in, “Cold as ice cream” and “Break the ice cream” and “Cuts no ice cream” and “Ice cream maiden” and “On ice cream” and “Skating on thin ice cream.”
    • Cream → Ice cream: As in, “Ice cream always rises to the top” and “Ice cream of the crop” and “Skin like peaches and ice cream” and “The cat who got the ice cream.”
  • Bread → Banana Bread: As in, “Banana bread always falls butter side down” and “Banana bread and butter” and “Break banana bread” and “Have your banana bread buttered on both sides” and “Put banana bread on the table” and “The best thing since sliced banana bread” and “Your daily banana bread.” Note: while banana bread has “bread” in the name, it is also categorised as a cake due to its cake-like characteristics (sweet, moist, airy, fluffy).
  • Cake → Shortcake: As in, “A slice of the shortcake” and “The icing on the shortcake” and “Let them eat shortcake” and “Piece of shortcake” and “The cherry on the shortcake” and “Have your shortcake and eat it too.”
  • Mooncake: Mooncakes are a small, round, dense type of Chinese cake eaten during the Mid-Autumn (or Mooncake) festival as an accompaniment to tea. Make some silly references to them with the following mooncake puns and phrases:
    • Moon → Mooncake: As in, “Ask for the mooncake” and “Eclipse of the mooncake” and “Many mooncakes ago” and “The dark side of the mooncake.”
    • Cake → Mooncake: As in, “A slice of the mooncake” and “Mooncake walk” and “Icing on the mooncake” and “Let them eat mooncake” and “Piece of mooncake” and “That really takes the mooncake” and “You can’t have your mooncake and eat it too.”
    • Moan → Moon: As in, “Whinging and mooning.”
    • *man* → *moon*: As in, “Anger moonagement” and “A moonipulative relationship” and “Take up the moontle.”
    • *men* → *moon*: As in, “Didn’t I moontion?” and “A respected moontor” and “You’re a moonace” and “Strict regimoon” and “No commoont” and “A strong commitmoont to” and “Environmoontally friendly.” Other words you could use: employmoont (employment), complemoont (complement), implemoont (implement), complimoont (compliment) and amoonable (amenable). Note: to be amenable is to be willing to respond to requests or suggestions.
    • *mon* → *moon*: As in, “All about the mooney” and “Hall moonitor” and “Moonkey business” and “Cookie moonster” and “The moonarch of” and “Every moonth.” Other words you could use: mooniker (moniker), moonopoly (monopoly), moontage (montage), commoon (common), salmoon (salmon), summoon (summon), lemoon (lemon), demoon (demon), cinnamoon (cinnamon), persimmoon (persimmon), sermoon (sermon), harmoony (harmony) and admoonish (admonish).
    • *mun* → *moon*: As in, “A tight-knit commoonity” and “Learn to commoonicate.” Other words that could work: commoonication (communication), immoonity (immunity), immoon (immune) and commoonion (communion).
  • Cake Pop: Cake pops are a fairly new type of cake where small balls of cake are styled as lollipops. They’re popular enough that we’ve included some pop-related puns here:
    • *pap* → *pop*: Popaya (papaya), popyrus (papyrus), poparazzi (paparazzi) and poprika (paprika). Note: papyrus is a type of very old paper.
    • Pep* → Pop*: As in, Popper (pepper), popperoni (pepperoni) and poppermint (peppermint. This could work well for a peppermint-flavoured cake pop.)
    • *pop*: We can simply emphasise the “pop” in these words: populist, popular, poplar, population, poppy, populace, lollipop and apoplectic. Notes: to be apoplectic is to be explosively angry. A populist is someone who supports ideas because they’re popular, rather than because they are moral or correct.
    • *pup* → *pop*: Poppet (puppet), poppy (puppy) and poppeteer (puppeteer).
    • Cake → Cake pop: As in, “A slice of the cake pop” and “Icing on the cake pop” and “Let them eat cake pops” and “A piece of cake pop” and “You can’t have your cake pop and eat it too.”
  • Sheet Cake: Sheet cakes are large, flat, rectangular cakes. Here are some sheet cake puns for you to use:
    • Shot → Sheet: As in, “Give it your best sheet” and “Have a sheet at” and “A long sheet” and “Not by a long sheet.”
    • Shut → Sheet: As in, “An open and sheet case” and “Keep your mouth sheet” and “Sheet up and take my money” and “Sheet your cake hole (this would be an amazingly appropriate pun)” and “Sheet your face.”
    • Sh*t → Sheet: As in, “Get your sheet together” and “Holy sheet” and “In deep sheet” and “Scared sheetless” and “No sheet” and “Sheet happens” and “Who gives a sheet?”
    • Seat → Sheet: As in, “Backsheet driver” and “Bums on sheets” and “By the sheet of your pants” and “Glued to your sheet” and Hold on to your sheet” and “In the box sheet” and “Not a dry sheet in the house” and “Please be sheeted” and “Take a sheet” and “The best sheet in the house” and “The hot sheet.”
    • Cheat → Sheet: As in, “Once a sheeter, always a sheeter” and “You can’t sheet an honest person.”
    • Set → Sheet: As in, “All sheet?” and “Game, sheet, match.” and “Got your heart sheet on” and “Ready, sheet, go!” and “Sheet eyes on” and “Sheet foot in” and “Sheet in motion” and “A new sheet of wheels” and “Sheet the record straight” and “Sheet sail” and “Sheet your teeth on edge” and “Sheet in your ways.”
    • Sit → Sheet: As in, “Don’t just sheet there” and “Sheet it out” and “Sheeting on the fence” and “Sheet tight” and “Sheet up and take notice” and “Sheeting pretty.”
    • *shat* → *sheet*: Sheetter (shatter), sheettering (shattering).
    • *cit* → *sheet*: As in, “In the sheety (city)” and “A proud sheetizen of” and “Sheetrus (citrus) flavoured (this could work well for a citrus-flavoured sheet cake)” and “In some capasheety” and “Worldwide atrosheety.” Other words that could work: sheetation (citation), sheetadel (citadel), sheetizenship (citizenship), complisheet (complicit), explisheet (explicit), tasheet (tacit), implisheet (implicit), solisheet (solicit), defisheet (deficit).
    • *sit* → *sheet*: As in, “We’ve got a sheetuation” and “Call the babysheeter” and “In transheet” and “Make a deposheet” and “A propensheety to” and “Posheetive results” and “An exquisheet meal.”
    • Sheet: To finish this section, we’ve got some simple sheet-related phrases that are general enough to use as puns: “White as a sheet” and “Keep a clean sheet” and “Between the sheets.”
  • Slab cake: Slab cakes are the Australian equivalent of sheet cakes (see section above). Here are some silly slab puns for you to use:
    • *sab* → *slab*: As in, “Team slabotage” and “Taking a slabbatical” and “Indispenslable to the team.” Note: a sabbatical is an extended break from work or a usual schedule.
    • Sebastian → Slabastian
    • Slap* → Slab*: As in, “A slab on the wrist” and “Slab bang in the middle” and “A slabdash job” and “Slabstick comedy.”
  • Blondie: Blondies are brownies that are made with vanilla rather than chocolate or cocoa. We’ve got a couple of blondie puns for you here:
    • Bondi beach → Blondie beach
    • Blonde → Blondie: “Bleached blondie” and “Blondie bombshell” and “Platinum blondie.”
  • Butterfly: Butterfly cakes are cupcakes that have the tops carved out, cut in half and then stuck back on top with jam, icing or cream to resemble a butterfly’s wings. Here are some butterfly-related phrases that could double as cupcake puns:
    • Fly → Butterfly: As in, “Born to butterfly” and “Come butterfly with me” and “Butterfly by the seat of your pants” and “Butterfly off the handle” and “Off to a butterflying start.”
    • Butterfly: These butterfly-related phrases are general enough to work as puns in the right context: “Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee” and “Social butterfly” and “The butterfly effect.”
  • Bread → Gingerbread: As in, “Gingerbread always falls butter side down” and “Gingerbread and butter” and “Gingerbread of life” and “Gingerbread crumb trail” and “The best thing since sliced gingerbread” and “Your daily gingerbread.”
  • Hedgehog: Hedgehogs are dense dessert bars that are similar to a sticky, fudgy brownie. Here are some hedgehog puns for you:
    • Hedge → Hedgehog: As in, “Hedgehog fund” and “Hedgehog your bets” and “You look as though you’ve been dragged through a hedgehog backwards.”
    • Hog → Hedgehog: As in, “Go the whole hedgehog” and “Ground hedgehog day.”
  • Marble: “Lose your marbles.” Note: marble cakes have a streaky, marble-like appearance of mixed light and dark batter.
  • Lava: Lava cakes have solid outsides with molten/liquid insides. Reference these gooey treats with these puns:
    • *lav* → *lava*: As in, “Lava-ish interior” and “Lava-ender scented.”
    • *lev* → *lava*: As in, “Looking for lava-rage (leverage)” and “A beastly lavathan (leviathan)” and “A malavalent (malevolent) glare.” Other words you could use: relavant (relevant), allava-ate (alleviate), clavar (clever), laval (level), lavaty (levity), lavar (lever) and irrelavant (irrelevant). Note: levity is a lightness, or a joking attitude.
    • *lov* → *lava*: As in, “I lava you” and ” and “All you need is lava” and “All’s fair in lava and war” and “Can you feel the lava tonight?” and “Can’t help falling in lava” and “Fall in lava” and “For the lava of god” and “Somebody to lava” and “What a lavaly sentiment” and “My lavar” and “A lavaing relationship” and “Feeling lavalorn” and “Close lavabirds” and “A lavable person” and “Dearly belavad.” Note: to be lovelorn is to be unloved.
    • *lava*: Simply emphasise the “lava” in these words: baklava, balaclava and lavatory.
  • Four → Petit Four: As in, “Down on all petit fours” and “Petit four by two” and “A petit four letter word.” Note: petit fours are small, bite-sized cakes.
  • Rum → Rum Baba: As in, “Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum baba.” Note: Rum babas are a small, rum-soaked cake served with cream.
  • Ball→ Snowball: As in, “Break your snowballs,” and “Snowballs to the wall,” and “Bust your snowballs,” and “A different snowball game,” and “Dropped the snowball,” and “Get the snowball rolling,” and “Got you by the snowballs,” and “Have a snowball,” and “The snowball is in your court.” Note: snowballs are small, cream-filled cakes that are covered with marshmallow and coconut.
  • Suffer → Souffle: As in, “Long souffle-ing.”
  • Tea → Teacake: As in, “Teacake for two” and “Teacake and sympathy.”
  • Cake → Teacake: As in, “A slice of the teacake” and “Teacake or death” and “A teacake walk” and “Icing on the teacake” and “Let them eat teacake” and “Piece of teacake” and “That takes the teacake” and “The cherry on the teacake” and “You can’t have your teacake and eat it too.”
  • Pie → Whoopie Pie: As in, “Easy as whoopie pie” and “Sweet as whoopie pie” and “A finger in many whoopie pies” and “A piece of the whoopie pie.” Note: whoopie pies are two cookie-shaped cakes that have been sanwiched together with icing or cream.
  • Yule Log: Yule logs are traditional Christmas cakes that resemble a firelog. Here are some puns that could be used to reference these:
    • You’ll → Yule: As in “Yule never guess” and “Ask a silly question and yule get a silly answer” and “Yule know how” and “Yule take care of it.” Note: although not commonly used in everyday/colloquial conversation, yule is now used to refer to the Christmas period.
    • You log → Yule log: As in, “Have yule logged on yet?” This is a very specific pun that refers to yule logs (large logs that are burned on Christmas Eve).
  • Fairy cake: Fairy cakes are another word for butterfly cakes. They’re small cupcakes with a section of the top cut out, then fashioned to look like wings on top of the cake. The next few puns are centred around the idea of fairy cakes:
    • *fair* → *fairy*: Swap “fair” for “fairy”, like so: “Affairy of the heart”, “An affairy to remember”, “All the fun of the fairy,” and “All’s fairy in love and war”, “By fairy means or foul”, “Faint heart never won fairy lady”, “Fairy trade”, “Fairy and square”, “Fairy dinkum”, “Fairy enough”, “Fairy game”, “A family affairy,” and “My fairy lady”, “No fairy!” and “Savoir fairy.” 
    • Far → Fairy: Swap “far” for “fairy” to create some witty magic puns like so: “As fairy as it goes”, “As fairy as the eye can see”, “Few and fairy between”, and “Over the hills and fairy away”, “So fairy so good”, “Thursday’s child has fairy to go” and “The fruit does not fall fairy from the tree”. 
    • Very → Fairy: As in, “Be afraid, be fairy afraid”, “Before your fairy eyes”, “How fairy dare you!”, “It was a fairy good year”, “Thank you fairy much”, “Fairy interesting, but stupid”, “All fairy well” and “At the fairy least”.
    • Fiery → Fairy: As in, “Fairy red hair,” and “Fairy rage,” and “Filled with fairy enthusiasm.”
    • Four → Fairy: As in, “Twenty-fairy seven,” and “A fairy-letter word.”
    • Forty → Fairy-ty: As in, “Fairy-ty winks,” and “Life begins at fairy-ty.”
    • Firing → Fairy-ing: As in, “Fairy-ing blanks,” and “Fairy-ing on all cylinders,” and “The fairy-ing line.”
    • Fury → Fairy: As in, “Bright red with fairy,” and “Filled with sorrow and fairy,” and “Blinded with fairy,” and “Pent-up fairy.”
    • Hairy → Fairy: As in, “A fairy situation,” and “Give it the fairy eyeball.” Note: to give someone the hairy eyeball is to look at someone disdainfully.
    • *fare* → *fairy*: As in, “Fairynheit 451,” and “Welfairy reform,” and “Fairy-thee-well!” and “I bid you fairywell!” and “Celebration and fanfairy.” Note: Fahrenheit 451 is a dystopian novel that’s been made into a movie.
    • *fer* → *fairy*: As in, “A fairyocious effort,” and “Your highest offairy (offer),” and “Buffairy (buffer) zone,” and “Long suffairying (suffering),” and “What’s the diffairyence (difference)?” and “Transfairy the funds,” and “A good refairyence,” and  “Taking the fairy (ferry),” and “Defairy (defer) your admission,” and “Infairyority (inferiority) complex,” and “Well, if you’re offairying.”
    • *for* → *fairy*: As in, “Going fairyward,” and “Insider infairymation,” “Too much infairymation,” and “Peak perfairymance,” and “Fairyeign (foreign) exchange,” and “The fairycast for today,” and “Why hast thou fairysaken me?” and “In reference (or refairyence) to the afairymentioned…”
    • *fur* → *fairy*: As in, “Hell hath no fairy (fury) like..” and “An infairyating (infuriating) situation,” and “A part of the fairyniture,” and “Fairytive (furtive) glances,” and “And fairythermore…” and “A blazing fairynace (furnace).”
    • Fast and Furious → Fast and Fairyous
    • Fairy: We’ll finish this section off with fairy-related puns: “Airy fairy,” and “Fairytale ending” and “Nobody loves a fairy when she’s forty”.
  • Mug Cake: Mug cakes are a fairly new type of cupcake where ingredients are put in a mug then microwaved, rather than being cooked in an oven. The following are centred around mug cakes and can be used as cupcake puns:
    • Mag* → Mug*: As in, “The mugnitude of” and “A mugnificent ending” and “Self-help mugazine” and “My mugnum opus.” Note: a magnum opus is considered to be a person’s greatest work.
    • *meg* → *mug*: As in, “Pomugranate flavoured” and “The alpha and the omuga.”
    • Cake → Mug cake: As in, “A slice of the mug cake” and “A mug cake walk” and “Icing on the mug cake” and “Let them eat mug cake” and “A piece of mug cake” and “Selling like mug cakes” and “That really takes the mug cake” and “The cherry on the mug cake” and “You can’t have your mug cake and eat it too.”

Cake-Related Words

To help you come up with your own cake puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

general: cake, cupcake, sweet, dessert, baked, bake, baking,  batter, milk, egg, butter, flour, sugar, icing, frosting, cream, buttercream,  jam, vanilla, marzipan, fondant, piping, sprinkles, fruit, jelly, mousse, cocoa, nuts, recipe, mix,  ingredients, baking powder, baking soda, cook, chef, oven, nuts, slice, piece, ramekin, patty pan/case, rise, hundreds and thousands, patisserie, bakery, baker

cake types: sponge, layer, tier, fruit, torte, cheesecake, pancake, birthday, angelfood, angel, chiffon, gateau, pound, flourless, chocolate, wedding, bundt, decorative, black forest, coffee, carrot, roulade, foam, shortened, roll, ice cream, upside-down, cassata, german, babka, banana bread, battenberg, shortcake, mooncake, cake pop, cake balls, madeleines , swiss roll, sheet cake, blondie, brownie, butterfly, charlotte, devil’s food, eccles, funnel, gingerbread, hedgehog, jaffa, lamington, marble, mille-feuille, lava, muffin, opera, pavlova, petit gâteau, petit fours, princess, red velvet, rum baba, snowball, souffle, teacake, tiramisu, whoopie pie, yule log, fairy cake, mug cake

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Bread Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on bread puns! 🍞 Bread is one of the more popular topics for word play on the internet, probably because there are so many different types of breads, all with unusual foreign names that are great for making puns with. This entry covers all the well-known bread puns, plus quite a few more that haven’t been used-to-death yet. It also includes toast puns and until Punpedia gets big enough to warrant distinct entries for them, this is the entry for baking puns / bakery puns too.

You might also like to visit the Punpedia entries on food puns, donut puntspasta puns, potato puns, cooking puns, cake puns and pizza puns.

Bread Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about bread that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page!

  • She better → Ciabatta: The term “ciabatta” is pronounced like “shi-batta” and refers to a floury-crusted Italian bread. Examples: “Ciabatta study hard if she wants to pass the test.” and “Ciabatta be quick, we’re nearly sold out!”
  • None → Naan: As in “I don’t want naan of that.” and “A jack of all trades and a master of naan.” and “Naan the wiser.” and “Naan of your business!” and “Second to naan.”
  • No one → Naan: As in “Naan’s home at the moment, but you can leave a message after the tone.”
  • Nan → Naan: As in, “Meet my naan,” and “My naan’s a great cook.”
  • Grain: As in “I’m going to go against the grain here and say …” and “There’s a grain of truth in what he’s saying.” and “I’d take it with a grain of salt.”
  • Rain → Grain: As in, “Right as grain,” and “Chasing grainbows,” and “Come grain or shine,” and “Grain on my parade,” and “Make it grain,” and “Graindrops keep falling on my head,” and “Graining cats and dogs,” and “Singin’ in the grain,” and “Somewhere over the grainbow,” and “Spitting with grain.” Notes: to chase rainbows is to go after unrealistic things. To rain on someone’s parade is to ruin a happy moment for them.
  • Grey → Grain: As in, “Fifty shades of grain,” and “A grain area,” and “Grain is the new black,” and “Grain matter,” and “Shades of grain.” Note: shades of grey refers to the complexity of a situation.
  • Brain → Grain: As in, “All brawn and no grains,” and “Beat your grains out,” and “Grain dead,” and “Grain fart,” and “Grain teaser,” and “Grain wave,” and “Grainstorming session,” and “Got it on the grain,” and “Hare grained,” and “A no-grainer,” and “Pick your grains,” and “Rack your grains,” and “It’s not grain surgery.”
  • Grind → Grain-d: As in, “Bump and grain-d,” and “Daily grain-d,” and “Grain-d down,” and “Grain-d to a halt,” and “Nose to the grain-dstone,” and “Don’t like the bastards grain-d you down.” Note: to have your nose to the grindstone is to work hard.
  • Gain → Grain: As in, “Capital grains,” and “Grain an advantage,” and “Ill-gotten grains,” and “No pain, no grain,” and “Nothing ventured, nothing grained.” Note: a capital gain is a profit from the sale of a capital asset (like stock or real estate).
  • *gain* → *grain*: As in, “Agrainst all odds,” and “Agrainst the clock,” and “Bar-grain basement,” and “Come a-grain?” and “A fool’s bar-grain,” and “Here we go a-grain,” and “More than you bar-grained for,” and “Now and a-grain,” and “A race agrainst time,” and “You can say that a-grain,” and “Back agrainst the wall.”
  • *ray* → *grain*: Change the “ray” sound in some words to “grain”: grain-ciously (graciously), engrainve (engrave), grain-dation (gradation), grain-dient (gradient), immi-grain-tion (immigration), ingrain-dient (ingredient).
  • Serial → Cereal: As in “There’s a cereal killer on the loose.”
  • Surreal → Cereal: As in “The view from the summit was cereal.” and “I love impressionism and cereal art.”
  • Stone → Scone: As in “The philosopher’s scone.” and “Leave no scone unturned.” and “Sticks and scones may break my bones …”
  • Its/It’s going → ‘Scone: As in “Scone to be a lot of fun!” and “Scone swimmingly.”
  • Its/It’s gone → ‘Scone: As in “It’s not coming back son. Scone.” and “Scone worse than we expected.”
  • *s can’t → Scone’t: “This scone’t go on much longer.”
  • Wheat: As in, “Separate the wheat from the chaff.” Note: to separate the wheat from the chaff is to separate the valuable from the worthless.
  • White → Wheat: As in, “A wheater shade of pale,” and “A wheat knight,” and “Wheat as a ghost,” and “Wheat as a sheet,” and “Great wheat shark,” and “Like wheat on rice,” and “Little wheat lie,” and “Men in wheat coats,” and “Not everything is black and wheat,” and “Wheat water rafting.” Note: like white on rice refers to a very close situation.
  • Sweet → Swheat: As in, “Home swheat home,” and “Swheat dreams,” and “Swheat nothings,” and “A swheat tooth,” and “Swheaten the pot,” and “Swheaten the deal,” and “Swheatheart,” and “Take the bitter with the swheat,” and “Short but swheat.”
  • Sweat → Swheat: As in, “Blood, swheat and tears,” and “Beads of swheat,” and “Break out in a cold swheat,” and “Don’t swheat it,” and “Running with swheat,” and “My new swheater,” and “Swheating bullets,” and “Swheat it out.”
  • Weight → Wheat: As in, “Pull your wheat,” and “Punching above your wheat,” and “Throw your wheat around,” and “Watch your wheat,” and “A wheat off my mind,” and “Worth your wheat in gold,” and “A dead wheat.”
  • *ate* → *wheat*: As in, evacu-wheat (evacuate), fluctu-wheat (fluctuate), and gradu-wheat (graduate).
  • Wait → Wheat: As in “Wheat a second…” and “I am lying in wheat.” and “Wheat and see.”
  • We t* → Wheat: As in “Wheat talked about this last night.” and “Wheat took our time.”
  • We’d → Wheat: As in “Wheat love for you to join us!”
  • What → Wheat: As in “Wheatever, man.” and “Wheat are you up to today?”
  • Bred → Bread: As in “Perfect table manners! You’re well bread.” and “My dog is a pure bread.”
  • Brad → Bread: As in “When’s Bread Pitt’s next film coming out?”
  • Bread: As in: “Bread always falls butter side down,” and “Bread and butter,” and “Bread of life,” and “Break bread,” and “Half a loaf is better than no bread,” and “Have your bread buttered on both sides,” and “Put bread on the table,” and “Take bread out of someone’s mouth,” and “The greatest thing since sliced bread,” and “A hair’s breadth.”
  • Read → B-read: As in, “All I know is what I b-read in the papers,” and “Exceedingly well b-read,” and “A good b-read,” and “B-read any good books lately?” and “I can b-read you like a book,” and “A bit of light b-reading,” and “B-read ’em and weep,” and “B-read between the lines,” and “B-read my lips,” and “At the b-ready,” and “I can’t b-read minds.”
  • Bed → Bread: As in, “Bread and breakfast,” and “A bread of nails,” and “Between you, me and the breadpost,” and “Get into bread with,” and “Get out of the wrong side of the bread,” and “You’ve made your bread, now lie in it,” and “Don’t go to bread on an argument,” and “Breadtime,” and “In bread with,” and “Wet the bread,” and “Get out of bread!” Notes: if something is between you, me and the bedpost, then it’s a secret. 
  • Bled → Bread: As in, “My papercut bread all over the place.”
  • Bride → Bread: As in, “Always the breadsmaid, never a bread,” and “Blushing bread,” and “Bread to be,” and “Father of the bread,” and “Here comes the bread.” 
  • Roll: As in “We’re on a roll!” and “Ready to roll?” and “She’s a great roll model.” and “Traditional gender rolls are lame.” and “Did she make the honour roll?”
  • Loaf: As in “Stop loafing around! Get up and do something!” (To “loaf” is to waste time and laze about)
  • Laugh → Loaf: As in “Loafter is the best medicine.” and “And he loafed right in my face.” and “I’m loafing my head off.”
  • Love → Loaf: As in “I loaf you <3″ and “The world needs more loaf.”
  • Life → Loaf: As in “Loaf is like a box of chocolates.” and “All walks of loaf.” and “It was a loaf-changing experience.” and “As large as loaf.” and “Living the high loaf.” and “Hold on for dear loaf!” and “Loaf coach” and “Loaf in the fast lane.” and “Loaf support.” and “Loaf’s too short.” and “I had the time of my loaf!”
  • Rap → Wrap: As in “That was an epic wrap battle.” (Playing on the flat-bread sandwich alternative)
  • Rapper → Wrapper: “She hit it big and is now a world famous wrapper.”
  • Do not → Donut: As in “I donut want to get into a pun battle with you.” and “Donut tempt me.”
  • Bit of (Bit ‘a) → Pita: “Don’t make a blind pita difference.”
  • Why → Rye: “Rye do you ask?” and “Rye do bread puns make me giggle?” and “Rye hast thou forsaken me?” and “Rye are you doing this to me?”
  • Wry → Rye: “A rye smile.” and “With rye Scottish wit.” (Rye is a type of grain used to make bread)
  • Rye: Words that contain the “rye” sound can be made into terribly silly bread puns: alryete, bryete, Bryean (Bryan), circumscryebed, compryesed, contryeved, copyryete, cryesis, cryeterion, cryeme, dryevers, descryebe, enterpryese, depryeved, fryeday, fryed, fryetened, pryeceless, pryemarily, pryevacy, pryeority, pryez, ryenocerous, ryeteous, ryetfully, ryevalries, samurye, subscryebed, surpryesingly, tryeangle, ryeting, tryeumph, rye-fle.
  • Riled up→ Rye-led up: As in “Jeez, calm down. No need to get rye-led up!”
  • Least→ Yeast: As in “Last, but not yeast.” and “Yeast common denominator.” and “It’s the yeast I could do.”
  • East→ Yeast: As in “I’m heading over yeast for a holiday.”
  • Need → Knead: As in “Only on a knead-to-know basis.” and “A friend in knead is a friend indeed.” and “You knead your head examined.”
  • Needy → Kneady: As in “He’s a bit kneady.”
  • Kneed → Knead: As in “He was knead in the chest during his rugby match.”
  • Get → Baguette: As in “Buy one, baguette one free.” and “I think I can baguette away with it.” and “Baguette cracking!” and “I’m trying to baguette into the habit of it.” and “Baguette out of my hair!”
  • Forget → Baguette: As in “Ahh, baguette it – you wouldn’t understand.” and “Lest we baguette.” and “Don’t baguette your towel!”
  • Toast: Can refer to the raising of glasses at a gathering to honour something: “Let’s call a toast.” It also has a slang usage: “You are toast.” Meaning “I’m going to beat you” at some competition (or physically).
  • *oast*→ *toast*: If a word contains the “toast” sound, a toast pun can sometimes be made: toastcard (postcard), toastess (hostess), toastline (coastline), toastdoctoral (postdoctoral), toastmortem (postmortem), toastmodern (postmodern), toastpone (postpone), Toastbusters.
  • Come → Crumb: As in “Crumb to think of it…” and “Crumb to your senses” and “Crumb again?” and “Crumb hell or high water.” and “Crumb out of your shell” and “Crumb rain or shine” and “Do you crumb here often?” and “An idea whose time has crumb.” and “The best is yet to crumb.” and “What has crumb over you?” and “Oh crumb on.”
  • Ban me → Bánh mì: The term “bánh mì” refers to any kind of Vietnamese bread. Examples: “What are you going to do? Bánh mì from making bread puns?”
  • Trust → Crust: As in “Crust me, I’m a doctor.” and “That was a breach of crust.” and “He’s a crustworthy young man.”
  • Christ → Crust: As in “Crust has fallen, crust has risen.” and “Crust is a main figurehead in western mythology.”
  • Crusty: This term can refer to someone (especially an older person) who is bad-tempered.
  • Rusty → Crusty: As in “My punning skills are a little crusty, sorry.”
  • Just → Crust: As in “It’s crust not my day today.” and “It’s crust around the corner.” and “Crust add water.” and “It’s crust a matter of time.”
  • Cust* → Crust*: If a word begins with “cust”, swap it with “crust”: crustodian, crustomer, crustom, crustomary, crustody, crustard, crustodial, crustomise, crustomarily.
  • *ust* → *crust*: If a word has the “ust”, it can sometimes be made into a crust pun: crustice (justice), crustification (justification), crustachioed (mustachioed), crustainable (sustainable), crustainability (sustainability).
  • Leaving → Leaven: “Leaven” is another term for “rising agent”: the ingredient added to make bread rise (usually yeast). Examples: “You’re leaven me here all by myself?” and “Oh, you’re leaven so early?!”
  • Rise: This is a reference to bread “rising” during the yeast fermentation process Examples: “More bread puns? I will rise to that challenge.” and “Rise from the ashes.” and “Rise and shine.” and “The sun has risen.”
  • Wasting time → Loafing around: As in “Stop loafing around and do something useful!”
  • Grainy: Other than referring to grain (the crop food, of course), this can refer to a texture or to a low resolution photograph: “Your profile picture is a bit grainy.”
  • Hot cross buns → Hot cross puns: This one’s a sort of “meta” bread pun.
  • Crumby: This is slang for “dirty”, “poor quality” and related concepts.
  • Money → Dough: The term “dough” is slang for money in some places.
  • *do*→ *dough*: Any word which contains the “dough” sound (or similar) can be made into an easy dough pun: abdoughmen (abdomen), Adoughbe (Adobe), adoughlescence, aficionadoughs, anecdoughtal, antidoughte, avacadough, bulldoughzer, commandough, condoughlences, crescendough (crescendo), doughmain, doughnation, doughnor, doughsage, doughze, Indoughnesian, innuendough, landoughners, Macedoughnian, overshadough, meadough, Orlandough, pseudough, shadough, taekwondough, tornadough, windough, widough, tuxedough.
  • Do→ Dough: As in “I dough what I can.” and “What are you doughing right now?”
  • Ingrained: As in “It was ingrained in me from a young age.”
  • *bun*: Words that contain the “bun” sound, or a similar sound can be made into a bread bun pun: absorbunt, abundance, abundantly, bunal (banal), bunality, bunevolence, bunignly, bunocular, bunanza, bourbun, bunch, bundle, bunny, bunting, bunyan, cabunets, combunation, cubun, disturbunce, husbund, incumbunts, Lebunon, Robunson, urbun, urbunization.
  • Pun → Bun: As in “No bun intended.”
  • *pun* → *bun*: Some words containing the “pun” sound can be made into terrible bread puns: particibunts (participants), perbundicular (perpendicular), Jabunese, occubunts (occupants), combunsation, bundits, bunishment, weabunry, sbunge (sponge).
  • Spread: As in “Spread your wings.” and “It spread like wildfire.” and “Stop spreading rumours.”
  • Slice: As in “It’s a lie no matter how you slice it.” and “Slice of the action”.
  • Awry → A rye: As in “Many youthful romances go a rye” and “I got the impression that something was a rye.”
  • Inbred → Inbread: As in “Inbread dogs are more likely to be unhealthy.”
  • Loafers: As in “My new pair of loafers are so cosy!”
  • Bed → Bread: As in “Bread and breakfast” and “Don’t let the bread bugs bite!”
  • Self-loathing → Self-loaving: As in “Excessive punning can lead to self-loaving.”
  • Hybrid → High bread: As in “I’m going to buy a high bread because it’s cheaper and more environmentally friendly.”
  • Jam: As in “My sandwich is jam-packed.” and “All seven of us were jammed into the same car.”
  • PunpernickelPumpernickel is a type of bread.
  • Patriarchy → Pastryarchy: As in “Down with the pastryarchy!” and “We live in a pastryarchy.”
  • Pain: France is famous for its breads and “pain” means “bread” in French, so this is an easy, but subtle pun.
  • Better → Butter: As in, “I’ve got a butter idea” and “Anything you can do, I can do butter” and “Appealing to your butter judgement” and “My butter half” and “Butter late than never” and “Butter luck next time” and “Butter safe than sorry” and “Butter than sex” and “Butter than new” and “I’ve changed for the butter” and “I couldn’t have said it butter” and “For butter or worse” and “Get the butter of” and “I should have known butter.”
  • Barter → Butter: As in, “Trade and butter economy.”
  • But her → Butter: As in, “Butter suitcase! It’s been left behind!” (a very specific pun)
  • Patter → Butter: As in, “The pitter butter of little feet.”
  • But → Butter: As in, “Butter seriously” and “Butter heads” and “Butter out” and “Down, butter not out” and “Everything butter the kitchen sink” and “Kick butter” and “No butters” and “Last butter not least” and “Gone, butter not forgotten.”
  • Potter → Butter: As in, “Harry Butter” and “Buttering about.”
  • Better → Breader: As in “Breader off dead.” and “The sooner the breader.”
  • Sentences → Sandwiches: As in “It’s crazy! We always finish each others sandwiches.” (Made somewhat possible as a pun by the Disney movie “Frozen”)
  • Mild → Mould/Mold: As in “I had a mold distrust of this man.” and “I’m moldly annoyed.”
  • Old → Mould/Mold: As in “Out with the mold and in with the new.” and “Up to your mold tricks I see.” and “The good mold days.”
  • Call her → Challah: This is a special type of Jewish ceremonial bread that is pronounced like “ka-la”. Example: “You should challah tonight when she finishes work.”
  • All of → Challah: As in “Challah these bread puns are cracking me up!”
  • Glue ten → Gluten: As in “If we gluten of these together we’ll have a nice chain of them.”
  • Even → Oven: As in “I don’t care about profit, I’ll be happy if we break oven.” and “Keep an oven keel.” and “I’m going to get oven with him.” Note: to keep an even keel is to keep something steady and balanced.
  • Often → Oven: As in “Do you come here oven?” and “Every so oven.”
  • Glaze: As in “The prospect makes my eyes glaze over with boredom.”
  • Graze → Glaze: As in “It just glazed the surface.” and “I’ll be fine, it’s just a glaze.”
  • Barely → Barley: As in “I’m barley getting by.” Note: barley is a type of cereal grain.
  • Waffle: As in “He just kept waffling on and on.”
  • Nothin’ → Muffin: As in “All or muffin.” and “Here goes muffin!” and “I will stop at muffin to …” and “You ain’t seen muffin yet.” and “We’ve got muffin in common.”
  • Make → Bake: As in “I can’t bake head or tail of it.” and “Enough to bake you sick.” and “Bake believe” and “It’ll bake a world of difference.” and “Just trying to bake ends meet.” and “Bake a name for yourself.”
  • Making → Baking: As in “A legend in the bakin’” and “This is history in the baking” and “You’re baking a fool of yourself.”
  • Floor → Flour: As in “A bread pun battle? I’ll mop the flour with you.”
  • Crap → Crepe: As in “I don’t give a crepe.” and “What a load of crepe.” and “Cut the crepe.”
  • Creepy → Crepe-y: As in “This music is crepe-y
  • Crack a → Cracker: As in “These baking puns made me cracker smile.”
  • Pan → Pen: “Pan” means bread in Japanese and Spanish. Examples: “The pan is mightier than the sword.” and “Put pan to paper.”
  • Brought → Brot: “Brot” means loaf in German. Examples: “I brot you into this world.” and “It was later brot to light that …”
  • Penny → Pane: “Pane” (pronounced “pahn-eh”) means bread in Italian. Examples: “Pane for your thoughts” and “It cost me a pretty pane.”
  • Flower → Flour: As in “Remember to stop and smell the flours.”
  • Adore → Adough: “I adough you.”
  • Don’t → Doughn’t: As in “Doughn’t fall for it.”
  • Though → Dough: As in “You look as dough you’ve seen a ghost!”
  • Hour → Flour: As in “We could go on for flours.” and “The plane leaves in one flour.” and “I’m on a flourly wage.”
  • Flair → Flour: As in, “A flour for the dramatic.”
  • Flir* → Flour*: As in, “Flourting with disaster” and “A real flourt.”
  • Flor* → Flour*: As in, “Floura and fauna” and “Floural arrangements.” Other words that could work: flourist (florist), Flourida (Florida), Flourence (Florence) and flourentine (florentine). Note: a florentine is a type of biscuit.)
  • Maze → Maize: As in “It’s a complicated maize to navigate.”
  • Amaze/amazing → Amaize/amaize-ing: As in, “What an amaize-ing effort!” and “You never cease to amaize me.”
  • *mise → *maize: As in, minimaize (minimise), surmaize (surmise), victimaize (victimise), compromaize (compromise), customaize (customise), maximaize (maximise).
  • Again → A grain: As in “Come a grain?” and “Never a grain.” and “Time and time a grain.” and “Now and a grain.”
  • Sour though → Sourdough: As in “The look he gave me was very sourdough.”
  • Puffy: As in “His eyes were puffy and full of tears.”
  • Red → Bread: As in “Walking down the bread carpet.” and “That was a bread herring.”
  • Ready → Bready: As in “Bready, get set, go!” and “Bready to roll.” and “Battle bready.” and “Get bready to rumble!” and “I was born bready.”
  • Readily → Breadily: As in “The island is breadily accessible by canoe.” and “I’ll breadily admit that I was wrong in that decision.”
  • Redhead → Breadhead: As in “Many of the greatest Scottish warriors were Breadheads.”
  • Head → Bread: As in “All the fame has gone to his bread.” and “You need to have your bread examined.” and “From bread to toe.” and “Keep your bread above water.” and “That went straight over my bread.” and “They both went bread to bread.” and “I couldn’t make bread or tail of it.”
  • Crumble: As in “Kingdoms will crumble.” and “The crumbling ruins.”
  • Rumble/Grumble → Crumble: As in “They hear the crumbling of the thunder. ” and “Talking about bread is making my stomach crumble.”
  • Its / It’s → Oats / Oat’s: As in “Oat’s just a matter of time.” and “Oat’s a shame.” and “Oat’s nothing personal” and “Oat’s worth oats weight in gold.” and “Takes oats toll.” and “A life of oats own.”
  • Ought → Oat: As in “You oat to say sorry.” and “Five minutes oat to be enough time.”
  • Sub: As in “That joke was sub-par.” and “It wasn’t terrible, just sub-optimal.”
  • Sub*: Words that start with “sub” (referencing the type of sandwich) are easy bread puns: sublime, submissive, subdivision, subcommittee, subconscious, subcontinent, subdue, subgroup, subjected, subject, subjectivity, submersible, submit, subscriber, subscription, subsequent, subliminal, subordinated, subsection, submarine, substance, substitution, subtract, subvert, suburbia, suburb, subtitles, subtraction, substrate, subsidy.
  • *sub*: If a word contains the “sub” sound, there could be a very forced bread pun opportunity: accessubility, admissuble, incomprehesuble, disubility, flexsubility, irresponsubility, possubility, enforsuble, taxsuble, unsubstantiated.
  • Stale: As in “All these bread memes are stale.”
  • Pun per nickel → Pumpernickel: As in “I could tell you more bread puns but it’ll be one punpernickel.”
  • Whole meal → Wholemeal: As in “Bread is great, but you should eat it with other foods, not as a wholemeal in itself.”
  • Homemade: Homemade bread may be impressed into people’s minds strongly enough to make a subtle use of “homemade” a bread pun.
  • Half-baked: This means “not completely planned or thought out”. For example: “Half-baked bread puns ought to be illegal.”
  • Rusty → Rusky: This refers to a hard “twice-baked” bread. Examples: “My bread pun skills are a little rusky.”
  • Pow → Pau: This is a type of Chinese steamed bun with filling. Words containing the “pow” sound can be simple pau puns: pauerpuff girls, pauerless, pauerful, pauder, pauerhouse, pauer, pauerboat.
  • Seedy: This is a describing word for someone or something that is morally questionable, foul, or dirty. Examples: “So many seedy people hanging around that place.”
  • Raise: As in “I’ve been working at the bakery for two years now and haven’t recieved a raise.” and “Raise the dead.”
  • Peace of mind → Pizza mind: Pizza puns can sometimes classify as bread puns, but it depends on the specific context.
  • Pit us → Pitas: As in “He’s trying to pitas against each other.”
  • Way back → Zweiback: This is a type of hard twice-baked bread. Its main pronunciation sounds like “swee-back” or “zwee-back” which sounds a bit like “way back”. Example: “Zweiback in the day, puns were cheap.”

Bread-Related Phrases

Common phrases, idioms and cliches which are related to bread can be used for some subtle and witty word play. Here is a list of the bread themed phrases that we’ve found so far:

  • loaf about
  • bread winner
  • it’s my bread and butter
  • born and bred
  • break bread
  • butter face
  • butter fingers
  • cake walk
  • cast bread upon the waters
  • crumb of comfort
  • knuckle sandwich
  • piece of cake
  • takes the cake
  • as flat as a pancake
  • as nutty as a fruit cake
  • the cherry on the cake
  • you can’t have your cake and eat it too
  • bread always falls buttered side down
  • put bread on the table
  • the best thing since sliced bread
  • you are toast
  • the toast of the town
  • one slice short of a loaf
  • take it with a grain of salt
  • go against the grain
  • hasn’t a grain of sense
  • she/he knows what side his bread is buttered on
  • that’s the way the cookie crumbles
  • drive for show and putt for dough
  • she’s/he’s on a roll
  • melt like butter
  • raking in the dough
  • separate the wheat from the chaff
  • rock and roll
  • a few sandwiches short of a picnic
  • upper crust
  • a baker’s dozen
  • against the grain

Bread-Related Words

There are many more puns to be made than could be documented in this Punpedia entry, and so we’ve compiled a list of bread-related concepts for you to use when creating your own puns. If you come up with a new pun, please share it in the comments!

stale, bake, baked, toasted, unleavened, leaven, crusty, French, moldy, wholemeal, multigrain, homemade, whole-wheat, wheat, grain, barley, rye, naan, sub, crumble, oat, bread, puffy, maize, flour, dough, baking, muffin, waffle, glaze, challah, gluten-free, brot, roti, butter, spread, jam, sandwich, pastry, pumpernickel, slice, bun, loaf, hot-cross buns, crust, bánh mì toast, baguette, knead, yeast, pita, donut, scone, roll, ciabatta, sourdough, crepe, glaze, white, brown, rusk, toaster, breadbasket, matzo, corn bread, pone, wafer, bagel, tortilla, manchet, French toast, challah, zwieback, brioche, chapati, fruitbread, ramekin, pizza, pita, focaccia, bannock, raise, rise, rising, soggy, crumpet, crummy, soda bread, pretzel, cake, slice, bread bin, chapatti, bakehouse, paste, breadcrumbs, fairy bread, bread knife, sub, submarine sandwich, burrito, margarine, yeast extract, cereal, flatbread, crouton, breadstick, durum, bread machine, leavening agent, crispbread, bran, starch, quinoa, pumpkin bread.

Bread Jokes

If you’re looking for some very corny bread jokes, you’ve come to the right place. All of these one-liner-style bread jokes use puns in their punchline. Some are phonetic puns, others are based on a slang phrase or cliche related to bread.

  • What did the baker say to his assistant after he caught him stealing money from the till? – That was a breach of crust.
  • What did the Indian chef say to the nosey employee? – It’s naan of your business!
  • Why doesn’t bread like warm weather? – Things get toasty!
  • Why aren’t bread jokes funny? – Because they always get mould.
  • What did the baker get for her mother on Mother’s Day? – Flours
  • What is a baker’s favourite Beatles song? – “Loaf is all you need”
  • When does sourdough bread rise? – When you yeast expect it.
  • What did the butter say to the bread? – I’m on a roll!
  • Why does everyone need bread and water? – Loaf makes the world go round.
  • What did one slice of bread say to the other slice of bread when he saw some butter and jam on the table? – We’re toast!
  • Why was the baker in a panic? – He was in a loaf or death situation.
  • What did the baker say to the lazy assistant? – Stop loafing around and get over here!
  • What did the baker’s assistant say to her partner after her first day on the job?  – It’s a crumb-y place to work.
  • How was the bakers assistant paid? – On a flourly wage.
  • What type of car did the baker buy? – A high bread car
  • Where did the baker get her baking skills? – They were in grained in her from a young age.

Bread Pun Images

Below is a collection of bread-related visual puns and meme-type images. If you’ve created your own visual bread puns or found one that we’ve missed, please post us a link in the comments section 🙂

Did this Punpedia entry help you?

Did you find the bread-related pun that you were looking for? If so, great! Otherwise, please let us know what you were looking for in the comments, below! Are you looking for puns for text messages, Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, or some other social media platform? Would you like to see more funny bread pun images? Or perhaps you just want more bread puns for your photo captions? Whatever the case, please let us know, and help us improve this Punpedia entry. If you’re got any bread puns (image or text) that aren’t included in this article, please submit them in the comments and one of our curators will add it as soon as possible. Thanks for visiting Punpedia 🙂