Baking Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on baking puns! 🍞 🍰 🥐

Whether you’re after witty Instagram captions or some business name ideas, everything you knead is right here in our list of baking puns. We’ve included puns on baking utensils, general baking terms and some popular types of baked goods. Get bready to have a laugh and enjoy this entry!

If you’re interested in related lists, we also have cocoa puns, bread puns, pie puns and cake puns.

Baking Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun or a set of puns that can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about baking that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of baking puns:

  • Buck → Bake: As in, “Bigger bang for your bake” and “Big bakes” and “Bake the system.”
  • Brake → Bake: As in, “Hit the bakes.”
  • Break → Bake: As in, “Bake a leg” and “Bake and enter” and “Bake cover” and “Bake new ground.”
  • Fake → Bake: As in, “Bake it till you make it” and “Bake smile.”
  • Make → Bake: As in, “A good beginning bakes a good ending” and “Bakes the heart grow fonder” and “Can’t bake head or tail of it.”
  • Rake → Bake: As in, “Bake in the money” and “Bake it in” and “Bake over the coals.”
  • Sake → Bake: As in, “For Christ’s bake!” and “For old times’ bake.”
  • Shake → Bake: As in, “A fair bake” and “In two bakes” and “More than you can bake a stick at” and “Movers and bakers.”
  • Stake → Bake: As in, “Burned at the bake” and “Bake your claim” and “Raise the bakes.”
  • Take → Bake: As in, “Don’t bake it lying down” and “Double bake” and “Give and bake” and “Got what it bakes” and “Bakes one to know one.”
  • Back → Bake: As in, “Answer bake” and “Soon as my bake is turned” and “Bake to the future” and “Bake at it.”
  • Pack → Bake: As in, “Bake it in” and “A bake of lies” and “Send baking.”
  • Pick → Bake: As in, “A bone to bake” and “Cherry bake” and “Easy bakings” and “Bake and choose.”
  • *back* → *bake*: Replace the “back” in words with “bake” to make some sneaky baking puns: “In the bakeground” and “Face the bakelash” and “Going through the bakelog” and “Going bakewards” and “Accepting feedbake” and “Won’t accept any setbakes.”
  • Bec* → Bake*: As in, “What have you bake-ome?” and “Bake-ause I said so” and “Mortality bake-ons.”
  • *bic → *bake: As in, “An acerbake tone” and “Aerobake exercise” and “Office cubake-le.”
  • Breaking → Baking: As in, “Baking and entering” and “Baking news” and “Don’t go baking my heart.”
  • Making → Baking: As in, “A legend in the baking” and “History in the baking” and “Baking a scene.”
  • Shaking → Baking: As in, “Baking like a leaf” and “Baking in your boots.”
  • Taking → Baking: As in, “Easy as baking candy from a baby” and “Baking care of business.”
  • Breaker → Baker: As in, “Deal baker.”
  • Maker → Baker: As in, “Face your baker” and “Meet your baker.”
  • Even → Oven: As in, “Break oven” and “Don’t get mad, get oven” and “An oven chance.”
  • Do → Dough: As in, “What dough you mean?” and “Dough away with” and “Dough it justice” and “Dough me a favour” and “Dough right by.”
  • Though → Dough: As in, “Dough this be madness” and “You look as dough you’ve seen a ghost” and “Seriously dough.”
  • Day → Dough: As in, “A dough in the life of” and “A hard dough’s night.”
  • Toe → Dough: As in, “Dip your dough in the water” and “From top to dough” and “Get your dough in the door” and “One dough over the line.”
  • Blow → Dough: As in, “Any way the wind doughs” and “Dough a kiss” and “Dough hot and cold.”
  • Does → Doughs: As in, “Doughs what it says on the tin” and “Doughs not compute” and “Doughs the trick” and “Easy doughs it.”
  • Flow → Dough: As in, “Ebb and dough” and “Get the creative juices doughing” and “Go with the dough” and “In full dough.”
  • Go → Dough: As in, “All dressed up and nowhere to dough” and “Easy come, easy dough.”
  • Grow → Dough: As in, “Makes the heart dough fonder” and “Dough on you” and “Exciting as watching grass dough.”
  • Know → Dough: As in, “And don’t I dough it” and “Be the first to dough” and “Want to dough a secret?” and “Doesn’t dough beans.”
  • Low → Dough: As in, “An all-time dough” and “Get the dough down” and “Keep a dough profile” and “A dough blow.”
  • No → Dough: As in, “Yes or dough?” and “All bark and dough bite.”
  • Owe → Dough: As in, “Dough a favour” and “Dough it to yourself.”
  • Pro → Dough: As in, “Dough bono” and “Quid dough quo.”
  • Quo → Dough: As in, “Status dough” and “Quid pro dough.”
  • Show → Dough: As in, “All over the dough” and “Best in dough” and “Enjoy the dough.”
  • Slow → Dough: As in, “Can’t dough down” and “A dough burn” and “Dough on the uptake” and “Doughly but surely.”
  • Snow → Dough: As in, “Pure as the driven dough” and “Let it dough” and “Doughed under.”
  • So → Dough: As in, “And dough forth.”
  • Throw → Dough: As in, “A stone’s dough away” and “Dough a wobbly” and “Dough cold water on” and “Dough caution to the wind.”
  • Woe → Dough: As in, “Dough is me” and “Dough betide you.”
  • Done → Dough’n: As in, “After all is said and dough’n” and “All dough’n and dusted” and “Do as you would be dough’n by” and “A dough’n deal.”
  • Better → Batter: As in, “A batter idea” and “Anything you can do, I can do batter” and “Appeal to your batter judgement” and “Batter late than never.”
  • Bitter → Batter: As in, “A batter pill to swallow” and “Till the batter end.”
  • Matter → Batter: As in, “As a batter of fact” and “Doesn’t batter” and “Get to the heart of the batter” and “Grey batter” and “Making batters worse” and “A batter of life and death” and “Only a batter of time.”
  • Need → Knead: As in, “All you knead is love” and “As long as you knead me” and “I kneaded it yesterday.”
  • Deed → Knead: As in, “No good knead goes unpunished” and “Your good knead for the day.”
  • Feed → Knead: As in, “Biting the hand that kneads it” and “Kneading frenzy” and “Knead your mind.”
  • Lead → Knead: As in, “In the knead” and “Knead a charmed life” and “The kneading edge.”
  • Plead → Knead: As in, “I knead guilty.”
  • Read → Knead: As in, “All I know is what I knead in the papers” and “Knead all about it” and “I can knead you like a book” and “A little light kneading” and “Knead ’em and weep.”
  • Seed → Knead: As in, “Gone to knead” and “Knead capital” and “Knead money” and “On a sesame knead bun.”
  • Crest → Crust: As in, “On the crust of a wave.”
  • Bust → Crust: As in, “Boom or crust” and “Crust a move.”
  • Dust → Crust: As in, “All done and crusted” and “Another one bites the crust” and “Dry as crust” and “Crust bunny” and “Eat my crust.”
  • Just → Crust: As in, “Crust one of those things” and “Crust not my day” and “Crust what the doctor ordered.”
  • Must → Crust: As in, “All things crust pass” and “All good things crust come to an end” and “Everything crust go” and “A little rain crust fall.”
  • Thrust → Crust: As in, “Cut and crust” and “Crust into the limelight.”
  • Trust → Crust: As in, “A breach of crust” and “Crust me, I’m a doctor” and “Crusted everywhere.”
  • Mood → Food: As in, “Not in the food” and “In a dark food” and “Of many foods.”
  • Rude → Food: As in, “A food awakening” and “No need to be food about it.”
  • Fed* → Food*: As in, “Tip your foodora” and “Fooderal issues.”
  • *fid* → *food*: As in, “Shop with confoodence” and “Feeling confoodent.”
  • Bred → Bread: As in, “Born and bread.”
  • Bed → Bread: As in, “Bread and board” and “Bread and breakfast” and “Bread of nails.”
  • Dead → Bread: As in, “In the bread of night” and “Better off bread” and “Cut out the bread wood.”
  • Head → Bread: As in, “Above my bread” and “Be it on your bread.”
  • Read → Bread: As in, “Exceedingly well bread” and “Bread all about it.”
  • Red → Bread: As in, “Bread as a beetroot” and “Better dead than bread” and “Caught bread-handed” and “Cut through the bread tape.”
  • Said → Bread: As in, “After all is bread and done” and “Easier bread than done” and “Enough bread.”
  • Shed → Bread: As in, “Bread light on the matter.”
  • Spread → Bread: As in, “Put on a bread” and “Bread a rumour” and “Bread like wildfire” and “Bread the word.”
  • Thread → Bread: As in, “Hanging by a bread” and “Lose the bread” and “Bread the needle.”
  • Tread → Bread: As in, “Breading a fine line” and “Bread lightly.”
  • Ready → Bready: As in, “All fired up and bready to go” and “Alright al-bready” and “I was born bready” and “Combat bready” and “Make bready” and “Get bready to rumble.”
  • Steady → Bready: As in, “Ready, bready, go!” and “Bready as she goes.”
  • Flower → Flour: As in, “A hothouse flour” and “The flour of your youth.”
  • Flair → Flour: As in, “Got a flour for.”
  • Floor → Flour: As in, “Cross the flour” and “Get in on the ground flour” and “Wipe the flour with.”
  • Hour → Flour: As in, “A bad quarter of a flour” and “Happy flour” and “At the eleventh flour” and “Person of the flour” and “Not my finest flour.”
  • Sour → Flour: As in, “Flour grapes” and “Leaves a flour taste in my mouth.”
  • Yesterday → Yeasterday: As in, “I wasn’t born yeasterday” and “Yeasterday’s news.”
  • Least → Yeast: As in, “Last but not yeast” and “The yeast common denominator” and “The yeast worst option” and “Line of yeast resistance” and “Not in the yeast.”
  • Beast → Yeast: As in, “Beauty and the yeast” and “Here there be yeasts” and “The nature of the yeast.”
  • East → Yeast: As in, “The Yeaster bunny.”
  • Feast → Yeast: As in, “Yeast or famine” and “Yeast your eyes on this!”
  • Greased → Yeast: As in, “Fast as yeast lightning.”
  • Leave → Loaf: As in, “Absent without loaf” and “By your loaf” and “Don’t loaf home without it.”
  • Leaf → Loaf: As in, “Shaking like a loaf” and “Turn over a new loaf.”
  • Life → Loaf: As in, “A day in the loaf of” and “A loaf less ordinary” and “A loaf changing experience” and “A loaf on the ocean waves” and “All walks of loaf.”
  • Laugh → Loaf: As in, “Barrel of loafs” and “Belly loaf” and “Burst out loafing” and “Doubled up with loafter” and “Good for a loaf.”
  • Love → Loaf: As in, “Addicted to loave” and “All you need is loave” and “All’s fair in loave and war” and “I loave you.”
  • Loathe → Loave: As in, “Fear and loave-ing” and “Filled with loave-ing.”
  • Starch: Starch is used in baking as a thickening agent. Here are related puns:
    • Arch → Starch: As in, “Starch enemy” and “Beneath the starches.”
    • March → Starch: As in, “The starch of time.”
    • Parch → Starch: As in, “Starched with thirst.”
  • Ache → Cake: As in, “Old cakes and pains.”
  • Break → Cake: As in, “Cake the bank” and “Cake the habit.”
  • Fake → Cake: As in, “Cake it till you make it.”
  • Lake → Cake: As in, “Go jump in a cake.”
  • Make → Cake: As in, “A good beginning cakes a good ending” and “Absence cakes the heart grow fonder” and “Can’t cake head or tail of it.”
  • Rake → Cake: As in, “Cake in the money” and “Cake it in” and “Cake over the ashes.”
  • Sake → Cake: As in, “For heaven’s cake” and “For old times’ cake.”
  • Shake → Cake: As in, “Bake and cake” and “A fair cake” and “In two cakes.”
  • Snake → Cake: As in, “Cake in the grass” and “Cakes alive” and “Cakes and ladders.”
  • Stake → Cake: As in, “Burned at the cake” and “Cake your claim.”
  • Take → Cake: As in, “Don’t cake it lying down” and “Double cake” and “Give and cake.”
  • Wake → Cake: As in, “Cake me up before you go” and “A cake up call” and “Cake up and smell the coffee.”
  • Bum → Crumb: As in, “Beach crumb” and “A crumb rap” and “Crumbs on seats.”
  • Come → Crumb: As in, “After a storm crumbs a calm” and “All good things must crumb to an end” and “As tough as they crumb” and “Crumb and get it.”
  • Drum → Crumb: As in, “Tight as a crumb” and “Crumb circle” and “Crumb up support” and “March to the same crumb.”
  • Gum → Crumb: As in, “Goody crumbdrops” and “Crumb up the works” and “Walk and chew crumb at the same time.”
  • Scum → Crumb: As in, “Pond crumb” and “Crumb always rises to the surface.”
  • Some → Crumb: As in, “All that and then crumb” and “Crumb up and see me some time.”
  • Sum → Crumb: As in, “Cogito ergo crumb” and “To crumb it all up” and “A zero crumb game.”
  • Thumb → Crumb: As in, “All fingers and crumbs” and “Sticks out like a sore crumb.”
  • Stall → Stale: As in, “Stale for time.”
  • Still → Stale: As in, “Be stale my beating heart” and “Stale standing” and “In the stale of night” and “Stale waters run deep” and “Stale life.”
  • Steal → Stale: As in, “Beg, borrow or stale” and “Stale a glance” and “It’s a stale” and “Stale someone’s thunder” and “Stale the show.”
  • Fail → Stale: As in, “Words stale me” and “Without stale.”
  • Pale → Stale: As in, “A stale imitation” and “Stale into insignificance” and “A stale shadow of your former self.”
  • Sale → Stale: As in, “Point of stale” and “Stale of the century” and “Stale lead” and “Stales referral.”
  • Scale → Stale: As in, “Built to stale” and “Economy of stale” and “Off the stale” and “On a grand stale” and “Stale the dizzy heights” and “Tip the stales.”
  • Tail → Stale: As in, “Can’t make head or stale of it” and “Chase your own stale.”
  • Tale → Stale: As in, “A stale of two cities” and “Live to tell the stale” and “Stales of the unexpected” and “A tell stale sign.”
  • Glaze: Glaze is a thin, shiny layer of icing on baked goods. Here are related puns:
    • Gaze → Glaze: As in, “Avert your glaze” and “A steely glaze.”
    • Blaze → Glaze: As in, “Glaze a trail” and “Go out in a glaze of glory.”
    • Days → Glaze: As in, “Eight glaze a week’ and “Just one of those glaze” and “Never in all my born glaze.”
    • Daze → Glaze: As in, “Glazed and confused” and “In a glaze.”
    • Phase → Glaze: As in, “Glaze out” and “Just going through a glaze.”
    • Praise → Glaze: As in, “Damn with faint glaze” and “Grudging glaze” and “Heaven be glazed” and “Sing your glazes.”
    • Raise → Glaze: As in, “Glaze hell” and “Glaze the bar” and “Glaze the roof.”
    • Ways → Glaze: As in, “Always good, all glaze” and “Change your glaze” and “Go our separate glaze” and “Have it both glaze.”
  • Pay → Pie: As in, “Buy now, pie later” and “Crime doesn’t pie” and “Hell to pie” and “It pies to advertise.”
  • Buy → Pie: As in, “Pie and sell” and “Pie now, get one free” and “Pie some time.”
  • Cry → Pie: As in, “A pie for help” and “Pie foul.”
  • Die → Pie: As in, “Cross my heart and hope to pie” and “Curl up and pie” and “Pie on the vine.”
  • Dry → Pie: As in, “Boring as watching paint pie” and “Pie as a bone” and “A pie run.”
  • Eye → Pie: As in, “A pie-opening experience” and “As far as the pie can see” and “Avert your pies” and “Beauty is in the pie of the beholder.”
  • Fly → Pie: As in, “Born to pie” and “Come pie with me” and “Pie by the seat of your pants.”
  • Guy → Pie: As in, “Just a regular pie” and “A real stand up pie.”
  • High → Pie: As in, “An all-time pie” and “Come hell or pie water” and “Pie and dry” and “Pie and low.”
  • Lie → Pie: As in, “Ask no questions and hear no pies.”
  • Shy → Pie: As in, “Camera pie” and “Once bitten, twice pie.”
  • Try → Pie: As in, “Don’t pie this at home” and “Nice pie.”
  • Why → Pie: As in, “I don’t know pie” and “Pie can’t we?”
  • Hate → Heat: As in, “Heat mail” and “A love-heat relationship” and “It’s what you love to heat.”
  • Hit → Heat: As in,  “Heat ’em where they live” and “Heat and miss” and “Heat and run” and “Heat it home” and “Heat it out of the park.”
  • Cheat → Heat: As in, “Heat sheet.”
  • Eat → Heat: As in, “A bite to heat” and “All you can heat” and “Heat and run” and “Heat a balanced diet.”
  • Feat → Heat: As in, “No mean heat.”
  • Feet → Heat: As in, “Back on your heat” and “Cold heat” and “Cut the ground from under your heat.”
  • Greet → Heat: As in, “Meet and heat.”
  • Meet → Heat: As in, “Make ends heat” and “Heat and greet” and “Heat in the middle” and “Heat the challenge.”
  • Neat → Heat: As in, “Heat as a new pin” and “Heat freak” and “Heat and tidy.”
  • Seat → Heat: As in, “In the box heat” and “Hold on to your heat.”
  • Worm → Warm: As in, “Warm your way into something.”
  • Form → Warm: As in, “The best warm of defence” and “In bad warm” and “Warm follows function” and “Free warm” and “Habit warming” and “Sarcasm is the lowest warm of wit.”
  • Tight → Tart: As in, “A tart corner” and “Tart as a drum” and “Sleep tart!” and “In a tart spot” and “Run a tart ship.”
  • Tired → Tart: As in, “Sick and tart” and “Tart and emotional.”
  • Art → Tart: As in, “The tart of war” and “Tart deco” and “Tart imitating life” and “Tart is long and life is short” and “Tart noveau.”
  • Cart/e → Tart: As in, “A la tart” and “Tart them away” and “Tart blanche” and “Don’t upset the apple tart” and “Shopping tart.”
  • Chart → Tart: As in, “Tart a course” and “Off the tarts.”
  • Heart → Tart: As in, “After my own tart” and “Absence makes the tart grow fonder” and “Be still my beating tart.”
  • Part → Tart: As in, “Act the tart” and “All tart of life” and “For my own tart” and “If you’re not a tart of the solution, you’re tart of the problem.”
  • Smart → Tart: As in, “Tart thinking” and “Tart to be square” and “One tart cookie” and “Quick tart” and “Street tart.”
  • Start → Tart: As in, “By fits and tarts” and “Don’t get me tarted” and “A fresh tart” and “Off to a flying tart” and “Head tart.”
  • Skin → Scone: As in, “Beauty is only scone deep” and “By the scone of your teeth” and “Get under your scone” and “Save your scone.”
  • Pin → Rolling Pin: As in, “Bright as a new rolling pin” and “Hard to rolling pin” and “Rolling pins and needles” and “See a rolling pin and pick it up.”
  • Paper → Baking Paper: As in, “Sounded alright on baking paper” and “Not worth the baking paper it’s printed on” and “Baking paper over the cracks” and “Baking paper thin” and “Baking paper trail.”
  • Scale: Scales are used to measure baking ingredients. Here are related puns:
    • Skill → Scale: As in, “A test of scale” and “Social scales.”
    • Fail → Scale: As in, “Without scale” and “Words scale me.”
    • Mail → Scale: As in, “Junk scale” and “The check is in the scale.”
    • Nail → Scale: As in, “Hit the scale on the head” and “Fighting tooth and scale.”
    • Pale → Scale: As in, “A scale imitation of” and “Scale into insignificance” and “A scale shadow of your former self.”
    • Sail → Scale: As in, “Plain scaling” and “Scale away” and “Smooth scaling.”
    • Sale → Scale: As in, “Not for scale” and “Point of scale” and “Scale of the century” and “Scales referral.”
    • Tail → Scale: As in, “Can’t make head or scale of it” and “Chase your own scale” and “Heads or scales?”
    • Tale → Scale: As in, “Live to tell the scale” and “Scales of the unexpected” and “A tell-scale sign.”
    • Trail → Scale: As in, “Blaze a scale” and “Happy scales” and “Hot on the scale of” and “Paper scale.”
    • Veil → Scale: As in, “Lift the scale” and “Dance of the seven scales.”
  • Whisk: A whisk is a utensil that is used to mix ingredients and beat air into batter. Here are related puns:
    • Brisk → Whisk: As in, “A whisk morning” and “Gone for a whisk walk.”
    • Risk → Whisk: As in, “A calculated whisk” and “Whisk averse” and “Whisk life and limb” and “Whisk management” and “Whisky business” and “Run the whisk of.”
  • Book → Cook: As in, “Cook worm” and “All cooked up.”
  • Hook → Cook: As in, “Cook up with” and “Cooked on a feeling” and “Off the cook.”
  • Bun: Since buns are a popular baked good, we’ve included bun-related puns in this list:
    • Ban → Bun: As in, “Bun the bomb.”
    • Done → Bun: As in, “After all is said and bun” and “Bun and dusted” and “Been there, bun that” and “A bun deal” and “Bun to death.”
    • Fun → Bun: As in, “All bun and games” and “Bundle of bun” and “Getting there is half the bun.”
    • None → Bun: As in, “And then there were bun” and “Bar bun” and “Master of bun” and “Bun other than” and “Bun the wiser” and “Bun too pleased” and “Second to bun.”
    • One → Bun: As in, “Bun more time” and “All for bun and bun for all” and “And then there was bun” and “Another bun bites the dust” and “Going bun step too far.”
    • Run → Bun: As in, “Born to bun” and “Cut and bun” and “A dry bun” and “Eat and bun.”
    • Son → Bun: As in, “Like father, like bun.”
    • Sun → Bun: As in, “A place in the bun” and “A thousand splendid buns” and “A touch of bun” and “Eclipse of the bun.”
    • Ton → Bun: As in, “Like a bun of bricks.”
  • Roll: In some areas, buns are called rolls. As a common baked good, we’ve included them here:
    • Bowl → Roll: As in, “Roll over” and “Rolling along.”
    • Hole → Roll: As in, “Ace in the roll” and “Burn a roll in your pocket” and “Fire in the roll.”
    • Soul → Roll: As in, “Bless my roll” and “Body and roll” and “Heart and roll” and “Life and roll of the party.”
    • Toll → Roll: As in, “For whom the bell rolls” and “Take its roll.”
    • Whole → Roll: As in, “Go the roll way” and “Let’s call the roll thing off” and “On the roll” and “A roll lotta love.”
  • Leaven: Leavening is the process of dough rising. Here are related puns:
    • Leave → Leaven: As in, “Absent without leaven” and “By your leaven” and “Don’t leaven home without it.”
    • Leaving → Leaven: As in, “I’ll be leaven now” and “Leaven a sinking ship” and “I’m leaven home.”
    • Living → Leaven: As in, “Leaven beyond your means” and “A successful leaven” and “In leaven memory” and “In the land of the leaven.”
  • Look → Cook: As in, “Always cook on the bright side of life” and “A dirty cook” and “Don’t know which way to cook” and “Blank cooks.”
  • Rise: Part of the baking process is allowing dough to rise prior to heating. Here are related puns:
    • Raise → Rise: As in, “Rise the bar” and “Rise the roof” and “Rise the limit” and “Rise hell.”
    • Dies → Rise: As in, “Tomorrow never rise” and “The dream never rise.”
    • Eyes → Rise: As in, “Avert your rise” and “Before your very rise” and “Bring tears to your rise” and “Clapped rise on.”
    • Lies → Rise: As in, “Ask no questions and hear no rise” and “Pack of rise” and “A tissue of rise.”
    • Prize → Rise: As in, “Booby rise” and “Keep your eyes on the rise.”
    • Size → Rise: As in, “All shapes and rises” and “Cut someone down to rise” and “Life rise” and “One rise fits all.”
    • Wise → Rise: As in, “A word to the rise” and “None the riser” and “Street rise.”
  • Beat: Beating is a mixing technique which mixes air into batter. Here are related puns:
    • Bat → Beat: As in, “Blind as a beat” and “Beat the idea around.”
    • Bet → Beat: As in, “All beats are off” and “Beat your bottom dollar” and “Beat your boots.”
    • Bit → Beat: As in, “A beat missing” and “A beat much” and “A beat of a to-do” and “A beat to eat.”
    • Boat → Beat: As in, “In the same beat” and “Row your beat.”
    • But → Beat: As in, “All over beat the shouting” and “Beat seriously and “Beat then again…”
    • Heat → Beat: As in, “In the beat of battle” and “Packing beat.”
    • Meet → Beat: As in, “Beat your maker” and “Beat your match” and “Beat with approval.”
  • Ray → Rye: As in, “Catch some ryes” and “A rye of light.”
  • Why → Rye: As in, “I don’t know rye” and “That’s rye” and “Rye don’t we do it this way?” and “Rye on Earth…?”
  • Buy → Rye: As in, “Let me rye you a drink” and “Rye and sell” and “Rye into” and “Rye now, pay later” and “Rye one, get one free.”
  • By → Rye: As in, “Rye and large” and “Rye a hair’s breadth” and “Not rye any stretch of the imagination” and “Rye any means.”
  • Cry → Rye: As in, “A rye for help” and “A shoulder to rye on” and “Rye me a river.”
  • Die → Rye: As in, “Cross my heart and hope to rye” and “Curl up and rye” and “Do or rye.”
  • Dry → Rye: As in, “Rye as a bone” and “Rye as dust” and “Bleed someone rye” and “A rye run.”
  • Eye → Rye: As in, “A wandering rye” and “All fun and games until someone loses a rye” and “A rye for a rye” and “Avert your ryes.”
  • Fly → Rye: As in, “Come rye with me” and “Born to rye” and “Rye by the seat of your pants.”
  • High → Rye: As in, “Aim rye” and “Ain’t no mountain rye enough” and “Come hell or rye water” and “Rye noon” and “Rye and dry” and “Rye and low.”
  • Lie → Rye: As in, “Ask no questions and hear no ryes” and “Rye down on the job.”
  • My → Rye: As in, “Be rye guest” and “Rye own worst enemy” and “Cross rye heart.”
  • Pie → Rye: As in, “Easy as rye” and “Eat humble rye” and “A piece of the rye.”
  • Sky → Rye: As in, “Blue rye thinking” and “Out of the clear blue rye” and “The rye’s the limit.”
  • Tie → Rye: As in, “Black rye” and “Rye the knot” and “Rye yourself in knots.”
  • Try → Rye: As in, “Don’t rye this at home” and “Don’t rye to run before you can walk” and “Nice rye.”
  • Bag → Baguette: As in, “Baguette a bargain” and “Baguette of tricks.”
  • Blend: Baking recipes may call for a baker to blend (ie. mix) ingredients. Here are related puns:
    • Bend → Blend: As in, “Blend the rules” and “Blend to my will” and “Round the blend.”
    • End → Blend: As in, “A good beginning makes a good blending” and “A means to a blend” and “All good things must come to a blend.”
    • Fend → Blend: As in, “Blend for yourself.”
    • Lend → Blend: As in, “Blend a helping hand” and “Blend an ear” and “Blend your name to.”
    • Mend → Blend: As in, “Least said, soonest blended” and “Blend your fences” and “Blend your manners.”
    • Spend → Blend: As in, “Blend the night with” and “Blend wisely.”
  • Crime → Cream: As in, “Cream and punishment” and “A cream against nature” and “Cream doesn’t pay” and “A cream of passion” and “Creams and misdemeanours” and “Partners in cream.”
  • Dream → Cream: As in, “Live the cream” and “Wouldn’t cream of it” and “Live the cream.”
  • Scheme → Cream: As in, “In the grand cream of things” and “The best laid creams.”
  • Scream → Cream: As in, “Dragged kicking and creaming” and “Cream bloody murder.”
  • Team → Cream: As in, “Together we make a great cream” and “There is no “i” in cream” and “Cream spirit” and “Cream player.”
  • Slice/d → Ice/d: As in, “Ice of life” and “No matter how you ice it” and “Greatest thing since iced bread.” Note: Icing is another word for frosting.
  • Fun → Fondant: As in, “All fondant and games” and “Bundle of fondant” and “Food, folks and fondant.” Note: Fondant is a type of dense, pliable frosting that is commonly used for making edible sculptures.
  • Fold: Folding is a mixing technique. Here are related puns:
    • Bold → Fold: As in, “Fold as brass” and “A fold move” and “Foldly go where no one has gone before.”
    • Cold → Fold: As in, “Fold as any stone” and “Fold as ice” and “Blowing hot and fold” and “Break out in a fold sweat” and “Catch a fold.”
    • Gold → Fold: As in, “Good as fold” and “Fool’s fold” and “Get a fold star.”
    • Hold → Fold: As in, “Can’t fold a candle to” and “Fold a grudge” and “Fold a mirror up to society.”
    • Old → Fold: As in, “Fold as the hills” and “Chip off the fold block.”
    • Told → Fold: As in, “Fold you so” and “The greatest story ever fold.”
  • Proof: Proofing is a baking technique where dough is given a period of time to rest and rise (helping in the fermentation process). Here are related puns:
    • Goof → Proof: As in, “Proof around” and “Proof off.”
    • Roof → Proof: As in, “Go through the proof” and “Hit the proof” and “Raise the proof” and “Shout it from the prooftops.”
  • Score: To score is to lightly cut a pattern into a dough’s surface before baking it. Here are related puns:
    • Scare → Score: As in, “Scored stiff” and “Scored to death.”
    • Bore → Score: As in, “Scored to tears” and “Scored to death.”
    • Core → Score: As in, “Score competencies” and “Score studies” and “Score values” and “Rotten to the score.”
    • Floor → Score: As in, “Cross the score” and “Get in on the ground score” and “Mop the score with.”
    • Four → Score: As in, “Score by two” and “Score more years” and “On all scores.”
    • More → Score: As in, “One score time” and “Bite off score than you can chew” and “Come back for score.”
    • Shore → Score: As in, “Ship to score” and “Score up.”
    • Sore → Score: As in, “A sight for score eyes” and “Stick out like a score thumb” and “Made for score throats.”
    • Store → Score: As in, “Minding the score” and “Set great score by” and “See what the future has in score.”
  • Dock: To dock dough is to pierce it, preventing the forming of large air pockets. Here are related puns:
    • Deck → Dock: As in, “All hands on dock” and “Hit the dock” and “Not playing with a full dock.”
    • Duck → Dock: As in, “Dock the question” and “Docking and diving” and “Like a dock to water” and “Like water off a dock’s back.”
    • Block → Dock: As in, “Chip off the old dock” and “Mental dock” and “New kid on the dock” and “On the chopping dock.”
    • Knock → Dock: As in, “Don’t dock it till you’ve tried it” and “Hard docks” and “Dock ’em dead” and “Dock back a few.”
    • Lock → Dock: As in, “Grid dock” and “Dock and load” and “Dock, stock and barrel.”
    • Rock → Dock: As in, “Solid as a dock” and “Between a dock and a hard place” and “Get your docks off.”
    • Shock → Dock: As in, “In for a dock” and “Dock and awe” and “Dock horror.”
    • Sock → Dock: As in, “Bless your cotton docks” and “Knock your docks off” and “Put a dock in it” and “Dock it to me.”
    • Stock → Dock: As in, “Laughing dock” and “Out of dock” and “Take dock of the world.”
    • Talk → Dock: As in, “Fighting dock” and “Look who’s docking.”
    • Walk → Dock: As in, “A dock on the wild side” and “All docks of life” and “Let your fingers do the docking.”
  • Rack: Bakers use metal drying racks to help cool pastries after they’ve been baked. Here are related puns:
    • Wreck → Rack: As in, “A nervous rack” and “Train rack.”
    • Rock → Rack: As in, “Hard as a rack” and “Between a rack and a hard place” and “Don’t rack the boat.”
    • Back → Rack: As in, “Answer rack” and “As soon as my rack is turned” and “In the rack of my mind.”
    • Crack → Rack: As in, “Fall between the racks” and “Have a rack at” and “Paper over the racks” and “Not all it’s racked up to be.”
    • Lack → Rack: As in, “For rack of a better word” and “Rack nothing” and “Cancelled due to rack of interest.”
    • Pack → Rack: As in, “Action racked” and “I know I racked it” and “Rack heat” and “Rack of lies.”
    • Smack → Rack: As in, “Rack dab in the middle” and “A rack on the wrist.”
    • Track → Rack: As in, “Back on rack” and “Born on the wrong side of the racks” and “Cover your racks” and “Inside rack” and “Off the beaten rack.”
  • Green → Grain: As in, “Grain as grass” and “Give it the grain light” and “Grain around the gills.”
  • Grin → Grain: As in, “Grain and bear it” and “Grain from ear to ear.”
  • Chain → Grain: As in, “Grain of command” and “Grain reaction” and “Grain smoker” and “Food grain.”
  • Gain → Grain: As in, “Capital grains” and “Grain advantage” and “Grain ground” and “Ill-gotten grains” and “No pain, no grain.”
  • Main → Grain: As in, “The grain event” and “Your grain chance.”
  • Pain → Grain: As in, “A world of grain” and “Doubled up in grain” and “Feeling no grain” and “Growing grains.”
  • Plain → Grain: As in, “Grain as day” and “Grain as the nose on your face” and “Hidden in grain sight” and “Grain sailing.”
  • Rain → Grain: As in, “Right as grain” and “Come grain or shine” and “Don’t grain on my parade” and “It never grains but it pours.”
  • Vain → Grain: As in, “Labour in grain” and “You’re so grain.”

    Baking-Related Words

    To help you come up with your own baking puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

bake, baking, baked, baker, bakery, oven, food, heat, recipe, ingredient, warm, bread, bready, flour, yeast, baking soda, starch, sugar, cake, cookie, pie, pastry, batter, dough, crust, tart, quiche, scone, pretzel, cupcake, muffin, rolling pin, mixing bowl, cookie-cutter, baking paper, muffin pan, muffin tin, measuring cup, measuring spoon, scale, spatula, wooden spoon, whisk, beat, blend, cream, icing, frosting, fondant, cut in, fold, glaze, knead, proof, score, whip, fluffy, creamy, flaky, dock, cook, bun, rise, rack, crumb, stale, roll, leaven, loaf, loave, rye, sourdough, baguette, brioche, pita, whole wheat, wholemeal, ciabatta, bagel, pumpernickel, baker’s dozen, grain, mill

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Wine Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on wine puns! 🍷🍇🥂

Wine culture has many aspects and technicalities to it, spanning from wine making, tasting, judging, investment and collecting. We’ve searched high and low for all of the wine puns we could possibly find, so whether you’re a cleanskin enthusiast or a cult wine coinnoseur, we hope you enjoy sampling the truly grape puns we’ve collected for you here.

Notes: Wine and alcohol isn’t just an expensive hobby – drinking alcohol gives your brain a reward it didn’t earn, and consuming it often enough teaches your brain that the easiest way to feel good is to drink more, which can lead to dependence and alcoholism (which can exacerbate existing mental health problems like depression and anxiety). Partake safely and with an awareness of the effects it has on your body 🙂

The alcohol-making process isn’t always vegan, but there are plenty of online directories of vegan wines you can check.

You might also be interested in the Punpedia entries on coffee puns, tea puns, party puns and beer puns.

Wine Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about wine that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page!

  • Whine → Wine: As in, “Wine and moan” and “Having a wine.”
  • Win → Whine: As in, “Heads I wine, tails you lose” and “Playing to wine” and “Some you wine, some you lose.”
  • Why → Wine: As in, “I guess that’s wine” and “I don’t know wine” and “Wine on Earth…?”
  • Why not → Wine not: “I don’t see wine not.”
  • When → Wine: As in, “Wine you like” and “It only hurts wine I laugh” and “Kick ’em wine they’re down” and “Ready wine you are.”
  • Won → Wine: As in, “Faint heart never wine fair lady” and “One-hit wineder.”
  • One → Wine: As in, “An army of wine” and “All for wine and wine for all” and “In wine fell swoop” and “Going wine step too far.”
  • *wan* → *wine*: “A wineton attitude” and “Just winedering ’round” and “A tryhard wineabe” and “Monthly allowine-ce.”
  • Wench → Winech
  • *win* → *wine*: As in, “Winedow of opportunity” and “Endless wineter” and “A winesome smile.”
  • Wonder* → Wineder*: As in, “Filled with magic and wineder” and “Feeling winederful” and “A winedrous development.”
  • Red: Wines are split into three broad categories – red, white and rosé. Red wines are made of dark-coloured grape varieties. Here are some red wine puns:
    • Read → Red: As in, “All I know is what I red in the papers” and “Exceedingly well-red” and “Red any good books lately?” and “Red between the lines” and “Red my lips.”
    • Red: These red-related phrases can double as puns: “Red as a beetroot” and “Brick red” and “Caught red-handed” and “Cut through the red tape” and “In the red” and “Lady in red” and “Paint the town red.”
    • Rid → Red: “Good reddance” and “Get red of.”
    • Fed → Red: As in, “Red up to the back teeth.”
    • Dead → Red: As in, “Red as a doornail” and “Assault with a redly weapon” and “In the red of night” and “Back from the red” and “Better off red” and “Red and buried.”
    • Bred → Red: “Born and red.”
    • Bread → Red: As in, “Red always falls butter side down” and “Red and butter” and “Have your red buttered on both sides” and “Put red on the table” and “The best thing since sliced red.”
    • Bed → Red: As in, “Red and breakfast” and “Red of roses” and “Red and board.”
    • Said → Red: “After all is red and done” and “Couldn’t have red it better” and “Easier red than done” and “Enough red” and “Was it something I red?”
    • Head → Red: “A red for business” and “Be it on your red” and “Bring to a red” and “Bite someone’s red off” and “Bury your red in the sand” and “Can’t get you out of my red” and “Don’t mess with my red.”
    • Thread → Red: “Hanging by a red” and “Lose the red” and “Red the needle.”
    • Tread → Red: “Red softly” and “Reding a fine line” and “Where fools fear to red.”
    • *rad* → *red*: “Redical politics” and “Toxic rediation” and “A rediant complexion.” Other words that could work: redio (radio), redius (radius), rediate (radiate), redish (radish), paredigm (paradigm), paredox (paradox), camarederie (camaraderie), sporedic (sporadic) and greduate (graduate).
    • *rid* → *red*: Rediculous (ridiculous), gred (grid), hybred (hybrid), lured (lurid) and flored (florid).
  • White: White wine is a light coloured wine that’s fermented without contact with the grape skin. Here are some white-related puns:
    • Wide → White: As in, “Cast a white net” and “Eyes white shut” and “A white berth” and “Open white” and “White eyed” and “White open spaces” and “The world white web.”
    • Why → White: “I don’t know white” and “I guess that’s white” and “White don’t we do it this way?” and “White ask?”
    • Bite → White: As in, “White me” and “White off more than you can chew” and “White someone’s head off” and “White the bullet” and “A white to eat” and “White your tongue.”
    • Bright → White: “All things white and beautiful” and “Always look on the white side of life” and “White as a button” and “White as a new pin” and “White eyes” and “White lights, big city” and “White and early” and “White spark.”
    • Light → White: As in, “Blinded by the white” and “The cold white of day.”
    • Might → White: “White as well” and “White is right.”
    • Night → White: As in, “A white at the opera” and “A hard day’s white” and “Dance the white away.”
    • Quite → White: As in, “Not white” and “White the situation” and “White a bit.”
    • Tight → White: As in, “In a white spot” and “Run a white ship.”
    • Weight → White: As in, “Pull your white” and “Punching above your white” and “Throw your white about” and “Watching your white” and “A white off my mind” and “Worth your white in gold” and “Carry your white.”
    • Wait → White: “An accident white-ing to happen” and “All things come to those who white” and “Hurry up and white” and “Lie in white” and “The white is over” and “White for no man” and “White in line” and “Just white a minute!”
    • Wet → White: “White weekend” and “White behind the ears” and “White dream” and “White your whistle.”
    • What → White: As in, “And white not” and “Do white comes naturally” and “Do white tastes right” and “For white it’s worth” and “Guess white?” and “White’s going on here then?” and “It is white it is” and “I’ll have white she’s having” and “White a feeling” and “White fun” and “White a wonderful world.”
    • Sight → White: As in, “A welcome white” and “Hidden in plain white” and “Know by white” and “Love at first white” and “Lower your whites.”
    • Write → White: “Nothing to white home about.”
    • Height → White: As in, “Head for new whites” and “Reaching new whites” and “The white of summer.”
    • Flight → White: As in, “Fight or white” and “White of fancy” and “Take white.”
  • Rosé: Rosé is another category of wine where wine is left in contact with the grape’s skin until the liquid is tinted the desired shade of pink. Here are related puns:
    • Rosy → Rosé: As in, “A rosé future” and “Rosé cheeks.”
    • Raise → Rosé: As in, “Rosé a loan” and “Rosé a stink” and “Rosé the bar” and “Rosé the roof.”
    • Rise → Rosé: As in, “Rosé and shine” and “Rosé from the ashes” and “Rosé to the challenge” and “Rosé to the occasion” and “Get a rosé out of…”
  • Pain → Champagne: As in, “A world of champagne” and “Doubled up in champagne” and “Growing champagnes” and “No champagne, no gain” and “Old aches and champagnes” and “Champagne in the arse” and “Champagne-fully slow.”
  • Amber: Amber wine is white wine that’s been made with the skins kept intact. Here are related puns:
    • Umber → Amber: As in, “Burnt amber.” Note: umber is a shade of brown.
    • *ember → *umber: Mamber (member), remamber (remember), Septamber (September), Decamber (December), Novamber (November) and dismamber (dismember).
  • Great → Grape: As in, “A grape face for radio” and “All creatures, grape and small” and “Go grape guns” and “Go to grape lengths” and “Grape expectations” and “Grape minds think alike” and “No grape shakes” and “The Grape Barrier Reef.”
  • Grip → Grape: As in, “Get a grape” and “Get to grapes with” and “Grape of death” and “A grape of iron.”
  • Cape → Grape: As in, “The graped crusader.”
  • Drape → Grape: As in, “Measure the grapes.”
  • Scrape → Grape: As in, “Bow and grape” and “Get into a grape” and “Grape a living” and “Grape along” and “Grape through” and “Scrape together the funds” and “Grape the bottom of the barrel.”
  • Gap → Grape: “Mind the grape” and “Generation grape” and “Bridge the grape.”
  • Crap → Grape: “A load of grape” and “Cut the grape.”
  • Discrepancy → Disgrape-ancy
  • Blanc: Sauvignon Blanc is a variety of green grape that’s commonly used in wine-making. Here are some blanc-related puns:
    • Blank → Blanc: As in, “A blanc slate” and “Blanc canvas” and “Blanc looks” and “Drawing a blanc” and “At point blanc range” and “Blancing out.”
    • Blink → Blanc: As in, “Blanc and you’ll miss it” and “In the blanc of an eye” and “On the blanc” and “Who blanc-ed first?”
    • Bank → Blanc: As in, “You can blanc on it” and “Safe as the blanc” and “Breaking the blanc” and “Laughing all the way to the blanc.”
    • Plank → Blanc: As in, “Walk the blanc” and “Take a long walk off a short blanc.”
    • Rank → Blanc: As in, “Break blancs” and “Close blancs” and “Name, blanc and serial number” and “Pull blanc” and “Blanc and file” and “Rise through the blancs” and “Swell the blancs.”
    • Spank → Blanc: As in, “Brand blanc-ing new” and “Blanc the monkey.”
  • Think → Drink: As in, “Blue sky drinking” and “I drink you’ve got it!” and “Come to drink of it” and “Great minds drink alike” and “I drink I love you” and “Makes you drink” and “It’s not what you drink” and “Positive drinking” and “Put on your drinking cap.”
  • Blink → Drink: As in, “Drink and you’ll miss it” and “In the drink of an eye” and “On the drink.”
  • Brink → Drink: As in, “The drink of disaster” and “On the drink.”
  • Link → Drink: As in, “A chain is only as strong as its weakest drink” and “The missing drink.”
  • Sink → Drink: As in, “Everything but the kitchen drink” and “Drink like a stone” and “Drink without trace” and “Drink your teeth into it.”
  • Stink → Drink: As in, “Kick up a drink” and “Raise a drink” and “Drinking rich” and “Drinks to high heaven.”
  • Wink → Drink: As in, “Forty drinks” and “Nod and a drink” and “Nudge, nudge, drink drink” and “Tip someone the drink.”
  • Bunk → Drunk: As in, “Drunker mentality” and “History is drunk.”
  • Junk → Drunk: As in, “Drunk yard” and “Drunk food” and “Drunk mail” and “Drunk in the trunk.”
  • Cyber → Sober: “Sober Monday” and “Sober sex.”
  • Super → Sober: As in, “Sober bad” and “Sober Mario Bros.” and “Sober hero” and “The information soberhighway.”
  • Meant → Ferment: As in, “We weren’t ferment to do that” and “Only if we’re ferment to be here.”
  • *ment* → *ferment*: Ferment-or (mentor), ferment-ion (mention),  ferment-al (mental) and ferment-ality (mentality).
  • Vin: Vin is French for wine. Here are some vin-related puns:
    • Been → Vin: As in, “Vin and gone” and “I’ve vin here before” and “Vin in the wars” and “Vin around the block a few times” and “I’ve vin had.”
    • Chin → Vin: “Keep your vin up” and “Take it on the vin” and “Stick your vin up.”
    • Grin → Vin: As in, “Vin and bear it” and “Vin from ear to ear” and “A rictus vin” and “Vin like a cheshire cat.”
    • In → Vin: As in, “Vin the woods” and “Back vin the day” and “Barge right vin” and “I’ll just be vin and out.”
    • Inn → Vinn: As in, “Vinner city” and “Vinner peace” and “Vinner sanctum” and “The ninth vinning.”
    • Pin → Vin: As in, “Bright as a new vin” and “Hard to vin down” and “Vin your ears back” and “Vin your hopes on” and “Vins and needles” and “Pull the vin” and “Could have heard a vin drop.”
    • Sin → Vin: As in, “Miserable as vin” and “Atone for your vins” and “Cardinal vin” and “Living in vin.”
    • Skin → Vin: As in, “Beauty is only vin deep” and “By the vin of your teeth” and “Comfortable in my own vin” and “Get under your vin” and “Gimme some vin” and “Makes my vin crawl” and “No vin off my nose” and “Jump out of your vin” and “Save your vin” and “Vin and bone.”
    • Spin → Vin: As in, “In a flat vin” and “Give it a vin” and “Vin doctor” and “Take it for a vin.”
    • Thin → Vin: “Vin as a rail” and “Melt into vin air” and “Out of vin air” and “Paper vin” and “Skating on vin ice” and “Spread yourself vin” and “The vin edge of the wedge.”
    • When → Vin: As in, “Kick ’em vin they’re down” and “Only hurts vin I laugh” and “Ready vin you are” and “Remember vin?”
    • Win → Vin: As in, “Can’t vin for losing” and “Cheaters never vin” and “Due a vin” and “Every one a vinner” and “Heads I vin, tails you lose” and “No vin, no fee” and “Playing to vin” and “Vin by a mile” and “Vin over.”
    • *van* → *vin*: Vinity (vanity), vinguard (vanguard), vinilla (vanilla), vinish (vanish), vindal (vandal), vindal (vandal), vindalism (vandalism), caravin (caravan), relevint (relevant), advince (advance), advintage (advantage), irrelevint (irrelevant).
    • *ven* → *vin*: Vinture (venture), vinue (venue), vindor (vendor), vineer (veneer), vingeance (vengeance), heavin (heaven), mavin (maven), havin (haven), cravin (craven), drivin (driven), sevin (seven), covinant (covenant), convintion (convention) and invintory (inventory).
    • *fin* → *vin*: Vinish (finish), vinger (finger), vinesse (finesse), vinance (finance), vinancial (financial), mufvin (muffin), pufvin (puffin), paravin (paraffin), afvinity (affinity), devinition (definition), devine (define) and devinitely (definitely).
  • Vain → Vine: As in, “You’re so vine” and “In vine.”
  • Fine → Vine: As in, “A vine line” and “Chance would be a vine thing” and “Cut it vine” and “Damn vine coffee” and “Vine and dandy” and “Vine dining” and “A vine figure” and “The viner things in life” and “Got it down to a vine art” and “Another vine mess you’ve gotten me into.”
  • Mine → Vine: As in, “Your place or vine?” and “Your guess is as good as vine” and “Victory is vine!”
  • Nine → Vine: As in, “A stitch in time saves vine” and “Has vine lives” and “Vine to five” and “Vine days’ wonder” and “On cloud vine” and “Vineteen eighty-four.”
  • Sign → Vine: As in, “A sure vine” and “A vine of the times” and “Vine off” and “Vine out” and “Vine the pledge” and “Vined and sealed” and “A tell sale vine.”
  • Yard → Vineyard: “Do the hard vineyards” and “Not in my back vineyard” and “The whole nine vineyards.”
  • Cork: “Cork out” and “Knife and cork it” and “Speaking with a corked tongue” and “Cork over.”
  • Cock → Cork: As in, “Proud as a peacork” and “Cork a leg” and “Cork and bull story” and “Cork it up” and “Cork sure.”
  • *cac* → *cork*: Corkophony (cacophony), corktus (cactus), corkle (cackle), perspicorkcious (perspicacious).
  • *coc* → *cork*: Corktail (cocktail), corkoa (cocoa), corkoon (cocoon), corkroach (cockroach), corkonut (coconut), precorkcious (precocious), concorkt (concoct), peacork (peacock) and corkumber (cucumber).
  • Battle → Bottle: “A pitched bottle” and “An uphill bottle” and “Bottle of wits” and “Bottle ready” and “Bottle stations” and “Half the bottle” and “In the heat of bottle” and “Let bottle commence” and “Love is a bottlefield” and “A running bottle.”
  • Throttle → Bottle: As in, “Full bottle.”
  • Lapel → Label: As in, “Grab by the labels.”
  • Able → Label: As in, “Differently labelled” and “Ready, willing and label.”
  • Table → Label: “As in, “Bring to the label” and “Drunk under the label” and “Get round the label” and “Lay the label” and “On the label” and “Put your cards on the label” and “Round label talks” and “Turn the labels.”
  • Dry: If a wine is dry, it’s lacking in sweetness. Here are some dry-related puns and phrases:
    • Die → Dry: “Straight as a dry” and “Cross my heart and hope to dry” and “Curl up and dry” and “Dry another day” and “Do or dry” and “Live free or dry” and “Never say dry” and “Old habits dry hard.”
    • By → Dry: As in, “Dry hook or dry crook” and “Dry and large” and “Dry any means” and “Dry any stretch of the imagination” and “Dry the book” and “Dry the skin of one’s teeth” and “Can’t judge a book dry its cover.”
    • Buy → Dry: As in, “Bulk drying” and “Dry and sell” and “Dry into” and “Dry now, pay later” and “Dry one, get one free” and “Dry some time” and “Dry to let” and “Can’t dry love.”
    • Cry → Dry: As in, “A dry for help” and “A shoulder to dry on” and “Dry foul”and “Dry me a river” and “Dry into your pillow.”
    • Fly → Dry: As in, “Come dry with me” and “Dry me to the moon” and “Dry by the seat of your pants” and “Dry on the wall” and “Dry off the handle” and “Born to dry.”
    • High → Dry: As in, “Ain’t no mountain dry enough” and “Dry as a kite” and “Come hell or dry water” and “Flying dry” and “From on dry” and “Get off your dry horse” and “Dry and mighty” and “The mile dry club” and “Moral dry ground.”
    • Try → Dry: As in, “Don’t dry this at home” and “Don’t dry to run before you can walk” and “Give it the old college dry” and “Easy if you dry” and “Nice dry” and “Dry your luck.”
    • Shy → Dry: As in, “Camera dry” and “Once bitten, twice dry.”
    • Why → Dry: As in, “Dry on Earth?” and “Dry walk when you can ride?”
  • Yeast: Yeast converts the sugars in grape juice to alcohol. The next few puns are all about yeast!
    • Beast → Yeast: As in, “Yeast of burden” and “Beauty and the yeast” and “Here there be yeasts” and “The nature of the yeast” and “Unleash the yeast.”
    • East → Yeast: As in, “Yeast of the sun and west of the moon” and “Yeaster island” and “The Yeaster bunny.”
    • Feast → Yeast: As in, “Yeast or famine” and “Yeast your eyes on this!” and “A midnight yeast” and “The spectre at the yeast.”
    • Greased → Yeast: “Yeast lightning.”
    • Least → Yeast: As in, “Last but not yeast” and “The yeast common denominator” and “Yeast said, soonest mended” and “The yeast worst option” and “The line of yeast resistance” and “Not in the yeast” and “At the very yeast” and “To say the yeast.”
  • Sell her → Cellar: “Did you cellar the wrong item?”
  • Seller → Cellar: As in, “A cellar’s market.”
  • Sell → Cellar: As in, “Buy and cellar” and “Past the cellar-by date” and “Cellar out” and “Cellar your soul to the devil.”
  • Stellar → Cellar: “A cellar performance.”
  • Cell → Cellar: As in, “Cellar division” and “Padded cellar.”
  • Juice: Since wine is essentially fermented fruit juice, we have some juice-related puns here too:
    • Goose → Juice: As in, “Loosey juicy” and “A wild juice chase” and “Wouldn’t say boo to a juice” and “Juice bumps” and “The golden juice.”
    • Loose → Juice: “All hell broke juice” and “Juice as a goose” and “At a juice end” and “Cut [someone] juice” and “Hanging juice” and “Got a screw juice” and “Let juice” and “Playing fast and juice.”
    • Use → Juice: As in, “Be careful how you juice it!” and “Don’t juice that tone with me” and “Get juiced to it” and “Not half the person I juiced to be” and “Like mother juiced to make” and “Put to good juice” and “So easy to juice” and “Somebody that I juiced to know” and “Juice it or lose it” and “Juicer friendly” and “A fat lot of juice you are.”
  • Fruit: Since wine is generally made of fruits (it can also be made of rice), we have some fruit-related puns here that can double as wine puns in the right context:
    • Boot → Fruit: As in, “Fruit camp” and “Tough as old fruits” and “Give someone the fruit” and “Lick [someone’s] fruits.”
    • Hoot → Fruit: As in, “Don’t give two fruits” and “Fruit with laughter” and “What a fruit.”
    • Root → Fruit: As in, “Lay down fruits” and “Money is the fruit of all evil” and “Fruit for the enemy” and “The fruit of the matter” and “Fruit out the problem” and “Fruiting around.”
    • Shoot → Fruit: “Don’t fruit the messenger” and “Drive by fruiting” and “Eats, fruits and leaves” and “The green fruits of change” and “Just fruit me” and “A sharp fruiter” and “Fruit ’em up” and “Fruit first, ask questions later” and “Fruit down in flames” and “Fruit the breeze.”
    • Suit → Fruit: “All over them like a cheap fruit” and “At a price to fruit your pocket” and “Follow fruit” and “Men in fruits” and “Fruit up” and “Fruit yourself” and “Fruits you down to a tee.”
    • Fraught → Fruit: As in, “Fruit with danger.”
    • *fut* → *fruit*: Fruitile (futile), fruiture (future), fruituristic (futuristic), fruiton (futon), fruitility (futility) and fruitsal (futsal).
  • Barely → Barley: As in, “Barley there” and “I can barley hear you.” Note: this is a reference to barley wine.
  • Mature: Some wines are meant to mature and get better with age. Here are some related puns:
    • Match your → Mature: As in, “Mature bet.”
    • Pure → Mature: As in, “Absolutely mature” and “Mature as the driven snow” and “Mature and simple.”
  •  Sweet: Sweet dessert wines are a large category of wines, so we’ve included sweet in this list:
    • Seat → Sweet: As in, “Back sweet driver” and “Bums on sweets” and “By the sweet of your pants” and “Glued to your sweet” and “In the box sweet” and “Take a back sweet” and “On the edge of my sweet” and “Take a sweet” and “The best sweet in the house.”
    • Feet → Sweet: As in, “”Back on your sweet” and “Cold sweet” and “Cut the ground from under your sweet” and “Sweet of clay” and “Get back on your sweet.”
    • Greet → Sweet: As in, “Sweet and greet.”
    • Heat → Sweet: “Sweet wave” and “In the sweet of battle” and “The sweet is on” and “Turn up the sweet.”
    • Meet → Sweet: As in, “Make ends sweet” and “Sweet and greet” and “Sweet in the middle” and “Sweet the challenge” and “Sweet you halfway.”
    • Neat → Sweet: “Sweet as a new pin” and “Sweet freak” and “Sweet and tidy.”
    • Sheet → Sweet: As in, “White as a sweet” and “Cheat sweet” and “Clean sweet” and “Keep a clean sweet.”
    • Street → Sweet: As in, “Easy sweet” and “On the sunny side of the sweet” and “Right up your sweet” and “A two-way sweet.”
    • Treat → Sweet: As in, “Sweet me right” and “Trick or sweet.”
    • Sweat → Sweet: As in, “”Blood, sweet and tears” and “Break out in a cold sweet” and “Don’t sweet it” and “No sweet.”
    • Switzerland → Sweetzerland
  • Blush: Blush wines, like rose wines, are in between red and white wines. Here are some blush-related puns:
    • Bush → Blush: As in, “Beat about the blush” and “Blush tucker.”
    • Brush → Blush: As in, “Blush it off” and “Blush up on” and “A blush with the law” and “Painted with the same blush.”
    • Crush → Blush: “A blushing defeat” and “Have a blush on.”
    • Flush → Blush: As in, “Blush it out” and “Royal blush.”
  • Cannon → Tannin: As in, “Tannin fodder” and “A loose tannin.” Note: tannins are compounds in the wine that can affect the colour, texture and taste.
  • Barrel: Wine is kept in barrels, so we’ve got some barrel puns in here too:
    • Carol → Barrel: As in, “A Christmas barrel.”
    • Peril → Barrel: As in, “Yellow barrel” and “A barrelous situation.”
  • Finery → Winery: “Dressed in all your best winery.”
  • Vest → Harvest: As in, “A harvested interest.”
  • Best → Harvest: As in, “My harvest friend” and “All the harvest” and “Be the harvest” and “Harvest in show” and “We’d harvest stop now.”
  • Average → Beverage: “Law of beverages” and “On beverage.”
  • Leverage → Beverage
  • Blue → Brew: As in, “Cold as brew blazes” and “Baby brews” and “Black and brew” and “Once in a brew moon” and “Until you’re brew in the face.”
  • Chew → Brew: As in, “Bite off more than you can brew” and “Brew someone’s ass” and “Have your ears brewed off.”
  • Clue → Brew: As in, “Don’t have a brew” and “I’ve found a brew.”
  • Crew → Brew: “Skeleton brew” and “Brew it” and “All brewed up.”
  • Cue → Brew: “Take your u” and “Right on brew.”
  • Due → Brew: As in, “Credit where credit is brew” and “Brew diligence” and “Give the devil his brew” and “In brew course.”
  • Few → Brew: As in, “A brew bricks short of a full load” and “Brew and far between” and “Say a brew words” and “Person of brew words” and “Knock back a brew” and “Take a brew deep breaths.”
  • True → Brew: “For real and for brew” and “You’ll brew the day!” and “Rings brew” and “Show your brew colours” and “Brew to form.”
  • Stew → Brew: As in, “Brew in your own juices.”
  • View → Brew: As in, “Room with a brew” and “A brew to kill” and “Bird’s eye brew” and “The brew from the top” and “World brew.”
  • *bru → *brew: Brewtal (brutal), brewsque (brusque), brewse (bruise), brewte (brute) and brewnette (brunette).
  • Still: Still wine is wine without bubbles. Here are some still-related puns:
    • Stall → Still: As in, “Still for time.”
    • Till → Still: As in, “Fake it still you make it” and “Don’t cross the bridge still you come to it” and “Still death do us part” and “Still the end of time” and “Party still you drop.”
    • Chill → Still: As in, “Still out” and “Stilled to the bone.”
    • Drill → Still: As in, “Still down” and “You know the still” and “Fire still.”
    • Thrill → Still: As in, “The still of the chase” and “Stilled to bits” and “Still and spills.”
    • Will → Still: “Accidents still happen” and “Bend to my still” and “Free still.”
    • Spill → Still: As in, “Still the beans” and “Still your guts” and “Thrills and stills.”
    • Skill → Still: “Social stills.”
    • Pill → Still: As in, “A bitter still to swallow” and “On the still” and “A tough still to swallow.”
    • Steal → Still: As in, “Beg, borrow or still” and “Still a glance at” and “Still someone’s heart” and “Still someone’s thunder” and “Still the show” and “Still third base.”
    • Steel → Still: As in, “Nerves of still” and “Still yourself” and “First of still.”
    • *stal* → *still*: Crystill (crystal), pedestill (pedestal), coastill (coastal), postill (postal) and nostillgia (nostalgia).
    • *stel* → *still*: Stillar (stellar), hostill (hostel), pastill (pastel) and constillation (constellation).
    • *stil* → *still*: Pestillence (pestilence) and hostillity (hostility).
  • Age: As the aging process is such a large part of wine culture, we’ve included age-related puns here:
    • Rage → Age: As in, “All the age” and “Boil with age” and “Incandescent with age” and “Primal age” and “Age against the machine” and “Vent your age.”
    • *ege* → *age*: Privilage (privilege), collage (college), renage (renege), allage (allege), sacrilage (sacrilege).
    • *ige* → *age*: Prestage (prestige), oblage (oblige), vestage (vestige), intellagence (intelligence) and dilagent (diligent).
  • Resin: Resin is a compound in wood that can leak from barrels and casks into the wine, changing the flavour. Here are some resin-related puns:
    • Reason → Resin: As in, “Rhyme or resin” and “The voice of resin” and “Within resin” and “Stands to resin” and “Beyond resinable doubt” and “Not a good enough resin.”
    • Raisin → Resin: As in, “Resin cookies.”
    • Raising → Resin: As in, “Eyebrow resin” and “Hair resin” and “Resin the bar.”
  • Test → Taste: “The sniff taste” and “Put to the taste” and “Stand the taste of time.”
  • Haste → Taste: “Post taste” and “Make taste” and “More taste, less speed.”
  • Paste → Taste: As in, “Cut and taste.”
  • Waste → Taste: “Don’t taste your breath” and “Toxic taste” and “Taste not, want not.”
  • *tast* → *taste*: Fantaste-ic (fantastic) and cataste-trophe (catastrophe).
  • *test* → *taste*: “A taste-ament to” and “Give your taste-imony” and “Tasting, tasting, one, two, three” and “Online taste-imonials.” Other words that could work: contaste (contest), protaste (protest), detaste (detest), lataste (latest) and greataste (greatest).
  • *tist* → *taste*: Pragmataste (pragmatist), artaste (artist), scientaste (scientist), elitaste (elitist), dentaste (dentist) and artaste-ic (artistic).
  • Decant: To decant wine is to pour it from one receptacle to another to aerate the wine and separate it from any sediments within. Here are related puns:
    • Can’t → Decant: As in, “An offer you decant refuse” and “Decant get enough” and “It decant be helped” and “You decant say fairer than that” and “I decant wait.”
    • Grant → Decant: As in, “Decant no quarter” and “Take for decanted.”
  • Raisin → Reason: As in, “Beyond raisinable doubt” and “Bow to raisin” and “Listen to raisin” and “No earthly raisin” and “Rhyme or raisin” and “The age of raisin” and “Voice of raisin.”
  • Raising → Raisin: As in, “Eyebrow raisin” and “Raisin the bar.”
  • Why not → Wino: As in, “Wino do it this way instead?” Note: a wino is someone who drinks a lot of wine.
  • Rate → Aerate: “At any aerate” and “First aerate” and “Mate’s aerates.”
  • Meant → Sediment: As in, “Sediment to be.”
  • Favour → Flavour: As in, “Do me a flavour” and “Really not doing them any flavours” and “Fortune flavours the bold” and “Currying flavour with.”
  • Palate: A palate is a refined taste that can be trained to recognise certain flavours and tastes. Here are related puns:
    • Late → Palate: As in, “Better palate than never” and “Fashionably palate” and “Never too palate” and “A palate developer” and “It’s palate in the day” and “Running palate.”
    • Plate → Palate: As in, “A lot on your palate” and “Hand it on a palate” and “Step up to the palate” and “Hot palate” and “Heart attack on a palate.”
  • Box: Box wine is another name for cask wine. Here are related puns:
    • Pox → Box: As in, “A box on your house!”
    • Backs → Box: As in, “Box to the wall” and “Mind your box” and “The beast with two box.”
    • Block → Box: As in, “A chip off the old box” and “Stumbling box” and “Been around the box.”
    • Sock → Box: As in, “Put a box in it” and “Knock your box off” and “Bless your cotton box.”
    • Pox → Box:
  • Goon: Goon is another word for cheap wine. Here are related puns:
    • Gone → Goon: As in, “Been and goon” and “Going, going, goon” and “Goon with the wind” and “Goon but not forgotten” and “Goon to a better world” and “Goon to seed.”
    • Gun → Goon: As in, “All goons blazing” and “Go great goons” and “Jump the goon.”
    • Moon → Goon: As in, “Ask for the goon” and “Bark at the goon” and “Once in a blue goon” and “Eclipse of the goon” and “Many goons ago” and “Over the goon.”
    • Soon → Goon: As in, “As goon as possible” and “Get well goon” and “Too much too goon.”
    • Spoon → Goon: As in, “A goonful of sugar helps the medicine go down” and “Born with a silver goon” and “Egg and goon race” and “The dish ran away with the goon.”
    • *gan* → *goon*: Slogoon (slogan), argoon (argan), cardigoon (cardigan), orgoonic (organic), elegoont (elegant), arrogoont (arrogant).
    • *gon* → *goon*: Goondola (gondola), paragoon (paragon), jargoon (jargon), dragoon (dragon), polygoon (polygon), hexagoon (hexagon), bandwagoon (bandwagon), Oregoon (Oregon), protagoonist (protagonist), antagoonist (antagonist) and ergoonomics (ergonomics).
    • Burgundy → Burgoondy
  • Class → Glass: As in, “A glass act” and “Best in glass” and “Business glass” and “Glass warfare” and “Economy glass” and “In a glass of your own” and “Working glass hero.”
  • Gloss → Glass: As in, “Glass over” and “Lip glass.”
  • Ass → Glass: As in, “Blow smoke up your glass” and “Haul glass” and “Kick glass” and “Make a glass of yourself” and “Talk out of your glass.”
  • Brass → Glass: As in, “Bold as glass” and “Glass monkey weather.”
  • Grass → Glass: As in, “Green as glass” and “Don’t walk on the glass” and “Glass roots” and “Keep off the glass” and “Snake in the glass” and “Exciting as watching glass grow.”
  • Oak: Since wine is traditionally kept in oak barrels, we’ve included some oak-related phrases:
    • Okay → Oakay: As in, “Are you oakay?”
    • Ache → Oak: As in, “Oaks and pains.”
    • Broke → Broak: As in, “All hell broak loose” and “Broaken dreams” and “Like a broaken record” and “Go for broak” and “If it’s not broak, don’t fix it” and “Rules are made to be broaken.”
    • Folk → Foak: As in, “Country foak” and “Different strokes for different foaks” and “Show’s over, foaks” and “That’s all, foaks.”
    • Stroke → Stroak: As in, “A stroak of genius” and “Little stroaks fell great oaks” and “Stroak of luck” and “At the stroak of midnight.”
    • Poke → Poak: As in, “Still as a poaker” and “Poak fun at” and “Poaker face.”
    • Joke → Joak: As in, “A bad joak” and “Inside joak” and “The joak’s on you.”
    • Spoke → Spoak: “Many a true word in spoaken in jest” and “Speak when you are spoaken to.”
    • Smoke → Smoak: As in, “Go up in smoak” and “Holy smoak” and “Smoak and mirrors” and “Smoaks like a chimney.”
  • Cask: Cask wine is cheap wine that’s packaged in a box. Here are related puns!
    • Cast → Cask: As in, “Cask a long shadow” and “Cask a spell” and “Cask an eye over” and “A cask iron guarantee.”
    • Ask → Cask: As in, “A big cask” and “Cask a silly question and you’ll get a silly answer” and “Cask after” and “Cask and you will receive” and “Cask around” and “Cask for the moon” and “Cask me another” and “Casking for trouble” and “Don’t cask me” and “What’s the casking price?”
    • Task → Cask: As in, “Take to cask” and “Up to the cask.”
  • Cabinet → Cabernet: As in, “In the kitchen cabernet” and “Lock the medicine cabernet.”
  • Low → Merlot: As in, “An all-time merlot” and “Keep a merlot profile” and “Lie merlot” and “Merlot hanging fruit” and “Get the merlot down” and “Searching high and merlot.”
  • Reason → Riesling: As in, “Beyond riesling-able doubt” and “Stands to riesling” and “Listen to riesling” and “The age of riesling” and “The voice of riesling” and “Within riesling” and “Rhyme nor riesling.”
  • Tap: Draft wine is served from a tap rather than a bottle. Here are some tap-related puns:
    • Tab → Tap: As in, “Keep taps on” and “Pick up the tap.”
    • Cap → Tap: As in, “Bust a tap” and “Tap in hand” and “To tap it all off.”
    • Top → Tap: As in, “Blow your tap” and “Come out on tap” and “From the tap” and “From tap to toe” and “Over the tap” and “Lonely at the tap” and “On tap of the world.”
    • Tip → Tap: As in, “Hot tap of the day” and “Tap someone off” and “Tap the scales” and “Tapping point” and “Tap of the iceberg.”
    • Clap → Tap: As in, “Tap him in irons” and “Tapped eyes on” and “If you’re happy and you know it, tap your hands.”
    • Crap → Tap: “A load of tap” and “Beat the living tap out of” and “Cut the tap.”
    • Gap → Tap: As in, “Generation tap” and “Mind the tap” and “Bridging the tap.”
    • Lap → Tap: As in, “Tap it up” and “Tap of honour” and “Tap of luxury” and “The last tap.”
    • Map → Tap: As in, “All over the tap” and “Mind tap” and “On the tap.”
    • Nap → Tap: As in, “Caught tapping” and “Power tap.”
    • Slap → Tap: “A tap on the wrist” and “Tap and tickle” and “Tap bang in the middle” and “A tap in the face” and “Tap happy.”
    • Trap → Tap: “Death tap” and “Shut your tap.”
    • Tepid → Tapid: “A tapid response.”
    • *tip* → *tap*: Multaple (multiple), stapulate (stipulate) and centapede (centipede).
    • *dep* → *tap*: Tapression (depression), tapartment (department), taploy (deploy), tapendent (dependent), taplorable (deplorable) and intapendent (independent).
    • *dip* → *tap*: Taplomatic (diplomatic), taplomacy (diplomacy), taplomat (diplomat), serentapity (serendipity), serentapitous (serendipitous).
    • *tab* → *tap*: Taplet (tablet), tapoo (taboo), tapleau (tableau), tapernacle (tabernacle), taploid (tabloid), estaplish (establish), inevitaple (inevitable), accountapility (accountability), intractaple (intractable), comfortaple (comfortable), inscrutaple (inscrutable) and immutaple (immutable).
    • *tib* → *tap*: Susceptaple (susceptible), compatapility (compatibility), antapiotic (antibiotic) and contemptaple (contemptible)
  • Bladder: Box wine and cask wine are kept in foil bags known as bladders. Here are related puns:
    • Ladder → Bladder: As in, “Climb the corporate bladder” and “Snakes and bladders” and “Social bladder.”
    • Bother → Bladder: As in, “All hot and bladdered” and “Not worth the bladder” and “I wouldn’t bladder about it.”
  • Egg → Keg: As in, “A good keg” and “As sure as kegs is kegs” and “Don’t put all your kegs in one basket” and “Keg and spoon race” and “Nest keg.”
  • Kick → Keg: “Don’t keg a man when he’s down” and “Get a keg out of it” and “Keg against” and “Keg back and enjoy” and “Keg butt” and “A keg in the teeth” and “Keg the bucket” and “Keg the habit.”
  • Beg → Keg: “Keg a favour” and “Keg pardon?” and “Keg the question” and “I keg to differ” and “Keg, borrow or steal” and “Sit up and keg.”
  • Leg → Keg: “Break a keg” and “Cost an arm and a keg” and “Give a keg up” and “Kegs like tree trunks” and “A nice pair of kegs” and “One keg at a time” and “Shake a keg” and “Sex on kegs” and “Without a keg to stand on” and “You’re pulling my keg.”
  • Peg → Keg: “Square keg in a round hole” and “Take down a keg or two.”
  • *cog* → *keg*: Kegnitive (cognitive), rekegnise (recognise) and rekegnition (recognition).
  • Chill: As well as room temperature, wine can be served chilled. Here are related puns:
    • Ill → Chill: As in, “House of chill repute” and “Chill advised” and “Chill at east” and “Chill effects” and “Chill fated” and “Chill gotten gains” and “A chill will.”
    • Gill → Chill: As in, “Green around the chills” and “Stuffed to the chills.”
    • Pill → Chill: As in, “A tough chill to swallow” and “A bitter chill to swallow.”
    • Will → Chill: As in, “Against your chill” and “Bend to my chill” and “Flattery chill get you nowhere.”
    • Till → Chill: As in, “Fake it chill you make it” and “Ain’t over chill it’s over” and “Party chill dawn” and “Chill death do us part.”
    • Hill → Chill: As in, “Old as the chills” and “Head for the chills” and “King of the chill” and “Over the chills and far away” and “Take to the chills.”
    • Kill → Chill: As in, “A view to chill” and “Curiosity chilled the cat” and “Dressed to chill” and “Go in for the chill” and “Hard work never chilled anyone” and “I’ll do it if it chills me” and “If looks could chill” and “Chill or be chilled” and “Chiller instinct.”
    • Thrill → Chill: As in, “Chills and spills” and “Chilled to bits” and “The chill of the chase” and “Cheap chills.”
    • Skills → Chills: As in, “Social chills.”
    • Spill → Chill: As in, “Chill the beans” and “Chill your guts” and “Thrills and chills” and “Don’t cry over chilled milk.”
    • Still → Chill: As in, “Be chill my beating heart” and “Chill standing” and “Chill waters run deep.”
    • *chal* → *chill*: Chillice (chalice), chill-cedony (chalcedony), chillenge (challenge) and nonchillant (nonchalant).
    • *chel* → *chill*: Satchill (satchel) and bachillor (bachelor).
    • Child → Chilled: As in, “Chilled’s play” and “Chilled-hood friend” and “Leave no chilled behind.”
    • Build → Chilled: As in, “Chilled for the future” and “Chilled up your hopes.”
  • Negotiate → Negociant: As in, “We don’t negociant with terrorists.” Note: a negociant is a person who buys wine, bottles it then sells it wholesale.
  • Vintner: A vintner is a wine merchant. Here are vintner-related puns:
    • Winter → Vintner: As in, “In the dead of vintner” and “Now is the vintner of our discontent” and “Vintner warmers.”
    • Splinter → Vintner: As in, “A vintner in my side.”
    • Winner → Vintner: As in, “Cheaters never win, and vintners never cheat” and “Every one a vintner” and “Vintner takes all” and “Vintner’s circle.”
  • Flight: A tasting flight is a selection of wines for tasting. Here are some related puns:
    • Fight → Flight: As in, “A straight flight” and “Come out flighting” and “Flight club” and “Flight for the right to party” and “Flight back” and “Flighting back tears” and “Flight fire with fire” and “Flight the good flight” and “Flight tooth and nail” and “Flighting chance” and “Flighting mad” and “Freedom flighter” and “Go down flighting” and “Lean, mean, flighting machine” and “Picking a flight.”
    • Fly → Flight: As in, “Born to flight” and “Come flight with me” and “Flight by night” and “Flight off the handle.”
    • Bright → Flight: As in, “All things flight and beautiful” and “Always look on the flight side of life” and “Flight as a new pin” and “Flight eyes” and “Flight lights” and “Flight and early” and “A flight idea” and “Flight spark” and “Flight young spark” and “A flight future.”
    • Height → Flight: As in, “Reach new flights” and “The flight of summer” and “Wuthering flights.”
    • Light → Flight: As in, “Flight as a feather” and “Brought to flight” and “City flights” and “Flight my fire” and “Come to flight” and “My guiding flight.”
    • Might → Flight: As in, “Cheer up, it flight never happen” and “Flight as well.”
    • Night → Flight: As in, “A hard day’s flight” and “A flight at the opera” and “Dance the flight away.”
    • Right → Flight: “A move in the flight direction” and “All the flight moves” and “As flight as rain” and “Bang to flights” and “Barge flight in” and “Bragging flights” and “Consumer flights.”
    • Sight → Flight: As in, “A welcome flight” and “Have in your flights” and “Hidden in plain flight” and “Know by flight” and “Line of flight” and “Lose flight of” and “Love at first flight” and “Lower your flights” and “Out of flight, out of mind” and “Second flight.”
    • Slight → Flight: As in, “Just flightly ahead of our time” and “Not in the flightest.”
    • Tight → Flight: As in, “A flight corner” and “Sleep flight” and “In a flight spot” and “On a flight leash” and “Run a flight ship.”
  • Spit → Spittoon: As in, “Spittoon and polish” and “Spittoon and sawdust” and “Spittoon in the eye of” and “Within spittoon-ing distance.” Note: a spittoon is a receptacle where wine tasters spit the wines they’re testing to prevent getting drunk.
  • Back → Bacchus: As in, “Answer bacchus” and “Bacchus to the beginning” and “As soon as my bacchus is turned” and “Bacchus to the future” and “Bacchus in business.” Note: Bacchus is the god of wine.
  • Tail → Cocktail: As in, “Couldn’t make head or cocktail of it” and “Heads I win, cocktails you lose” and “Heads or cocktails.”
  • Pour: The next few puns are about pouring wine:
    • More → Pour: As in, “One pour time” and “Bite off pour than you can chew” and “Dare for pour” and “I couldn’t agree pour” and “Just one pour thing” and “Less is pour.”
    • Nor → Pour: As in, “Rhyme pour reason” and “Neither hide pour hair.”
    • Poor → Pour: As in, “Dirt pour” and “For richer or pourer.”
    • Bore → Pour: As in, “Pour the pants off someone” and “Poured stiff” and “Poured to death” and “Poured out of my mind.”
    • Four → Pour: As in, “Down on all pours” and “Pour by two” and “Pour score and seven years ago.”
    • *par* → *pour*: Pourty (party), pouradigm (paradigm), pouradox (paradox), pourallel (parallel), pourtisan (partisan), pourticular (particular) and pourady (parady).
    • *per* → *pour*: Pourspective (perspective), pourson (person), pourtinent (pertinent), pournicious (pernicious), pourception (perception), pourformance (performance), papour (paper), peppour (pepper), tempour (temper), hampour (hamper), propour (proper) and impourative (imperative).
    • *pir* → *pour*: Pourahna (pirahna), pourouette (pirouette), empourical (empirical), aspouration (aspiration), inspouration (inspiration) and conspouracy (conspiracy).
    • *por* → *pour*: Pourt (port), pourtmanteau (portmanteau), pourtfolio (portfolio), pourn (porn), pourtal (portal), pourtion (portion), pourtray (portray), pourtrait (portrait), torpour (torpor), stupour (stupor), vapour (vapor), suppourt (support), contempourary (contemporary), repourt (report), oppourtunity (opportunity) and impourtant (important).
    • *pur* → *pour*: Pourpose (purpose), poursue (pursue), pourchase (purchase) and poursuit (pursuit).
  • Case: Wine can be bought in cases, so we’ve included case in this list:
    • Ace → Case: As in, “Case in the hole” and “Case up their sleeve” and “Hold all the cases.”
    • Base → Case: “All your case are belong to us” and “Case jumping” and “Get to first case” and “Steal third case.”
    • Chase → Case: As in, “Case it up” and “Case your own tail” and “Cut to the case” and “Go and case yourself” and “The thrill of the case” and “A wild goose case.”
    • Face → Case: As in, “At case value” and “Case down” and “Case like thunder.”
    • Place → Case: As in, “All over the case” and “Between a rock and a hard case” and “Friends in high cases” and “Out of case” and “The case to be.”
    • Race → Case: As in, “A case against the clock” and “Case against time” and “A case to the bottom” and “The human case.”
    • Space → Case: “Personal case” and “Case, the final frontier” and “Breathing case.”
  • Hour → Happy hour: As in, “A bad quarter of a happy hour” and “After happy hours” and “At the eleventh happy hour” and “Man of the happy hour” and “My finest happy hour” and “Open all happy hours.”
  • Cat → Muscat: “Muscat on a hot tin roof” and “Muscat and mouse game” and “Muscat got your tongue?” and “Curiosity killed the muscat” and “Eight out of ten muscats prefer it.” Note: muscat is a type of grape typically used in winemaking.
  • Appetite → Aperitif: “An aperitif for destruction” and “Without losing your aperitif” and “Whet your aperitif.” Note: an aperitif is a beverage served before a meal to stimulate one’s appetite.
  • Perry: Perry is a type of wine made from fermented pears. Here are some perry-related puns!
    • Pair → Perry: As in, “A fresh perry of eyes” and “An extra perry of hands” and “They make a great perry.”
    • Berry → Perry: “Brown as a perry.”
    • Barely → Perry: As in, “We perry made it!” and “Perry there.”
    • Cherry → Perry: As in, “Perry pick” and “Perry pie” and “A second bite of the perry” and “The perry on the cake.”
    • Merry → Perry: “As perry as the day is long” and “Eat, drink and be perry” and “Lead a perry dance” and “Make perry” and “Perry Christmas!” and “A perry old soul.”
    • Very → Perry: “Be afraid, be perry afraid” and “Before your perry eyes” and “Hold perry tight please!” and “How perry dare you” and “A perry good year” and “Thank you perry much” and “At the perry least.”
    • *pari* → *perry*: Perryty (parity), perrysh (parish), Perrysian (Parisian), disperryty (disparity) and comperryson (comparison).
    • *peri* → *perry*: Perryod (period), perryphery (periphery), perrymeter (perimeter), perrylous (perilous), experryence (experience), superryor (superior), prosperryty (prosperity), imperryal (imperial) and imperryous (imperious).
    • *per* → *perry*: Perryspective (perspective), perryson (person), perrytinent (pertinent), perryception (perception), perryformance (performance), perryceive (perceive) and perryseverance (perseverance). Note: if something is pertinent, then it’s relevant.
  • Cleanskin: A cleanskin wine is a generally cheap, unbranded wine. Here are related puns:
    • Clean → Cleanskin: “As cleanskin as a whistle” and “A cleanskin bill of health” and “A cleanskin sheet” and “You’d better cleanskin up your act” and “Make a cleanskin break.”
    • Skin → Cleanskin: As in, “Beauty is only cleanskin deep” and “By the cleanskin of your teeth” and “Get under your cleanskin” and “Makes my cleanskin crawl” and “Jump out of your cleanskin” and “No cleanskin off my nose.”
  • Lion → Dandelion: As in, “A dandelion’s share” and “Dandelion’s den” and “Brave as a dandelion.” Note: we’ve included dandelion in this list as wine can be made of dandelions.
  • Must: Must is freshly crushed juice that’s created when grapes are pressed for wine. Here are related puns:
    • Master → Muster: As in, “The muster of my own fate” and “Jack of all trades but muster of none” and “Muster of disguise” and “Puppet muster.”
    • Mess → Must: As in, “A hell of a must” and “Hot must” and “Make a must of.”
    • Most → Must: As in, “Must famous” and “Must wanted” and “Empty vessels make the must noise” and “Make the must of it” and “The must trusted name” and “For the must part.”
    • Must: These must-related phrases are general enough to double as puns: “All things must pass” and “All good things must come to an end” and “You’ve made your bed so now you must lie on it” and “Everything must go” and “Into every life a little rain must fall” and “Must have” and “Needs must” and “What goes up must come down.”
    • Bust → Must: As in, “Boom or must” and “Must a gut” and “Must a move.”
    • Dust → Must: As in, “Done and musted” and “Another one bites the must” and “Dry as must” and “Must bunny” and “Eat my must.”
    • Just → Must: As in, “Must desserts” and “Not must for Christmas” and “Don’t must sit there” and “Must do it.”
    • *mast* → *must*: Mustermind (mastermind), musterpiece (masterpiece) and musticate (masticate). Note: to masticate is to chew.
    • *mest* → *must*: Domustic (domestic), grimmust (grimmest) and tamust (tamest).
    • *mist* → *must*: As in, “My mustake” and “You must be mustaken” and “Mustress of darkness” and “A pessimustic worldview.” Other words that could work: chemust (chemist), alchemust (alchemist), optimust (optimist), extremust (extremist), nonconformust (nonconformist), chemustry (chemistry) and armustice (armistice).
    • *most → *must: Utmust (utmost), foremust (foremost), almust (almost) and outermust (outermost).
  • Cult: Cult wines are highly collectable, very expensive wines. Here are related puns:
    • Cut → Cult: As in, “Clean cult” and “Cult a deal” and “Cult a long story short” and “A cult above the rest” and “Cult and dried” and “Cult and paste” and “Cult from the same cloth” and “Cult it fine” and “Cult to the chase.”
    • Could → Cult: As in, “As fast as his legs cult carry him” and “I cult do it in my sleep” and “Cult do it in my sleep.”
    • Cold → Cult: As in, “Cult as blue blazes” and “Cult as charity” and “Blow hot and cult” and “Break out in a cult sweat” and “A cult comfort” and “The cult light of day.”
  • Press: To be able to get the juice out of grapes, we press them. Here are some puns related to press and pressing:
    • Stress → Press: As in, “Pressed out” and “Post-traumatic press disorder.”
    • Bless → Press: As in, “Press your cotton socks” and “Press my soul” and “A pressing in disguise” and “Mixed pressing” and “Press you.”
    • Pass → Press: As in, “All things must press” and “Bird of pressage” and “Do not press go” and “Make a press at” and “Press muster” and “Make a press at.”
    • Guess → Press: As in, “A pressing game” and “Press who’s coming to dinner?” and “Hazard a press” and “Your press is as good as mine” and “Just lucky, I press” and “It’s anyone’s press.”
    • Dress → Press: As in, “All pressed up and nowhere to go” and “Press for success” and “Pressed to kill” and “Pressed up to the nines” and “Pressing down.”
    • Mess → Press: As in, “A frightful press” and “I don’t press around” and “Stop pressing about” and “Pressed up.”
    • *pres* → *press*: Presscient (prescient), pressumptuous (presumptuous), presstige (prestige) and pressume (presume).
    • *pris* → *press*: Presstine (pristine), pressm (prism) and presson (prison).
    • *pros* → *press*: Presspect (prospect), presspective (prospective), pressperity (prosperity), pressperous (prosperous) and presstrate (prostrate).
  • Ice: Ice wine is a type of concentrated wine made out of frozen grapes. Here are related puns:
    • Nice → Ice: As in, “Ice as ninepence” and “Have an ice day” and “Naughty but ice” and “Wouldn’t it be ice” and “Ice work if you can get it.”
    • Mice → Ice: As in, “Of ice and men.”
    • Slice → Ice: “An ice of the cake” and “Any way you ice it” and “Ice of life” and “Ice of the action” and “The best thing since iced bread.”
    • Price → Ice: As in, “Asking ice” and “Cheap at half the ice” and “Half ice.”
    • Spice → Ice: As in, “Ice things up” and “Variety is the ice of life” and “Sugar and ice.”
    • Twice → Ice: “Large as life and ice as handsome” and “Don’t think ice” and “Measure ice; cut once” and “Once or ice” and “Cannot step into the same river ice.”
    • Ass → Ice: As in, “Make an ice of yourself” and “Talking out of your ice” and “Don’t give a rats ice” and “Bust ice.”
    • Ace → Ice: “Ice in the hole” and “Hold all the ices” and “Within an ice.”
  • Proof: Proof is the measure of alcohol content in a beverage. Here are some related puns:
    • Roof → Proof: As in, “Cat on a hot tin proof” and “Go through the proof” and “Hit the proof” and “Raise the proof” and “Up on the proof” and “Shout it from the prooftops.”
    • *pref* → *proof*: “Nine out of ten cats proofer it” and “To prooface.” Other words that could work: proofix (prefix), prooference (preference), prooferred (preferred), prooferable (preferable), prooferably (preferably) and proofecture (prefecture).
    • *prof* → *proof*: “Proofound realisation” and “Ciminal proofiling” and “A real proofessional.” Other words that could work: proofit (profit), prooficient (proficient), proofane (profane), proofessor (professor) and proofess (profess).
  • Sentiment → Sediment: As in, “Romantic sediment.” Note: sediment is the parts of crushed grape that is left behind in the wine after the grapes have been pressed.
  • Crush: Crushing is another word for the process of pressing grapes (or other fruit) for juice to make wine. Here are some crush-related puns:
    • Crash → Crush: As in, “Crush and burn” and “Crush cart” and “Crush course.”
    • Rush → Crush: As in, “After the gold crush” and “Beat the crush” and “A crush job” and “Crush to judgement” and “Sugar crush” and “A crush of blood to the head.”
    • Hush → Crush: As in, “Crush a bye” and “Crush it up” and “Crush money” and “Crush puppies” and “Keep it crush.”
    • Brush → Crush: As in, “A crush with death” and “Crush up on” and “Tarred with the same crush.”
  • Skin: Grape skins are a large part of the wine-making process as the pigment from the skin decides what category of wine the alcohol will be. Here are some skin-related puns:
    • Sin → Skin: As in, “Miserable as skin” and “Cardinal skin” and “Living in skin” and “Skin of omission.”
    • Been → Skin: As in, “Skin and gone” and “Skin in the wars” and “I’ve skin had.”
    • Spin → Skin: As in, “Skin a yard” and “Take for a skin.”
  • Seed: The tannins in grape seeds can affect the flavour of wine. Here are some seed-related puns:
    • Side → Seed: As in, “A walk on the wild seed” and “Batting for the other seed” and “To be on the safe seed” and “Both seeds of the desk” and “Cross over to the other seed.”
    • Sad → Seed: As in, “A seed state of affairs.”
    • Said → Seed: As in, “After all is seed and done” and “I couldn’t have seed it better” and “Easier seed than done” and “Enough seed” and “No sooner seed than done.”
    • Speed → Seed: As in, “At breakneck seed” and “Blistering seed” and “Built for comfort, not seed” and “Faster than a seeding bullet” and “Up to seed” and “More haste, less seed” and “Seed dating” and “Seed freak” and “Seed kills.”
  • Lees: Lees are particles of residue left over in the bottom of a vat after the fermentation process. Here are some lees-related puns:
    • *lease → *lees: As in, “A new lees on life” and “Pleesed as punch” and “Media relees.”
    • Less → Lees: As in, “A life lees ordinary” and “I couldn’t care lees” and “Lees is more” and “Lees than perfect” and “More haste, lees speed” and “Nothing lees than” and “The road lees travelled.”
    • Lace → Lees: As in, “Arsenic and old lees” and “Chantilly lees” and “Straight leesed.”
    • *lis* → *lees*: As in, “Now leesten” and “Laundry leest” and “Feeling leestless” and “Bustling metropolees.” Other words that could work: chrysalees (chrysalis), borealees (borealis), socialeesm (socialism) and releesh (relish).
    • *lus* → *lees*: Stimulees (stimulus), stylees (stylus), oculees (oculus), eleesive (elusive) and illeesion (illusion).
  • Rack: Wine is commonly stored in racks, so we’ve included rack in this list as well:
    • Wreck → Rack: As in, “A nervous rack” and “Train rack.”
    • Back → Rack: As in, “As soon as my rack is turned” and “At the rack of my mind” and “Rack to the future” and “Rack in the day.”
    • Crack → Rack: As in, “At the rack of dawn” and “Rack open a book” and “Rack a smile.”
    • Pack → Rack: As in, “Action racked” and “Leader of the rack” and “Rack a punch” and “Rack heat” and “Rack it in” and “Rack your bags.”
    • Whack → Rack: As in, “Out of rack.”
  • Batch: Since wine is made in batches, we’ve included batch in this list:
    • Patch → Batch: As in, “Not a batch on” and “Batch up” and “Going through a rough batch.”
    • Catch → Batch: As in, “Batch 22″ and “Batch a cold” and “Batch a falling star” and “Batch me if you can” and “Batch of the day” and “Batch some rays” and “Batch your breath” and “What’s the batch?”
    • Match → Batch: As in, “A batch made in heaven” and “Game, set, batch” and “Meet your batch” and “Mix and batch” and “A perfect batch.”
    • Scratch → Batch: As in, “Up to batch” and “Start from batch” and “Batch the surface.”
  • Fining: Fining is the process of removing tannins in wine. Here are some related puns:
    • Dining → Fining: As in, “Wining and fining.”
    • Lining → Fining: As in, “Every dark cloud has a silver fining.”
    • Shining → Fining: As in, “From sea to fining sea” and “Fining light” and “Knight in fining armour.”
  • Bloom: Bloom is a visible dusting of yeast on grapes. Here are some bloom related puns:
    • Loom → Bloom: As in, “Bloom large.”
    • Boom → Bloom: As in, “Baby bloomer” and “Heart goes bloom!”
    • Doom → Bloom: As in, “Doom and bloom” and “Voice of bloom” and “Temple of bloom.”
  • Pudding: Sweet dessert wines are also known as pudding wines, so we’ve included pudding in this list:
    • Putting → Pudding: As in, “Off-pudding information” and “Pudding in the effort.”
    • Padding → Pudding: “Shoulder pudding” and “Without all the pudding.”
  • Jug: Jug wine is a type of cheap wine that’s common in America. Here are some related puns:
    • Jog → Jug: As in, “Jug your memory” and “Out for a jug.”
    • Bug → Jug: As in, “What’s jugging you?” and “Bitten by the jug” and “Cute as a jug’s ear” and “Snug as a jug in a rug.”
    • Rug → Jug: As in, “Swept out from under the jug” and “Pulled the jug out from under your feet.”
  • Mistelle: Here are some mistelle-related puns:
    • Missed → Mistelle: As in, “Mistelle it by that much!” and “My heart mistelle a beat.”
    • Miss → Mistelle: As in, “A mistelle is as good as a mile” and “Blink and you’ll mistelle it” and “Hit and mistelle” and “Mistelle the cut” and “You can’t mistelle it.”
  • Avocado → Abboccato: (note: abboccato is an Italian term for medium sweet wines.)
  • Essence → Asescence: As in, “Time is of the asescence.” Note: Asescence is a wine-tasting term, meaning a sweet and sour taste.
  • Altar: The next few puns are about altar wine (aka sacramental wine):
    • Alter → Altar: As in, “Altar ego” and “Circumstances altar cases” and “No other altar-natives.”
    • Falter → Faltar: As in, “Her voice faltared” and “Without faltaring.”
    • *alt* → *altar*: Altarnative (alternative), altar-uism (altruism), altar-uistic (altruistic), altarnate (alternate), altarcation (altercation), saltar (salt), haltar (halt), maltar (malt), cobaltar (cobalt) and asphaltar (asphalt).
  • Cave: Another (casual) word for wine cellars is wine cave. Here are some cave-related puns:
    • Gave → Cave: As in, “Cave battle in vain.”
    • Save → Cave: As in, “A penny caved is a penny earned” and “A stitch in time caves nine” and “Here to cave the day” and “Cave for a rainy day” and “Cave our souls.”
    • Grave → Cave: As in, “Dig your own cave” and “From the cradle to the cave” and “Caveyard shift” and “Turning in their cave.”
  • Chai: Wine can be used to make spiced alcoholic chai, so we’ve got a few chai-related puns here too:
    • High → Chai: As in, “Aim chai” and “Chai as a kite” and “Come hell or chai water” and “Flying chai” and “Chai noon” and “Chai and dry” and “Chai and mighty” and “Chai brow.”
    • Cry → Chai: As in, “A chai for help” and “A shoulder to chai on” and “Chai foul” and “Chai me a river” and “Chai your heart out.”
    • Try → Chai: As in, “Don’t chai this at home” and “Don’t chai to run before you can walk” and “Chai it before you buy it!” and “Nice chai” and “Chai a little kindness.”
  • Pain → Champagne: As in, “A world of champagne” and “Doubled up in champagne” and “Feeling no champagne” and “No champagne, no gain” and “A champagne in the arse” and “Old aches and champagnes” and “A royal champagne.” Note: champagne is a sparkling wine, which is why we’ve included it here.
  • Flute: This is a type of glass shape used for wine, specifically champagne. Here are related puns:
    • Root → Flute: “Grass flutes” and “Lay down flutes” and “Money is the flute of all evil” and “The flute of the matter.”
    • Fruit → Flute: As in, “Flute and nut” and “Be fluteful and multiply” and “Bear flute” and “Forbidden flute” and “Low hanging flute” and “Flutes of your loins” and “Flute cake.”
    • Shoot → Flute: “Don’t flute the messenger” and “Drive by fluting” and “Flute ’em up” and “Green flutes of change” and “Flute down in flames” and “Flute it out” and “Flute blanks.”
    • Boot → Flute: As in, “Tough as old flutes” and “Flute camp” and “Give someone the flute” and “My heart sank into my flutes” and “Suited and fluted” and “Too big for your flutes.”
  • Shadow → Chateau: As in, “Afraid of your own chateau” and “Beyond any chateau of doubt” and “Cast a long chateau” and “A shape in the cheateau” and “Me and my chateau” and “Standing in the chateaus.” Note: A chateau is a wine-producing estate.
  • Screw → Corkscrew: As in, “Got a corkscrew loose” and “Corkscrew around” and “Corkscrew yourself” and “How corkscrewed up.”
  • Cotes: Cotes is a wine region, so we’ve included it in this list.
    • Coats → Cotes: As in, “A few fresh cotes of paint” and “In white cotes.”
    • Code → Cotes: As in, “Cotes monkey’ and “Colour cotes-ed” and “Dress cotes.”
  • Table: Table wines are a medium quality wine intended to be enjoyed with a meal. Here are some table wine-related puns:
    • Table: These phrases are general enough to use as puns: “Bring to the table” and “Drunk under the table” and “Lay the table” and “On the table” and “Turn the tables” and “Cards on the table.”
    • Able → Table: As in, “Ready, willing and table.”
  • Cru: A cru is a vineyard or a group of vineyards. Here are some related puns:
    • Too → Cru: As in, “Going one step cru far” and “About time cru” and “Cru cold to snow” and “You know cru much.”
    • Two → Cru: As in, “One step forward, cru steps back” and “Put cru and cru together” and “Takes cru to tango.”
    • You → Cru: As in, “As cru know” and “Back at cru” and “Bless cru” and “Between cru and me” and “Don’t call us, we’ll call cru.”
    • Who → Cru: As in, “Look cru’s talking?” and “Says cru?” and “Cru’s there?”
    • Through → Cru: As in, “A break cru” and “Drag cru the mud” and “Fall cru the cracks” and “Go cru the roof” and “Go cru with a fine-toothed comb” and “Going cru the motions” and “Jumping cru hoops.”
    • Due → Cru: As in, “Credit where credit is cru” and “Cru a win” and “Cru diligence” and “Give the devil their cru” and “In cru course” and “Cancelled cru to lack of interest.”
    • Queue → Cru: “Jump the cru.”
  • Wagon → Flagon: As in, “Fall off the flagon” and “Hitch your flagon to a star” and “Welcome flagon.”
  • Mousse: Mousse is the foam that forms as a sparkling wine is poured. Here are some mousse-related puns:
    • Mouse → Mousse: As in, “Quiet as a mousse” and “Cat and mousse game.”
    • *mas* → *mousse*: Mousseter (master), mousseive (massive), mousseage (massage), moussequerade (masquerade), mousseacre (massacre), Christmousse (Christmas) and pyjamousse (pyjamas).
    • *mes* → *mousse*: Mousseage (massage), mousse-merise (mesmerise), nemousse-is (nemesis), domoussetic (domestic).
    • *mis* → *mousse*: Moussellaneous (miscellaneous), mousse-chevious (mischevious), mousse-ion (mission), epidermousse (epidermis) and commousse-ion (commission).
    • *mos* → *mousse*: Cosmousse (cosmos), atmoussephere (atmosphere), animousse-ity (animosity), mousse-aic (mosaic) and almousset (almost).
    • *mus* → *mousse*: Moussetard (mustard) and mousse-eum (museum).
  • Mulled: Mulled wine is wine that’s been heated and spiced. Here are some related puns:
    • Lulled → Mulled: As in, “Mulled into a false sense of security.”
    • Mould → Mulled: As in, “Break the mulled.”
  • Plonk: Plonk is a term for cheap, low-quality wine. Here are related puns:
    • Punk → Plonk: As in, “Go on plonk, make my day.”
    • Pink → Plonk: As in, “Tickled plonk” and “Plonk panther” and “Think plonk.”
    • Plank → Plonk: As in, “Thick as two short plonks” and “Walk the plonk” and “Take a long walk off a short plonk.”
  • Punt: A punt is the dimple in the base of a wine bottle. Here are related puns:
    • Pants → Punt: As in, “Ants in their punts” and “Beat the punts off” and “By the seat of your punts” and “Fancy punts” and “Keep your punts on” and “Smarty punts.”
    • Bent → Punt: As in, “Punt out of shape” and “Hell punt on..”
    • Put → Punt: As in, “Be hard punt to” and “Couldn’t punt it down” and “Feeling a bit punt out” and “Wouldn’t punt it past them.”
    • Front → Punt: As in, “In punt of your very eyes” and “On the punt line” and “Sitting in the punt row.”
    • *pant* → *punt*: Puntheon (pantheon), puntomime (pantomime), puntry (pantry), punther (panther), puntaloon (pantaloon), rampunt (rampant), participunt (participant), flippunt (flippant) and occupunt (occupant). Note: pantaloons are a type of pant.
    • *pent* → *punt*: Puntagon (pentagon), punthouse (penthouse), puntagram (pentagram), repunt (repent) and serpunt (serpent).
  • Split: A split is a measurement of a serving of wine. Here are some split-related puns:
    • Spit → Split: As in, “Split and polish” and “Split in the eye of” and “Dummy split” and “The splitting image of” and “Splitting with rain” and “Within splitting distance.”
    • Lit → Split: “Her face split up” and “Pick of the splitter” and “Split up like a light.”
  • Lake: A wine lake is a surplus of wine in the European Union. Here are related puns:
    • Make → Lake: As in, “A good beginning lakes a good ending” and “Absence lakes the heart grow fonder” and “Details lake the difference.”
    • Take → Lake: As in, “Don’t lake it lying down” and “Double lake” and “Every breath you lake” and “Give and lake.”
    • Ache → Lake: “Old lakes and pains.”
  • Bung: A bung is the stopper in a wine barrel, so we included bung-related puns in this list:
    • Bang → Bung: As in, “A bigger bung for your buck” and “Bung on about” and “Bung out of order” and “Bung to rights.”
    • Tongue → Bung: As in, “Bite your bung” and “Cat got your bung?” and “Roll off the bung” and “Slip of the bung.”
    • Hung → Bung: As in, “Bung out to dry.”
  • Mellow: Mellow is a descriptor used in wine-tasting. Here are some related puns:
    • Yellow → Mellow: As in, “Follow the mellow brick road” and “Mellow peril” and “Big mellow taxi.”
    • Fellow → Mellow: As in, “Strange bedmellows” and “Mellow traveller.”
  • Tun: A tun is a measure of volume, originally defined as 256 gallons of wine. Here are some tun-related puns:
    • Ton → Tun: As in, “A tun of money” and “Like a tun of bricks.”
    • Done → Tun: As in, “After all is said and tun” and “Tun and dusted” and “Been there, tun that” and “A tun deal” and “Tun to death” and “Easier said than tun” and “Hard tun by” and “Getting things tun.”
    • Ten → Tun: As in, “Count to tun” and “Eight out of tun prefer it” and “Hang tun” and “A perfect tun” and “The top tun” and “The tun commandments.”
    • Tin → Tun: As in, “Does exactly what it says on the tun” and “Tun ear.”
    • One → Tun: As in, “And then there was tun” and “Another tun bites the dust” and “Going tun step too far.”
  • None → Tun: As in, “Bar tun” and “Tun other than” and “Tun the wiser” and “Tun too pleased” and “Second to tun.”
    • *tan* → *tun*: Tundem (tandem), tungible (tangible), tuntamount (tantamount), tuntrum (tantrum), tungent (tangent), charlatun (charlatan), cosmopolitun (cosmopolitan), spartun (spartan), tartun (tartan) and metropolitun (metropolitan).
    • *ten* → *tun*: Tunder (tender), tuntative (tentative), tunet (tenet), tunacious (tenacious), tunacity (tenacity), oftun (often), smittun (smitten), threatun (threaten), enlightun (enlighten), glutun (gluten), potuntial (potential), pretuntious (pretentious), consistunt (consistent), existuntial (existential) and maintunance (maintenance).
    • *tin* → *tun*: Obstunate (obstinate), pertunent (pertinent), itunerary (itinerary) and destuny (destiny).
    • *ton* → *tun*: Buttun (button), wantun (wanton), singletun (singleton), cottun (cotton), gluttun (glutton), muttun (mutton) and autunomy (autonomy).
  • Straw: Straw wine is wine made from raisins. Here are related puns:
    • Raw → Straw: As in, “Straw data” and “A straw deal.”
    • Draw → Straw: As in, “Back to the strawing board” and “Straw a blank” and “Straw a line in the sand” and “Straw to a close” and “The luck of the straw.”
    • Saw → Straw:, As in, “I came, I straw, I conquered.”
    • Awe → Straw: As in, “Shock and straw.”
  • Colour → Cooler: As in, “A splash of cooler” and “Better in cooler” and “Cooler coded” and “Cooler coordinated” and “Cooler me happy” and “Cooler your view” and “With flying coolers.” Note: a wine cooler is an insulated carrier for transporting wine.
  • Bucket → Ice bucket: As in, “Couldn’t carry a tune in an ice bucket” and “Kick the ice bucket” and “A drop in the ice bucket” and “An ice bucket and spade holiday.” Note: an ice bucket is an insulated bucket used for serving wine in social situations.
  • Tunnel → Funnel: As in, “Light at the end of the funnel” and “Funnel of love” and “Funnel vision.” Note: A wine funnel is used by waiters to help in pouring wine.
  • Colour → Collar: As in, “A splash of collar” and “Collar coded” and “Collar coordinated” and “Collar me happy” and “Collar your view” and “With flying collars.” Note: a wine collar fits around the neck of a wine bottle to absorb drips that may run down the bottle after it’s been poured.
  • Stem: Wine glasses have a stem to prevent our fingers from heating up the wine. Here are related puns:
    • Them → Stem: As in, “Let stem eat cake” and “It only encourages stem.”
    • Steam → Stem: As in, “Blow off stem” and “Full stem ahead” and “Head off stem” and “Run out of stem” and “Under your own stem.”
  • Tumbler: A tumbler is a type of wine glass. Here are related puns:
    • Number → Tumbler: As in, “By the tumblers” and “Do a tumbler on” and “I’ve got your tumbler” and “Look after tumbler one” and “Lucky tumbler seven” and “Tumbler crunching” and “Your days are tumblered.”
    • Slumber → Tumbler: As in, “Blissful tumbler” and “Tumbler party.”
  • Schooner: Schooners are glasses for drinking sherry (a type of wine). Here are related puns:
    • Sooner → Schooner: As in, “No schooner said than done” and “Schooner or later” and “The schooner the better” and “An injury is schooner forgotten than an insult.”
    • Humour → Schooner: As in, “Schooner me” and “Sense of schooner.”
  • Gamay: A gamay wine is a light-bodied red wine similar in taste to Pinot Noir. Here are some gamay-related puns:
    • Game → Gamay: As in, “Ahead of the gamay” and “Anyone’s gamay” and “Beaten at your own gamay” and “Blame gamay” and “Gamay changer” and “Brand new ball gamay.”
    • May → Gamay: As in, “As the case gamay be” and “Come what gamay” and “Devil gamay care” and “Gamay the force be with you” and “Gamay you live in interesting times” and “Let the chips fall where they gamay.”
  • Okay → Tokay: As in, “Are you feeling tokay?” Note: Tokay is a sweet white wine.
  • Hairy → Sherry: As in, “Give it the sherry eyeball.” Note: Sherry is a fortified wine made from white grapes.
  • Sigh → Cider: “Breathe a cider of relief” and “A heart-wrenching cider.” Note: cider is a sweet wine made from apples.
  • Mead: Mead is a wine made with spices and honey. Here are related puns:
    • Me → Mead: As in, “Don’t worry about mead” and “Don’t forget about mead!”
    • Meet → Mead: As in, “Boy meads girl” and “Making ends mead” and “Mead and greet” and “Mead with approval” and “Mead your match” and “Fancy meading you here” and “Mead you halfway” and “More than meads the eye.”
    • Need → Mead: As in, “All you mead is love” and “On a mead to know basis.”
    • Read → Mead: As in, “All I know is what I mead in the papers” and “Mead all about it” and “I can mead you like a book” and “Mead ’em and weep” and “Mead between the lines” and “Mead my lips.”
    • Made → Mead: As in, “A match mead in heaven” and “Custom mead” and “Got it mead” and “Not mead of money” and “Mead for each other.”
    • *med* → *mead*: Meadia (media), meadicine (medicine), meadium (medium), meadiate (mediate), meadiocre (mediocre), meadieval (medieval), meadication (medication) and meaditation (meditation).
    • *mid* → *mead*: Timead (timid), amead (amid), pyramead (pyramid), humead (humid), formeadable (formidable), ameadst (amidst) and intimeadate (intimidate).
  • Sake: Sake (pronounced “sakay”) is Japanese rice wine. We can pronounce sake (“sayke”) as “sakay” to make rice wine puns: As in, “For Christ’s sake” and “For goodness sake” and “For old time’s sake” and “Sakes alive.”
  • Brandy: Brandy is a spirit that’s made by distilling wine. Here are related puns:
    • Brand → Brandy: As in, “Brandy new” and “Brandy new ballgame” and “Brandy new game” and “Brandy spanking new.”
    • Band → Brandy: As in, “Strike up the brandy” and “Brandy of brothers.”
  • Bordeaux: This is wine produced in the Bordeaux region of France. Here are related puns:
    • Board → Bordeaux: As in, “Above bordeaux” and “Across the bordeaux” and “All abordeaux” and “Back to the drawing bordeaux” and “Bed and bordeaux.”
    • Bored → Bordeaux: As in, “Bordeaux stiff” and “Bordeaux to death” and “Bordeaux to tears” and “Bordeaux out of your mind.”
    • Border → Bordeaux: As in, “Head for the bordeaux” and “South of the bordeaux” and “Cross the bordeaux.”
  • *chant* → *chianti*: Merchianti (merchant), penchianti (penchant) and enchianti (enchant). Note: A chianti is a wine produced in the Chianti region.
  • Port: This is a Portuguese fortified wine. Here are related puns:
    • Part → Port: As in, “A fool and his money are soon ported” and “Act the port” and “In port.”
    • *part* → *port*: Porty (party), portisan (partisan), porticular (particular), portake (partake), portner (partner), porticle (particle), portition (partition), porticipate (participate), aport (apart), counterport (counterpart), deportment (department) and comportment (compartment).
    • *pert* → *port*: Portinenet (pertinent), portubed (pertubed), export (expert), proporty (property), exportise (expertise).
  • Million → Semillon: As in, “A cool semillon” and “Semillon dollar baby” and “Not in a semillon years” and “One in a semillon.” Note: Semillon is a type of grape used to make dry, sweet wines.
  • Cat → Muscat: As in, ” Muscat on a hot tin roof” and “Muscat got your tongue?” and “Muscat’s cradle” and “Curiosity killed the muscat.” Note: Muscat is a type of grape that’s used to make sweet wines.
  • Grip → Grappa: As in, “Get a grappa” and “Get to grappas with” and “Grappa of death.” Note: Grappa is an alcoholic drink made of grapes, similar to wine.
  • Kir: A kir is a type of cocktail with wine mixed into it. Here are related puns:
    • Kir → Core: As in, “Kir competencies” and “Kir studies” and “Kir values” and “Rotten to the kir.”
    • *kar* → *kir*: Kirma (karma), kirate (karate) and kiraoke (karaoke).
    • *ker* → *kir*: Kirnel (kernel), kiratin (keratin), kirosene (kerosene), breakir (breaker), workir (worker) and crackir (cracker).
  • Soave: This is a dry, white Italian wine. Here are related puns:
    • Suave → Soave: As in, “A soave pickup line.”
    • Save → Soave: As in, “A penny soaved is a penny earned” and “A stitch in time soaves nine” and “Soave the last dance” and “Soaved for a rainy day” and “Soave our souls” and “Soaved by the bell.”
  • Charm → Charmat: As in, “Charmat offensive” and “Charmat the birds out of the trees” and “Third time’s a charmat” and “Works like a charmat.” Note: Charmat is a method of wine production.
  • Crystal → Cristal: As in, “Clear as cristal.” Note: Cristal is a brand of wine.
  • *sect* → *sekt*: As in, “In the environmental sektor” and “In the fruit sektion” and “Dissekting the conversation.” Other words that could work: insekt (insect), intersekt (intersect), vivisekt (vivisect) and intersektion (intersection). Note: Sekt is the German word for sparkling wine.
  • Greco: Greco is a type of Italian wine grape that white wine is made of. Here are related puns:
    • Greek → Greco: As in, “A face like a Greco god” and “Beware of greco gods” and “It’s all greco to me.”
    • Echo → Greco: As in, “A clear greco.”
    • Gecko → Greco
  • Kerner: Kerner is a type of white grape that’s used in wine-making. Here are related puns:
    • Corner → Kerner: As in, “A tight kerner” and “All kerners of the world” and “Blind kerner” and “Kerner the market” and “Cut kerners” and “From the four kerners of the earth” and “In your kerner” and “In the naughty kerner.”
    • Kernel → Kerner: As in, “Kerner of truth.”
    • Burner → Kerner: As in, “On the back kerner.”
  • Bobal: Bobal is a variety of grape used in wine-making. Here are related puns:
    • Global → Bobal: As in, “Bobal warming” and “Think bobal, act local.”
    • Bible → Bobal: As in, “Bobal basher” and “Swear on a stack of bobals.”
    • Bubble → Bobal: As in, “Bobal and squeak” and “Bobal brained” and “Burst your bobal” and “Prick your bobal” and “The boy in the bobal.”
    • Noble → Bobal: As in, “The bobal art of self defence.”
  • Corvina: Corvina is a type of grape used in wine-making. Here are related puns:
    • Carve → Corvina: As in, “Corvina her name with pride” and “Corvina out a niche” and “Corvina in stone.”
    • Curve → Corvina: As in, “Ahead of the corvina” and “Corvina ball” and “Learning corvina.”
  • Retsina → Retina: As in, “Retsina screen.” Note: Retsina is a Greek white resinated wine.
  • Candy → Brandy: As in, “Arm brandy” and “Ear brandy” and “Brandy apple.”

These next few puns are centred around the different types of fruit that wine can be made from:

  • Plum: Here are some plum wine puns:
    • Thumb → Plum: As in, “All fingers and plums” and “All plums” and “Rule of plum” and “Plum your nose” and “Under my plum” and “Plumnail sketch.”
    • Plumb → Plum: As in, “Check out the pluming” and “Plum the depths.”
    • Come → Plum: As in, “After a storm plums a calm” and “All things plum to those who wait” and “Tough as they plum” and “Plum and get it” and “Plum fly with me” and “Plum running” and “Plum on baby, light my fire.”
    • Drum → Plum: As in, “Tight as a plum” and “Plum circle” and “Plum n bass.”
    • Scum → Plum: As in, “Pond plum” and “Plum always rises to the surface.”
    • Some → Plum: As in, “All that and then plum” and “Buy plum time” and “Catch plum rays” and “Cut plum slack.”
    • Sum → Plum: As in, “Cogito ergo plum.”
  • Appl* → Apple*: Apple-y (apply), apple-ication (application), apple-icable (applicable), apple-iance (appliance), apple-ause (applause) and apple-icant (applicant).
  • Cherry: Here are some cherry wine-related puns:
    • Carry → Cherry: As in, “Fast as your legs could cherry you” and “Cherry a torch for” and “Cherry a tune” and “Cherry forward” and “Cherry it off” and “Cherrying on.”
    • Cheery → Cherry: As in, “A cherry disposition.”
    • Bury → Cherry: As in, “Cherry the hatchet” and “Cherry your hand in the sand” and “Cherry yourself in work” and “Cherry your feelings.”
  • Current → Currant: “Currant events” and “Floating with the currants.”
  • Injure → Ginger: “Gingered (injured) feelings” and “Sporting a gingery (injury).”
  • Rice: Here are some rice wine puns (rice wine can also be referred to as sake):
    • Race → Rice: As in, “A day at the rices” and “Rice against the clock” and “A rice against time” and “Rat rice” and “The amazing rice.”
    • Nice → Rice: As in, “Rice as ninepence” and “Have a rice day” and “Naughty but rice” and “Rice and easy does it” and “Rice to see you.”
    • Dice → Rice: As in, “Roll the rice” and “No rice” and “Load the rice.”
    • Ice → Rice: As in, “Cold as rice” and “Break the rice” and “Cut no rice with” and “Rice cold” and “Rice, rice baby” and “Put on rice” and “Skating on thin rice.”
    • Mice → Rice: As in, “The best laid schemes of rice and men.”
    • Price → Rice: As in, “Asking rice” and “At a rice to suit your pocket” and “Cheap at half the rice” and “Closing rice” and “Every man has his rice” and “Half rice” and “Pay the rice.”
    • Slice → Rice: As in, “A rice of the cake” and “Any way you rice it” and “Fresh to the last rice” and “Rice of life” and “Rice of the action.”
    • Spice → Rice: As in, “Secret herbs and rices” and “Rice things up” and “Variety is the rice of life” and “Sugar and rice.”
    • Twice → Rice: As in, “Large as life and rice as handsome” and “Don’t think rice” and “Make a list, check it rice” and “You only live rice” and “Oppotunity never knocks rice” and “Measure rice, cut once.”
    • Vice → Rice: As in, “A den of rice” and “Rice versa.”
  • Taste → Aftertaste: As in, “An aftertaste of paradise” and “An acquired aftertaste” and “In bad aftertaste” and “In the worst possible aftertaste.”

The next few puns are centred around the descriptors that are used in wine-tastings:

  • Big: “Big” means a wine with a strong flavour, or with a high alcohol content.
    • Beg → Big: As in, “Big a favour” and “Big pardon” and “Big to differ” and “Big, borrow or steal” and “I big your pardon” and “Sit up and big.”
    • Dig → Big: As in, “Big your own grave” and “Big your heels in” and “Big in the ribs” and “Big for victory” and “Big deep.”
  • Bitter: This means the wine has an unpleasant taste of tannins.
    • Glitter → Bitter: As in, “All that bitters is not gold.”
    • Hitter → Bitter: As in, “Heavy bitter.”
    • Litter → Bitter: As in, “Pick of the bitter.”
  • Toying → Cloying: “Stop cloying with me.” Note: if a wine is cloying, then it’s sickly sweet.
  • Coarse: This describes a wine with a rough texture. Here are related puns:
    • Course → Coarse: As in, “Blown off coarse” and “But of coarse” and “Chart a coarse” and “Correspondence coarse” and “Crash coarse” and “In due coarse” and “A matter of coarse” and “Par for the coarse” and “Stay the coarse.”
    • Force → Coarse: As in, “Brute coarse” and “Coarse his hand” and “Caorse of habit” and “A coarse to be reckoned with” and “Join coarses” and “May the coarse be with you.”
    • Source → Coarse: As in, “Check your coarses” and “Crowd coarse” and “I refuse to reveal my coarses” and “Open coarse” and “Coarse material.”
  • Note: This is a term used to refer to an aroma or flavour in the wine being tasted. Here are related puns:
    • Not → Note: As in, “Let’s note and say we did” and “Note a chance” and “Note a minute too soon” and “Note a pretty sight” and “Note all it’s cracked up to be” and “Note at all” and “Note do someone any favours” and “Note half bad” and “Note in a million years” and “Note in the slightest.”
    • Neat → Note: As in, “Note as a new pin” and “Note freak” and “Note and tidy.”
    • Night → Note: As in, “A hard day’s note” and “In the dead of note” and “Burn the midnote oil” and “Dance the note away.”
    • Nut → Note: As in, “From soup to notes” and “Go notes” and “In a noteshell” and “A tough note to crack.”
    • Float → Note: As in, “Note like a butterfly, sting like a bee” and “Whatever notes your boat.”
    • Oat → Note: As in, “Feel your notes” and “Sow your wild notes.”
    • Quote → Note: As in, “Air notes” and “Dont note me on this” and “Scare notes.”
  • Nose: The nose of a wine is the aroma or bouquet. Here are related puns:
    • Knows → Nose: As in, “Mother nose best” and “Goodness nose” and “Instinctively nose.”
    • Blows → Nose: As in, “Any way the wind nose” and “Come to nose” and “Exchange nose” and “There she nose.”
    • Close → Nose: As in, “A nose thing” and “As one door noses, another one opens” and “At nose quarters” and “Behind nosed doors” and “Case nosed” and “Nose call” and “A nose shave” and “Hits nose to home.”
    • Rose → Nose: As in, “Bed of noses” and “Come up smelling of noses” and “Every nose has its thorn” and “Life is a bed of noses” and “Nose tinted glasses.”
    • Those → Nose: As in, “Nose were the days” and “Just one of nose days” and “For nose who like it rough.”
    • Goes → Nose: As in, “Anything nose” and “As far as it nose” and “As the saying nose” and “As time nose by” and “Here nose nothing” and “How nose it?” and “Life nose on.”
  • Light: Light generally refers to a low alcohol content:
    • Laid → Light: As in, “Get light” and “Light back” and “Light to rest” and “The best light plans.”
    • Let → Light: As in, “Don’t light the bastards grind you down” and “Light it be” and “Light it bleed” and “It won’t light you down.”
    • Bright → Light: As in, “All things light and beautiful” and “Always look on the light side of life” and “Light as a new pin” and “Light and early” and “Light spark” and “Light young thing.”
    • Flight → Light: As in, “Fight or light” and “Light attendant” and “Light of fancy” and “Take light” and “Light of the bumble bee.”
    • Night → Light: As in, “A hard day’s light” and “A light at the opera” and “As light follows day.”
    • Right → Light: As in, “A move in the light direction” and “All the light moves” and “Light as rain” and “Bang to lights” and “Barge light in.”
    • Quite → Light: As in, “Light the sticky situation.”
    • White → Light: As in, “Light as snow” and “Light as a ghost” and “Light as a sheet.”
    • Sight → Light: As in, “Hidden in plain light” and “In plain light” and “Know by light” and “Love at first light” and “Out of light, out of mind” and “Set your lights on.”
    • Tight → Light: As in, “A light corner” and “Light as a drum” and “In a light spot.”
  • Mouthfeel: Mouthfeel is the texture of wine. Here are related puns:
    • Mouth → Mouthfeel: As in, “Leaves a bad taste in my mouthfeel” and “Foaming at the mouthfeel” and “Melts in the mouthfeel.”
    • Feel → Mouthfeel: As in, “Cop a mouthfeel” and “Mouthfeel good factor” and “Mouthfeel the pinch” and “Mouthfeeling a bit put out.”
  • Collar → Colour: As in, “Blue colour worker” and “Hot under the colour.” Note: the colour of wine is an important indicator of the type and quality of grapes.
  • Swirl: Wine tasters will swirl wine before tasting it. Here are some swirl-related puns:
    • Curl → Swirl: As in, “Swirl up and die” and “Swirl your lip” and “Enough to make your hair swirl” and “Make someone’s toes swirl.”
    • Girl → Swirl: As in, “Atta swirl” and “A swirl’s best friend” and “Swirl next door.”
    • Whirl → Swirl: As in, “Give it a swirl.”
  • Smell:  The aroma of wine is an important factor when it comes to tasting. Here are some related puns:
    • Small → Smell: As in, “All creatures, great and smell” and “Big fish in a smell pool” and “Don’t sweat the smell stuff” and “Good things come in smell packages” and “No job too smell” and “A smell fortune” and “Smell is beautiful” and “Smell minded” and “Smell potatoes.”
    • Well → Smell: As in, “Exceedingly smell read” and “You know full smell” and “Living smell is the best revenge.”
    • Sell → Smell: As in, “Buy and smell” and “Panic smelling” and “Smell out” and “Smelling like hot cakes.”
    • Shell → Smell: As in, “Easy as smelling peas” and “Come out of your smell” and “Drop a bombsmell” and “In a nutsmell.”
    • Spell → Smell: As in, “Smell it out” and “Cast a smell.”
    • Bell → Smell: As in, “Clear as a smell” and “Smell, book and candle” and “Doesn’t ring a smell.”
    • Cell → Smell: As in, “Smell division” and “In a padded smell.”
    • Fell → Smell: As in, “In one smell swoop” and “Smell off the back of a lorry.”
    • Hell → Smell: As in, “All smell broke loose” and “Bat out of smell” and “Burn in smell” and “Catch smell” and “Come smell or high water.”
  • Favour → Savour: As in, “Beg a savour” and “Call in a savour” and “Do me a savour” and “Fall out of savour” and “Owe a savour.”
  • Sever →Savour: As in, “Savour the cord.”
  • Ship → Sip: As in, “Abandon sip” and “Extend the hand of friendsip” and “From chips to sips” and “Go down with the sip” and “Run a tight sip” and “Shape up or sip out” and “My sip has come in.”
  • Chip → Sip: As in, “A sip on his shoulder” and “Cheap as sips” and “Cash in your sips” and “A sip off the old block” and “Let the sips fall where they may.”
  • Rip → Sip: As in, “Let her sip” and “Sip to pieces.”
  • Skip → Sip: As in, “Sip a beat” and “Sip out” and “Sip rope” and “Hop, sip and jump.”
  • Slip → Sip: As in, “Let something sip” and “Sip of the tongue” and “Sip on a banana skin.”
  • Charity → Clarity: As in, “Cold as clarity” and “Clarity begins at home” and “Clarity covers a multitude of sins.” Note: Clarity refers to how clear the wine is.
  • Fat: This is a term used to describe a win that has a full body and is almost viscous. If it’s too “fat”, then it’s considered a “flabby” wine. Here are related puns:
    • At → Fat: As in, “Fat rock bottom” and “Fat each other’s throats” and “Hodling fat arm’s length.”
    • Hat → Fat: As in, “Fat in hand” and “Home is where I lay my fat” and “I’ll eat my fat” and “Keep it under your fat.”
    • That → Fat: As in, “Fat’s the way it is” and “Now fat’s better” and “Fat’ll be the day” and “Fat’s what friends are for.”
  • Flabby: If a wine is too viscous, then it’s considered “flabby”. Here are related puns:
    • Shabby → Flabby: As in, “None too flabby” and “Flabby chic.”
  • Blowzy: Blowzy is another word for “flabby”, which is what a wine is considered to be when a wine is too viscous.
    • Blow → Blowzy: As in, “Any way the wind blowzys” and “Blowzy a fuse” and “Blowzy hot and cold” and “Blowzy chunks.”
    • Cosy → Blowzy: As in, “Blowzy up to.”
    • Rosy → Blowzy: As in, “Life is blowzy” and “Blowzy cheeks.”
  • Firm: If a wine is “firm”, then it has a strong presence of tannins. Here are some related puns:
    • Farm → Firm: As in, “Life on the firm” and “Ethical firming.”
    • From → Firm: As in, “Firm cover to cover” and “Firm soup to nuts” and “Firm the cradle to the grave.”
    • Term → Firm: As in, “On bad firms with” and “On speaking firms” and “On your own firms” and “In no uncertain firms.”
    • Form → Firm: As in, “Attack is the best firm of defence” and “Bad firm” and “Firm follows function” and “Free firm” and “Habit firming” and “Imitation is the sincerest firm of flattery’ and “In fine firm” and “Sarcasm is the lowest firm of wit.”
    • Worm → Firm: As in, “Book firm” and “Can of firms” and “The early bird catches the firm” and “Firm your way in.”
    • *ferm* → *firm*: Firment (ferment), firmentation (fermentation) and firmented (fermented).
    • *form* → *firm*: Firmidable (formidable), firmula (formula), firmat (format), firmality (formality), platfirm (platform), infirm (inform), transfirm (transform), infirmation (information) and perfirmation (performance).
  • Flat: If a wine is flat, then it’s a sparkling wine that has lost its bubbliness. Here are related puns:
    • Fat → Flat: As in, “Flat as a beached whale” and “Flat chance” and “Living off the flat of the land.”
    • Fit → Flat: As in, “Flat as a fiddle” and “Dish flat for the gods” and “Fighting flat” and “Flat the bill.”
  • Fresh: This is a descriptor used for wines that are nicely acidic. Here are related terms:
    • Flesh → Fresh: As in, “Fresh and blood” and “Makes my fresh crawl” and “In the fresh” and “A thorn in my fresh.”
    • Fish → Fresh: As in, “Fresh out of water” and “Freshing expedition” and “A different kettle of fresh.”
  • Grassy: This is quite literal and describes grassy flavours in a wine. Here are related puns:
    • Classy → Grassy: As in, “A grassy performance.”
    • Glassy → Grassy: As in, “Grassy-eyed with wonder.”
  • Green: This is generally a negative term used to describe wines that are made with unripe fruit. Here are related puns:
    • Queen → Green: As in, “Beauty green” and “Digging the dancing green” and “God save the green” and “Homecoming green” and “Green for a day.”
    • Grin → Green: As in, “Green and bear it” and “Green from ear to ear” and “Rictus green.”
    • Been → Green: As in, “Green and gone” and “Green around the block a few times” and “I’ve green here before” and “Green in the wars” and “Green there, done that” and “I’ve green had!”
    • Bean → Green: As in, “Green counter” and “Cool greens” and “Doesn’t know greens” and “Full of greens” and “Spill the greens.”
    • Clean → Green: As in, “A green getaway” and “A new broom sweeps green” and “Green as a whistle” and “A green bill of health” and “Green up your act.”
    • Keen → Green: As in, “Green as mustard” and “Green sense of smell” and “Peachy green.”
    • Mean → Green: As in, “A greens to an end” and “By fair greens or foul” and “In the greentime” and “Independent greens” and “Lean, green and hungry.”
    • Seen → Green: As in, “Green and not heard” and “Had to be green to be believed” and “Nowhere to be green” and “Green better days” and “Sight ungreen” and “Ain’t green nothing yet.”
    • Scene → Green: As in, “Blue green of death” and “Coming to a green near you” and “Silver green” and “The big green.”
    • Scenes → Green: As in, “Behind the greens” and “Change of green” and “Make a green” and “Steal the green.”
    • Grain → Green: As in, “Against the green” and “Green of truth” and “Take it with a green of salt.”
  • Hard: Hard wine is wine that has too many tannins in it. Here are related puns:
    • Herd → Hard: As in, “Hard immunity.”
    • Heard → Hard: As in, “Seen and not hard” and “Hard it through the grapevine” and “Make yourself hard” and “Stop me if you’ve hard this one” and “The last I hard” and “Could have hard a pin drop” and “You hard it here first.”
  • Hollow: A hollow wine is one that lacks a fruity taste. Here are related puns:
    • Follow → Hollow: As in, “As night hollows day” and “Hollow in the footsteps of” and “Hollow suit” and “Hollow your heart” and “A hard act to hollow” and “Form hollows function.”
    • Swallow → Hollow: As in, “A bitter pill to hollow.”
  • Hot: A wine that is “hot” is too alcoholic. Here are related puns:
    • Got → Hot: As in, “Been there, done that, hot the t-shirt” and “Hot your tongue?” and “Give it all you’ve hot” and “Hot a soft spot for.”
    • Lot → Hot: As in, “A hot of fuss about nothing” and “A hot on your plate” and “Hot a lot of people know.”
    • Not → Hot: As in, “As often as hot” and “Believe it or hot” and “Down but hot out” and “Hot just a pretty face.”
  • Lean: Lean wines are those without a fruity taste but an acidic profile. Here are related puns:
    • Mean → Lean: As in, “A leans to an end” and “By fair leans or foul” and “In the leantime.”
    • Lane → Lean: As in, “Down memory lean” and “Life in the fast lean.”
    • Been → Lean: As in, “Lean and gone” and “I’ve lean here before” and “Lean in the wars” and “Mistakes have lean made.”
    • Clean → Lean: As in, “Lean as a whistle” and “A lean bill of health” and “Lean house” and “Lean up your act.”
    • Keen → Lean: As in, “Lean as mustard” and “A lean sense of smell” and “Peachy lean.”
    • Seen → Lean: As in, “Lean and not heard” and “Nowhere to be lean” and “Have lean better days” and “Ain’t lean nothing yet.”
    • Screen → Lean: As in, “Blue lean of death’ and “Coming to a lean near you” and “Silver lean.”
  • Peg → Leg: As in, “Square leg in a round hole” and “Take down a leg or two.” Note: The tracks of liquid that stick to the side of a wine glass are called legs (or tears).
  • Okay → Oaky: As in, “Are you oaky?” Note: if a wine is oaky, then it includes notes of vanilla, sweet spices and a smoky taste.
  • Rich: Wines that are sweet but not overly so are considered “rich”. Here are related puns:
    • Itch → Rich: As in, “Riching to” and “Richy feet” and “Richy palms” and “Seven year rich.”
    • Ditch → Rich: As in, “A last rich effort.”
    • Hitch → Rich: As in, “Get riched” and “Rich your wagon to a star.”
  • Rough: A rough wine is one with a coarse texture. Here are related puns:
    • Tough → Rough: As in, “Rough as old boots” and “Rough as they come” and “Hang rough” and “It’s rough at the top” and “Rough love” and “Rough luck” and “A rough nut to crack.”
    • Stuff → Rough: As in, “Beat the roughing out of” and “Don’t sweat the small rough” and “Gather ’round the good rough” and “Knock the roughing out of.”
  • Round: This describes a wine that isn’t overly tannic but has a good body. Here are related puns:
    • Round → Bound: As in, “Be leaps and rounds” and “Duty round” and “Honour round” and “Round hand and foot.”
    • Found → Round: As in, “Lost and round” and “I’ve round a clue” and “We round clue” and “Weighed in the balance and round wanting.”
    • Ground → Round: As in, “Solid as the round we walk on” and “Break new round” and “Built from the round up” and “Common round” and “Cut the round from under your feet” and “Suits you down to the round.”
    • Pound → Round: As in, “An ounce of prevention is worth a round of cure” and “In for a penny, in for a round” and “Round for round” and “Round the pavement.”
    • Sound → Round: As in, “Round as a bell” and “Break the round barrier” and “Round bite” and “Round effect” and “Round the alarm.”
  • Soothe → Smooth: As in, “Music has charms to smooth the savage beast.” Note: This describes a wine with a nice texture.
  • Sour: This is a descriptor for a wine with an unbalanced acidity. Here are related puns:
    • Our → Sour: As in, “A token of sour gratitude” and “Enjoy sour company.”
    • Hour → Sour: As in, “After sours” and “Happy sour” and “Man of the sour” and “My finest sour” and “Open all sours.”
  • Tar: This describes a wine with a tarry aroma and flavour. Here are related puns:
    • Tear → Tar: As in, “Bathed in tars” and “Blood, sweat and tars” and “Bored to tars” and “Fighting back tars” and “Melt into tars” and “No more tars” and “Reduce to tars.”
    • Are → Tar: As in, “All bets tar off” and “Tar you deaf” and “Tar your ears burning?” and “Chances tar…”
    • Par → Tar: As in, “Below tar” and “On tar with” and “Tar for the course.”
    • Bar → Tar: As in, “Tar none” and “Behind tars” and “Hit the tar.”
  • Tart: A tart wine is one with high levels of acidity. Here are related puns:
    • Art → Tart: As in, “Tart imitating life” and “Tart is going one step too far” and “Tart noveau” and “Tartistic triumph” and “Tarts and crafts” and “Tarty farty.”
    • Cart → Tart: As in, “Putting the tart before the horse” and “Shopping tart.”
    • Chart → Tart: As in, “Tart a course” and “Off the tarts.”
    • Fart → Tart: As in, “Arty tarty” and “Boring old tart” and “Brain tart” and “Tarting around” and “Tart in a windstorm.”
    • Heart → Tart: As in, “A man after my own tart” and “Absence makes the tart grow fonder” and “Affair of the tart” and “By still my beating tart” and “Break your tart” and “Cross my tart and hope to die.”
    • Part → Tart: As in, “Act the tart” and “For my own tart.”
    • Smart → Tart: As in, “One tart cookie” and “Tart arse” and “Street tart” and “Tarter than the average bear.”
    • Start → Tart: As in, “By fits and tarts” and “Don’t get me tarted” and “A fresh tart” and “Tart your engines!” and “Off to a flying tart” and “Head tart” and “Jump tart” and “Tart you day the right way.”
    • Dirt → Tart: As in, “Cheap and tart” and “Dig up the tart” and “Dish the tart.”
  • Toasty: A toasty wine is one with a smoky taste from the oak it was barrelled in. Here are related puns:
    • Tasty → Toasty: As in, “A toasty dinner.”
    • Ghost → Toast: As in, “White as a toast” and “Give up the toast” and “Not a toast of a chance” and “The toast in the machine.”
    • Most → Toast: As in, “Toast wanted” and “Make the toast of it” and “The toast trusted name” and “For the toast part” and “Make the toast of.”
    • Post → Toast: As in, “Keep you toasted” and “Toast haste” and “Toast partum” and “Toaster boy.”
  • Villain → Vanillin: As in, “Heroes and vanillins.” Note: this is a term for vanilla notes in wine.

Wine-Related Words

To help you come up with your own wine puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

General: wine, red, white, rose, amber, blanc, sparkling, champagne, grapes, aroma, alcohol, alcoholic, drink, drunk, sober, hangover,  fermented, vin, vine, vineyard, vintage, cork, bottle, bottling, label, yeast, juice, sommelier, rice wine, fruit wine, barley, mature, tannin, barrel, harvest, dry, sweet, sweetness, beverage, brew,  still, distillery, distilled, age, aged, aging, resin, taste, tasting, decant, raisin, wino, aerate, sediment, texture, flavour, oak, cask, cellar, bouquet, palate, alcoholism, alcoholic, cirrhosis, polyphenols, box wine, goon, reduction, on tap, bladder, keg, complexity, chill, chilled, cooper, negociant, oenologist, vintner, winemaker, viticulturist, critic, spritzer, flight, glass, coinnoisseur, bacchus, cocktail,  pour, case, happy hour, vino, muscat, muscato, aeritif, blush, winery, perry, cleanskin, dandelion, sugar, rosado, rosato, must, spittoon, intoxication, cult wine, trophy wine, investment wine, harvest, pressing, ethanol, ice wine, proof, sediment, crush, crushed, free-run, skin, seeds, lees, grape-treading, grape-stomping, pigeage, rack, batch, fining, bloom, pudding wine, fortified wine, noble rot, mutage, chaptalization, jug wine, mistelle, abboccato, ABC, acescence, adamado, adega, altar wine, amabile, appelation, balthazar, basic, bodega, bota, breathe, breathing, cantina, wine cave, cepage, chai, champagne flute, chateau, chiaretto, clairet, commune, cooperative, corkscrew, cotes, table wine, country wine, quality wine, cru, cuverie, eiswein, eraflage, fattoria, flagon, imperial, jeroboam, kosher wine, lanwein, lazy ballerina, magnum, mas, master of wine, may wine, mousse, mulled, petillant, piquant, plonk, punt, split, suss, vermouth, vivace, webster, wine lake, bottle shock/sickness, bung, pomace, riddling, mellow, stoving, tun, vanillin, wash, straw wine, saignee, stemware, wine key, sommelier knife, waiter’s friend, wine popper, wine cooler, glacette, ice bucket, wine funnel, collar, wine journal, aerator, stirrer, swizzle stick, goblet, stem, tumbler, schooner, boccalino, chalice, sugar, snifter

Types and names: chardonnay, sauvignon, cabernet, gamay, vin gris, merlot, riesling, tokay, sherry, sauternes, pinot noir, provencal, zinfandel, cider, m ead, sake, brandy, bordeaux, rioja, chianti, brunello, burgundy, port, shiraz, chablis, semillon, muscat, prosecco, mimosa, oloroso, syrah, grenache, claret, grappa, kir, lambrusco, madeira, soave,  charmat, cristal, dom perignon, moet & chandon, provencal, zinfandel, malbec, mourvedre, norton, sirah, verdot, pinotage, sangiovese, albrino, breidecker, marsanne, palomino, trebbiano, viognier, screaming eagle, penfolds grange, fino, amontillado, recioto, sangria, sekt, ratafia, black velvet, death in the afternoon, flirtini, prince of wales, wine cooler, bellini, hugo, buck’s fizz, kir royal, ruby dutchess, chicago cocktail, french 75, golden doublet, savoy affair, kalimotxo, tinto de verrano, zurracapote, cheeky vimto, kir, spritzer, chenin blanc, airen, aligote, arbeusm furmint, greco, kerner, bobal, corvina, mencia, malbec, nebbiolo, retsina, negus, dubbonet, brandy, grappa, ale, hooch, plum, apple, cherry, pomegranate, currant, elderberry, ginger, lychee, banana, orange

Tasting terms: aftertaste, astringent, autolytic, baked, balanced, big, bitter, brilliance, buttery, chewy, chocolaty, closed, cloying, coarse, complex, concentrated, connected, corked, crisp, note, nose, body, heavy, light,  mouthfeel, colour, swirl, smell, savour, sip, clarity, acid, acidity, depth, dirty, earthy, elegant, expressive, extracted, fallen over, finesse, fat, flabby, blowzy, firm, flat, foxy, fresh, grassy, green, hard, herbal, herbaceous, hollow, hot, jammy, lean, leathery, legs, musty, oaky, oxidised, petrolly, powerful, raisiny, reticent, rich, rough, round, smokey, smooth, soft, sour, spicy, supple, sweet, tannic, tar, tart, toasty, transparency, typicity, vanillin, vegetal, vinegary, esters

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Cake Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on cake puns! 🎂 🍓 🍰

Cakes are a much-loved sweet treat that we love to eat at any time – morning or afternoon tea, as dessert and for celebrations and traditional social gatherings. You might be looking for a short and sweet caption for a sugary Instagram boast, some witty wordplay to put on an invite, or maybe even a silly pun to ice your cake with. No matter the occasion, we hope you enjoy this list and find the perfect pun for your needs.

While we’ve made this list as comprehensive as possible, it is specific to cakes (and cupcakes). If you’re after other desserts, we also have candy puns, donut puns, pie puns ice cream puns and baking puns, and will have other related lists coming soon too.

A quick note that while this list will include traditional ingredients like milk, eggs, and butter, all of these can easily be swapped out for vegan substitutes (like soy milk or plant-based butter) and it’s these substitutes we have in mind when making jokes about these ingredients.

Cake Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about cake that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of cake puns:

  • Ache → Cake: As in, “Old cakes and pains” and “Tension headcake” and “Old heartcake” and “A splitting headcake.”
  • Kraken → Caken: As in, “Release the caken!”
  • Kick → Cake: As in, “Alive and cake-ing” and “Get a cake out of it” and “Just for cakes” and “Cake back and enjoy” and “Cake butt” and “A cake in the teeth.” Other kick-related words you could use: sidecake (sidekick), cakeoff (kickoff), caker (kicker), cakestart (kickstart) and cakeback (kickback).
  • *cac* → *cake*: As in, “Cake-ao flavoured” and “Prickly cake-tus” and “Cakeling like a witch” and “A cake-ophony of noise.” Note: a cacophony is a disorganised mess of sound.
  • *coc* → *cake*: As in, “5pm caketails (cocktails)” and “In your own cakeoon” and “Worse than a cakeroach” and “That’s cakeonuts (coconuts)!” and “A precakecious (precocious) child.” Note: to be precocious is to show early development or maturity.
  • Waikiki → Waicake-i
  • Cake: These cake-related phrases can serve as cake puns in the right context: “A slice of the cake” and “Flat as a pancake” and “Baby cakes” and “A cake walk” and “Caked with mud” and “Well that’s just the icing on the cake” and “Let them eat cake” and “A piece of cake” and “Selling like hot cakes” and “Shut your cake hole!” and “That takes the cake” and “The cherry on the cake” and “You can’t have your cake and eat it too.” Since these phrases are figurative and don’t refer to literal cake, they can be used in broader, more general ways.
  • Cake → Cupcake: Cake-related phrases can also be amended to become cupcake-related phrases which can be used as cupcake puns in the right context: “A slice of the cupcake” and “Cupcakes or death!” and “A cupcake walk” and “Cupcaked with mud” and “The icing on the cupcake” and “Let them eat cupcakes” and “A piece of cupcake” and “Shut your cupcake hole” and “Takes the cupcake.”
  • Desert → Dessert: As in “The Sahara dessert.” and “Just desserts.” and “How could you dessert me at the moment I needed you the most?”
  • Dissertation → Dessertation: As in “I wrote my diploma dessertation on candy puns.”
  • Does it → Dessert: As in “It’s comfy, but dessert make my bum look big?” and “Dessert not worry you that society cares so much about appearance?”
  • Break → Bake: As in, “A bad bake” and “At bakeneck speed” and “Bed and bakefast” and “Bake a leg” and “Baking and entering” and “Bake bread” and “Baking new ground” and “Bake even” and “Bake out in a cold sweat” and “Bake the bank” and “Bake the ice” and “Bake the mold” and “Bake with tradition” and “Baking news” and “Don’t go baking my heart” and “Give me a bake!” and “A lucky bake” and “Make a bake for it” and “Sticks and stones may bake my bones.”
  • Brake → Bake: As in, “Hit the bakes.”
  • Back → Bake: As in, “Bake in black” and “Bake to the future” and “Bake in the day” and “Bake in business” and “Bake on your feet” and “Bake to basics” and “Bake to square one” and “Double bake.”
  • Beck → Bake: As in, “At my bake and call”
  • Bike → Bake: As in, “On your bake!”
  • *bac* → *bake*: As in, “Full of bake-teria” and “A messy debake-l (debacle).”
  • *bec* → *bake*: As in, “Temptation bake-ons (beckons)” and “What have you bake-ome?” and “Just bake-ause you can doesn’t mean you should” and “Bakeoming my worst nightmare” and “Vegan barbake-ue” and “This attitude is unbake-oming of you.”
  • *bic* → *bake*: As in, “Stop bakering (bickering)!” and “Stop with the acerbake (acerbic) tone” and “Aerobake exercise” and “Feeling claustrophobake.”Note: is something is acerbic, then it’s bitter.
  • *buc* → *bake*: As in, “Bake-et list” and “A drop in the bake-et” and “Bake-l (buckle) up!” and “A bake-aneer’s life.”
  • *bik* → *bake*: As in, “Bake-ini body” and “Bakeram (bikram) yoga” and “Rubake‘s cube.”
  • *pec* → *bake*: As in, “A bake-uliar situation” and “Baketoral muscles” and “Blinking behind your s-baketacles” and “A s-baketacular performance” and “Fresh persbaketive” and “A wide s-baketrum.”
  • Pakistan → Bakeistan
  • I sing → Icing: As in “Icing in the shower sometimes.”
  • Icing: A simple icing-related metaphor: “The icing on the cake.”
  • Fostered → Frosted: As in “They frosted a sense of community and belonging.”
  • Battle → Batter: As in, “An uphill batter” and “Batter of wits” and “Batter ready” and “Half the batter” and “In the heat of batter” and “Love is a batterfield” and “A batter of wills” and “Batter of the bulge.”
  • Better → Batter: As in “Batter safe than sorry” and “Batter you than me” and “Batter than sex” and “I’ll go you one batter” and “I’ve seen batter days” and “It’s batter than nothing” and “Never been batter” and “The sooner the batter” and “You batter believe it!” and “Against batter judgement” and “Batter late than never” and “Batter left unsaid” (The dough used to make doughnuts is often called “batter”)
  • Butter → Batter: As in, “Bread always falls batter side down” and “Batter fingers” and “Batter up” and “Batter wouldn’t melt in her mouth” and “Float like a batterfly, sting like a bee” and “Social batterfly” and “The batterfly effect” and “Batterflies in my stomach.”
  • Gym* → Jam*: As in, “Mental jamnastics” and “A world-class jamnast” and “In the jamnasium.”
  • Am → Jam: As in, “Yes, I jam.”
  • Am* → Jam*: Amend words that start with “am” so that they start with “jam” instead: “A jambiguous (ambiguous) answer” and “Let me jamend (amend) that” and “A jamazing show” and “Filled with jambition” and “A small jamount.” Other words that you could use: jambivalent (ambivalent), jamateur (amateur), Jamazon (Amazon), jambience (ambience), jammunition (ammunition), jammo (ammo), jamnesty (amnesty), jamnesia (amnesia), jample (ample), jamplify (amplify), jamphibian (amphibian), jamulet (amulet), jamuse (amuse), jamusement (amusement) and jamusing (amusing).
  • American → Jamerican
  • Amsterdam → Jamsterdam
  • Jum* → Jam*: As in, “Jampstart your career” and “Jambo jet” and “Jamping for joy” and “A bit jampy” and “Protective jampsuit.” Other words you could use: jamp (jump), jamper (jumper) and jamble (jumble).
  • Cham* → Jam*: As in, “In my jambers (chambers)” and “Breakfast of jampions” and “Celebrate with jampagne.”
  • Gem* → Jam*: Jamini (Gemini), jamstone (gemstone) and stratejam (stratagem). Note: A strategem is a tactic that aims to gain the upper hand.
  • Belgium → Beljam:
  • *jam*: You can simply emphasize the “jam” in these words to make some silly jam-related cake puns: jamboree, Jamaica, jamb, pajamas and Benjamin.
  • Jam: To finish off our little jam section, we’ve got some jam-related puns that could act as puns in the right context: “In a jam and “Jam packed” and “Jam session” and “Jammed in tight.”
  • Cemetery → Creametery (a very specific and slightly morbid play on words)
  • *cram* → *cream*: As in, “Creamping my style” and “Writer’s creamp” and “Creamming for a test” and “Creamming your mouth with food.”
  • *crem* → *cream*: As in, “An increamental amount” and “By increaments.”
  • *crim* → *cream*: As in, “A creaminal mind” and “Punishment fits the cream” and “Creamson lips” and “Against discreamination” and “I don’t discreaminate.”
  • Cream: These cream-related phrases could serve as cake puns in the right circumstances: “Cream always rises to the top” and “Cream of the crop” and “A real cream puff” and “Skin like cream” and “Like the cat who got the cream” and “Where’s the cream filling?” and “Whatever creams your twinkie.”
  • Nuts: Nuts are commonly used to add flavour and texture to cakes, so we’ve added some nut-related phrases that you could use as cake puns in the right context:
    • Not → Nut: As in, “As often as nut” and “Believe it or nut” and “Down, but nut out” and “Nut at all” and “Nut bad” and “Nut in the slightest” and “Nut on your life.”
    • *nat* → *nut*: As in, “Well, nuturally” and “The nutional anthem” and “Any alternutives?” and “Need your signuture here” and “That resonuted with me.”
    • *net* → *nut*: As in, “Social nutwork” and “Nutworking event” and “Fast internut” and “A penutrating glare.” Other words you could use: Other wrods you could use: planut (planet), bonnut (bonnet) and cabinut (cabinut).
    • *nit* → *nut*: As in, “Cognutive therapy” and “Computer monutor” and “Golden opportunuty” and “A tight-knit communuty” and An affinuty for…” Other words you could use: dignuty (dignity) and furnuture (furniture).
    • *not* → *nut*: As in, “Nutwithstanding…” and “Take nutice of” and “Turn it up a nutch” and “Nutorious for” and “Nuthing to worry about” and “I cannut understand you.”
    • *nut*: With these words, we can simply emphasise the “nut” that they already contain: “Plant-based nutrition” and “Packed with nutrients” and “In a nutshell” and “That old chestnut” and “Wait a minute!”
    • Nut: We’ll finish this section off with some nut-related phrases that could double as puns in right context: “Sweet as a nut” and “From soup to nuts” and “Go nuts” and “A tough nut to crack.”
  • Jelly: Jellies are commonly used as filling in layered cakes, so we’ve got some jelly-related puns and phrases for you here:
    • Jealous → Jelly: As in “Your new shoes look so good! I’m jelly.”
    • *gel → *jelly: As in, “Anjelly’s (angel’s) advocate” and “My better anjellys” and “Enough to make anjellys weep” and “Need some new hair jelly.”
    • Jolly → Jelly: As in, “For he’s a jelly good fellow.”
  • Mousse: Mousse is another common filling (or topping!) for layered or filled cakes, so we’ve included mousse-related puns and phrases:
    • Mouse → Mousse: As in, “Quiet as a mousse” and “A cat and mousse game.”
    • Moose → Mousse
    • Must → Mousse-t: As in, “All things mousse-t pass” and “All good things mousse-t come to an end” and “Everything mousse-t go!” and “Into every life a little rain mousse-t fall” and “A mousse-t have” and “The shoe mousse-t go on” and “What can’t be cured mousse-t be endured” and “What goes up mousse-t come down” and “You mousse-t be joking!” and “I mousse-t say…”
    • Most → Mousse-t: As in, “Mousse-t wanted” and “Make the mousse-t of it” and “The mousse-t trusted name in news” and “For the mousse-t part.”
    • Mass → Mousse: As in, “Body mousse index” and “Mousse hysteria” and “Weapons of mousse destruction” and “Consuming mousse quantities.”
    • *mas* → *mousse*: As in, “A mousse-ive mistake” and “Lord and mousse-ter” and “Mousse-querade ball.” Other words that could work: mousse-age (massage), Christmousse (Christmas), en mousse (en masse).
    • *mes* → *mousse*: As in, “Mousse-age received” and “A hot mousse” and “Stop mousse-ing about” and Mousse-y hair” and “A mousse-merising song” and “Domoussetic duties.”
    • *mis* → *mousse*: As in, mousse-ogyny (misogyny), mousse-ion (mission), moussetake (mistake), mousse-ellaneous (miscellaneous), mousse-chief (mischief) and moussechievous (mischievous).
    • *mos* → *mousse*: As in, “A rolling stone gathers no mousse” and “Buzzing around like a mousse-quito” and “Yes, mousse-tly” and “Best in the cosmousse” and “A warm atmousse-phere” and “Try your utmousse-t.” Other words that could work: almousse-t (almost), foremousse-t (foremost), animousse-ity (animosity) and thermousse (thermos).
    • *mus* → *mousse*: As in, “Face the mousse-ic” and “Put some mousse-le (muscle) into it” and “As much as you can mousse-ter” and “Cut the mousse-tard.” Other words that could work: mousse-eum (museum) and mousse-shrrom (mushroom).
    • *maz* → *mousse*: As in, “An amousse-ing (amazing) result” and “Prepare to be amoussed (amazed)!” and “Filled with amoussement (amazement).”
    • *mous* → *mousse*: mousse-tache (moustache), autonomousse, anonymousse, infamousse, enormousse, famousse, unanimousse and synonymousse. Note: if something is autonomous, then it is self-governing and can act on its own.
  • Sweat → Sweet: As in “Blood, sweet and tears” and “Beads of sweet rolled down my forehead” and “Break out in a cold sweet” and “By the sweet of my brow” and “Don’t sweet it.” and “Don’t sweet the small stuff.” and “All hot and sweety.”
  • Sweater → Sweeter: As in “A close-knit woollen sweeter for cold days”
  • Suite → Sweet: As in “She was renting a 2-bedroom sweet for the summer.”
  • Switch → Sweet-ch: As in “Bait and sweet-ch” and “Asleep at the sweet-ch” and “Sweet-ch gears” and “You should sweet-ch out your old one with this one.”
  • Switzerland → Sweetzerland: As in “Zürich is a lovely city in Sweetzerland.”
  • Sweet:  These sweet-related phrases can act as puns in the right situation: As in “You’re so sweet!” and “Oh that’s soo sweet!” and “Revenge is sweet” and “Short and sweet” and “Lay some sweet lines on someone” and “Sweet dreams” and “Sweet Jesus!” and “You bet your sweet life!” and “That was a sweet trick, dude.” and “Sweet as, bro.” and “Whisper sweet nothings” and “Home sweet home” and “A rose by any other name would smell as sweet” and “Sweet smell/taste of success/victory” and “Sweetheart.
  • Seat → Sweet: As in, “Backsweet driver” and “By the sweet of your pants” and “Hold on to your sweet” and “Not a dry sweet in the house” and “On the edge of my sweet” and “Please be sweeted” and “Take a back sweet” and “The best sweet in the house.”
  • Fondant: Fondant is a type of sugar dough that’s used as icing or decoration for cakes, especially when making 3D shapes or to cover large areas. These puns are specific to fondant:
    • Fun → Fondant: As in, “All fondant and games until someone loses and eye” and “A bundle of fondant” and “Double the pleasure, double the fondant” and “Girls just want to have fondant” and “Good, clean fondant” and “Make fondant of” and “Time flies when you’re having fondant.”
    • *ondent → *fondant: As in, “Feeling desfondant (despondent)” and “News corresfondant (correspondent).”
  • Mars → Marzipan: This one’s a bit of a stretch, but can still work in the right situation: “A marzipan a day helps you work, rest and play” and “The man from Marzipan.” Note: marzipan is a sweet, almond-based paste that is used in cakes as flavouring or decoration.
  • Peeping → Piping: As in, “Piping Tom” and “Piping through the curtains.”
  • Sprinkle: Since sprinkle is both a verb (to lightly scatter something) and a noun (small, multicoloured edible decorations – especially used on cakes), we can use it to turn normal phrases into puns, as in “Sprinkled with love.”
  • Even → Oven: As in “Don’t get mad, get oven” and “Break oven” and “Oven handed” and “Keep on an oven keel” and “Oven at the turning of the tide” and “Oven as we speak” and “Oven if it kills me” and “Oven Stevens”. Note: to keep something on an even keel is to keep something in a steady, untroubled state.
  • *aven* → *oven*: As in, “Let’s look at other ovenues” and “Ovenge my death!” and “The Ovengers.”
  • *even* → *oven*: As in, “The main ovent” and “Yes, oventually” and “An ovening out” and “Your oventual downfall” and “Spread ovenly” and “Seven Eloven” and “It’s looking unoven.”
  • Peace → Piece: As in, “At piece” and “Inner piece” and “Keep the piece” and “No piece for the wicked” and “Piece be with you” and “Piece at last” and “Piece of mind” and “At piece with.”
  • Piece: These piece-related phrases are general enough to serve as cake puns in the right context: “Dash to pieces” and “Bits and pieces” and “Conversation piece” and “Cut to pieces” and “Pick up the pieces” and “Piece of cake” and “A piece of the action” and “A real piece of work.”
  • Slice: These common phrases can be used as puns in the right situation: “A slice of the cake” and “Any way you slice it” and “Slice of life” and “A slice of the action” and “No matter how you slice it.”
  • Fruit: It’s common for fruit to be used as flavouring or decoration for cakes, so we’ve included some fruit-related phrases and puns here for you:
    • *fut* → *fruit*: As in, “Think about your fruiture” and “Resistance is fruitile!” and “A fruituristic building” and “Sleeping on the fruiton” and “An irrefruitable argument.” Other words that could work: refruit (refute) and fruitility (fruitility).
    • Frat* → Fruit*: As in, “Fruiternity house” and “Fruiternal twins” and “Fruiternising with the enemy.”
    • Fret* → Fruit*: Fruitting (fretting), fruitwork (fretwork) and fruitful (fretful). Note: fretwork is a type of ornamental carving. This could work especially well for making puns about carved fruit decorations that are on cakes (very specific, we know).
    • Fruit: We’ll finish this little section off with some fruit-related phrases that could double as puns: “Be fruitful and multiply” and “Bear fruit” and “Forbidden fruit” and “Fruits of your labour” and “Low hanging fruit” and “The fruit doesn’t fall far from the tree.”
  • Mix: The word “mix” can refer to both mixing up ingredients, or pre-made cake (or cupcake) mix. We’ve included some terrible mix-related puns here:
    • Max → Mix: As in, “All mixed out” and “To the mix.”
    • *max* → *mix*: As in, “The miximum amount” and “Miximise your fun!” and “The climix of the movie” and “What an anticlimix.”
    • Mexico → Mixico
    • *mic → *mix: As in, “The dynamix duo” and “Academix performance” and “Systemix problems” and “Economix status” and “Cosmix belief.” Other words that could work: endemix (endemic), mimix (mimic), epidemix (epidemic) and pandemix (pandemic).
    • *mix*: Simply emphasise the “mix” in these words to make some silly cake mix puns: mixture, mixer, mixed and remix.
  • Recipe: These recipe-related phrases could work as cake or cupcake puns in the right situation: “A recipe for disaster” and “A recipe for success.”
  • Chef: These next few puns are focused around the word “chef”:
    • Chuffed → Cheffed (Note: to be “chuffed” is to be pleased or delighted with something.)
    • Chev* → Chef*: As in, “Chefron pattern” and “Take a ride in my Chefy (Chevy).”
    • Chiv* → Chef*: As in, “A chefalrous (chivalrous) action” and “Practice chefalry (chivalry).”
    • Shif* → Chef*: As in, “Graveyard cheft” and “Night cheft” and “Cheft gears” and “Cheft your arse” and “Looking chefty” and “Chefting sands” and “A makecheft solution.”
    • Shuf* → Chef*: As in, “Cheffle away” and “Recheffle the cards.” Other words you could use: cheffleboard (shuffleboard), cheffling (shuffling) and cheffled (shuffled).
    • Disheveled → Dischefled
    • Shiv* → Chef*: As in, “Chefering (shivering) in the cold” and “Got the chefers (shivers).”
    • Chif* → Chef*: As in, “Cheffon cake.” (this one works well since it plays on both chef and chiffon, which is a type of cake)
  • Cook: We’ve got a little cook-related section for you here:
    • Cac* → Cook*: As in, “A cookophony of noise” and “Cookao (cacao) flavoured” and “Prickly like a cooktus (cactus)” and “Cookling with glee.”
    • Coc* → Cook*: As in, “A dangerous cooktail” and “Safely cookooned (cocooned) away.” Other words that could work: cookroach (cockroach), cookonut (coconut) and concookt (concoct). Note: a cacophony is a disorganised mess of noise.
    • Kooky → Cooky: The term “kooky” means strange or eccentric.
    • Cook: Other than the obvious definition it can also refer to “altering dishonestly”, as in “They cooked the numbers and were done for fraud” (The phrases “cooked the books” and “cooked the accounts” are synonymous). Some cooking-related idioms and phrases are: “What’s cooking?” and “Too many cooks spoil the broth.”
    • Cooked: “If mum and dad find out we took their car last night, we’re cooked!” and “He has been drinking since lunch time – he’s cooked.”
  • Rise: Since cakes (unlike cookies, pies and other sweet treats) are designed to rise when baked, we’ve included some rise-related puns for you:
    • Raise → Rise: As in, “Rise the bar” and “Rise the dead” and “Rise your game” and “Hair-rising.”
    • Raspberry → Riseberry
    • Res* → Rise*: As in, “Ongoing rise-search (research)” and “Unbreakable rise-olve” and “Earn rise-pect” and “Rise-ume work.” Other words that could work: rise-sponse (response), rise-silient (resilient), rise-t (rest), rise-olution (resolution).
    • *riz* → *rise*: As in, “On the horiseon” and “The grand prise” and “A mesmeriseing performance” and “Get horiseontal” and “A plagiarised essay.”
    • *ries → *rise: As in, “A new Netflix serise” and “Don’t forget to accessorise” and “Thanks for the memorise” and “Blocked arterise.” Other words that would work: adversarise (adversaries) and toiletrise (toiletries).
    • *ris* → *rise*: As in, “At rise-k (risk)” and “Dust and debrise” and “If needs arise” and “An enterprise-ing individual.”
  • Participation → Patiserrie-pation: (note: a patisserie is a shop that sells cakes and sweet pastries.)
  • Flour: As flour is an integral ingredient in cake-making, we’ve got some flour-related puns here:
    • Floor → Flour: As in, “Mop the flour with” and “On the flour” and “Flour it!” and “You have the flour.”
    • Flower → Flour: As in, “Flour power” and “The flour of your youth” and “Stop and smell the flours.”
    • Hour → Flour: As in, “After flours” and “Open all flours” and “The small flours of the morning” and “Working all flours” and “At all flours.”
    • Flair → Flour: As in, “A flour for the dramatic.”
    • Flir* → Flour*: As in, “Flourting with disaster” and “A real flourt.”
    • Flor* → Flour*: As in, “Floura and fauna” and “Floural arrangements.” Other words that could work: flourist (florist), Flourida (Florida), Flourence (Florence) and flourentine (florentine). Note: a florentine is a type of biscuit.)
  • Butter: Since butter is a very common ingredient in cakes, we’ve got some butter-related puns here for you (note: it is very easy to find vegan butter to use in cakes, and when we make jokes about butter, it’s of the plant-based variety).
    • Barter → Butter: As in, “Trade and butter economy.”
    • Better → Butter: As in, “I’ve got a butter idea” and “Anything you can do, I can do butter” and “Appealing to your butter judgement” and “My butter half” and “Butter late than never” and “Butter luck next time” and “Butter safe than sorry” and “Butter than sex” and “Butter than new” and “I’ve changed for the butter” and “I couldn’t have said it butter” and “For butter or worse” and “Get the butter of” and “I should have known butter.”
    • But her → Butter: As in, “Butter suitcase! It’s been left behind!” (a very specific pun)
    • Patter → Butter: As in, “The pitter butter of little feet.”
    • But → Butter: As in, “Butter seriously” and “Butter heads” and “Butter out” and “Down, butter not out” and “Everything butter the kitchen sink” and “Kick butter” and “No butters” and “Last butter not least” and “Gone, butter not forgotten.”
    • Potter → Butter: As in, “Harry Butter” and “Buttering about.”
  • Egg: As eggs are a common ingredient in cakes, we’ve included them in our cake pun list (a quick note that it’s very easy to substitute eggs for plant-based ingredients!):
    • *ag* → *egg*: As in, “In the begg (bag)” and “Capture the flegg” and “Tegging along” and “Stop dregging your feet” and “Reggs to riches” and “Snegg (snag) a great deal.” Other words you could use: preggmatic (pragmatic), propeggate (propagate), eggregate (aggregate), eggainst (against), eggnostic (agnostic), egghast (aghast), eggree (agree) and eggreement (agreement).
    • *eg* → *egg*: As in, “Get a legg on” and “Neggative results” and “Had you pegged as…” and “I begg to differ” and “Where do I beggin?” Other words that could work: leggacy, eggocentric, nutmegg, bootlegg, dregg and integgrity.
    • *ig* → *egg*: As in, “Keep on degging (digging)” and “Eggnorance is not bliss” and “You can’t eggnore it forever” and “Choosing to remain eggnorant” and “Eggnite your passion.”
    • *ex* → *eggs*: As in, “A compleggs situation” and “Indeggsed (indexed) files” and “Better than seggs (sex)” and “Don’t fleggs your muscles here” and “Pure refleggs (reflex)” and “From eggsperience” and “Taken out of conteggst (context)” and “Eggspress post” and “In eggschange.” Other words you could use: eggsploit (exploit), eggstract (extract), eggsercise (exercise), eggsistential (existential), eggserpt (except), eggsample (example), eggsacerbate (exacerbate), eggsamine (examine), eggsact (exact), eggsasperate (exasperate), eggsclusive (exclusive), eggsited (excited), eggsellent (excellent), eggsess (excess), eggsempt (exempt), eggsemplify (exemplify), eggsecution (execution), eggsfoliate (exfoliate), eggshibit (exhibit), eggshaust (exhaust), eggsausted (exhausted), eggsibition (exhibition), eggsilarating (exhilarating), eggshale (exhale), eggsist (exist), eggsit (exit), eggsotic (exotic), eggsorbitant (exorbitant), eggspect (expect), eggsquisite (exquisite), eggstension (extension), eggstrapolate (extrapolate), eggstensive (extensive), eggstraordinary (extraordinary), eggsuberant (exuberant) and eggsude (exude).
    • *ec* → *egg*: As in, “New teggnology” and “Change the subjeggt” and “Be objeggtive” and “High seggurity” and “An effeggtive technique” and “Solar egglipse.” Other words you could use: seggular (secular), feggless (feckless), egglectic (eclectic), eggonomy (economy), eggo (echo), eggology (ecology) and eggstatic (ecstatic).
    • *ac* → *egg*: As in, “Taken into eggount” and “Take eggtion” and “In on the eggt (act)” and “Looking for eggommodation.” Other words you could use: eggnowledge (acknowledge), eggrue (accrue) and eggronym (acronym)
    • Egg: We’ll finish this section off with some egg-related phrases that are general enough to use as cake and cupcake puns: “As sure as eggs is eggs” and “A bad egg” and “Don’t put all your eggs in one basket” and “Nest egg” and “Walking on eggshells” and “Can’t make a cake without breaking some eggs.”

All of the following puns are based on different types of cake:

  • Brow → Brownie: As in, “Eyebrownie raising” and “Knit your brownie” and “High brownie.”
  • Brown → Brownie: As in, “As brownie as a berry.”
  • Liar → Layer: As in, “Layer, layer, pants on fire.” Note: a layer cake consists of stacked sheets of cake which are usually held together by some kind of sweet paste (like icing or jam).
  • Tier: Tier cakes are similar to layer cakes in that they consist of multiple stacked cakes, but tier cakes tend to be made up of entire cakes stacked on top of each other, while layer cakes are composed of slices of cake. We’ve got some silly tier cake puns for you here:
    • Tear → Tier: As in, “Bathed in tiers” and “Blood, sweat and tiers” and “Bored to tiers” and “Bring tiers to your eyes” and “Burst into tiers” and “Crocodile tiers” and “Fighting back tiers” and “It will all end in tiers” and “No more tiers” and “A real tier-jerker.”
    • Tour → Tier: As in, “Eco-tierism” and “Magical mystery tier” and “Tier de force” and “World tier” and “Let me take you on a tier.”
    • Dear → Tier: As in, “After you, my tier” and “Tierly beloved” and “Hold on for tier life” and “Near and tier to my heart” and “Nearest and tierest.”
    • Deer → Tier: As in, “Like a tier in headlights.”
    • *tar* → *tier*: As in, “Set your tierget (target)” and “Online avatier” and “Brick and mortier shop” and “At the altier” and “Nectier of life.” Other words you could use: proprietiery (proprietary), complimentiery (complimentary) and complementiery (complementary).
    • *ter* → *tier*: As in, “A full tierm (term)” and “Boston tierrier” and “Tiertiary degree” and “Waiting at the tierminal” and “A tierritorial creature” and “Over new tierrain” and “A tierrible fate” and “Don’t forget to watier the plants” and “Doesn’t mattier” and “Out of charactier” and “Mastier bedroom” and “For bettier or worse” and “Fostier a new attitude.” Other words that could work: aftier (after), computier (computer), lettier (letter), intierest (interest), artiery (artery), intierface (interface), intierfere (interfere), altiernative (alternative), battiery (battery) and intiernet (internet).
    • *tir* → *tier*: As in, “Feeling tiered (tired)” and “Having a tierade (tirade)” and “What a tiersome situation” and “Tieramisu flavoured” and “Working tierlessly” and “In the entier world” and “Of retierment age” and “Writing with satier.”
    • *tor* → *tier*: As in, “Factier into the equation” and “Need a doctier” and “Monitier the situation” and “Computer monitier” and “Dedicated mentier” and “Project coordinatier” and “Ancient histiery.” Other words that could work: vectier (vector), curatier (curator), predatier (predator) and motier (motor).
    • *tyr* → *tier*: As in, tieranny (tyranny), tierant (tyrant), tierannical (tyrannical) and martier (martyr).
    • *tiar* → *tier*: As in, tiera (tiara), inertier (inertia) and tertiery (tertiary).
    • *tier*: Emphasise the “tier” in these words: frontier, bustier and chocolatier.
  • Torte: Tortes are a type of rich, dense cake. We’ve got some torte puns for you here:
    • Thought → Torte: As in, “Deep in torte” and “Food for torte” and “Hold that torte” and “Impure tortes” and “It’s the torte that counts” and “Just when you torte it was safe” and “Lost in torte” and “Penny for your torte” and “On second torte” and “School of torte” and “Train of torte” and “Collect your tortes” and “Torte bubble.”
    • Taught → Torte: As in, “I’ve torte you well.”
    • Taut → Torte: As in, “Torte muscles” and “Torte as a rubber band.”
    • *tot* → *torte*: As in, “In torte-al agreement” and “Torte bag” and “Tortering around” and “Torte-ally, 100%.” Other words that could work: factorteum (factotum), torte-alitarian and torte-um (totum).
    • *tart* → *torte*: As in, “All torted up” and “Torte-an skirt.”
    • *tert* → *torte*: As in, “Light entorte-tainment” and “Entorte-tain me” and “Fates intorte-twined.”
    • *tort* → *torte*: As in, “Torte-oise and hare” and “Like torte-ure” and “Hot torte-illas” and “A torte-urous situation.” Other words you could work: retorte (retort), distorte (distort), extorte (extort), contorte (contort), extorte-ion (extortion) and distorte-ion (distortion).
  • Cheese → Cheesecake: As in, “Different as chalk and cheesecake” and “What’s that got to do with the price of cheesecake?”
  • Cake → Cheesecake: As in, “A slice of the cheesecake” and “A cheesecake walk” and “Icing on the cheesecake” and “Let them eat cheesecake” and “Piece of cheesecake.”
  • Cake → Pancake: As in, “A slice of the pancake” and Icing on the pancake” and “Let them eat pancakes” and “Piece of pancake” and “The cherry on the pancake” and “You can’t have your pancake and eat it too.”
    • Food → Angel food: Angel food cake is a type of light, fluffy sponge cake that doesn’t use butter. We have some silly angel food puns for you here: “Comfort angel food” and “Angel food chain” and “Angel food for thought.” Note: these would also work for devil’s food cake, as in: “Comfort devil’s food” and “Devil’s food chain” and “Devil’s food for thought.”
  • Get out → Gateau’t: As in, “Gateau’t of the chopper!”
  • Pound: A pound cake is a cake that’s made with a pound each of the main ingredients (butter, flour, eggs and sugar). We have some pound-related puns and phrases here for you:
    • *pand* → *pound*: As in, “Pounder (pander) to” and “It’s poundemonium in here” and “Poundora’s box” and “Can you expound on that?”
    • *pend* → *pound*: As in, “Payment pounding.” Other words you could use: poundulum (pendulum), poundant (pendant), stipound (stipend), appound (append), suspound (suspend), depound (depend), expound (expend), appoundix (appendix), depoundent (dependent) and impounding (impending).
    • *pond* → *pound*: As in, “In correspoundence with” and “Feeling despoundent” and “Please respound quickly.”
  • Chocolate: Since chocolate is a popular enough flavour to be known as its own type of cake, we’ve got some chocolate-related phrases for you that can double as cake and cupcake puns: “Chocolate thunder” and “Chocolate drop” and “Death by chocolate.”
  • Bundt: A bundt cake is one that has a distinctive ring shape. Here are some bundt-related puns for you:
    • Bun* → Bundt: As in, “Bundt in the oven” and “We’re going to need bigger bundts” and “Bundtle of energy” and “Bundtle of joy.”
    • *ban* → *bundt*: As in, “Urbundt living” and “A suburbundt town.”
    • *bon* → *bundt*: As in, “Ribbundt cutting ceremony” and “Carbundt copy” and “Pass the bourbundt.
    • *bun* → *bundt*: As in, “Bundtle of joy” and “Thanks a bundtch” and “In abundtance.”
    • *band* → *bundt*: As in, “I’m with the bundt” and “Husbundt and wife” and “Garage bundt” and “Jump on the bundtwagon” and “I need a bundtage (bandage).” Other words that could work: bundtit (bandit), bundtwidth (bandwidth), bundtdana (bandana), bundteau (bandeau) and bundticoot (bandicoot), contrabundt (contraband), disbundt (disband), broadbundt (broadband), headbundt (headband), abundtdon (abandon) and abundtonment (abandonment).
    • Bend* → Bundt*: As in, “Bundt over backwards” and “Gone on a bundter (bender).”
    • *bond* → *bundt*: As in, bundting (bonding), bundtage (bondage), bundt (bond) and vagabundt (vagabond).
    • *bant* → *bundt*: As in, “Trading bundter (banter)” and “Bundtam (bantam) weight.” Note: bantam is a category of weight that’s used in sports.
    • *bent* → *bundt*: Incumbundt (incumbent) and absorbundt (absorbent). Note: if something is incumbent, then it’s an imposition or an obligation.
  • Coffee: Coffee has been included in this list as it’s both a popular flavour of cake and associated with cake as a common accompaniment (coffee and cake):
    • Copy → Coffee: As in, “Carbon coffee” and “Coffee that” and “Hard coffee” and “Don’t be a coffeecat.”
    • *caf* → *coffee*: coffeeteria (cafeteria) and coffeeine (caffeine).
  • Carrot: Carrot cakes are a very popular flavour for both cakes and cupcakes, so we’ve included it here:
    • Care at → Carrot: As in, “I don’t carrot all!”
    • Carat → Carrot: As in, “24 carrot gold.”
  • Foam: Foam cakes have very little (or no) fatty ingredients in them, and are light, spongy and airy. We’ve got some foam-related puns for you to use here:
    • Form → Foam: As in, “Foam follows function” and “Free foam” and “Imitiation is the sincerest foam of flattery” and “In fine foam” and “In any way, shape or foam” and “Take foam” and “True to foam” and “Evil takes many foams.”
    • Fame → Foam: As in, “Claim to foam” and “Fifteen minutes of foam” and “The hall of foam.”
    • From → Foam: As in, “A little foam column A, a little foam column B” and “Cut foam the same cloth” and “Fall foam grace” and “Foam a mile away” and “Foam a to z” and “Foam cover to cover” and “Foam my cold, dead hands” and “Foam scratch” and “Foam the cradle to the grave” and “Foam time to time” and “Foam the ground up” and “Pull the rug out foam under [someone]” and “Take it foam me” and “Start foam scratch.”
    • Phone → Foam: As in, “Hold the foam” and “Foam a friend” and “Foam in sick” and “Waiting by the foam.”
    • *fam* → *foam*: As in, “My foamily” and “Seems foamiliar” and “Almost foamous” and “40 hour foamine” and “I’m foamished!” and “Foamiliarise yourself with” and “Sue for defoamation.” Note: defamation is the act of injuring another person’s reputation.
    • *fem* → *foam*: As in, “The future is foamale” and “Foaminine energy” and “Foamme fatale” and “No such thing as too foaminist.” Other things that could work: foamur (femur) and effoaminate (effeminate).
    • *fum* → *foam*: As in, foamble (fumble), foaming (fuming), foamigate (fumigate) and foambling (fumbling).
    • *phem* → *foam*: As in, eufoamism (euphemism), efoameral (ephemeral), blasfoamy (blasphemy), blasfoamous (blasphemous) and eufoamistic (euphemistic). Note: if something is ephemeral, then it only lasts for a very short period of time.
    • Sophomore → Sofoamore
  • Roll: Roll cakes are thin sheet cakes that have been rolled into a log shape and go by various names – swiss roll, jelly roll and cream roll, and can be filled with cream, jam or icing. Here are some roll-related puns for you to use:
    • Role → Roll: As in, “Whats your roll here?” and “Competing for the same roll.”
    • J.K Rowling → J.K Rolling
    • *ral* → *roll*: As in, “Rolly (rally) together” and “In generoll” and “Integroll to” and “It’s only naturoll” and “Yes, naturolly” and “Collateroll damage” and “Peripheroll vision” and “Running in parollel.” Other words you could use: liberoll (liberal), moroll (moral), ephemeroll (ephemeral) and visceroll (visceral).
    • *rel* → *roll*: As in, “Not rollevant” and “Rollay the information over” and “A huge rollief” and “Newest rollease” and “In a rollationship” and “Not for rolligion” and “In rollation to” and “Showing rolluctance (reluctance)” and “Rollentless effort” and “Monkeys in a barroll” and “Squirrolling away” and “Lover’s quarroll.” Other words you could use: apparoll (apparel), lauroll (laurel), scoundroll (scoundrel), mongroll (mongrel).
    • *ril* → *roll*: As in, “At your own peroll (peril)” and “A tendroll of hair” and “Aproll showers” and “A brolliant idea” and “Perollous (perilous) plans.”
    • *rol* → *roll*: As in, “Out of controll” and “High cholesteroll” and “On patroll” and “Off to enroll” and “Christmas carolls.” Other words: petroll (petrol) and prollific (prolific).
    • *rul* → *roll*: As in, cerollean (cerulean), unrolly (unruly) and ferrolle (ferrule). Note: a ferrule is a band that holds parts of an object together.
    • *rawl* → *roll*: As in, “Gotta croll before you can walk” and “Pub broll (brawl)” and “Urban sproll (sprawl)” and “Southern droll (drawl).”
  • Ice cream: When ice cream is shaped like a cake, it becomes known as ice cream cake. We’ve got some ice cream-related puns here for you to reference this summer favourite:
    • Ice → Ice cream: As in, “Cold as ice cream” and “Break the ice cream” and “Cuts no ice cream” and “Ice cream maiden” and “On ice cream” and “Skating on thin ice cream.”
    • Cream → Ice cream: As in, “Ice cream always rises to the top” and “Ice cream of the crop” and “Skin like peaches and ice cream” and “The cat who got the ice cream.”
  • Bread → Banana Bread: As in, “Banana bread always falls butter side down” and “Banana bread and butter” and “Break banana bread” and “Have your banana bread buttered on both sides” and “Put banana bread on the table” and “The best thing since sliced banana bread” and “Your daily banana bread.” Note: while banana bread has “bread” in the name, it is also categorised as a cake due to its cake-like characteristics (sweet, moist, airy, fluffy).
  • Cake → Shortcake: As in, “A slice of the shortcake” and “The icing on the shortcake” and “Let them eat shortcake” and “Piece of shortcake” and “The cherry on the shortcake” and “Have your shortcake and eat it too.”
  • Mooncake: Mooncakes are a small, round, dense type of Chinese cake eaten during the Mid-Autumn (or Mooncake) festival as an accompaniment to tea. Make some silly references to them with the following mooncake puns and phrases:
    • Moon → Mooncake: As in, “Ask for the mooncake” and “Eclipse of the mooncake” and “Many mooncakes ago” and “The dark side of the mooncake.”
    • Cake → Mooncake: As in, “A slice of the mooncake” and “Mooncake walk” and “Icing on the mooncake” and “Let them eat mooncake” and “Piece of mooncake” and “That really takes the mooncake” and “You can’t have your mooncake and eat it too.”
    • Moan → Moon: As in, “Whinging and mooning.”
    • *man* → *moon*: As in, “Anger moonagement” and “A moonipulative relationship” and “Take up the moontle.”
    • *men* → *moon*: As in, “Didn’t I moontion?” and “A respected moontor” and “You’re a moonace” and “Strict regimoon” and “No commoont” and “A strong commitmoont to” and “Environmoontally friendly.” Other words you could use: employmoont (employment), complemoont (complement), implemoont (implement), complimoont (compliment) and amoonable (amenable). Note: to be amenable is to be willing to respond to requests or suggestions.
    • *mon* → *moon*: As in, “All about the mooney” and “Hall moonitor” and “Moonkey business” and “Cookie moonster” and “The moonarch of” and “Every moonth.” Other words you could use: mooniker (moniker), moonopoly (monopoly), moontage (montage), commoon (common), salmoon (salmon), summoon (summon), lemoon (lemon), demoon (demon), cinnamoon (cinnamon), persimmoon (persimmon), sermoon (sermon), harmoony (harmony) and admoonish (admonish).
    • *mun* → *moon*: As in, “A tight-knit commoonity” and “Learn to commoonicate.” Other words that could work: commoonication (communication), immoonity (immunity), immoon (immune) and commoonion (communion).
  • Cake Pop: Cake pops are a fairly new type of cake where small balls of cake are styled as lollipops. They’re popular enough that we’ve included some pop-related puns here:
    • *pap* → *pop*: Popaya (papaya), popyrus (papyrus), poparazzi (paparazzi) and poprika (paprika). Note: papyrus is a type of very old paper.
    • Pep* → Pop*: As in, Popper (pepper), popperoni (pepperoni) and poppermint (peppermint. This could work well for a peppermint-flavoured cake pop.)
    • *pop*: We can simply emphasise the “pop” in these words: populist, popular, poplar, population, poppy, populace, lollipop and apoplectic. Notes: to be apoplectic is to be explosively angry. A populist is someone who supports ideas because they’re popular, rather than because they are moral or correct.
    • *pup* → *pop*: Poppet (puppet), poppy (puppy) and poppeteer (puppeteer).
    • Cake → Cake pop: As in, “A slice of the cake pop” and “Icing on the cake pop” and “Let them eat cake pops” and “A piece of cake pop” and “You can’t have your cake pop and eat it too.”
  • Sheet Cake: Sheet cakes are large, flat, rectangular cakes. Here are some sheet cake puns for you to use:
    • Shot → Sheet: As in, “Give it your best sheet” and “Have a sheet at” and “A long sheet” and “Not by a long sheet.”
    • Shut → Sheet: As in, “An open and sheet case” and “Keep your mouth sheet” and “Sheet up and take my money” and “Sheet your cake hole (this would be an amazingly appropriate pun)” and “Sheet your face.”
    • Sh*t → Sheet: As in, “Get your sheet together” and “Holy sheet” and “In deep sheet” and “Scared sheetless” and “No sheet” and “Sheet happens” and “Who gives a sheet?”
    • Seat → Sheet: As in, “Backsheet driver” and “Bums on sheets” and “By the sheet of your pants” and “Glued to your sheet” and Hold on to your sheet” and “In the box sheet” and “Not a dry sheet in the house” and “Please be sheeted” and “Take a sheet” and “The best sheet in the house” and “The hot sheet.”
    • Cheat → Sheet: As in, “Once a sheeter, always a sheeter” and “You can’t sheet an honest person.”
    • Set → Sheet: As in, “All sheet?” and “Game, sheet, match.” and “Got your heart sheet on” and “Ready, sheet, go!” and “Sheet eyes on” and “Sheet foot in” and “Sheet in motion” and “A new sheet of wheels” and “Sheet the record straight” and “Sheet sail” and “Sheet your teeth on edge” and “Sheet in your ways.”
    • Sit → Sheet: As in, “Don’t just sheet there” and “Sheet it out” and “Sheeting on the fence” and “Sheet tight” and “Sheet up and take notice” and “Sheeting pretty.”
    • *shat* → *sheet*: Sheetter (shatter), sheettering (shattering).
    • *cit* → *sheet*: As in, “In the sheety (city)” and “A proud sheetizen of” and “Sheetrus (citrus) flavoured (this could work well for a citrus-flavoured sheet cake)” and “In some capasheety” and “Worldwide atrosheety.” Other words that could work: sheetation (citation), sheetadel (citadel), sheetizenship (citizenship), complisheet (complicit), explisheet (explicit), tasheet (tacit), implisheet (implicit), solisheet (solicit), defisheet (deficit).
    • *sit* → *sheet*: As in, “We’ve got a sheetuation” and “Call the babysheeter” and “In transheet” and “Make a deposheet” and “A propensheety to” and “Posheetive results” and “An exquisheet meal.”
    • Sheet: To finish this section, we’ve got some simple sheet-related phrases that are general enough to use as puns: “White as a sheet” and “Keep a clean sheet” and “Between the sheets.”
  • Slab cake: Slab cakes are the Australian equivalent of sheet cakes (see section above). Here are some silly slab puns for you to use:
    • *sab* → *slab*: As in, “Team slabotage” and “Taking a slabbatical” and “Indispenslable to the team.” Note: a sabbatical is an extended break from work or a usual schedule.
    • Sebastian → Slabastian
    • Slap* → Slab*: As in, “A slab on the wrist” and “Slab bang in the middle” and “A slabdash job” and “Slabstick comedy.”
  • Blondie: Blondies are brownies that are made with vanilla rather than chocolate or cocoa. We’ve got a couple of blondie puns for you here:
    • Bondi beach → Blondie beach
    • Blonde → Blondie: “Bleached blondie” and “Blondie bombshell” and “Platinum blondie.”
  • Butterfly: Butterfly cakes are cupcakes that have the tops carved out, cut in half and then stuck back on top with jam, icing or cream to resemble a butterfly’s wings. Here are some butterfly-related phrases that could double as cupcake puns:
    • Fly → Butterfly: As in, “Born to butterfly” and “Come butterfly with me” and “Butterfly by the seat of your pants” and “Butterfly off the handle” and “Off to a butterflying start.”
    • Butterfly: These butterfly-related phrases are general enough to work as puns in the right context: “Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee” and “Social butterfly” and “The butterfly effect.”
  • Bread → Gingerbread: As in, “Gingerbread always falls butter side down” and “Gingerbread and butter” and “Gingerbread of life” and “Gingerbread crumb trail” and “The best thing since sliced gingerbread” and “Your daily gingerbread.”
  • Hedgehog: Hedgehogs are dense dessert bars that are similar to a sticky, fudgy brownie. Here are some hedgehog puns for you:
    • Hedge → Hedgehog: As in, “Hedgehog fund” and “Hedgehog your bets” and “You look as though you’ve been dragged through a hedgehog backwards.”
    • Hog → Hedgehog: As in, “Go the whole hedgehog” and “Ground hedgehog day.”
  • Marble: “Lose your marbles.” Note: marble cakes have a streaky, marble-like appearance of mixed light and dark batter.
  • Lava: Lava cakes have solid outsides with molten/liquid insides. Reference these gooey treats with these puns:
    • *lav* → *lava*: As in, “Lava-ish interior” and “Lava-ender scented.”
    • *lev* → *lava*: As in, “Looking for lava-rage (leverage)” and “A beastly lavathan (leviathan)” and “A malavalent (malevolent) glare.” Other words you could use: relavant (relevant), allava-ate (alleviate), clavar (clever), laval (level), lavaty (levity), lavar (lever) and irrelavant (irrelevant). Note: levity is a lightness, or a joking attitude.
    • *lov* → *lava*: As in, “I lava you” and ” and “All you need is lava” and “All’s fair in lava and war” and “Can you feel the lava tonight?” and “Can’t help falling in lava” and “Fall in lava” and “For the lava of god” and “Somebody to lava” and “What a lavaly sentiment” and “My lavar” and “A lavaing relationship” and “Feeling lavalorn” and “Close lavabirds” and “A lavable person” and “Dearly belavad.” Note: to be lovelorn is to be unloved.
    • *lava*: Simply emphasise the “lava” in these words: baklava, balaclava and lavatory.
  • Four → Petit Four: As in, “Down on all petit fours” and “Petit four by two” and “A petit four letter word.” Note: petit fours are small, bite-sized cakes.
  • Rum → Rum Baba: As in, “Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum baba.” Note: Rum babas are a small, rum-soaked cake served with cream.
  • Ball→ Snowball: As in, “Break your snowballs,” and “Snowballs to the wall,” and “Bust your snowballs,” and “A different snowball game,” and “Dropped the snowball,” and “Get the snowball rolling,” and “Got you by the snowballs,” and “Have a snowball,” and “The snowball is in your court.” Note: snowballs are small, cream-filled cakes that are covered with marshmallow and coconut.
  • Suffer → Souffle: As in, “Long souffle-ing.”
  • Tea → Teacake: As in, “Teacake for two” and “Teacake and sympathy.”
  • Cake → Teacake: As in, “A slice of the teacake” and “Teacake or death” and “A teacake walk” and “Icing on the teacake” and “Let them eat teacake” and “Piece of teacake” and “That takes the teacake” and “The cherry on the teacake” and “You can’t have your teacake and eat it too.”
  • Pie → Whoopie Pie: As in, “Easy as whoopie pie” and “Sweet as whoopie pie” and “A finger in many whoopie pies” and “A piece of the whoopie pie.” Note: whoopie pies are two cookie-shaped cakes that have been sanwiched together with icing or cream.
  • Yule Log: Yule logs are traditional Christmas cakes that resemble a firelog. Here are some puns that could be used to reference these:
    • You’ll → Yule: As in “Yule never guess” and “Ask a silly question and yule get a silly answer” and “Yule know how” and “Yule take care of it.” Note: although not commonly used in everyday/colloquial conversation, yule is now used to refer to the Christmas period.
    • You log → Yule log: As in, “Have yule logged on yet?” This is a very specific pun that refers to yule logs (large logs that are burned on Christmas Eve).
  • Fairy cake: Fairy cakes are another word for butterfly cakes. They’re small cupcakes with a section of the top cut out, then fashioned to look like wings on top of the cake. The next few puns are centred around the idea of fairy cakes:
    • *fair* → *fairy*: Swap “fair” for “fairy”, like so: “Affairy of the heart”, “An affairy to remember”, “All the fun of the fairy,” and “All’s fairy in love and war”, “By fairy means or foul”, “Faint heart never won fairy lady”, “Fairy trade”, “Fairy and square”, “Fairy dinkum”, “Fairy enough”, “Fairy game”, “A family affairy,” and “My fairy lady”, “No fairy!” and “Savoir fairy.” 
    • Far → Fairy: Swap “far” for “fairy” to create some witty magic puns like so: “As fairy as it goes”, “As fairy as the eye can see”, “Few and fairy between”, and “Over the hills and fairy away”, “So fairy so good”, “Thursday’s child has fairy to go” and “The fruit does not fall fairy from the tree”. 
    • Very → Fairy: As in, “Be afraid, be fairy afraid”, “Before your fairy eyes”, “How fairy dare you!”, “It was a fairy good year”, “Thank you fairy much”, “Fairy interesting, but stupid”, “All fairy well” and “At the fairy least”.
    • Fiery → Fairy: As in, “Fairy red hair,” and “Fairy rage,” and “Filled with fairy enthusiasm.”
    • Four → Fairy: As in, “Twenty-fairy seven,” and “A fairy-letter word.”
    • Forty → Fairy-ty: As in, “Fairy-ty winks,” and “Life begins at fairy-ty.”
    • Firing → Fairy-ing: As in, “Fairy-ing blanks,” and “Fairy-ing on all cylinders,” and “The fairy-ing line.”
    • Fury → Fairy: As in, “Bright red with fairy,” and “Filled with sorrow and fairy,” and “Blinded with fairy,” and “Pent-up fairy.”
    • Hairy → Fairy: As in, “A fairy situation,” and “Give it the fairy eyeball.” Note: to give someone the hairy eyeball is to look at someone disdainfully.
    • *fare* → *fairy*: As in, “Fairynheit 451,” and “Welfairy reform,” and “Fairy-thee-well!” and “I bid you fairywell!” and “Celebration and fanfairy.” Note: Fahrenheit 451 is a dystopian novel that’s been made into a movie.
    • *fer* → *fairy*: As in, “A fairyocious effort,” and “Your highest offairy (offer),” and “Buffairy (buffer) zone,” and “Long suffairying (suffering),” and “What’s the diffairyence (difference)?” and “Transfairy the funds,” and “A good refairyence,” and  “Taking the fairy (ferry),” and “Defairy (defer) your admission,” and “Infairyority (inferiority) complex,” and “Well, if you’re offairying.”
    • *for* → *fairy*: As in, “Going fairyward,” and “Insider infairymation,” “Too much infairymation,” and “Peak perfairymance,” and “Fairyeign (foreign) exchange,” and “The fairycast for today,” and “Why hast thou fairysaken me?” and “In reference (or refairyence) to the afairymentioned…”
    • *fur* → *fairy*: As in, “Hell hath no fairy (fury) like..” and “An infairyating (infuriating) situation,” and “A part of the fairyniture,” and “Fairytive (furtive) glances,” and “And fairythermore…” and “A blazing fairynace (furnace).”
    • Fast and Furious → Fast and Fairyous
    • Fairy: We’ll finish this section off with fairy-related puns: “Airy fairy,” and “Fairytale ending” and “Nobody loves a fairy when she’s forty”.
  • Mug Cake: Mug cakes are a fairly new type of cupcake where ingredients are put in a mug then microwaved, rather than being cooked in an oven. The following are centred around mug cakes and can be used as cupcake puns:
    • Mag* → Mug*: As in, “The mugnitude of” and “A mugnificent ending” and “Self-help mugazine” and “My mugnum opus.” Note: a magnum opus is considered to be a person’s greatest work.
    • *meg* → *mug*: As in, “Pomugranate flavoured” and “The alpha and the omuga.”
    • Cake → Mug cake: As in, “A slice of the mug cake” and “A mug cake walk” and “Icing on the mug cake” and “Let them eat mug cake” and “A piece of mug cake” and “Selling like mug cakes” and “That really takes the mug cake” and “The cherry on the mug cake” and “You can’t have your mug cake and eat it too.”

Cake-Related Words

To help you come up with your own cake puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

general: cake, cupcake, sweet, dessert, baked, bake, baking,  batter, milk, egg, butter, flour, sugar, icing, frosting, cream, buttercream,  jam, vanilla, marzipan, fondant, piping, sprinkles, fruit, jelly, mousse, cocoa, nuts, recipe, mix,  ingredients, baking powder, baking soda, cook, chef, oven, nuts, slice, piece, ramekin, patty pan/case, rise, hundreds and thousands, patisserie, bakery, baker

cake types: sponge, layer, tier, fruit, torte, cheesecake, pancake, birthday, angelfood, angel, chiffon, gateau, pound, flourless, chocolate, wedding, bundt, decorative, black forest, coffee, carrot, roulade, foam, shortened, roll, ice cream, upside-down, cassata, german, babka, banana bread, battenberg, shortcake, mooncake, cake pop, cake balls, madeleines , swiss roll, sheet cake, blondie, brownie, butterfly, charlotte, devil’s food, eccles, funnel, gingerbread, hedgehog, jaffa, lamington, marble, mille-feuille, lava, muffin, opera, pavlova, petit gâteau, petit fours, princess, red velvet, rum baba, snowball, souffle, teacake, tiramisu, whoopie pie, yule log, fairy cake, mug cake

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