Art Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on art puns! 🎨 ✏️ 🖌️

We’ve curated a huge gallery of artfully terrible puns for you, separated into sections of puns to do with general art terms, colours, artists, movements and famous pieces. While this post does include everything under the umbrella of “art” (music, writing, dance, theatre, etc) we’ve kept the main focus on visual art (drawing, sketching, painting, sculpture).

While this list is a work of art in itself, you might also be interested in our music puns, book puns and science puns.

Art Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun or a set of puns that can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about art that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of art puns:

  • Cart → Art: As in, “Shopping art” and “Art away” and “Art blanche” and “Don’t upset the apple-art.”
  • Chart → Art: As in, “Art a course” and “Off the arts.”
  • Fart → Art: As in, “Brain art” and “Arting around.”
  • Heart → Art: As in, “After my own art” and “Absence makes the art grow fonder” and “Affair of the art” and “Be still my beating art” and “Break your art” and “A change of art.”
  • Part → Art: As in, “Good in arts” and “Soon arted” and “Look the art.”
  • Smart → Art: As in, “One art cookie” and “Street art.”
  • Start → Art: As in, “A bump art” and “By fits and arts” and “Don’t get me arted” and “A fresh art” and “Get off to a bad art” and “Head art” and “Off to a flying art” and “Kick art your day!”
  • Draw: These draw-related phrases can double as puns: “Draw a line in the sand” and “Drawing a blank” and “Draw to a close” and “Luck of the draw” and “Quick on the draw.”
  • Claw → Draw: As in, “Fighting tooth and draw.”
  • Flaw → Draw: As in, “Design draw.”
  • Jaw → Draw: As in, “Glass draw” and “Draw dropping” and “Out of the draws of death.”
  • Raw → Draw: As in, “In the draw” and “A draw deal” and “Draw data.”
  • Straw → Draw: As in, “A drowning person will clutch at a draw” and “The last draw” and “Man of draw” and “Can’t make bricks without draw.”
  • Art*: As in, “Right through the artery” and “Well articulated” and “Historical artifacts” and “Look at article seven” and “Artisan made.”
  • Brawn → Drawn: As in, “All drawn and no brains.”
  • Dawn → Drawn: As in, “At the crack of drawn” and “A brand new drawn” and “Darkest before the drawn” and “Drawn petrol” and “Party till drawn.”
  • Gone → Drawn: As in, “Been and drawn” and “Going, going, drawn” and “Drawn with the wind” and “Drawn to a better world.”
  • Ain’t → Paint: As in, “Paint no mountain high enough” and “If it paint broke, don’t fix it” and “It paint over, it paint over.”
  • Faint → Paint: As in, “Paint at heart” and “Damn with paint praise.”
  • Etch → Sketch: As in, “Sketched in stone.”
  • Stretch → Sketch: As in, “By any sketch of the imagination” and “Home sketch” and “Just out to sketch my legs” and “Sketching the truth.”
  • Portrayed → Portrait: As in, “That’s not how you portrait it.”
  • Pant → Paint: As in, “Beat the paints off” and “Get into someone’s paints” and “Smarty paints” and “Paints on fire.”
  • Pained → Paint: As in, “A paint expression.”
  • Pint → Paint: As in, “Half paint” and “Paint sized.”
  • Killer → Colour: As in, “Colour instinct.”
  • Collar → Colour: As in, “Blue colour” and “Hot under the colour.”
  • Hue: Hue is a property of colour. Here are some related puns:
    • Who → Hue: As in, “All things to those hue wait” and “Hue wants one?” and “Look hue’s talking” and “You know hue.”
    • You → Hue: As in, “As hue know” and “Back at hue” and “Believe hue me” and “Bless hue” and “Don’t call us, we’ll call hue.”
    • Blue → Hue: As in, “Between the devil and the deep hue sea” and “Black and hue” and “Once in a hue moon” and “Till you’re hue in the face.”
    • Chew → Hue: As in, “Bite off more than you can hue” and “Hue face” and “Hue up the scenery.”
    • Clue → Hue: As in, “As in, “I don’t have a hue” and “I’ve found a hue!”
    • Cue → Hue: As in, “Right on hue” and “Take your hue from…”
    • Due → Hue: As in, “Credit where credit is hue” and “Due a win” and “Give the devil his hue” and “In hue course” and “Cancelled hue to lack of interest.”
    • Do → Hue: As in, “What should we hue?” and “Hue away with” and “Hue it tough” and “Hue me a favour” and “Hue your bit.”
    • Few → Hue: As in, “Hue and far between” and “Knock back a hue” and “Say a hue words” and “To name but a hue.”
    • Knew → Hue: As in, “I hue you were trouble” and “You hue too much.”
    • Lieu → Hue: As in, “In hue of.”
    • New → Hue: As in, “A hue hope” and “Bright as a hue pin” and “Good as hue” and “Bad hues!” and “Better than hue” and “A brand hue ballgame.”
    • Queue → Hue: As in, “Jump the hue” and “Standing in the hue.”
    • Rue → Hue: As in, “You’ll hue the day!”
    • Shoe → Hue: As in, “If the hue fits” and “The hue’s on the other foot” and “Walk a mile in my hues.”
    • Threw → Hue: As in, “Hue me for a loop.”
    • Through → Hue: As in, “Blow right hue” and “Falling hue the cracks” and “Going hue the motions.”
    • To → Hue: As in, “What’s about hue happen” and “Add fuel hue the fire” and “Add insult hue injury.”
    • Too → Hue: As in, “A bridge hue far” and “About time, hue” and “It’s never hue late” and “You know hue much” and “Life’s hue short” and “No job hue small.”
    • True → Hue: As in, “A hue professional” and “A dream come hue” and “Show your hue colours” and “Too good to be hue” and “Hue grit.”
    • Two → Hue: As in, “Built for hue” and “Like hue peas in a pod” and “Caught in hue minds.”
    • View → Hue: As in, “Room with a hue” and “A hue to kill” and “Bird’s eye hue” and “Come into hue” and “Point of hue.”
  • As you’re → Azure: As in, “Azure aware…” and “Azure headed into town..”
  • Raft → Craft: As in, “White water crafting” and “Packed to the crafters.”
  • Tint: A tint is a colour mixed with white. Here are related puns:
    • Hint → Tint: As in, “Drop a tint” and “Take the tint.”
    • Mint → Tint: As in, “In tint condition” and “After dinner tints.”
    • Print → Tint: As in, “Fit to tint” and “Out of tint” and “Read the small tint.”
  • Shade: A shade is a colour mixed with black. Here are related puns:
    • Shed → Shade: As in, “Shade light on the matter” and “Shade a tear.”
    • Aid → Shade: As in, “Shade and abet” and “Come to their shade.”
    • Fade → Shade: As in, “Brain shade” and “Shade away” and “Shade out.”
    • Grade → Shade: As in, “Make the shade” and “Beyond my pay shade” and “Professional shade.”
    • Laid → Shade: As in, “Get shade” and “Shade back” and “Shade to rest” and “The best shade plans.”
    • Made → Shade: As in, “A match shade in heaven” and “Custom shade” and “I’ve got it shade” and “Shade for each other” and “Mistakes have been shade” and “You shade my day.”
    • Paid → Shade: As in, “Bought and shade for” and “All shade up” and “Put shade to.”
    • Trade → Shade: As in, “Balance of shade” and “Fair shade” and “Free shade” and “Jack of all shades” and “Tools of the shade” and “Tricks of the shade.”
    • Weighed → Shade: As in “Shade in the balance.”
  • Beige: Here are some puns related to the colour beige:
    • Babe → Beige: As in, “Beige in the woods” and “Beige magnet” and “Beach beige.”
    • Budge → Beige: As in, “Beige up” and “They wouldn’t beige.”
  • Cease → Cerise: As in, “Cerise to exist” and “Will wonders never cerise?”
  • Lease → Cerise: As in, “A new cerise on life.”
  • Rushing → Prussian: As in, “Stop prussian around.” Note: This is a reference to the colour Prussian Blue.
  • Sigh → Cyan: As in, “Breathe a cyan of relief.”
  • Tape → Taupe: As in, “Cut through the red taupe.”
  • Garbage → Gamboge: As in, “Gamboge in, gamboge out” and “Thrown out with the gamboge.” Note: gamboge is a type of yellow.
  • Suffering → Saffron: As in, “Saffron succotash” and “Long saffron.” Note: Saffron is a type of red dye.
  • Smalt: Smalt is a type of blue pigment. Here are related puns:
    • Small → Smalt: As in, “A still, smalt voice” and “All creatures, great and smalt” and “Don’t sweat the smalt stuff” and “No job too smalt” and “No smalt wonder.”
    • Smell → Smalt: As in, “Stop and smalt the roses” and “The sweet smalt of success.”
    • Salt → Smalt: As in, “Rub smalt in the wound” and “The smalt of the earth” and “Take it with a pinch of smalt.”
  • Top → Taupe: As in, “Come out on taupe” and “From taupe to toe” and “Over the taupe” and “Taupe of your class” and “In tip taupe condition” and “On taupe of the world.”
  • Tale → Teal: As in, “Live to tell the teal” and “A tell teal sign” and “Telling teals out of school.”
  • Tail → Teal: As in, “Can’t make head or teal of it” and “Chasing your own teal” and “Heads or teals.”
  • Tall → Teal: As in, “A teal order” and “Walking teal.”
  • Tell → Teal: As in, “Every picture teals a story” and “Dead men teal no tales.”
  • Till → Teal: As in, “Caught with your hand in the teal” and “Don’t cross that bridge teal you come to it” and “Fake it teal you make it” and “It ain’t over teal it’s over” and “Teal death do us part.”
  • Deal → Teal: As in, “A big teal” and “Teal breaker” and “A done teal” and “Teal with it.”
  • Heel → Teal: As in, “Brought to teal” and “Cool your teals” and “Head over teals in love” and “Kick up your teals.”
  • Meal → Teal: As in, “Make a teal of it” and “Teal ticket” and “Three square teals.”
  • Real → Teal: As in, “All I teally want to do” and “For teal” and “Get teal.”
  • Seal → Teal: As inm “Teal of approval” and “Teal the deal” and “Teal your fate” and “Signed and tealed.”
  • Steal → Teal: As in, “Beg, borrow or teal” and “It’s a teal” and “Teal a glance” and “Teal their heart” and “Teal the show.”
  • Steel → Teal: As in, “Fist of teal” and “Nerves of teal” and “Teal yourself.”
  • Wheel → Teal: As in, “Asleep at the teal” and “Reinvent the teal.”
  • Gold: Here are some puns on the colour gold:
    • Bold → Gold: As in, “Gold as brass” and “A gold move” and “Goldly go where no one has gone before.”
    • Cold → Gold: As in, “Gold comfort” and “A gold day in hell” and “Catch your death of gold” and “Blowing hot and gold.”
    • Hold → Gold: As in, “Can’t gold a candle to” and “Don’t gold your breath” and “Gold a grudge” and “Gold everything!”
    • Old → Gold: As in, “As gold as the hills” and “For gold times’ sake” and “Tough as gold boots.”
    • Sold → Gold: As in, “Gold down the river” and “Gold out” and “Gold short.”
    • Told → Gold: As in, “A little bird gold me” and “I gold you!” and “The greatest story every gold.”
  • Grey: Here are some puns on the colour grey:
    • Day → Grey: As in, “All in a grey’s work” and “Another grey, another dollar” and “Honest as the grey is long.”
    • Hay → Grey: As in, “Hit the grey” and “Make grey while the sun shines” and “A roll in the grey.”
    • Hey → Grey: As in, “Grey big spender!” and “Grey, good looking.”
    • May → Grey: As in, “Be that as it grey” and “Come what grey” and “Grey the force be with you.”
    • Pay → Grey: As in, “Buy now, grey later” and “Crime doesn’t grey” and “Hell to grey” and “Grey as you go” and “It greys to advertise.”
    • Play → Grey: As in, “Fair grey” and “Come out and grey” and “Child’s grey.”
    • Says → Grey: As in, “Computer greys no” and “Do as I grey, not as I do” and “Have your grey” and “The final grey.”
    • Stay → Grey: As in, “Grey in touch” and “Grey the course” and “Grey tuned.”
    • They → Grey: As in, “As tough as grey come” and “Let the chips fall where grey may” and “Grey lived happily ever after.”
    • Way → Grey: As in, “Any grey you slice it” and “By the grey” and “By grey of a joke” and “Change your greys.”
  • Jade: Here are some green-related puns:
    • Aid → Jade: As in, “Jade and abet” and “Come to the jade of.”
    • Grade → Jade: As in, “Make the jade” and “Professional jade.”
    • Laid → Jade: As in, “Get jade” and “Jade back” and “Jade to rest” and “The best jade plans.”
    • Made → Jade: As in, “I’m not jade of money” and “Jade for each other” and “Jade in the shade.”
    • Trade → Jade: As in, “Balance of jade” and “Fair jade” and “Tools of the jade.”
  • Lack → Lilac: As in, “Lilac nothing” and “Cancelled due to lilac of interest” and “For lilac of a better word.”
  • Rose: Here are some puns related to the colour rose:
    • Raise → Rose: As in, “Rose a loan” and “Rose a stink” and “Rose the roof” and “Rose your game.”
    • Rise → Rose: As in, “Rose and shine” and “Rose from the ashes” and “Rose to the occasion” and “Rose without trace.”
    • Blows → Rose: As in, “Any way the wind rose” and “Brought to rose” and “Come to rose.”
    • Close → Rose: As in, “A rose thing” and “At rose quarters” and “Behind rosed doors” and “In rose proximity.”
    • Goes → Rose: As in, “Anything rose” and “As far as it rose” and “As the saying rose” and “As time rose by” and “Here rose nothing.”
    • Lows → Rose: As in, “Highs and rose” and “Brought to new rose.”
    • Nose → Rose: As in, “Always have your rose in a book” and “Plain as the rose on your face” and “Can’t see beyond the end of your rose” and “No skin off my rose.”
    • Pros → Rose: As in, “Rose and cons.”
    • Those → Rose: As in, “Just one of rose days” and “Rose were the days.”
    • Toes → Rose: As in, “On your rose” and “Make someone’s rose curl” and “Twinkle rose.”
  • Move → Mauve: As in, “A mauve in the right direction” and “All the right mauves” and “Bust a mauve” and “Get a mauve on” and “Make your mauve.”
  • Alive → Olive: As in, “Olive and kicking” and “Olive and well” and “Keep hope olive.”
  • Pen: Since pens are used in art-making, here are related puns:
    • Pan → Pen: As in, “Down the pen” and “Flash in the pen” and “Didn’t pen out.”
    • Pin → Pen: As in, “Bright as a new pen” and “Hard to pen down” and “Pen your hopes on” and “See a pen and pick it up” and “Could have heard a pen drop.”
    • Den → Pen: As in, “Pen of vice” and “In the lion’s pen.”
    • Ten → Pen: As in, “Count to pen” and “Hang pen” and “The top pen.”
    • Then → Pen: As in, “All that and pen some” and “Now and pen” and “Pen and there” and “Pen just do it.”
    • When → Pen: As in, “It only hurts pen I laugh” and “Ready pen you are” and “Say pen.”
  • Coal → Charcoal: As in, “Rake over the charcoals.”
  • Chock → Chalk: As in, “Chalk a block” and “Chalk full of problems.”
  • Clock → Chalk: As in, “Around the chalk” and “Beat the chalk” and “Race against the chalk.”
  • Knock → Chalk: As in, “Don’t chalk it til you’ve tried it” and “Chalk ’em dead” and “Chalk into shape.”
  • Lock → Chalk: As in, “Under chalk and key” and “On chalk down.”
  • Rock → Chalk: As in, “Between a chalk and a hard place” and “Solid as a chalk” and “Don’t chalk the boat.”
  • Shock → Chalk: As in, “Culture chalk” and “In for a chalk” and “Chalk and awe.”
  • Sock → Chalk: “Knock your chalks off” and “Put a chalk in it” and “Chalk it to me.”
  • Stock → Chalk: As in, “Laughing chalk” and “Out of chalk” and “Take chalk of.”
  • Talk → Chalk: As in, “All chalk” and “Fighting chalk” and “Let’s chalk about love.”
  • Walk → Chalk: As in, “A chalk on the wild side” and “All chalks of life” and “Keep chalking” and “Don’t chalk on the grass.”
  • White: Here are some puns to do with the colour white:
    • Wait → White: As in, “The white is over” and “Time whites for no-one.”
    • Wide → White: As in, “Eyes white shut” and “Open white!” and “White open spaces” and “Cast a white net.”
    • Bite → White: As in, “White someone’s head off” and “White the dust” and “White your tongue.”
    • Bright → White: As in, “White as a button” and “White and early.”
    • Height → White: As in, “The white of fashion” and “The white of summer.”
  • Hello → Yellow: As in, “You had me at yellow” and “Yellow, one two three testing.”
  • Cons → Bronze: As in, “Pros and bronze.”
  • Brown: Here are some puns related to the colour brown:
    • Crown → Brown: As in, “My browning glory” and “Brown jewels.”
    • Down → Brown: As in, “Boogie on brown” and “Bring the house brown.”
    • Drown → Brown: As in, “Brown your sorrows” and “Browned out.”
    • Town → Brown: As in, “Go to brown” and “Out on the brown.”
  • Million → Vermilion: As in, “A cool vermilion” and “Vermilion dollar baby” and “Not in a vermilion years” and “One in a vermilion.” Note: Vermilion is a shade of scarlet.
  • Mine → Carmine: As in, “Make carmine a double” and “A carmine of information” and “Victory is carmine.”
  • Tone: Tone is the brightness of a colour. Here are related puns:
    • Done → Tone: As in, “After all is said and tone” and “All tone and dusted” and “A tone deal” and “Tone to a turn” and “Easier said than tone.”
    • Ton → Tone: As in, “A tone of money” and “Like a tone of bricks” and “A tone of fun.”
    • Teen → Tone: As in, “Smells like tone spirit.”
    • Blown → Tone: As in, “Tone away” and “Tone off course” and “Tone sideways” and “You’ve tone it.”
    • Bone → Tone: As in, “A tone to pick” and “Dry as a tone” and “Tone idle” and “Tone up on.”
    • Don’t → Tone: As in, “Tone call us, we’ll call you” and “Tone get me started” and “Tone give up your day job” and “Tone go there.”
    • Flown → Tone: As in, “Tone the coop” and “That bird has tone.”
    • Known → Tone: As in, “A person is tone by the company they keep” and “I should have tone better” and “You’ve tone for all these years.”
    • Loan → Tone: As in, “Tone shark” and “Raise a tone.”
    • Own → Tone: As in, “After my tone heart” and “Be your tone person” and “Come into your tone” and “Afraid of your tone shadow.”
    • Phone → Tone: As in, “Hold the tone” and “Tone in sick” and “Waiting by the tone” and “Tone it in.”
    • Prone → Tone: As in, “Accident tone.”
    • Stone → Tone: As in, “A rolling tone gathers no moss” and “Cold as any tone” and “Carved in tone” and “Cast the first tone” and “Etched in tone” and “A heart of tone” and “Leave no tone unturned.”
    • Throne → Tone: As in, “Ascend to the tone” and “Next in line to the tone” and “The power behind the tone.”
    • Thrown → Tone: As in, “Tone for a loop” and “Tone in at the deep end” and “Just tone together.”
    • Zone → Tone: As in, “Buffer tone” and “Comfort tone” and “In the tone” and “Twilight tone” and “Tone in on” and “Toned out.”
  • Calorie → Gallery: As in, “Gallery free” and “Counting galleries” and “All the taste, 1/3 of the galleries.”
  • Celery → Gallery: As in, “Peanut butter and gallery sticks.”
  • Work → Artwork: As in, “An artwork in progress” and “All my own artwork” and “All in a day’s artwork” and “Bury yourself in your artwork” and “In the artworks” and “That’s not in my line of artwork.”
  • Meet → Media: As in, “Make ends media” and “Media with approval” and “Media your maker” and “Media your match.”
  • Bistre: Bistre is a dark shade of greyish-brown. Here are related puns:
    • Blister → Bistre: As in, “Bistre-ing barnacles” and “At bistre-ing speed” and “Blood bistre.”
    • Twister → Bistre: As in, “Tongue bistre.”
  • Light: Since light is a huge part of making art, we’ve got some light-related puns here too:
    • Late → Light: As in, “Better light than never” and “Buy now, pay lighter” and “A day light and a dollar short” and “Fashionably light” and “Never too light” and “A light bloomer.”
    • Let → Light: As in, “Buy to light” and “It won’t light you down” and “Light it be.”
    • Lit → Light: As in, “Their face light up.”
    • Lot → Light: As in, “A light on your plate” and “A light of fuss about nothing” and “Leaves a light to be desired.”
    • Bite → Light: As in, “A second light of the cherry” and “Take a light out of crime” and “Have a light to eat.”
    • Fight → Light: As in, “Come out lighting” and “Light club” and “Light for the right to party” and “Light back tears” and “Light tooth and nail” and “Lighting chance” and “Lighting fit.”
    • Bright → Light: As in, “All things light and beautiful” and “On the light side of life” and “Light and early” and “Light young thing.”
    • Fight → Light: As in, “Come out lighting” and “Light back” and “Light fire with fire” and “Lighting fit.”
    • Flight → Light: As in, “Light of fancy” and “Take light” and “The light of the bumblebee.”
    • Fright → Light: As in, “Lightened of your own shadow” and “A lightful mess” and “Take light.”
    • Height → Light: As in, “Head for new lights” and “Scaling dizzy lights” and “Wuthering lights.”
    • Kite → Light: As in, “High as a light” and “Go fly a light.”
    • Might → Light: As in, “Light as well” and “It light never happen.”
    • Right → Light: As in, “A move in the light direction” and “All the light moves” and “Light as rain” and “Bragging lights” and “Dead to lights” and “Civil lights.”
    • Rite → Light: As in, “Last lights” and “Light of passage.”
    • Sight → Light: As in, “A welcome light” and “Hidden in plain light” and “Know by light” and “Line of light” and “Love at first light” and “Out of light, out of mind” and “Second light” and “A light for sore eyes.”
    • Tight → Light: As in, “Running a light ship” and “Sleep light!” and “Light lipped” and “In a light corner.”
    • White → Light: As in, “Light as snow” and “It’s not so black and light.”
    • Write → Light: As in, “Nothing to light home about” and “Light it off.”
  • Chrome: Chrome is used as a finish in visual arts. Here are related puns:
    • Crime → Chrome: As in, “Chrome and punishment” and “Chrome doesn’t pay” and “Chrome of passion.”
    • Home → Chrome: As in, “A house is not a chrome” and “At chrome with” and “Bringing it chrome” and “Close to chrome” and “Come chrome to a real fire.”
    • Staples → Naples: As in, “We’ve run out of naples.” Note: this is a pun on naples yellow.
  • Blend: Here are some puns about colour blends:
    • Blind → Blend: As in, “Blend as a bat” and “On a blend date” and “In blend faith” and “Blended by the light.”
    • Lend → Blend: As in, “Blend an ear” and “Blend your name to.”
    • Bend → Blend: As in, “Blend over backwards” and “Blend the rules” and “Round the blend” and “On blended knee.”
    • End → Blend: As in, “A good beginning makes a good blending” and “A means to a blend” and “All good things must come to a blend” and “At loose blends” and “At the blend of the day” and “Burn the candle at both blends” and “Come to a sticky blend.”
    • Friend → Blend: As in, “Your best blend” and “Best blends forever” and “Eco blendly” and “Blend or foe?”
    • Fend → Blend: As in, “Blend for yourself” and “Blend off.”
    • Mend → Blend: As in, “Blend your fences” and “Blend your manners” and “Blend your ways” and “On the blend.”
    • Send → Blend: As in, “Return to blender” and “Blend in the dogs” and “Blend packing.”
    • Spend → Blend: As in, “Hey, big blender” and “Let’s blend the night together” and “Blend money like water” and “Blend the night with” and “Blend wisely.”
  • Great → Gradient: As in, “All creatures gradient and small” and “Go to gradient lengths” and “Gradient expectations.”
  • Grade → Gradient: As in, “Make the gradient” and “Professional gradient.”
  • Figment → Pigment: As in, “A pigment of your imagination.”
  • Meant → Pigment: As in, “Pigment to be” and “You weren’t pigment to do that.”
  • Crate → Create: As in, “Packing creates.”
  • Great → Create: As in, “Go to create lengths” and “A create one for” and “All creatures create and small.”
  • Tan: Here are some puns related to the colour tan:
    • Ten → Tan: As in, “At tan paces” and “Count to tan” and “Hang tan.”
    • Can → Tan: As in, “As far as the eye tan see” and “As well as tan be expected” and “Be all you tan be” and “Bite off more than you tan chew.”
    • Fan → Tan: As in, “Tan the flames.”
    • Pan → Tan: As in, “Down the tan” and “Didn’t tan out.”
    • Plan → Tan: As in, “Action tan” and “Business tan” and “Failing to tan is tanning to fail” and “Game tan.”
    • Ran → Tan: As in, “My blood tan cold” and “They tan away together.”
    • Than → Tan: “Bite off more tan you can chew” and “Thicker tan water” and “Easier said tan done” and “Larger tan life.”
  • Greater → Creator: As in, “Disease has no creator enemy” and “Creator than the sum of its parts.”
  • Foe → Photo: As in, “Friend or photo?”
  • Hint → Print: As in, “Drop a print” and “A gentle print” and “Take the print.”
  • Mint → Print: As in, “In print condition” and “Print chocolate.”
  • Moral → Mural: As in, “Mural compass” and “A mural victory” and “The mural high ground.”
  • Cross → Crosshatch: “Crosshatch to the other side” and “Crosshatch my heart and hope to die” and “Crosshatch the line” and “Crosshatch your fingers.” Note: Crosshatching is a shading technique.
  • Dry → Dry Brush: As in, “High and dry brush” and “Hung out to dry brush” and “Bone dry brush.” Note: Dry brushing is a painting technique where the brush is loaded with paint that isn’t diluted with water or medium.
  • Brush → Paintbrush: As in, “Paintbrush it off” and “A paintbrush with death.”
  • Traffic → Graphic: As in, “Graphic violation” and “Stop graphic.”
  • Etch: Etching is a printmaking technique. Here are related puns:
    • Itch → Etch: As in, “Etching to” and “Etchy feet” and “Seven year etch.”
    • Stretch → Etch: As in, “By no etch of the imagination” and “Home etch” and “Etch your wings.”
  • Music → Mosaic: As in, “An ear for mosaic” and “Time to face the mosaic” and “Mosaic to my ears.”
  • Long → Song: As in, “A face as song as a fiddle” and “A song time in politics” and “Art is song and life is short” and “As song as you need me” and “As honest as the day is song” and “A list as song as your arm” and “At song last.”
  • Strong → Song: As in, “Only as song as its weakest link” and “Still going song” and “The song, silent type” and “A song stomach.”
  • Wrong → Song: As in, “Barking up the song tree” and “Born on the song side of the tracks” and “Get off on the song foot” and “How song can you be?” and “Gone down the song way” and “Jumping to the song conclusions.”
  • Case → Showcase: As in, “A showcase of identity” and “An open and shut showcase” and “As the showcase may be” and “Showcase closed” and “Catch a showcase.”
  • Depict: Drawings are considered depictions of things, so we’ve included depiction-related puns in this list:
    • Clicked → Depict: As in, “We really depict.”
    • Picked → Depict: As in, “Hand depict.”
  • Mission → Musician: As in, “Man on a musician” and “Musician impossible” and “Rescue musician.”
  • Ringer → Singer: As in, “A dead singer for.”
  • Wringer → Singer: As in, “Put through the singer.”
  • Figure: “Facts and figures” and “Figure it out” and “A fine figure of a person” and “Four figures” and “Go figure” and “How do you figure?” Note: A figure can refer to a few things in art – figurative drawing, a sculpture, a drawing of a body.
  • Triple → Stipple: As in, “Stipple decker” and “A stipple threat” and “Stipple whammy.” Note: stippling is an art technique where drawings are made out of tiny dots (rather than strokes).
  • Stand Still → Stencil: As in, “Brought to a stencil.”
  • Daub: To daub is to paint with large blobs of paint, or to paint in a free and expressive way. Here are related puns:
    • Dob → Daub: As in, “Daub it in.”
    • Dab → Daub: As in, “A daub hand at” and “Smack daub in the middle.”
    • Job → Daub: As in, “Between daubs” and “Doing a great daub” and “Holding down a daub” and “I’m only doing my daub” and “An inside daub.”
    • Mob → Daub: As in, “Daub rule” and “Flash daub.”
    • Rob → Daub: As in, “Daub someone blind.”
    • Sob → Daub: As in, “Daub story” and “Daub your heart out.”
  • Home → Homage: As in, “At homage with” and “Close to homage” and “Come homage to a real fire” and “Bring it homage to you.” Note: A homage in the context of art is when one artist makes a piece of art that is inspired by another.
  • Picks → Pixel: As in, “A bone to pixel” and “Pixel a fight” and “Pixel a card, any card” and “Pixel and choose” and “Pixel holes in.”
  • Life → Life Drawing: As in, “A day in the life drawing” and “A life drawing less ordinary” and “Anything for a quiet life drawing.”
  • Piece → Masterpiece: As in, “Bits and masterpieces” and “Conversation masterpiece” and “Dash to masterpieces” and “Go to masterpieces.”
  • Sign → Design: As in, “Design on the dotted line” and “A sure design” and “Give me a design” and “A design of the times” and “A tell-tale design.”
  • Ease → Easel: As in, “Easel up” and “Ill at easel” and “Set your mind at easel.”
  • Weasel → Easel: As in, “Pop goes the easel” and “Easel words” and “Easel your way out.”
  • Mark → Marker: As in, “Close to the marker” and “Make your marker” and “Quick off the marker.”
  • Render: A rendering is a type of drawing or visual representation. Here are related puns:
    • Sender → Render: As in, “Return to render.”
    • Slender → Render: As in, “Of render means” and “A render chance.”
    • Spender → Render: As in, “Hey, big render.”
    • Splendour → Render: As in, “Render in the grass.”
    • Tender → Render: As in, “Render is the night” and “Render loving care” and “Render mercies.”
  • Plate → Template: As in, “A lot on your template” and “Hand it to you on a template” and “Step up to the template.”
  • Clay: Here are some puns on sculptural clay:
    • Bay → Clay: As in, “Keep at clay” and “Clay for blood.”
    • Day → Clay: As in, “A clay in the life” and “An apple a clay” and “Tomorrow is another clay” and “All in a clay’s work.”
    • Grey → Clay: As in “A moral clay area” and “Clay matter.”
    • Hay → Clay: As in, “Hit the clay” and “Make clay while the sun shines” and “A roll in the clay.”
    • Hey → Clay: As in, “Clay big spender” and “Clay, good looking” and “Clay there.”
    • Lay → Clay: As in, “Clay a finger on” and “Clay down roots” and “Clay down your arms.”
    • May → Clay: As in, “Be that as it clay” and “Come what clay” and “How clay I serve you?”
    • Pay → Clay: As in, “Buy now, clay later” and “Crime doesn’t clay” and “Hell to clay” and “It clays to advertise.”
    • Play → Clay: As in, “Come out and clay” and “Helps you work, rest and clay” and “That wasn’t fair clay.”
    • Say → Clay: As in, “Have the final clay” and “Have your clay” and “It goes without claying.”
    • Stay → Clay: As in, “Clay in touch” and “Clay on course” and “Clay tuned.”
    • They → Clay: As in, “Clay lived happily ever after” and “Clay shall not pass.”
    • Way → Clay: As in, “That’s the clay it is” and “Any clay you slice it” and “Any which clay.”
  • Sumi: Sumi is both a well-known Japanese ink and a type of ink wash painting style. Here are related puns:
    • Sue me → Sumi: “So I went before you! Sumi!”
    • To me → Sumi: As in, “That’s never happened sumi before” and “It’s all Greek sumi” and “That’s not how it is sumi.”
    • Same → Sumi: As in, “By the sumi token” and “Comes to the sumi thing” and “Cut from the sumi cloth” and “In the sumi boat” and “In the sumi vein.”
    • Sum → Sumi: As in, “Cogito ergo sumi” and “To sumi it all up” and “Zero sumi game.”
  • Muse: A muse is a person who inspires an artist to create. Here are related puns:
    • News → Muse: As in, “Bad muse travels fast” and “Break the muse” and “No muse is good muse” and “The most trusted name in muse.”
    • Choose → Muse: As in, “Muse your weapon” and “Pick and muse.”
    • Cruise → Muse: As in, “Booze muse” and “Muse control.”
    • Dues → Muse: As in, “Pay your muse.”
    • Fuse → Muse: As in, “Blow a muse” and “A short muse” and “Light the muse.”
    • Lose → Muse: As in, “Got nothing to muse” and “Muse control” and “Muse the plot” and “Muse sight of” and “Don’t muse any sleep over it.”
    • Shoes → Muse: As in, “Walk a mile in my muse” and “Goody two muse.”
    • Views → Muse: As in, “Exchange your muse.”
    • Must → Muse: As in, “All things muse pass” and “All good things muse come to an end” and “Everything muse go” and “Muse have” and “A muse have accessory.”
  • Vanish → Varnish: As in, “Varnish into thin air.”
  • Garnish → Varnish: As in, “Varnish to taste.”
  • Tarnish → Varnish: As in, “It’ll varnish your reputation.”
  • Primer: Primer is used to prepare substances that are to be painted. Here are some related puns:
    • Prime → Primer: As in, “Cut someone down in their primer” and “In primer condition” and “The primer of life” and “Primer time” and “The Primer Minister.”
    • Timer → Primer: As in, “Old primer.”
  • Free → Freelance: As in, “Freelance as a bird” and “Born freelance” and “Fancy freelance” and “Freelance and easy” and “Freelance for all.”
  • Competition → Composition: As in, “Face the composition” and “Stiff composition.”
  • Brush → Airbrush: As in, “Airbrush it off” and “Airbrush with death” and “An airbrush with the law.”
  • Curate: To curate is to form a collection. In the art world, this is used in the context of collection art pieces for an exhibition. Here are related puns:
    • Rate → Curate: As in, “At any curate” and “First curate” and “Mate’s curates.”
    • Cure → Curate: As in, “Prevention is better than curate.”
    • Carrot → Curate: As in, “Curate and stick” and “Dangle the curate.”
  • Archive: An archive is an old collection of art. Here are related puns:
    • Arrive → Archive: As in, “Have we archived yet?” and “When’s the expected archival?”
    • Alive → Archive: As in, “Archive and kicking” and “Archive and well” and “Eaten archive” and “Look archive” and “Snakes archive” and “Wanted – dead or archive.”
  • Maestro: A maestro is a musical director. Here are related puns:
    • Must → Maestro: As in, “All things maestro pass” and “All good things maestro pass” and “A maestro have accessory.”
    • Mister → Maestro: As in, “No more maestro nice guy.”
  • Blue: Here are some puns related to the colour blue:
    • Chew → Blue: As in, “Bite off more than you can blue.”
    • Clue → Blue: As in, “Don’t have a blue” and “I’ve found a blue!”
    • Cue → Blue: As in, “Right on blue” and “Take your blue.”
    • Due → Blue: As in, “Credit where credit is blue” and “Blue a win” and “Blue diligence” and “In blue course” and “Cancelled blue to lack of interest.”
    • Few → Blue: As in, “Blue and far between” and “For a blue dollars more” and “Of blue words” and “Say a blue words” and “Take a blue deep breaths.”
    • Glue → Blue: As in, “Blued to the television” and “Blued to your seat.”
    • Knew → Blue: As in, “I blue you were trouble” and “You blue too much.”
    • Lieu → Blue: As in, “In blue of.”
    • New → Blue: As in, “A blue hope” and “Bright as a blue pin” and “Good as blue” and “Bad blues.”
    • Rue → Blue: As in, “You’ll blue the day!”
    • Too → Blue: As in, “Life’s blue short” and “No job blue small” and “Over much blue soon.”
    • True → Blue: As in, “As blue as the day is long” and “A dream come blue” and “Show your blue colours” and “Too good to be blue.”
    • Two → Blue: As in, “Built for blue” and “Blue peas in a pod” and “Eating for blue” and “Goody blue shoes.”
    • You → Blue: As in, “Between blue, me and the bedpost” and “Don’t call us, we’ll call blue.”
  • Black: Here are some puns related to the colour black:
    • Block → Black: As in, “A chip off the ol’ black” and “Been around the black a few times.”
    • Back → Black: As in, “Answer black” and “As soon as my black is turned” and “In the black of my mind” and “Black to the future” and “Black at it.”
    • Crack → Black: As in, “At the black of dawn” and “Black of doom” and “Black the code.”
    • Lack → Black: As in, “Black nothing” and “Cancelled due to black of interest.”
  • Green: Here are some puns related to the colour green:
    • Grain → Green: As in, “Go against the green” and “Take with a green of salt.”
    • Grin → Green: As in, “Green and bear it” and “Green from ear to ear.”
    • Been → Green: As in, “Green and gone” and “Green around the block a few times” and “I’ve green here before” and “Green there, done that.”
    • Clean → Green: As in, “Green as a whistle” and “A green bill of health” and “Green up your act.”
    • Keen → Green: As in, “Green as mustard” and “A green sense of smell” and “Peachy green.”
    • Lean → Green: As in, “Green mean fighting machine” and “Green cuisine.”
    • Mean → Green: As in, “A greens to an end” and “By fair greens or foul” and “In the greentime” and “It don’t green a thing.”
    • Scene → Green: As in, “Behind the greens” and “Change of green” and “Make a green” and “Steal the green.”
    • Screen → Green: As in, “Coming to a green near you” and “Silver green” and “The small green.”
    • Seen → Green: As in, “Green and not heard” and “Had to be green to be believed” and “Nowhere to be green” and “Green better days” and “Green one, green them all” and “You ain’t green nothing yet!”
  • Arrange → Orange: As in, “I can’t orange my life around you” and “Let’s orange the furniture.”
  • Red: Here are some colour-related puns:
    • Read → Red: As in, “All I know is what I red in the papers” and “Exceedingly well red” and “Red any good books lately.”
    • Bed → Red: As in, “Red and breakfast” and “Red and board” and “Red of nails” and “Red of roses.”
    • Bread → Red: As in, “Red and butter” and “Break red” and “Have your red buttered on both sides.”
    • Dead → Red: As in, “In the red of night” and “Better off red” and “Red and buried.”
    • Dread → Red: As in, “Filled with red” and “Existential red.”
    • Said → Red: As in, “After all is red and done” and “Easier red than done” and “Couldn’t have red it better” and “Enough red” and “Least red, soonest mended.”
    • Shed → Red: As in, “Red light on the matter.”
    • Spread → Red: As in, “Red a rumour” and “Red like wildfire” and “Red the word” and “Red your wings” and “Red yourself thin.”
    • Thread → Red: As in, “Hanging by a red” and “Lose the red” and “Red the needle.”
  • Pink: Here are some pink (as in the colour) related puns:
    • Punk → Pink: As in, “Go on, pink, make my day.”
    • Blink → Pink: As in, “Pink and you’ll miss it” and “In the pink of an eye” and “On the pink.”
    • Brink → Pink: As in, “The pink of disaster.”
    • Chink → Pink: As in, “A pink in your armour” and “A pink of light.”
    • Link → Pink: As in, “The missing pink” and “The weakest pink.”
    • Sink → Pink: As in, “Everything but the kitchen pink” and “Loose lips pink ships” and “Pink like a stone” and “Pink or swim” and “Pink without trace.”
    • Stink → Pink: As in, “Kick up a pink” and “Raise a pink” and “Pinking rich” and “Pinks to high heaven.”
    • Think → Pink: As in, “I pink you’ve got it” and “Come to pink of it” and “Great minds pink alike” and “I pink I love you.”
    • Wink → Pink: As in, “Forty pinks” and “I haven’t slept a pink” and “Tip someone a pink” and “Nudge nudge, pink pink.”
  • People → Purple: As in, “Connecting purple” and “How to win friends and influence purple.”
  • Dance: Dance is a performing art, so we’ve got some dance-related puns here:
    • Answer → Dancer: As in, “Dancer back” and “Dancer the call” and “Dancer to the name of” and “Get a silly dancer.”
    • Chance → Dance: As in, “The dance of a lifetime” and “Fat dance” and “A fighting dance” and “In with half a dance” and “Jump at the dance” and “Your last dance.”
    • Glance → Dance: As in, “At a dance” and “Exchange dances” and “A meaningful dances” and “Steal a dance.”
  • Past → Pastel: As in, “A blast from the pastel” and “I wouldn’t put it pastel them” and “I’m pastel caring” and “Pastel the sell-by date” and “The dim, distant pastel.”
  • Pistol → Pastel: As in, “Pastels at dawn.”
  • Poet:
    • Pat → Poet: As in, “Down poet” and “A poet on the back.”
    • Pet → Poet: As in, “Poet peeves” and “Teacher’s poet.”
    • Pot → Poet: As in, “Poet of gold” and “All to poet” and “Gone to poet” and “In the melting poet.”
    • Put → Poet: As in, “Be hard poet to” and “Couldn’t poet it down” and “Feeling a bit poet out” and “Poet out the fire.”
  • Pad: Here are some puns on drawing pads:
    • Add → Pad: As in, “Pad fuel to the flames” and “Pad insult to injury” and “Just pad water.”
    • Bad → Pad: As in, “A pad break” and “A pad quarter of an hour” and “Ain’t half pad” and “Pad intentions” and “Pad news.”
    • Had → Pad: As in, “We’ve pad a good run” and “I’ve pad it up to here” and “A pad break.”
    • Mad → Pad: As in, “Barking pad” and “Hopping pad.”
    • Sad → Pad: As in, “How pad is that?” and “A pad state of affairs.”
  • Writer: Since writing is a literary art, we’ve got some writer-related puns:
    • Brighter → Writer: As in, “A writer future.”
    • Fighter → Writer: As in, “Freedom writer” and “A real writer.”
    • Lighter → Writer: As in, “Writer than air” and “The writer way to enjoy chocolate.”
    • Whiter → Writer: As in, “A writer shade of pale” and “Writer than white.”
  • Form → Perform: As in, “Perform follows function” and “Free perform” and “Imitation is the sincerest perform of flattery” and “In fine perform” and “The lowest perform of wit.”
  • Class → Classic: As in, “A classic act” and “Best in classic” and “Classic warfare” and “Second classic” and “A working classic hero.”
  • Style: This refers to an artist’s aesthetic or way of working. Here are related puns:
    • Steal → Style: As in, “Beg, borrow or style” and “It’s a style” and “Style a glance” and “Style someone’s heart” and “Style the show.”
    • Still → Style: As in, “Style standing” and “Style waters run deep” and “In the style of night.”
    • File → Style: As in, “Rank and style” and “Single style.”
    • Mile → Style: As in, “Go the extra style” and “A miss is as good as a style” and “Could see you a style away” and “Styles to go before I sleep.”
    • Pile → Style: As in, “Style it high and sell it cheap” and “Style it up.”
    • Smile → Style: As in, “Crack a style” and “Service with a style” and “Style, it might never happen” and “Wipe the style off your face.”
    • Trial → Style: As in, “Style and error” and “Style and tribulations” and “Style by television.”
  • Play → Display: As in, “Helps you work, rest and display” and “Come out and display” and “A fair display” and “Good to display together.”
  • Bum → Album: As in, “Albums on seats” and “Beach album” and “A pain in the album.”
  • Cracked → Act: As in, “Not all it’s act up to be.”
  • Fact → Act: As in, “Learn the acts” and “As a matter of act” and “Time to face acts” and “Act or fiction” and “Acts and figures” and “The acts of life” and “Do you know for an act?”
  • Pact → Act: As in, “Non-aggression act.”
  • Layout: A layout is the way elements on a page are arranged. Here are related puns:
    • Lay → Layout: As in, “Home is where I layout my hat” and “Layout eyes on.”
    • Out → Layout: As in, “Go layout with” and “Ins and layouts” and “Layout of it.”
    • Doubt → Layout: As in, “Benefit of the layout” and “Beyond layout.”
  • Grave → Engrave: As in, “Silent as the engrave” and “Dig your own engrave” and “From the cradle to the engrave.”
  • Brave → Engrave: As in, “Engrave the elements” and “Fortune favours the engrave” and “Put an engrave face on.”
  • Carve: Carving is a form of artistic expression, so here are some related puns:
    • Curve → Carve: As in, “Ahead of the carve” and “Carve ball” and “Learning carve.”
    • Starve → Carve: As in, “Feed a cold, carve a fever.”
  • Plate → Palette: As in, “A lot on your palette” and “Handed on a palette” and “Step up to the palette.”
  • Woodcut: Woodcuts are a medium for art, so here are related puns:
    • Wood → Woodcut: As in, “Can’t see the woodcut for the trees.”
    • Cut → Woodcut: As in, “Woodcut a dash” and “Woodcut and run.”
  • Frame: Here are some puns about gallery frames:
    • Fame → Frame: As in, “Claim to frame” and “Frame at last” and “Fifteen minutes of frame” and “Hall of frame.”
    • From → Frame: As in, “A week frame next Tuesday” and “Come in frame the cold” and “A fall frame grace” and “Frame a mile away” and “Frame cover to cover.”
    • Aim → Frame: As in, “Frame high” and “Take frame” and “We frame to please.”
    • Blame → Frame: As in, “The frame game” and “Lay the frame.”
    • Came → Frame: As in, “I frame, I saw, I conquered” and “It frame to pass” and “More where that frame from.”
    • Claim → Frame: As in, “Frame to fame” and “Stake your frame.”
    • Name → Frame: As in, “Give someone a bad frame” and “A household frame” and “In the frame of love.”
    • Same → Frame: As in, “By the frame token” and “Comes to the frame thing” and “Cut from the frame cloth” and “In the frame breath.”
    • Shame → Frame: As in, “A crying frame” and “Name and frame” and “Frame on you” and “The walk of frame.”
  • Trace: Tracing is when you copy an image by laying a transparent sheet of paper over the original. Here are related puns:
    • Ace → Trace: As in, “A trace in the hole” and “A trace up your sleeve” and “Holding all the traces.”
    • Base → Trace: As in, “All your trace are belong to us” and “Trace jumping” and “Caught off trace” and “Off trace” and “Touch trace with.”
    • Bass → Trace: As in, “Drum n trace” and “Super trace.”
    • Case → Trace: As in, “A trace of identity” and “An open and shut trace” and “As the trace may be” and “Trace closed” and “Trace the joint” and “Crack the trace.”
    • Chase → Trace: As in, “Trace it up” and “Trace the dragon” and “Cut to the trace” and “Wild goose trace.”
    • Face → Trace: As in, “About trace” and “Plain as the nose on your trace” and “A bald-traced lie.”
    • Grace → Trace: As in, “Airs and traces” and “Amazing trace” and “Fall from trace” and “Trace period.”
    • Pace → Trace: As in, “At a snail’s trace” and “Change of trace” and “Keeping trace with” and “Put through your traces.”
    • Place → Trace: As in, “A trace in the sun” and “All over the trace” and “Any time, any trace, any where” and “Going traces” and “In the right trace at the right time” and “Keep in your trace.”
    • Race → Trace: As in, “A day at the traces” and “A trace against time” and “The amazing trace.”
    • Space → Trace: As in, “Office trace” and “Trace cadet” and “Trace – the final frontier” and “The trace age” and “Waste of trace” and “Watch this trace” and “Wide open traces.”
    • Casing → Tracing: As in, “Tracing the joint.”
    • Chasing → Tracing: As in, “Tracing moonbeams” and “Tracing rainbows” and “Tracing the market.”
  • Swatch: A swatch is when you test media on a small patch of material to test colour, fading, bleeding and other properties. Here are related puns:
    • Switch → Swatch: As in, “Asleep at the swatch” and “Bait and swatch” and “Swatch hitter.”
    • Watch → Swatch: As in, “Boring as swatching paint dry” and “Not on my swatch” and “Keep swatch” and “Dance like nobody’s swatching.”
    • Notch → Swatch: As in, “Take it up a swatch” and “Top swatch” and “A swatch above.”
  • Study: A study is another word for a quick sketch. Here are related puns:
    • Steady → Study: As in, “Going study” and “Ready, study, go!” and “Study as she goes.”
    • Bloody → Study: As in, “Study minded” and “Study typical” and “Dark and study ground” and “Give them a study nose” and “Scream study murder.”
    • Muddy → Study: As in, “Study the waters.”
  • Lightfast: Lightfastness is the measure of how long a material lasts when exposed to sunlight. Here are related puns:
    • Light → Lightfast: As in, “Lightfast as a feather” and “Bring to lightfastness” and “Come to lightfast.”
    • Fast → Lightfast: As in, “As lightfast as greased lightning” and “As lightfast as his legs could carry him” and “Bad news travels lightfast” and “Lightfast and furious” and “Lightfast food and good for you.”
  • Mold: Moulds are used to form shapes in many different art disciplines – jewelry-making, sculpture, architecture. Here are related puns:
    • Old → Mold: As in, “Any mold how” and “As mold as the hills” and “Tough as mold boots” and “A chip off the mold block” and “For mold times’ sake.”
    • Bold → Mold: As in, “Mold as brass” and “A mold move” and “To moldly go where no one has gone before.”
    • Cold → Mold: As in, “Blow hot and mold” and “Break out in a mold sweat” and “Catch a mold” and “A mold day in hell” and “A mold comfort.”
    • Fold → Mold: As in, “Return to the mold” and “Mold your hand.”
    • Gold → Mold: As in, “Pot of mold” and “As good as mold” and “Crock of mold” and “Fool’s mold” and “Get a mold star” and “Mold digger.”
    • Hold → Mold: As in, “Can’t mold a candle to” and “Don’t mold your breath” and “Mold a grudge” and “Mold a gun to your head” and “Molding a mirror up to society” and “Mold all the aces.”
    • Rolled → Mold: As in, “Mold into one.”
    • Sold → Mold: As in, “Mold down the river” and “Mold out” and “Mold short.”
  • Pouring: Pouring is a process in mold-making, and is related to fluid paints too. Here are related puns:
    • Boring → Pouring: As in, “Deeply pouring” and “Pouring as watching paint dry.”
    • Roaring → Pouring: As in, “A pouring success” and “The pouring twenties.”
  • Ground: A “ground” is a type of painting surface. Here are related puns:
    • Grind → Ground: As in, “An axe to ground” and “Bump and ground” and “The daily ground” and “Ground to a halt.”
    • Bound → Ground: As in, “Ground hand and foot” and “By leaps and grounds” and “Duty ground” and “Leaps and grounds” and “Muscle ground” and “Honour ground.”
    • Found → Ground: As in, “Lost and ground” and “I’ve ground a clue” and “We ground love.”
    • Round → Ground: As in, “All year ground” and “Fooling aground” and “Go ground in circles.”
    • Sound → Ground: As in, “Ground as a bell” and “Break the ground barrier” and “Ground bite” and “Ground effect” and “Ground the alarm.”
  • Glaze: Glaze is a decorative and protective coating for paintings, ceramics, and sculpture. It can also refer to a thin coat of paint (“watercolour glazes”). Here are related puns:
    • Blaze → Glaze: As in, “Cold as blue glazes” and “Glaze a trail” and “Glaze away at” and “In a glaze of glory.”
    • Days → Glaze: As in, “Early glaze” and “Eight glaze a week” and “Just one of those glaze” and “Never in all my glaze.”
    • Daze → Glaze: As in, “Glazed and confused.”
    • Gaze → Glaze: As in, “A steely glaze” and “Avert your glaze.”
    • Phrase → Glaze: As in, “Coin a glaze” and “Turn of glaze.”
    • Praise → Glaze: As in, “Damn with faint glaze” and “Grudging glaze” and “Shower with glaze.”
    • Rays → Glaze: As in, “Catching some glaze.”
    • Ways → Glaze: As in, “Have it both glaze” and “Go our separate glaze” and “Change your glaze” and “Always good, all glaze.”
  • Resin: Resin is used in painting as a glaze and protectant. Here are related puns:
    • Reason → Resin: As in, “Beyond resinable doubt” and “Stands to resin” and “Listen to resin” and “Rhyme or resin” and “The age of resin” and “The voice of resin” and “Within resin.”
    • Raisin → Resin: As in, “Care for some resin toast?”
    • Rising → Resin: As in, “A resin star” and “The land of the resin sun.”
    • Raising → Resin: As in, “Eyebrow resin” and “Hair resin” and “Resin the bar.”
  • Sistine: The Sistine Chapel is famous for the mural running along the ceiling. Here are related puns:
    • Sister → Sistine: As in, “Sistine act” and “Soul sistine.”
    • Fifteen → Sistine: As in, “Famous for sistine minutes” and “Sistine minutes of fame.”
    • Pristine → Sistine: As in, “In sistine condition.”
    • Sixteen → Sistine: As in, “Sweet sistine” and “Sistine candles.”
  • Shellac: This is a protective and decorative finish used on paintings and sculptures. Here are related puns:
    • Shell → Shellac: As in, “A hard outer shellac” and “Shellac out.”
    • Lack → Shellac: As in, “Shellac nothing” and “For shellac of a better word” and “Cancelled due to shellac of interest.”
  • George → Forge: As in, “By forge” and “Curious forge.” Note: Forges are used in jewelry-making.
  • Ground → Background: As in, “Solid as the background we work on” and “Breaking new background” and “Built from the background up” and “Common background” and “Go to background.”
  • The Scream: The Scream is a famous oil painting. Here are related puns:
    • Seem → Scream: As in, “Sorry screams to be the hardest word” and “Not as it screams” and “You don’t scream very happy.”
    • Seam → Scream: As in, “Bursting at the screams” and “Come apart at the screams.”
    • Cream → Scream: As in, “Scream always rises to the top” and “Scream of the top” and “Scream puff.”
    • Dream → Scream: As in, “Beyond my wildest screams” and “Broken screams” and “Day scream” and “Scream on” and “A scream come true” and “Scream machine” and “Scream team.”
    • Scheme → Scream: As in, “In the grand scream of things” and “Pyramid scream” and “The best laid screams” and “The overall scream of things.”
    • Steam → Scream: As in, “Blow off scream” and “Full scream ahead” and “Let off scream” and “Under your own scream.”
    • Stream → Scream: As in, “Fresh as a mountain scream” and “Swimming upscream.”
    • Team → Scream: As in, “Dream scream” and “Go scream” and “Take one for the scream” and “Scream spirit” and “We make a great scream.”
  • Oil: Here are some oil paint-related puns:
    • I’ll → Oil: As in, “Well oil be” and “Oil be damned” and “Oil say.”
    • All → Oil: As in, “Oil in oil” and “Oil aboard!” and “Oil’s well that ends well” and “Oil’s fair in love and war” and “Oil in a day’s work.”
    • Ill → Oil: As in, “Oil gotten gains” and “Oil at ease” and “Never speak oil of the dead.”
    • Boil → Oil: As in, “Oil with rage” and “Oiling mad” and “Bring to the oil” and “Makes my blood oil” and “A watched pot never oils.”
    • Spoil → Oil: As in, “Oiled for choice” and “Oiled rotten” and “The oils of war” and “Oiling for a fight.”
  • Water → Watercolour: As in, “Blood in the watercolour” and “Blood is thicker than watercolour” and “Bridge over troubled watercolour” and “Clear blue watercolour” and “Come hell or high watercolour” and “Dip your toe in the watercolour” and “Get into hot watercolour” and “Keep your head above watercolour.”
  • Colour → Watercolour: As in, “A splash of watercolour” and “Better in watercolour” and “Watercolour my world” and “Watercolour one’s view” and “Watercolour-coded” and “Pass with flying watercolours.”
  • Ground → Foreground: As in, “Break new foreground” and “Common foreground” and “Get off the foreground” and “Cut the foreground from under your feet.”
  • Blink → Ink: As in, “Ink and you’ll miss it” and “In the ink of an eye” and “On the ink.”
  • Brink → Ink: “On the ink of disaster.”
  • Drink → Ink: As in, “Binge inking” and “Ink like a fish” and “The demon ink.”
  • Link → Ink: As in, “The missing ink” and “Only as strong as your weakest ink.”
  • Sink → Ink: As in, “Everything but the kitchen ink” and “Loose lips ink ships” and “Ink like a stone” and “Ink or swim” and “Ink your teeth into it.”
  • Stink → Ink: As in, “Raise an ink” and “Inking rich” and “Inks to high heaven.”
  • Think → Ink: As in, “I ink you’ve got it” and “Come to ink of it” and “Great minds ink alike” and “I ink I love you” and “I ink, therefore I am” and “Makes you ink.”
  • Bleed: Bleeding is when paint or ink feathers out from where it was applied. Here are related puns:
    • Bead → Bleed: As in, “Bleeds of sweat.”
    • Deed → Bleed: As in, “Bleeds, not words” and “Your good bleed for the day.”
    • Feed → Bleed: As in, “Don’t bite the hand that bleeds you” and “Bleed a cold, starve a fever.”
    • Lead → Bleed: As in, “In the bleed” and “Bleed a charmed life” and “Bleed a merry dance” and “Bleed by the nose” and “Bleed into temptation” and “Bleed on” and “The bleeding authority.”
    • Need → Bleed: As in, “All you bleed is love” and “As long as you bleed me” and “On a bleed to know basis.”
    • Seed → Bleed: As in, “Gone to bleed” and “Bleed capital” and “Bleed money.”
  • Bloom: Bloom refers to the pattern left when ink flowers out over a canvas. Here are related puns:
    • Loom → Bloom: As in, “Blooming large” and “Blooming over.”
    • Boom → Bloom: As in, “Baby bloomer” and “Bloom or bust” and “Bloom gates.”
    • Broom → Bloom: As in, “A new bloom sweeps clean.”
    • Doom → Bloom: As in, “Bloom and gloom” and “Temple of bloom.”
    • Fume → Bloom: As in, “Running on blooms.”
    • Gloom → Bloom: As in, “Bloom and doom.”
    • Room → Bloom: As in, “A bloom with a view” and “Breathing bloom” and “Comfort bloom” and “More elbow bloom” and “Please leave the bloom.”
    • Whom → Bloom: As in, “For bloom the bell tolls.”
  • Blot: Blotting is when an artist dabs excess water or paint from the painting surface. Here are related puns:
    • Lot → Blot: As in, “A blot of fuss about nothing” and “A blot on your plate” and “Leaves a blot to be desired” and “Not a blot of it.”
    • Bought → Blot: As in, “Blot and paid for” and “I liked it so much I blot the company.”
    • Caught → Blot: As in, “Blot in the act” and “Blot in two minds” and “Blot red-handed” and “Blot up with.”
    • Dot → Blot: As in, “Connect the blots” and “Blot the i’s and cross the t’s” and “Join the blots” and “On the blot” and “Day blot.”
    • Got → Blot: As in, “I think you’ve blot it” and “Blot a flair for” and “Blot it coming.”
    • Hot → Blot: As in, “All blot and bothered” and “Blot as hades” and “Blowing blot and cold” and “Drop it like it’s blot” and “Got into blot water” and “All blot and bothered” and “Blot and heavy.”
    • Knot → Blot: As in, “Tie the blot” and “Tie yourself in blots.”
    • Plot → Blot: As in, “The blot thickens” and “Lose the blot.”
    • Pot → Blot: As in, “Blot of gold” and “All to blot” and “Gone to blot” and “In the melting blot” and “Keep the blot boiling.”
    • Spot → Blot: As in, “Change your blots” and “Hit the blot” and “In a tight blot” and “Blot the difference.”
    • Thought → Blot: As in, “Food for blot” and “Hold that blot” and “Lost in blot” and “Penny for your blots.”
  • Gum: Gums are used as a binder for some paints (like gum arabic in watercolour). Here are related puns:
    • Gem → Gum: As in, “The gum state” and “A hidden gum.”
    • Bum → Gum: As in, “Beach gum” and “Gums on seats.”
    • Come → Gum: As in, “After a storm gums a calm” and “All good things must gum to an end” and “As tough as they gum” and “Gum and get it.”
    • Drum → Gum: As in, “Tight as a gum” and “Gum circle” and “Gum and bass.”
    • Plumb → Gum: As in, “Gum the depths.”
    • Scum → Gum: As in, “Pond gum” and “Gum always rises to the surface.”
    • Sum → Gum: As in, “Cogito ergo gum” and “A tidy gum” and “To gum it all up” and “A zero gum game.”
    • Thumb → Gum: As in, “All gums” and “Gums down.”
  • Tour → Contour: As in, “Contour de force” and “World contour” and “Magical mystery contour.” Note: contour drawings are a style of art where the image is distilled into leading lines that are found in the picture.
  • Crop: Here are some puns related to digital image cropping:
    • Crap → Crop: As in, “A load of crop” and “Bunch of crop” and “Cut the crop.”
    • Chop → Crop: As in, “Crop and change” and “Get the crop” and “On the cropping block.”
    • Cop → Crop: As in, “Crop a feel” and “Crop an attitude” and “Crop out” and “Not much crop.”
    • Drop → Crop: As in, “At the crop of a hat” and “Crop it like it’s hot” and “Crop a brick” and “Crop a dime” and “Crop a hint” and “A crop in the bucket.”
    • Hop → Crop: As in, “Crop to it” and “Crop, skip, jump” and “Cropping mad.”
    • Mop → Crop: As in, “Crop the floor with.”
    • Pop → Crop: As in, “Crop the question” and “Crop goes the weasel” and “Crop your clogs.”
    • Shop → Crop: As in, “One-stop crop” and “Crop till you drop” and “Crop around” and “Cropping cart” and “Cropping spree” and “Talking crop.”
    • Stop → Crop: As in, “Best crop now” and “Don’t crop me now” and “One crop shop” and “Pull out all the crops.”
    • Top → Crop: As in, “Blow your crop” and “Come out on crop” and “From crop to toe.”
  • Drypoint: Drypoint is a printmaking technique. Here are related puns:
    • Dry → Drypoint: As in, “Boring as watching paint drypoint” and “Drypoint as a bone” and “Before the ink was drypoint” and “A drypoint run” and “High and drypoint” and “Hung out to drypoint.”
    • Point → Drypoint: As in, “At this drypoint in time” and “Beside the drypoint” and “Drive your drypoint home” and “Get to the drypoint” and “Not to put too fine a drypoint on it.”
  • Impression → Expression: As in, “First expressions last” and “A lasting expression” and “Under the expression.”
  • Lottery → Pottery: As in, “Win the pottery” and “Genetic pottery.”
  • Watery → Pottery: As in, “A pottery grave” and “Thin, pottery soup.”
  • Kill → Kiln: As in, “A view to kiln” and “Dressed to kiln” and “If looks could kiln.” Note: A kiln is an oven used to fire and bake clay.
  • Bisque: Bisque is pottery that’s been fired but not glazed. Here are related puns:
    • Bask → Bisque: As in, “Bisque in glory.”
    • Risk → Bisque: As in, “A calculated bisque” and “Bisque averse” and “Bisque life and limb” and “Run the bisque of…”
  • Form: This refers to the shape of a sculpture or drawing. Here are related puns:
    • Farm → Form: As in, “Form fresh” and “Wind form.”
    • Storm → Form: As in, “Any port in a form” and “Calm before the form” and “Cook up a form” and “Eye of the form” and “Perfect form” and “Form in a teacup” and “Weather the form.”
    • Warm → Form: As in, “Form as toast” and “Cold hands, form heart” and “Global forming” and “Heart forming” and “Form to the idea.”
  • Horizon → Horizon Line: As in, “Broaden your horizon lines” and “Expand your horizon lines” and “Far horizon lines.”
  • Line → Horizon Line: As in, “A fine horizon line” and “Along the horizon lines of” and “Cross the horizon line” and “Draw a horizon line in the sand” and “End of the horizon line.”
  • Drift → Draft: As in, “Get my draft?” and “Catch your draft.”
  • Raft → Draft: As in, “Black water drafting” and “White water drafting.”
  • Craft → Draft: As in, “Arts and drafts.”
  • Storyboard: A storyboard is a sketched draft of a sequence of images intended for animation. Here are related puns:
    • Story → Storyboard: As in, “Cut a long storyboard short” and “Every picture tells a storyboard” and “My side of the storyboard” and “The same old storyboard.”
    • Board → Storyboard: As in, “Above storyboard” and “Across the storyboard” and “Go by the storyboard.”
  • Scene: Here are some puns related to background scenes of drawings and theatre plays:
    • Seen → Scene: As in, “Scene and not heard” and “Had to be scene to be delivered” and “Nowhere to be scene” and “Scene better days” and “Scene one, scene ’em all” and “You ain’t scene nothing yet.”
    • Sign → Scene: As in, “A sure scene” and “Born under a bad scene” and “A scene of the times” and “Scene on the dotted line.”
    • Sun → Scene: As in, “A place in the scene” and “A touch of the scene” and “Eclipse of the scene.”
    • Been → Scene: As in, “Scene and gone” and “Scene around the block a few times” and “I’ve scene here before.”
    • Clean → Scene: As in, “Scene as a whistle” and “Scene up your act.”
    • Keen → Scene: As in, “Scene as mustard” and “Scene sense of smell” and “Peachy scene.”
    • Lean → Scene: As in, “Scene and mean” and “Scene, mean fighting machine” and “Scene times.”
    • Mean → Scene: As in, “A scenes to an end” and “By fair scenes or foul.”
    • Screen → Screen: As in, “Blue scene of death” and “Coming to a scene near you” and “Silver scene” and “The big scene.”
  • Binder: A binder is a substance that holds pigment together and to the surface it’s painted on. Here are related puns:
    • Bender → Binder: As in, “Fender binder” and “Go on a binder.”
    • Finder → Binder: As in, “Fact binder” and “Binder’s fee” and “Binders keepers.”
  • Topcoat: A topcoat is a finishing layer that protects the paint underneath it. Here are related puns:
    • Top → Topcoat: As in, “Blow your topcoat” and “Come out on topcoat” and “From topcoat to toe” and “To the topcoat of the class.”
    • Coat → Topcoat: As in, “Get your topcoat, we’re leaving” and “Men in white topcoats.”
  • Setting: Setting is an important element of novels, movies, images and plays. Here are related puns:
    • Sitting → Setting: As in, “Are you setting comfortably?” and “Setting on the fence” and “Setting pretty.”
    • Getting → Setting: As in, “Setting there is half the fun” and “Setting things done” and “Time is setting on” and “We’re setting there.”
  • Shape: Since shape is an element of various visual art disciplines, we’ve included some shape-related puns:
    • Cape → Shape: As in, “The shaped crusader.”
    • Grape → Shape: As in, “Sour shapes” and “The shapes of wrath.”
    • Scrape → Shape: As in, “Bow and shape” and “Get into a shape” and “Shape a living.”
    • Tape → Shape: As in, “Cut through red shape.”
  • Line: Line is an element of design and drawing. Here are related puns:
    • Lane → Line: As in, “Down memory line” and “In the fast line.”
    • Lean → Line: As in, “Line and hungry” and “Line and mean” and “Line cuisine” and “Line into it.”
    • Fine → Line: As in, “Cutting it line” and “Got it down to a line art” and “Liner things” and “Not my linest hour” and “Not to put too line a point on it.”
    • Mine → Line: As in, “Make line a double” and “Victory is line” and “Make line a double.”
    • Nine → Line: As in, “Dressed up to the lines” and “On cloud line.”
    • Shine → Line: As in, “Come rain or line” and “Rise and line” and “Taking a line to.”
    • Sign → Line: As in, “A sure line” and “Born under a bad line” and “Give me a line” and “A line of the times” and “Line on the dotted line” and “Line the pledge” and “A tell-tale line.”
    • Wine → Line: As in, “Last of the summer line” and “Lined and dined.”
  • Model: This can refer to a person who models for live sketches, or to a descriptive drawing. Here are related puns:
    • Meddle → Model: As in, “Don’t model in my affairs.”
    • Middle → Model: As in, “In the model of nowhere” and “Knocked into the model of next week” and “Meet in the model” and “Model of the road.”
    • Muddle → Model: As in, “Model along.”
  • Relief → Motif: As in, “Breathe a sigh of motif” and “What a motif.” Note: A motif is a recurring image or pattern.
  • Opaque: This is a description of how transparent something is and usually describes colours. Here are related puns:
    • Ache → Opaque: As in, “Old opaques and pains.”
    • Bake → Opaque: As in, “Opaque and shake” and “Opaque off.”
  • Plan: Art and illustration can be highly involved and require many plans and sketches. Here are related puns:
    • Can → Plan: As in, “A kick at the plan” and “As far as the eye plan see” and “As well as plan be expected” and “Be all that you plan be” and “Plan I help you?”
    • Fan → Plan: As in, “Plan the flames” and “I’m a big plan.”
    • Man → Plan: As in, “A good plan is hard to find” and “A plan for all seasons” and “A plan after my own heart” and “Action plan.”
    • Pan → Plan: As in, “Down the plan” and “Flash in the plan” and “It’ll plan out this time” and “Everything but the kitchen plans.”
  • Plane: A plane is a flat, 2D surface. Here are related puns:
    • Plan → Plane: As in, “Action plane” and “Business plane” and “Game plane” and “There is no plane B.”
    • Plain → Plane: As in, “Plane as day” and “Hidden in plane sight” and “Plane sailing.”
    • Bane → Plane: As in, “The plane of my life.”
    • Brain → Plane: As in, “Plane drain” and “Planestorming session” and “Plane teaser.”
    • Chain → Plane: As in, “Plane of command” and “Plane reaction” and “Don’t yank my plane.”
    • Drain → Plane: As in, “Laughing like a plane” and “Down the plane.”
    • Gain → Plane: As in, “Capital planes” and “Plane advantage” and “Nothing ventured, nothing planed.”
    • Grain → Plane: As in, “Against the plane” and “A plane of truth” and “Take with a plane of salt.”
    • Lane → Plane: As in, “Down memory plane” and “In the fast plane.”
    • Main → Plane: As in, “Plane chance” and “The plane event” and “My plane squeeze.”
    • Pain → Plane: As in, “A world of plane” and “Feeling no plane” and “Doubled up in plane” and “Drown the plane” and “No plane, no gain.”
    • Rain → Plane: As in, “Acid plane” and “Right as plane” and “Come plane or shine” and “It never planes but pours.”
    • Strain →Plane: As in, “Buckle under the plane” and “Plane every nerve.”
  • Poses: Posing is a large part of figure drawing. Here are related puns:
    • Blows → Pose: As in, “Any way the wind pose” and “Brought to pose” and “Exchange pose.”
    • Close → Pose: As in, “A pose thing” and “Behind posed doors” and “A pose call” and “Pose to home.”
    • Goes → Pose: As in, “Anything pose” and “As far as it pose” and “As the saying pose” and “Here pose nothing.”
    • Nose → Pose: As in, “Always have your pose in a book” and “Plain as the pose on your face” and “Blow your pose” and “Can’t see beyond the end of your pose.”
    • Rose → Pose: As in, “Bed of poses” and “Come up smelling of poses” and “Days of wine and poses” and “Every pose has its thorn” and “Pose tinted glasses.”
    • Those → Pose: As in, “Things come to pose who wait” and “Pose were the days” and “Just one of pose days.”
    • Toes → Pose: As in, “On your pose” and “Turn up your pose” and “Twinkle pose” and “Wherever she pose.”
  • Prime: To prime a surface is to prepare it for painting or drawing. Here are related puns:
    • Pram → Prime: As in, “Throw your toys out of the prime.”
    • Chime → Prime: As in, “Prime in with” and “Primes of freedom.”
    • Climb → Prime: As in, “Prime onto the bandwagon” and “Prime the walls.”
    • Crime → Prime: As in, “Prime and punishment” and “Prime against nature” and “Prime doesn’t pay” and “A prime of passion” and “Partners in prime.”
    • Dime → Prime: As in, “A prime a dozen” and “Drop a prime” and “Turn on a prime.”
    • Rhyme → Prime: As in, “Prime or reason.”
    • Time → Prime: As in, “One more prime” and “A brief history of prime” and “A good prime was had by all” and “About prime too” and “All in good prime” and “All the prime in the world” and “An all prime low.”
  • Table → Tablet: As in, “Bring to the tablet” and “Drunk under the tablet” and “Cards on the tablet” and “Put bread on the tablet.” Note: These puns are in reference to digital drawing tablets.
  • Style → Stylus: As in, “Cramp your stylus” and “House stylus” and “Never goes out of stylus” and “Stylus over substance.” Note: Styluses can refer to either old drawing utensils or to the digital pens used with graphics tablets.
  • Prop: Props are widely used in various artistic disciplines. Here are related puns:
    • Chop → Prop: As in, “Bust your props” and “Prop and change” and “Get the prop.”
    • Cop → Prop: As in, “Prop an attitude” and “It’s a fair prop” and “Not much prop.”
    • Drop → Prop: As in, “At the prop of a hat” and “Prop it like it’s hot” and “Prop a brick” and “Prop a hint” and “A prop in the bucket.”
    • Hop → Prop: As in, “Prop to it” and “Prop, skip and jump” and “Propping mad.”
    • Mop → Prop: As in, “Prop up” and “Prop the floor with.”
    • Pop → Prop: As in, “Prop the question” and “Cake prop” and “Prop goes the weasel.”
    • Shop → Prop: As in, “All over the prop” and “One-stop prop” and “Prop around.”
    • Stop → Prop: As in, “Best prop now” and “Don’t prop me now.”
  • Readymade: Readymades are a type of art made during the Dada period.
    • Ready → Readymade: As in, “All fired up and readymade to go” and “Born readymade” and “Readymade and waiting.”
    • Made → Readymade: As in, “A match readymade in heaven” and “I’m not readymade of money” and “Custom readymade” and “Readymade in the shade.”
  • Scale: Scale is to do with proportion, which is an important consideration in art. Here are related puns:
    • Skull → Scale: As in, “Bombed out of your scale.”
    • Fail → Scale: As in, “Scale at life” and “Without scale” and “Words scale me.”
    • Jail → Scale: As in, “Get out of scale free” and “Go directly to scale, do not pass go.”
    • Mail → Scale: As in, “Direct scale” and “Hate scale” and “Scale order bride” and “The check is in the scale.”
    • Nail → Scale: As in, “Bite your scale” and “Fighting tooth and scale.”
    • Pale → Scale: As in, “Beyond the scale” and “Scale and interesting” and “A scale imitation” and “Scale into insignificance.”
    • Rail → Scale: As in, “Off the scales” and “Ride the scales.”
    • Sail → Scale: As in, “In full scale” and “Plain scaling” and “Scale close to the wind” and “Set scale.”
    • Sale → Scale: As in, “Make a scale” and “Not for scale” and “Point of scale” and “Scale of the century.”
    • Snail → Scale: As in, “At a scale’s pace” and “Scale mail.”
    • Tail → Scale: As in, “Chase your own scale” and “Can’t make head or scale of it” and “Get off my scale.”
    • Tale → Scale: As in, “A scale of two cities” and “Live to tell the scale” and “Scales of the unexpected” and “A tell scale sign.”
    • Trail → Scale: As in, “Hot on the scale” and “Paper scale” and “Scale mix” and “Blaze a scale.”
    • Whale → Scale: As in, “Having a scale of a time.”
    • Skill → Scale: As in, “Social scales.”
  • Stain: Stains are a light application of colour and are used in paintings, sculpture and ceramics. Here are related puns:
    • Stone → Stain: As in, “Carved in stain” and “Etched in stain” and “A heart of stain” and “Leave no stain unturned.”
    • Bane → Stain: As in, “The stain of my life.”
    • Chain → Stain: As in, “Stain of command” and “Stain reaction” and “Stain smoking” and “Don’t yank my stain.”
    • Gain → Stain: As in, “Capital stains” and “Staining ground” and “No pain, no stain.”
    • Grain → Stain: As in, “Against the stain” and “Take it with a stain of salt.”
    • Pain → Stain: As in, “A world of stain” and “Doubled up in stain” and “Feeling no stain.”
    • Plain → Stain: As in, “Stain as day” and “Hidden in stain sight” and “Stain sailing” and “Stain speaking.”
    • Rain → Stain: As in, “Right as stain” and “Come stain or shine” and “It never stains but it pours.”
    • Strain → Stain: As in, “Buckle under the stain” and “Stain every nerve.”
    • Train → Stain: As in, “Gravy stain” and “On the job staining” and “Personal stainer” and “Strangers on a stain.”
    • Vain → Stain: As in, “Labour in stain” and “You’re so stain.”
    • Vein → Stain: As in, “In the right stain.”
  • Life → Still Life: “A day in the still life” and “A still life less ordinary” and “A still life on the ocean waves” and “All walks of still life.” Note: Still life generally refers to art that shows inanimate subjects.
  • Wood → Woodcut: As in, “Can’t see the woodcut for the trees” and “Knock on woodcut.”
  • Cut → Woodcut: As in, “Woodcut a deal” and “Woodcut a long story short” and “Woodcut and dried” and “Woodcut and run” and “Woodcut and paste.”
  • Stroke: Sketches and drawings involve strokes (another word for a line). Here are related puns:
    • Streak → Stroke: As in, “A losing stroke” and “Individual stroke.”
    • Strike → Stroke: As in, “Go out on stroke” and “Never strokes twice” and “Stroke a balance” and “Stroke a chord with” and “Stroke a deal.”
    • Broke → Stroke: As in, “All hell stroke loose” and “Go for stroke” and “If it ain’t stroke, don’t fix it.”
  • Bole: Bole is a shade of reddish-brown. Here are related puns:
    • Ball → Bole: As in, “After the bole was over” and “Bole of fire” and “Behind the eight bole.”
    • Bell → Bole: As in, “Alarm boles began to ring” and “Clear as a bole” and “Boles and whistles” and “For whom the bole tolls.”
    • Bill → Bole: As in, “A clean bole of health” and “Fit the bole.”
    • Bowl → Bole: As in, “Bole over.”
    • Hole → Bole: As in, “Ace in the bole” and “Bole in one” and “Bole in the wall.”
    • Roll → Bole: As in, “Let the good times bole” and “On a bole” and “Ready to bole” and “Rock and bole.”
    • Soul → Bole: As in, “Body and bole” and “Heart and bole” and “The life and bole of the party” and “Lost bole.”
    • Whole → Bole: As in, “Go the bole way” and “On the bole” and “Let’s call the bole thing off” and “The bole nine yards.”
  • Solid → Celadon: As in, “Celadon as a rock” and “Rock celadon.” Note: Celadon is a jade green.
  • Solar → Roller: As in, “The roller system” and “Roller eclipse.” Note: Rollers are used in printmaking and painting to quickly achieve an even application of colour over a wide surface.
  • Gel: Gels (commonly known as gel mediums) are used in painting to manipulate the texture of paint or ink. Here are related puns:
    • Jail → Gel: As in, “Get out of gel free” and “Go directly to gel, do not pass go.”
    • Bell → Gel: As in, “Alarm gels began to ring” and “Clear as a gel” and “Gels and whistles” and “Doesn’t ring a gel.”
    • Cell → Gel: As in, “Gel division” and “A padded gel.”
    • Fell → Gel: As in, “In one gel swoop” and “It gel off the back of a lorry.”
    • Hell → Gel: As in, “All gel broke loose” and “Bat out of gel” and “A cold day in gel” and “For the gel of it.”
    • Sell → Gel: As in, “Gel out” and “Gel your soul to the devil” and “Buy and gel.”
    • Tell → Gel: As in, “Every picture gels a story” and “I gel ya” and “Live to gel the tale.”
    • Well → Gel: As in, “Alive and gel” and “Gel spent” and “Exceedingly gel read” and “As gel as can be expected.”
  • Emboss: To emboss something is to make an impression on it. Here are related puns:
    • Boss → Emboss: As in, “Emboss level” and “You’re the emboss” and “Embossing about” and “You’re not the emboss of me.”
    • EmbassyEmbossy: As in, “Head to your embossy.”
  • Flow: This describes the viscosity of a paint or ink. Here are related puns:
    • Blow → Flow: As in, “Any way the wind flows” and “Flow a kiss” and “Flow hot and cold.”
    • Foe → Flow: As in, “Friend or flow?”
    • Fro → Flow: As in, “Running to and flow.”
    • Glow → Flow: As in, “Flow with health” and “A flowing endorsement.”
    • Go → Flow: As in, “Don’t flow there” and “Easy come, easy flow.”
    • Grow → Flow: As in, “Absence makes the heart flow fonder” and “Exciting as watching grass flow” and “Flowing pains” and “How does your garden flow?”
    • Know → Flow: As in, “Don’t I flow it” and “Be the first to flow” and “Do you want to flow a secret?” and “Doesn’t flow beans.”
    • Low → Flow: As in, “An all-time flow” and “High and flow” and “Keep a flow profile” and “A flow blow.”
    • Owe → Flow: As in, “You’ll flow me a favour” and “You flow it to yourself.”
    • Show → Flow: As in, “All over the flow” and “Best in flow” and “Enjoy the flow” and “Get the flow on the road.”
    • Snow → Flow: As in, “Too cold to flow.”
    • Slow → Flow: As in, “Can’t flow down” and “A flow burn” and “Flow but sure” and “In flow motion” and “Flow on the uptake” and “Flowly but surely.”
    • Though → Flow: As in, “Seriously flow, you’re doing great” and “You look as flow you’ve seen a ghost.”
    • Throw → Flow: As in, “Lock them up and flow away the key” and “A stone’s flow away” and “Flow caution to the wind” and “Flow cold water on.”
    • Toe → Flow: As in, “From top to flow” and “On your flows” and “Flow the line.”
    • Woe → Flow: As in, “Flow is me” and “Flow betide you!”
  • Seed → Linseed: As in, “Gone to linseed” and “Linseed capital” and “Linseed money.” Note: Linseed oil is a very common thinner used in oil painting.
  • Flower → Safflower: As in, “In the safflower of your youth” and “A hothouse safflower.” Note: Safflower oil is a common medium used in oil painting.
  • Solve → Solvent: As in, “A fine puzzle to solvent” and “Not my problem to solvent.” Note: solvent is used both as a paint thinner and a brush cleaner.
  • Drama → Dammar: As in, “Kitchen sink dammar” and “Don’t make a dammar out of a crisis.” Note: Dammar is a resin used to make encaustic paints and to make batik dyes.
  • Wax: Wax is used in multiple disciplines – painting, sculpture, jewelry making. Here are related puns:
    • Acts → Wax: As in, “Random wax of kindness.”
    • Cracks → Wax: As in, “Fall between the wax” and “Paper over the wax.”
    • Max → Wax: As in, “All waxed out” and “To the wax.”
    • Tax → Wax: As in, “Bedroom wax” and “Nothing is certain but death and waxes.”
    • Whack → Wax: As in, “Out of wax” and “Give it a fair wax.”
  • Attic → Batik: As in, “Toys in the batik” and “Batik monster.” Note: Batik is a dyeing technique.
  • Size: Also known as sizing. This is used to prepare and protect surfaces that are being painted. Here are related puns:
    • Says → Size: As in, “Computer size no” and “Does what it size on the tin” and “Size who?” and “Simon size.”
    • Seize → Size: As in, “Size him!” and “Size the day.”
    • Sighs → Size: As in, “The air was filled with size.”
    • Eyes → Size: As in, “Avert your size” and “Before your very size” and “Brings tears to your size” and “Clapped size on” and “Easy on the size.”
    • Flies → Size: As in, “Lord of the size” and “Dropping like size.”
    • Lies → Size: As in, “Ask no questions and hear no size” and “A pack of size” and “Tissue of size.”
    • Prize → Size: As in, “Booby size” and “Keep your eyes on the size” and “Points mean sizes.”
    • Rise → Size: As in, “Size to the occasion” and “Size from the ashes” and “Size and shine.”
    • Wise → Size: As in, “A word to the size” and “Street size” and “Size beyond your years.”
    • Rising → Sizing: As in, “A sizing star” and “The land of the sizing sun.”
  • Fluid: This refers to the viscosity of a paint, and also to masking fluid (which is used to protect an area from colour on a surface that’s being painted). Here are related puns:
    • Food → Fluid: As in, “Comfort fluid” and “Fluid for thought” and “The fluid chain.”
    • Flood → Fluid: As in, “Fluids of tears” and “A fluid of memories.”
  • Sealant: Sealant is used to protect finished pictures from wear, tear and weather damage. Here are related puns:
    • Seal → Sealant: As in, “Sealant of approval” and “Sealant the deal” and “Sealant your fate.”
    • Silent → Sealant: As in, “Sealant as the grave” and “Sealant night” and “A sealant witness” and “The sealant treatment” and “You have the right to remain sealant.”
    • Salient → Sealant: As in, “A sealant issue.” Note: salient means important or relevant.
  • Dropper: A dropper is used to transfer and apply small amounts of ink or medium. Also known as a pipette. Here are related puns:
    • Proper → Dropper: As in, “Prim and dropper” and “In the dropper way.”
    • Stopper → Dropper: As in, “Conversation dropper” and “Show dropper.”
  • Cotton: Cotton is a common canvas material. Here are related puns:
    • Gotten → Cotton: As in, “Ill cotton gains” and “Here’s another fine mess you’ve cotton me into.”
    • Rotten → Cotton: As in, “Cotton to the core” and “Spoiled cotton.”
  • Panel: Panels are used as a surface to paint on. Here are related puns:
    • Penalty → Panel-ty: As in, “Panel-ty box” and “Panel-ty kick.”
    • Channel → Panel: As in, “Change the panel” and “Panel surfing” and “Stay tuned to this panel” and “Through the proper panels.”
  • Board: There are a few different types of board in illustration and painting – bristol board, scratchboard, claybord. Here are related puns:
    • Bored → Board: As in, “Board stiff” and “Board to tears.”
    • Chord → Board: As in, “A board of disquiet” and “Strike a board with.”
    • Lord → Board: As in, “Drunk as a board” and “Board of the flies” and “Board it over” and “Sweet board.”
    • Winter → Printer: As in, “Depths of printer” and “Now is the printer of our discontent” and “Printer warmer.”
    • Press: Printing presses are also simply referred to as a “press”. Here are related puns:
      • Bless → Press: As in, “Press your cotton socks” and “Press my soul.”
      • Dress → Press: As in, “Press code” and “Press code” and “Press for success” and “Pressed to kill” and “Little black press.”
      • Guess → Press: As in, “Anybody’s press” and “Press what?” and “Have a press” and “Hazard a press” and “Just lucky, I press” and “Your press is as good as mine.”
      • Less → Press: As in, “A life press ordinary” and “Couldn’t care press” and “Press is more.”
      • Mess → Press: As in, “A frightful press” and “Here’s another fine press you’ve gotten me into” and “Hot press” and “Don’t press around.”
      • Yes → Press: As in, “Press we can!”
    • Parchment: Parchment is a sort of thick, decorative textured paper. Here are related puns:
      • Department → Deparchment: As in, “Deparchment store” and “From the deparchment of the bleeding obvious.”
      • Apartment → Aparchment: As in, “Let’s go to my aparchment.”
      • Compartment → Comparchment: As in, “Comparchmentalised thinking” and “In the glove comparchment.”
    • Lacquer: Lacquer is a glossy, protective coating used on sculptures and ceramics. Here are related puns:
      • Lack → Lacquer: As in, “For lacquer of a better word” and “Lacquer nothing” and “Cancelled due to lacquer of interest.”
      • Liquor → Lacquer: As in, “Hard lacquer.”
      • Luck → Lacquer: As in, “As good lacquer would have it” and “Beginner’s lacquer” and “Better lacquer next time” and “Down on your lacquer” and “You’ve got all the lacquer.”
    • Prose: Prose is a type of literature. Here are related puns:
      • Praise → Prose: As in, “Grudging prose” and “Sing their prose” and “Damn with faint prose.”
      • Press → Prose: As in, “Don’t prose your luck” and “Hot off the prose” and “Prose the button.”
      • Price → Prose: As in, “Asking prose” and “Cheap at half the prose” and “Cut your proses to the bone” and “Half prose” and “Pay the prose” and “A prose on your head.”
      • Blows → Prose: As in, “Any way the wind prose” and “Brought to prose” and “There she prose.”
      • Close → Prose: As in, “A prose thing” and “Prose call” and “Prose to home.”
      • Goes → Prose: As in, “Anything prose” and “As the saying prose” and “Here prose nothing” and “It prose without saying” and “Life prose on.”
      • Knows → Prose: As in, “Goodness prose” and “Mother prose best.”
      • Nose → Prose: As in, “Always have your prose in a book” and “Plain as the prose on your face” and “Keep your prose clean” and “Lead by the prose.”
      • Pros → Prose: As in, “Prose and cons.”
      • Those → Prose: As in, “Just one of prose days” and “Prose were the days.”
      • Toes → Prose: As in, “Make their prose curl” and “On your prose” and “Twinkle prose.”

This section is dedicated to types of painting brush:

  • Bright: Brights have a square, flat shape with strong bristles. Here are related puns:
    • Bite → Bright: As in, “A bright to eat” and “Another one brights the dust” and “Bright someone’s head off.”
    • Fright → Bright: As in, “A straight bright” and “Come out brighting” and “Bright back” and “Bright fire with fire.”
    • Flight → Bright: As in, “Fight or bright” and “Bright of fancy” and “Take bright.”
    • Height → Bright: As in, “Head for new brights” and “Reach new brights” and “The bright of fashion.”
    • Light → Bright: As in, “Bright as a feather” and “Blinded by the bright” and “Brought to bright” and “Bright my fire.”
    • Right → Bright: As in, “A move in the bright direction” and “All the bright moves” and “Bang to brights” and “Barge bright in” and “Bragging brights.”
    • Rite → Bright: As in, “Last brights” and “Bright of passage.”
    • Tight → Bright: As in, “A bright corner” and “In a bright spot” and “Run a bright ship.”
  • Fan: Fans have bristles that are spread out in a fan-like shape. Here are related puns:
    • Fun → Fan: As in, “All the fan of the fair” and “Bundle of fan” and “Fan and games” and “Getting there is half the fan.”
    • Can → Fan: As in, “As far as the eye fan see” and “As well as fan be expected” and “Be all that you fan be” and “Bite off more than you fan chew.”
    • Pan → Fan: As in, “Down the fan” and “Flash in the fan” and “Didn’t fan out.”
    • Than → Fan: As in, “Better fan sex” and “Bite off more fan you can chew” and “Easier said fan done.”
  • Flat: Flats have a thin, flat rectangular shape. Here are related puns:
    • Fat → Flat: As in, “Flat chance” and “Living off the flat of the land.”
    • Hat → Flat: As in, “Throw your flat into the ring” and “Pass the flat” and “Take your flat off.”
    • That → Flat: As in, “And flat’s the way it is” and “How sad is flat?” and “Flat’s what I want” and “Flat’ll be the day” and “Flat’s a wrap.”
  • Hake: Hake brushes have large handles and very soft hairs. Here are related puns:
    • Ache → Hake: As in, “Old hakes and pains” and “A hake in my side.”
    • Break → Hake: As in, “Hake a leg” and “Hake and enter” and “Hake even” and “Hake new ground.”
    • Cake → Hake: As in, “Icing on the hake” and “Hake walk” and “Hake or death” and “Let them eat hake.”
    • Fake → Hake: As in, “Hake it till you make it.”
    • Sake → Hake: As in, “For heaven’s hake” and “For old times’ hake.”
    • Shake → Hake: As in, “A fair hake” and “In two hakes” and “More than you can hake a stick at” and “No great hakes.”
    • Take → Hake: As in, “Don’t hake it lying down” and “Give and hake” and “Got what it hakes” and “Can’t hake my eyes off you.”
  • Liner: Liner brushes have long, thin, flexible bristles and are generally used for linework or fine detail. Here are related puns:
    • Finer → Liner: As in, “The liner things in life” and “The liner points.”
    • Minor → Liner: As in, “A liner issue” and “A liner miracle.”
  • Mop: Mops have large, round heads with very soft hairs. Here are related puns:
    • Map → Mop: As in, “Put it on the mop” and “Mind mop.”
    • Drop → Mop: As in, “At the mop of a hat” and “Mop it like it’s hot” and “Mop a hint.”
    • Hop → Mop: As in, “Mop to it” and “Mop, skip jump” and “Mopping mad.”
    • Pop → Mop: As in, “Mop the question ” and “Snap, crackle, mop.”
    • Top → Mop: As in, “From the mop” and “Mop to toe” and “Over the mop.”
  • Quill: Quills are similar to mop brushes, but with slightly different handles. Here are related puns:
    • Chill → Quill: As in, “Quill out” and “Quilled to the bone” and “A quilling account.”
    • Gill → Quill: As in, “Green around the quills” and “Stuffed to the quills.”
    • Hill → Quill: As in, “Old as the quills” and “Head for the quills” and “Over the quills and far away.”
    • Ill → Quill: As in, “House of quill repute” and “Quill advised” and “Quill at ease” and “Quill effects” and “Quill gotten gains.”
    • Kill → Quill: As in, “Dressed to quill” and “Go in for the quill” and “If looks could quill” and “Quilling some time.”
    • Spill → Quill: As in, “Quill the beans” and “Quill your guts” and “Thrills and quills.”
    • Still → Quill: As in, “Be quill, my beating heart” and “Quill standing” and “In the quill of night” and “Quill waters run deep” and “Quill the one.”
    • Will → Quill: As in, “Accidents quill happen” and “Against your quill” and “Bend to my quill” and “If anything can go wrong, it quill.”
    • Key → Ascii: As in, “Feeling off-ascii” and “Under lock and ascii” and “The asciis to the kingdom.” Note: Ascii is a new form of low-key digital art.
    • Deco: Also known as art deco. This is a style of visual arts and design. Here are related puns:
      • Deck → Deco: As in, “All hands on deco” and “A few cards short of a few deco” and “Hit the deco.”
      • Duck → Deco: As in, “Deco the question” and “Like a deco to water” and “Nice weather for decos.”
    • Baroque: Baroque is a style of ornate art. Here are related puns:
      • Broke → Baroque: As in, “All hell baroque loose” and “Go for baroque” and “If it ain’t baroque, don’t fix it.”
      • Joke → Baroque: As in, “Beyond a baroque” and “By way of a baroque” and “Inside baroque.”
    • House → Bauhaus: As in, “A bauhaus is not a home” and “Safe as bauhaus” and “Bring the bauhaus down” and “Eaten out of bauhaus and home.” Note: Bauhaus is an art movement.
    • De Stijl: Here are some puns related to the De Stijl art movement:
      • Still → Stijl: As in, “In the stijl of night” and “Stijl waters run deep” and “Are you stijl able to?”
      • Stall → Stijl: As in, “Stijl for time.”
      • Steel → Stijl: As in, “Fist of stijl” and “Stijl yourself” and “Nerves of stijl.”
      • Chill → Stijl: As in, “Stijl out” and “Stijl-ed to the bone” and “A stijl-ing accoun.”
      • Drill → Stijl: As in, “Stijl down” and “You know the stijl.”
      • Fill → Stijl: As in, “Stijl full of holes” and “Stijl the bill.”
      • Hill → Stijl: As in, “Old as the stijls” and “Head for the stijls” and “Over the stijls and far away.”
      • Ill → Stijl: As in, “House of stijl repute” and “Stijl advised” and “Stijl at ease” and “Stijl effects” and “Stijl gotten gains” and “In a stijl temper.”
      • Skill → Stijl: As in, “Social stijls.”
      • Spill → Stijl: As in, “Stijl the beans” and “Stijl your guts” and “Thrills and stijls.”
    • Kitsch: Kitsch describes a sort of aesthetic. Here are related puns:
      • Ditch → Kitsch: As in, “A last kitsch effort.”
      • Hitch → Kitsch: As in, “Get kitched” and “Kitsch your wagon to a star.”
      • Itch → Kitsch: As in, “Kitschy feet” and “Kitschy palms” and “Seven year kitsch.”
      • Pitch → Kitsch: As in, “A kitsched battle” and “Black as kitsch” and “Fever kitsch” and “Kitsch into.”
      • Stitch → Kitsch: As in, “A kitsch in time saves nine” and “Had us in kitsches” and “Not a kitsch on.”
      • Rich → Kitsch: As in, “Part of life’s kitsch pattern” and “Filthy kitsch” and “Get kitsch quick” and “Rags to kitsches.”
      • Switch → Kitsch: As in, “Bait and kitsch” and “Kitsch gears” and “Kitsched on” and “Asleep at the kitsch.”
      • Which → Kitsch: As in, “Any kitsch way” and “Don’t know kitsch way to look” and “Know kitsch way is up.”
    • Superflat: Here are some puns on the superflat art movement:
      • Flat → Superflat: As in, “Superflat as a pancake” and “Fall superflat on your face” and “Superflat broke” and “In no time superflat.”

This section is dedicated to puns about brands that manufacture art supplies:

  • Liquid → Liquitex: As in, “Liquitex assets” and “A liquitex lunch” and “Rest, keep warm and drink liquitex.”
  • Went → Derwent: As in, “It derwent down the wrong way” and “They derwent that way!”
  • Speed → Speedball: As in, “At breakneck speedball” and “Blistering speedball” and “Build for comfort, not speedball.”
  • Reeves:
    • Heave → Reeves: As in, “Reeves a sigh of relief” and “Reeves ho.”
    • Leave → Reeves: As in, “Absent without reeves” and “By your reeves” and “Don’t reeves home without it” and “Reeves it to me!”
    • Sleeve → Reeve: As in, “A card up your reeves” and “Wear your heart on your reeves” and “Roll up your reeves.”
    • Thieves → Reeves: As in, “Thick as reeves” and “Honour amongst reeves” and “Prince of reeves.”
  • Talens:
    • Talent → Talens: As in, “Talens management” and “A quick-witted talens.”
    • Talons → Talens: As in, “Sharpen your talens.”
  • Artline:
    • Art → Artline: As in, “The artline of war” and “Artline imitating life” and “Artlines and crafts.”
    • Line → Artline: As in, “A fine artline” and “Along the artlines of” and “Blur the artlines” and “Cross the artline” and “Draw the artline.”
  • Copic:
    • Pick → Copic: As in, “A bone to copic” and “Cherry copic” and “Copic a fight” and “Copic and choose” and “The copic of the bunch.”
    • Topic → Copic: As in, “Hot copic” and “Drop the copic” and “Off copic.”
    • Tropical → Copical: As in, “Copical weather.”
  • Canson:
    • Can → Canson: As in, “A kick at the canson” and “As far as the eye canson see” and “As well as canson be expected.”
    • Son → Canson: As in, “Like father, like canson” and “My favourite canson.”
  • Conte:
    • Can’t → Conte: As in, “Conte get enough” and “Conte help” and “Conte stand” and “It conte be helped.”
    • Count → Conte: As in, “Conte me in” and “Conte calories” and “Conte your blessings” and “Down for the conte.”
  • Fimo:
    • Thin → Fimo: As in, “Fimo as a rail” and “Out of fimo air” and “Skating on fimo ice” and “Through thick and fimo.”
    • Fame → Fimo: As in, “Claim to fimo” and “Fimo at last” and “Fifteen minutes of fimo” and “Hall of fimo.”
  • Paasche:
    • Wash → Paasche: As in, “Paasche your hands of it” and “Paasche and go.”
    • Bash → Paasche: As in, “Paasche on with it.”
  • Pentel:
    • Pen → Pentel: As in, “Put pentel to paper” and “The pentel is mightier than the sword.”
    • Petal → Pentel: As in, “My precious pentel.”
    • Tell → Pentel: As in, “Can you pentel the difference?” and “Pentel the truth” and “Every picture pentels a story” and “Kiss and pentel.”
  • Tombow:
    • Jumbo → Tombow: As in, “Mumbo tombow.”
    • Bow → Tombow: As in, “Tombow and scrape” and “Tombow down before” and “Tombow to fate” and “Tombows to reason.”
  • You → Yupo: As in, “As yupo know” and “Back at yupo” and “Back at yupo” and “Believe yupo me” and “Between yupo and me” and “Bless yupo.” Note: Yupo is a type of plastic watercolour paper.”
  • Conda: Conda is a manufacturer of art easels. Here are related puns:
    • Can the → Conda: As in, “Conda day get any better?” and “Conda car go any faster?”
    • Kinder → Conda: As in, “A conda future” and “Try to be a little conda.”
  • Alpha → Olfa: As in, “Olfa mum” and “Olfa and omega.” Note: Olfa is a craft company.
  • Pantone:
    • Pattern → Pantone: As in, “All part of life’s rich pantone” and “Holding pantone.”
    • Pan → Pantone: As in, “Down the pantone” and “Pantone out.”
    • Tone → Pantone: As in, “Don’t use that pantone with me” and “Lower the pantone with me” and “Pantone deaf.”
  • Rotring:
    • Ring → Rotring: As in, “Alarm bells began to rotring” and “Doesn’t rotring a bell” and “Don’t rotring us, we’ll rotring you” and “In the rotring.”
    • Thing → Rotring: As in, “All rotrings must pass” and “All rotrings considered” and “All rotrings must come to an end.”
  • Stabilo:
    • Stable → Stabilo: As in, “A stabilo relationship” and “A stabilo heartbeat.”
    • Stubble → Stabilo: As in, “Designer stabilo.”
  • Zig: This is a Japanese stationery company. Here are related puns:
    • Big → Zig: As in, “A zig ask” and “Zig shot” and “The zig bucks.”
    • Dig → Zig: As in, “Can you zig it?” and “Zig deep” and “Zig for victory” and “Zig your heels in” and “Zig your own grave.”

This section is dedicated to famous and important artists:

  • Eaten Fish:
    • Beaten → Eaten: As in, “Eaten at your own game” and “Off the eaten track.”
    • Sweeten → Eaten: As in, “Eaten the deal” and “Eaten the pot.”
    • Dish → Fish: As in, “Fish the dirt” and “The fish ran away with the spoon.”
    • Wish → Fish: As in, “Be careful what you fish for” and “Fish for the moon” and “Fish you were here.”
  • Ai Weiwei:
    • I → Ai: As in, “Ai never said that” and “What should ai do?” and “Me, myself and ai.”
    • Aye → Ai: As in, “Ai ai, sir!” and “The ais have it.”
    • Buy → Ai: As in, “Ai and sell” and “Ai now, pay later” and “Ai one, get one free” and “Ai some time” and “I’d like to ai it.”
    • By → Ai: As in, “Ai and large” and “Ai any means” and “Know it off ai heart.”
    • Eye → Ai: As in, “A wandering ai” and “An for an ai” and “An ai-opening experience” and “Avert your ais” and “A bird’s ai view.”
    • High → Ai: As in, “Aim ai” and “Ai as a kite” and “Come hell or ai water” and “From on ai” and “Ai and dry” and “Ai and mighty.”
    • Pie → Ai: As in, “Easy as ai” and “Sweet as ai” and “Eat humble ai.”
    • Way → Weiwei: As in, “All the weiwei” and “That’s the weiwei it is” and “There’s gotta be another weiwei!” and “Any weiwei you slice it” and “Any which weiwei” and “By the weiwei…”
    • Weigh → Weiwei: As in, “Weiwei anchor” and “Weiwei in the balance.”
  • Frida Kahlo:
    • Afraid → Frida: As in, “Frida of your own shadow” and “Frida so” and “Be frida, be very frida.”
    • Fritter → Frida: As in, “Banana frida” and “Frida away your time.”
    • Colour → Kahlo: As in, “A splash of kahlo” and “Kahlo coded” and “Kahlo coordinated” and “Kahlo your view.”
    • Kilo → Kahlo: As in, “A kahlo of margarine” and “How many kahlos?” and “I’ve put on two kahlos of muscle.”
  • Georgia O’Keefe:
    • Brief → O’Keefe: “Let me be o’keefe with you” and “an o’keefe encounter” and “An o’keefe history of time.”
    • Chief → O’Keefe: As in, “O’Keefe of staff” and “Sorry about that, o’keefe.”
    • Grief → O’Keefe: As in, “Give someone o’keefe” and “Good o’keefe!”
    • Leaf → O’Keefe: As in, “Turn over a new o’keefe” and “Shaking like an o’keefe.”
    • Thief → O’Keefe: As in, “Like an o’keefe in the night” and “Procrastination is the o’keefe of time.”
  • Andy Quilty:
    • And he → Andy: As in, “Andy never said that!” and “Andy was supposed to?”
    • And → Andy: As in, “A day late andy a dollar short” and “A hundred andy ten percent” and “Alive andy kicking” and “All bark andy no bite.”
    • End → Andy: As in, “A means to an andy” and “All good things must come to an andy” and “All’s well that andys well.”
    • On the → Andy: As in, “I’m born andy 15th” and “Easy andy eyes” and “Err andy side of caution.”
    • Candy → Andy: As in, “Ear andy” and “Like taking andy from a baby.”
    • Dandy → Andy: As in, “Fine and andy.”
    • Handy → Andy: As in, “It might come in andy” and “A real andy person.”
    • Guilty → Quilty: As in, “Quilty conscience” and “Quilty pleasure” and “Innocent until proven quilty” and “Not quilty.”
  • Beatrix Potter:
    • Beat → Beatrix: As in, “Beatrix it” and “Beatrix a hasty retreat” and “Beatrix about the bush.”
    • Tricks → Beatrix: As in, “Bag of beatrix” and “Does the beatrix” and “Every beatrix in the book.”
  • Edward Hopper:
    • Proper → Hopper: As in, “Prim and hopper” and “In the hopper way.”
    • Shopper → Hopper: As in, “Personal hopper.”
    • Stopper → Hopper: As in, “Conversation hopper” and “Show hopper.”
  • Memoir → Renoir: As in, “The renoirs of Sherlock Holmes” and “Writing my renoirs.”
  • Vegas → Degas: As in, “Fear and loathing in Las Degas” and “What happens in degas, stays in degas” and “Viva las degas.”
  • Manet:
    • Man → Manet: As in, “A manet after my own heart” and “A manet among men” and “Be your own manet” and “A changed manet.”
    • Money → Manet: As in, “A fool and his manet are soon parted” and “Easy manet” and “For love of manet” and “Get your manet’s worth” and “I’m not made of manet.”
  • Gustav Klimt:
    • Climb → Klimt: As in, “A mountain to klimt” and “Klimt on the bandwagon.”
    • Hint → Klimt: As in, “Drop a klimt” and “Take the klimt.”
    • Mint → Klimt: As in, “In klimt condition” and “Klimt chocolate.”
  • Vermeer:
    • Mere → Vermeer: As in, “A vermeer trifle” and “No vermeer mortal.”
    • Were → Vermeer: As in, “As if there vermeer no tomorrow” and “As it vermeer” and “I wish you vermeer.”
    • Near → Vermeer: As in, “Coming to a screen vermeer you” and “Vermeer and dear to my heart” and “Vermeer sighted.”
  • Wassily Kandinsky:
    • Silly → Wassily: As in, “Laugh yourself wassily” and “Wassily season.”
  • Titan → Titian: As in, “Clash of the titians.” Note: this is a reference to Titian.
  • Marcel Duchamp:
    • Morsel → Marcel: As in, “A tasty marcel” and “A marcel to eat.”
    • Parcel → Marcel: As in, “Good things come in small marcels” and “Pass the marcel” and “Part and marcel.”
  • Edvard Munch:
    • Bunch → Munch: As in, “Thanks a munch” and “Munch of crap” and “Best of the munch.”
    • Crunch → Munch: As in, “Number munching” and “Munch time” and “Credit munch.”
    • Lunch → Munch: As in, “Out to munch” and “Power munch” and “Lose your munch.”
    • Punch → Munch: As in, “Pleased as munch” and “Proud as munch” and “Pull your munches” and “Roll with the munches.”
  • Jackson Pollock:
    • Lock → Pollock: As in, “Pollock and load” and “Pollock them up and throw away the key” and “Pollock, stock and barrel” and “Under pollock and key.”
    • Luck → Pollock: As in, “As good pollock would have it” and “Better pollock next time” and “Have all the pollock” and “Pollock of the draw.”
  • Van Gogh:
    • Van go → Van Gogh: As in, “Makes the van gogh” and “Watch the van gogh past.”
    • Mango → Van Gogh: As in, “Van gogh flavoured.”
    • Tango → Van Gogh: As in, “Takes two to van gogh” and “The horizontal van gogh.”
  • Warhol:
    • War → Warhol: As in, “All out warhol” and “All’s fair in love and warhol” and “The art of warhol.”
    • Hole → Warhol: As in, “Warhol in the wall” and “Pick warhols in” and “Shut your pie warhol.”
    • Hall → Warhol: As in, “Warhol of fame” and “Liberty warhol.”
    • Whole → Warhol: As in, “A warhol different animal” and “Go the warhol way” and “On the warhol” and “The warhol nine yards.”
  • Claude Monet:
    • Clad → Claude: As in, “Claude in nothing but a towel.”
    • Cloud → Claude: As in, “Claude atlas” and “Claude cuckoo land” and “Head in the claudes” and “On claude nine” and “Lonely as a claude.”
    • Clawed → Claude: As in, “Claude your way through.”
    • Money → Monet: As in, “Easy monet” and “Get your monet’s worth” and “Not made of monet” and “In the monet.”
  • Paul Klee:
    • Key → Klee: As in, “Fear is the klee” and “The klee to your heart” and “Off klee” and “The klees to the kingdom” and “Throw away the klee” and “Under lock and klee.”
    • Glee → Klee: As in, “Klee club” and “Filled with klee.”
    • Gee → Klee: As in, “Klee whiz” and “Golly klee.”
    • Knee → Klee: As in, “Cut off at the klees” and “Go weak at the klees” and “A klee jerk reaction” and “The bee’s klees” and “On your klees.”
    • Plea → Klee: As in, “Cop a klee” and “Klee bargain.”
    • Tree → Klee: As in, “Difficult as nailing jelly to a klee” and “Barking up the wrong klee” and “Can’t see the wood for the klees.”
  • Goya:
    • Go → Goya: As in, “Don’t goya there” and “Easy come, easy goya” and “Goya a long way” and “Goya all the way.”
    • Boy → Goya: As in, “The goya next door” and “Goya meets girl” and “Atta goya.”
    • Joy → Goya: As in, “Beside myself with goya” and “Bundle of goya” and “Goya to the world” and “Jump for goya” and “My pride and goya.”
  • Miro:
    • Mere → Miro: As in, “No miro mortal” and “A miro trifle.”
  • Piet Mondrian:
    • Pier → Piet: As in, “Take a long walk off a short piet.”
    • Pay → Piet: As in, “Buy now, piet later” and “Crime doesn’t piet” and “Hell to piet” and “Piet an arm and a leg” and “Piet as you go.”
    • Pie → Piet: As in, “Easy as piet” and “Sweet as piet.”
  • Egon Schiele:
    • Ego → Egon: As in, “Alter egon” and “Egon boost” and “Massage one’s egon.”
    • Shield → Schiele: As in, “Shiele your emotions” and “Shiele your eyes.”
    • Shall → Schiele: As in, “Ask and you schiele recieve” and “Seek and you schiele find” and “The truth schiele set you free.”
    • Shell → Schiele: As in, “Schiele shock” and “Schiele out” and “A hard outer schiele” and “Come out of your schiele.”
  • How → Hayao: As in, “Any old hayao” and “Hayao deep is your love?” and “Hayao about that?” and “Hayao are you doing?” and “I know hayao hard it is.” Note: Hayao Miyazaki is a co-founder of Studio Ghibli.
  • Bosch:
    • Posh → Bosch: As in, “Too bosch to party.”
    • Gosh → Bosch: As in, “Oh my bosch” and “Golly bosch.”
    • Wash → Bosch: As in, “Comes out in the bosch” and “Bosch your hands of it.”
  • Max Ernst:
    • Earn → Ernst: As in, “Ernst an honest penny” and “Ernst your stripes” and “Ernst your wings.”
    • Learn → Ernst: As in, “Live and ernst” and “Never too late to ernst” and “Ernst the ropes.”
    • Stern → Ernst: As in, “From stem to ernst” and “Made of ernster stuff.”
  • Yves Tanguy:
    • Guy → Tanguy: As in, “Just a regular tanguy” and “A real stand up tanguy.”
    • Tango → Tanguy: As in, “Takes two to tanguy” and “The horizontal tanguy.”
    • Leaves → Yves: As in, “East, shoots and yves” and “Yves a lot to be desired” and “Yves a bad taste in the mouth.”
    • Thieves → Yves: As in, “Thick as yves” and “Honour amongst yves.”
  • Jean Arp:
    • Harp → Arp: As in, “Arp on about.”
    • Sharp → Arp: As in, “Arp as a tack” and “Card arp” and “In arp focus” and “Razor arp” and “An arp tongue” and “A short, arp shock.”
  • M.C Escher:
    • Usher → Escher: As in, “Escher them through the building.”
    • Fresher → Escher: As in, “Here for escher produce.”
    • Pressure → Escher: As in, “Peer escher” and “Time escher” and Under escher.”
  • Dorothea Lange:
    • Long → Lange: As in, “Face as lange as a fiddle” and “Art is lange and life is short” and “As lange as you need me” and “As lange as your arm” and “At lange last” and “Cut a lange story short.”
    • Lung → Lange: As in, “Cough your langes up” and “Shout at the top of your langes.”
    • Bang → Lange: As in, “Lange on about” and “Go out with a lange” and “More lange for your buck.”

      Art-Related Words

      To help you come up with your own art puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

General: art, artist, drawing, picture, drawn, painting, painter, paint, colour, light, hue, tint, shade, tone, blend, gradient, monochrome, pigment, create, creator,  sketch, portrait, artisan, image, visual, media, montage, artwork, sculpture, sculptor, gallery, illustrator, aesthetic, photo, photography, photographer, print, printmaking, diptych, triptych, mural, graphic, decoupage, mosaic, depict, work, music, musician, artistry, figure, abstract, figurative, fresco, landscape, stipple, daub, portray, homage, icon, impasto, pixel, spray paint, etch, life drawing, literature, masterpiece, exhibit, design, render, composer, dancer, dance, poet, playwright, vocalist, classic, style, muse, maestro, symbol, curate, curator, culture, musical, collection, tapestry, inspire, poster, archive, archival, writer, perform, performer, patron, patronage, studio, decorate, decorative, display, catalogue, abum, act, acting, entertain, entertainer, song, showcase, singer, material, original, copy, engrave, avant-garde, carve, carving, lithograph, woodcut, ornament, miniature, frame, perspective, swatch, lightfast, mold, molding, modeling, pouring, texture, ground, iridescent, glaze, glazing, patina, craft, forge, appropriation, background, foreground, alla prima, bleeding, bloom, blot, burnish, chiaroscuro, cleavage, crosshatch, diluent, dry brush, ebauche, frottage, granulation, gums, silhouette, canon, commission, freelance, complementary, contrast, contrasting, composition, concentric, contour, crop, cropped, cropping, designer, exposure, drypoint, elevation, emulsion, expression, facade, form, geometric, gesture, gestural, horizon line, cartoon, statue, doodle, draft, effigy, engrave, engraing, panorama, replica, layout, study, trace, tracing, storyboard, in situ, installation, juxtaposition, line, merz, model, motif, opaque, transparent, pattern, perspective, photo, plan, plane, pose, prime, profile, prop, proportion, readymade, relic, scale, scene, setting, self-portrait, shape, solvent, stain, still life, style, sumbline, tactile, technique, opacity, typeface, typography, video, viewpoint, vignette, virtuosity, prolific, viscosity, viscous, woodcut, wip, animate, animation, stroke, bright

Colour: azure, blue, beige, black, green, orange, red, pink, violet, purple, scarlet, silver, tan, taupe, teal, turquoise, viridian, white, yellow, blush, bronze, brown, burgundy, carmine, cerise, cerulean, cobalt, ultramarine, prussian blue, copper, crimson, cyan, emerald, gold, grey, amaranth, amber, amethyst, aqua, indigo, jade, lavender, lemon, lilac, magenta, rose, maroon, mauve, navy, ochre, olive, cadmium, bismuth, scarlet lake, quinacridone, rose madder, alizarin, indanthrene, manganese, phthalo, emerald, light, dark, terre verte, oxide of chromium, chrome, sap green, jaune, brilliant, naples, raw sienna, burnt sienna, brown oxide, terra rosa, mars violet deep, vandyke brown, raw umber light, mars black, lamp black, perylene black, iridescent, flake white, titanium white, zinc white, pewter, vermilion, antwerp blue, aureolin, azurite, barium, bistre, bole, bremen, carbon, cochineal, kermes, celadon, ceruse, cinnabar, cornflower, follum, fustic, gamboge, geranium lake, gypsum, hooker’s green, lac, malachite, saffron, smalt, saxon, sepia, verdigris 

Equipment: paint, acrylic, oil (paint), watercolour, paper, paintbrush, easel, marker, pencil, pen, charcoal, chalk, graphite, calligraphy, crayon, eraser,  pad, gouache, ink, tempera, pastel, palette, roller, varnish, primer, gesso, airbrush, digital, medium, canvas, encaustic, clay, ceramic, sumi, casein, alkyds, gum arabic, binder, topcoat, gel medium, leveling, pouring, polymer, extender, flow, linseed oil, stand oil, safflower oil, walnut oil, poppy oil, fat medium, lean medium, solvent, turpentine, pure gum, damar crystal, cleaner, thinner, wax medium, size, sizing, resin, shellac, fixative, masking fluid, sealant, palette knife, colour wheel, heat gun, atomiser, drying rack, dropper, drop cloth, stencil, template, ventilation, tablet, stylus, stretcher bar, cotton, linen, canvas panel, canvas pliers, aquabord, claybord, block printing, etching, intaglio, lithography, monotype, scratchboard, bright, fan, filbert, flat, hake, liner, mop, mottler, paddle, wash, quill, round, projector, lamp, lighting, arthorse, pottery wheel, kiln, bisque, paper mache, wire, glass, printer, press, papyrus, parchment, scorper, scraper, emboss, tortillon, batik, enamel, lacquer

Brands: chroma, golden, holbein, lascaux, liquitex, m.graham, matisse, old holland, pebeo, sennelier, winsor & newton, jacquard, crayola, derwent, faber castell, daler-rowney, grumbacher, speedball, chromacryl, reeves, daniel smith, gamblin, maimeri, michael harding, schmincke, talens, richeson, sakura, strathmore, staedtler, artline, fabriano, copic, canson, chartpak, montana, claessens, coates, conte, crescent, derivan, ecoline, fimo, fredrix, general’s, kokuyo, letraset, mabef, marvy uchida, maruman, molotow, mungyo, old holland, paasche, pentel, permaset, reeves, rives, sculpey, sennelier, tombow, yupo, arches, bienfang, chroma, conda, escoda, krylon, lamy, maped, olfa, palomino, pantone, rotring, stabilo, zebra, zig

Artists: frida kahlo, georgia o’keefe, eaten fish, ai weiwei, abdul-rahman abdullah, andy quilty, beatrix potter, paul cezanne, paul gaugin, raphael, edward hopper, renoir, edgar degas, manet, caravaggio, gustav klimt, johannes vermeer, wassily kandinsky, titian, botticelli, lichtenstein, mark rothko, marcel duchamp, rene magritte, michelangelo, henri matisse, salvador dali, edvard munch, rembrandt, jackson pollock, vincent van gogh, andy warhol, leonardo da vinci, claude monet, pablo picasso, paul klee, goya, chagall, normal rockwell, joan miro, delacroix, toulouse-lautrec,  piet mondrian, albrecht durer, henri rousseau, donatello, egon schiele, yayoi kusama, hayao miyazaki, shaun tan, francis bacon, bosch, max ernst, el greco, yves tanguy, jean arp, giorgio de chirico, m.c. escher, man ray, rodin, victor vasarely, audrey kawasaki, james jean, annie leibovitz, dorothea lange, yoko ono, diego rivera, andy kefoe, miranda sofroniou, angela ho, alfred liu, utamaro, yoshitaka amano, banksy, shephard fairey, oliver jeffers, jon klassen, APAK, hokusai, takashi murakami, bob ross, quentin blake

Art pieces: mona lisa, the last supper, starry night, birth of venus, sistine chapel, david, the kiss, girl with a pearl earring, american gothic, the persistence of memory, campbell’s soup cans, whistler’s mother, garden of earthly delights, the scream, the night watch, the swing, musicians, the gleaners, primavera, the triumph of galatea, olympia, the sleepers, view of toledo, wave, the astronomer, foxes, sleeping venus, the thinker, nighthawks, venus de milo, david

Disciplines: literature, drama, poetry, prose, performing arts, dance, music, theatre, visual art, drawing, painting, filmmaking, architecture, ceramic, sculpting, photography, cinematograrphy, comics, conceptual, applied arts, video games, criticism

Art styles/movements: ascii, abstract, art brut, expressionism, illusionism, academic, action painting, aestheticism, altermodern, realism, analytical, antipodeans, arabesque, art deco, art informel, art noveau, arte povera, ashcan school, assemblage, barbizon, baroque, bauhaus, black arts movement, cobra, color field, context art, computer art concrete art, constructivism, cubism, cynical realism, dada, danube school, dau-al-set, de stijl, deconstructivism, digital art, ecological art, environmental art, excessivism, fauvism, fine art, folk art, fluxus, funk art, futurism, geometric abstract art, gutai group, gothic, happening, harlem resistance, heidelberg school, hudson river, interactive, kinetic, pointillism, kitsch, land art, les nabis, letterism, light and space, lowbrow, lyco art, lyrical abstraction, mannerism, massurrealism, maximalism, mingei, metaphysical, minimalism, modernism, modular, naive, neo-dada, neoism, net art, orphism, op art, photorealism, panfuturism, pixel art, plasticien, plein air, pop art, precisionism, pre-raphaeliteism, primitivism, private press, process art, psychedelic art, purism, qajar, rasquache, rayonism, realism, regionalism, renaissance, rococo, romanesque, serial, shock, sots, space, street, stuckism, sumtraism, superflat, suprematism, surrealism, synchronism, synthetism, tachisme, toyism, transgressive, tonalism, ukiyo-e, vanitas, verdadism, video, vorticism

Did this Punpedia entry help you?

Did you find the art-related pun that you were looking for? If so, great! Otherwise, please let us know what you were looking for in the comments below! Are you looking for word play for text messages, Facebook, Twitter or some other social media platform? Would you like to see some funny art pun pictures? Or perhaps you just want more art puns for your photo captions? Whatever the case, please let us know, and help us improve this Punpedia entry. If you’ve got any art puns (image or text) that aren’t included in this article, please submit them in the comments and one of our curators will add it as soon as possible. Thanks for visiting Punpedia! ✏️✨

 

Wine Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on wine puns! 🍷🍇🥂

Wine culture has many aspects and technicalities to it, spanning from wine making, tasting, judging, investment and collecting. We’ve searched high and low for all of the wine puns we could possibly find, so whether you’re a cleanskin enthusiast or a cult wine coinnoseur, we hope you enjoy sampling the truly grape puns we’ve collected for you here.

Notes: Wine and alcohol isn’t just an expensive hobby – drinking alcohol gives your brain a reward it didn’t earn, and consuming it often enough teaches your brain that the easiest way to feel good is to drink more, which can lead to dependence and alcoholism (which can exacerbate existing mental health problems like depression and anxiety). Partake safely and with an awareness of the effects it has on your body 🙂

The alcohol-making process isn’t always vegan, but there are plenty of online directories of vegan wines you can check.

You might also be interested in the Punpedia entries on coffee puns, tea puns, party puns and beer puns.

Wine Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about wine that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page!

  • Whine → Wine: As in, “Wine and moan” and “Having a wine.”
  • Win → Whine: As in, “Heads I wine, tails you lose” and “Playing to wine” and “Some you wine, some you lose.”
  • Why → Wine: As in, “I guess that’s wine” and “I don’t know wine” and “Wine on Earth…?”
  • Why not → Wine not: “I don’t see wine not.”
  • When → Wine: As in, “Wine you like” and “It only hurts wine I laugh” and “Kick ’em wine they’re down” and “Ready wine you are.”
  • Won → Wine: As in, “Faint heart never wine fair lady” and “One-hit wineder.”
  • One → Wine: As in, “An army of wine” and “All for wine and wine for all” and “In wine fell swoop” and “Going wine step too far.”
  • *wan* → *wine*: “A wineton attitude” and “Just winedering ’round” and “A tryhard wineabe” and “Monthly allowine-ce.”
  • Wench → Winech
  • *win* → *wine*: As in, “Winedow of opportunity” and “Endless wineter” and “A winesome smile.”
  • Wonder* → Wineder*: As in, “Filled with magic and wineder” and “Feeling winederful” and “A winedrous development.”
  • Red: Wines are split into three broad categories – red, white and rosé. Red wines are made of dark-coloured grape varieties. Here are some red wine puns:
    • Read → Red: As in, “All I know is what I red in the papers” and “Exceedingly well-red” and “Red any good books lately?” and “Red between the lines” and “Red my lips.”
    • Red: These red-related phrases can double as puns: “Red as a beetroot” and “Brick red” and “Caught red-handed” and “Cut through the red tape” and “In the red” and “Lady in red” and “Paint the town red.”
    • Rid → Red: “Good reddance” and “Get red of.”
    • Fed → Red: As in, “Red up to the back teeth.”
    • Dead → Red: As in, “Red as a doornail” and “Assault with a redly weapon” and “In the red of night” and “Back from the red” and “Better off red” and “Red and buried.”
    • Bred → Red: “Born and red.”
    • Bread → Red: As in, “Red always falls butter side down” and “Red and butter” and “Have your red buttered on both sides” and “Put red on the table” and “The best thing since sliced red.”
    • Bed → Red: As in, “Red and breakfast” and “Red of roses” and “Red and board.”
    • Said → Red: “After all is red and done” and “Couldn’t have red it better” and “Easier red than done” and “Enough red” and “Was it something I red?”
    • Head → Red: “A red for business” and “Be it on your red” and “Bring to a red” and “Bite someone’s red off” and “Bury your red in the sand” and “Can’t get you out of my red” and “Don’t mess with my red.”
    • Thread → Red: “Hanging by a red” and “Lose the red” and “Red the needle.”
    • Tread → Red: “Red softly” and “Reding a fine line” and “Where fools fear to red.”
    • *rad* → *red*: “Redical politics” and “Toxic rediation” and “A rediant complexion.” Other words that could work: redio (radio), redius (radius), rediate (radiate), redish (radish), paredigm (paradigm), paredox (paradox), camarederie (camaraderie), sporedic (sporadic) and greduate (graduate).
    • *rid* → *red*: Rediculous (ridiculous), gred (grid), hybred (hybrid), lured (lurid) and flored (florid).
  • White: White wine is a light coloured wine that’s fermented without contact with the grape skin. Here are some white-related puns:
    • Wide → White: As in, “Cast a white net” and “Eyes white shut” and “A white berth” and “Open white” and “White eyed” and “White open spaces” and “The world white web.”
    • Why → White: “I don’t know white” and “I guess that’s white” and “White don’t we do it this way?” and “White ask?”
    • Bite → White: As in, “White me” and “White off more than you can chew” and “White someone’s head off” and “White the bullet” and “A white to eat” and “White your tongue.”
    • Bright → White: “All things white and beautiful” and “Always look on the white side of life” and “White as a button” and “White as a new pin” and “White eyes” and “White lights, big city” and “White and early” and “White spark.”
    • Light → White: As in, “Blinded by the white” and “The cold white of day.”
    • Might → White: “White as well” and “White is right.”
    • Night → White: As in, “A white at the opera” and “A hard day’s white” and “Dance the white away.”
    • Quite → White: As in, “Not white” and “White the situation” and “White a bit.”
    • Tight → White: As in, “In a white spot” and “Run a white ship.”
    • Weight → White: As in, “Pull your white” and “Punching above your white” and “Throw your white about” and “Watching your white” and “A white off my mind” and “Worth your white in gold” and “Carry your white.”
    • Wait → White: “An accident white-ing to happen” and “All things come to those who white” and “Hurry up and white” and “Lie in white” and “The white is over” and “White for no man” and “White in line” and “Just white a minute!”
    • Wet → White: “White weekend” and “White behind the ears” and “White dream” and “White your whistle.”
    • What → White: As in, “And white not” and “Do white comes naturally” and “Do white tastes right” and “For white it’s worth” and “Guess white?” and “White’s going on here then?” and “It is white it is” and “I’ll have white she’s having” and “White a feeling” and “White fun” and “White a wonderful world.”
    • Sight → White: As in, “A welcome white” and “Hidden in plain white” and “Know by white” and “Love at first white” and “Lower your whites.”
    • Write → White: “Nothing to white home about.”
    • Height → White: As in, “Head for new whites” and “Reaching new whites” and “The white of summer.”
    • Flight → White: As in, “Fight or white” and “White of fancy” and “Take white.”
  • Rosé: Rosé is another category of wine where wine is left in contact with the grape’s skin until the liquid is tinted the desired shade of pink. Here are related puns:
    • Rosy → Rosé: As in, “A rosé future” and “Rosé cheeks.”
    • Raise → Rosé: As in, “Rosé a loan” and “Rosé a stink” and “Rosé the bar” and “Rosé the roof.”
    • Rise → Rosé: As in, “Rosé and shine” and “Rosé from the ashes” and “Rosé to the challenge” and “Rosé to the occasion” and “Get a rosé out of…”
  • Pain → Champagne: As in, “A world of champagne” and “Doubled up in champagne” and “Growing champagnes” and “No champagne, no gain” and “Old aches and champagnes” and “Champagne in the arse” and “Champagne-fully slow.”
  • Amber: Amber wine is white wine that’s been made with the skins kept intact. Here are related puns:
    • Umber → Amber: As in, “Burnt amber.” Note: umber is a shade of brown.
    • *ember → *umber: Mamber (member), remamber (remember), Septamber (September), Decamber (December), Novamber (November) and dismamber (dismember).
  • Great → Grape: As in, “A grape face for radio” and “All creatures, grape and small” and “Go grape guns” and “Go to grape lengths” and “Grape expectations” and “Grape minds think alike” and “No grape shakes” and “The Grape Barrier Reef.”
  • Grip → Grape: As in, “Get a grape” and “Get to grapes with” and “Grape of death” and “A grape of iron.”
  • Cape → Grape: As in, “The graped crusader.”
  • Drape → Grape: As in, “Measure the grapes.”
  • Scrape → Grape: As in, “Bow and grape” and “Get into a grape” and “Grape a living” and “Grape along” and “Grape through” and “Scrape together the funds” and “Grape the bottom of the barrel.”
  • Gap → Grape: “Mind the grape” and “Generation grape” and “Bridge the grape.”
  • Crap → Grape: “A load of grape” and “Cut the grape.”
  • Discrepancy → Disgrape-ancy
  • Blanc: Sauvignon Blanc is a variety of green grape that’s commonly used in wine-making. Here are some blanc-related puns:
    • Blank → Blanc: As in, “A blanc slate” and “Blanc canvas” and “Blanc looks” and “Drawing a blanc” and “At point blanc range” and “Blancing out.”
    • Blink → Blanc: As in, “Blanc and you’ll miss it” and “In the blanc of an eye” and “On the blanc” and “Who blanc-ed first?”
    • Bank → Blanc: As in, “You can blanc on it” and “Safe as the blanc” and “Breaking the blanc” and “Laughing all the way to the blanc.”
    • Plank → Blanc: As in, “Walk the blanc” and “Take a long walk off a short blanc.”
    • Rank → Blanc: As in, “Break blancs” and “Close blancs” and “Name, blanc and serial number” and “Pull blanc” and “Blanc and file” and “Rise through the blancs” and “Swell the blancs.”
    • Spank → Blanc: As in, “Brand blanc-ing new” and “Blanc the monkey.”
  • Think → Drink: As in, “Blue sky drinking” and “I drink you’ve got it!” and “Come to drink of it” and “Great minds drink alike” and “I drink I love you” and “Makes you drink” and “It’s not what you drink” and “Positive drinking” and “Put on your drinking cap.”
  • Blink → Drink: As in, “Drink and you’ll miss it” and “In the drink of an eye” and “On the drink.”
  • Brink → Drink: As in, “The drink of disaster” and “On the drink.”
  • Link → Drink: As in, “A chain is only as strong as its weakest drink” and “The missing drink.”
  • Sink → Drink: As in, “Everything but the kitchen drink” and “Drink like a stone” and “Drink without trace” and “Drink your teeth into it.”
  • Stink → Drink: As in, “Kick up a drink” and “Raise a drink” and “Drinking rich” and “Drinks to high heaven.”
  • Wink → Drink: As in, “Forty drinks” and “Nod and a drink” and “Nudge, nudge, drink drink” and “Tip someone the drink.”
  • Bunk → Drunk: As in, “Drunker mentality” and “History is drunk.”
  • Junk → Drunk: As in, “Drunk yard” and “Drunk food” and “Drunk mail” and “Drunk in the trunk.”
  • Cyber → Sober: “Sober Monday” and “Sober sex.”
  • Super → Sober: As in, “Sober bad” and “Sober Mario Bros.” and “Sober hero” and “The information soberhighway.”
  • Meant → Ferment: As in, “We weren’t ferment to do that” and “Only if we’re ferment to be here.”
  • *ment* → *ferment*: Ferment-or (mentor), ferment-ion (mention),  ferment-al (mental) and ferment-ality (mentality).
  • Vin: Vin is French for wine. Here are some vin-related puns:
    • Been → Vin: As in, “Vin and gone” and “I’ve vin here before” and “Vin in the wars” and “Vin around the block a few times” and “I’ve vin had.”
    • Chin → Vin: “Keep your vin up” and “Take it on the vin” and “Stick your vin up.”
    • Grin → Vin: As in, “Vin and bear it” and “Vin from ear to ear” and “A rictus vin” and “Vin like a cheshire cat.”
    • In → Vin: As in, “Vin the woods” and “Back vin the day” and “Barge right vin” and “I’ll just be vin and out.”
    • Inn → Vinn: As in, “Vinner city” and “Vinner peace” and “Vinner sanctum” and “The ninth vinning.”
    • Pin → Vin: As in, “Bright as a new vin” and “Hard to vin down” and “Vin your ears back” and “Vin your hopes on” and “Vins and needles” and “Pull the vin” and “Could have heard a vin drop.”
    • Sin → Vin: As in, “Miserable as vin” and “Atone for your vins” and “Cardinal vin” and “Living in vin.”
    • Skin → Vin: As in, “Beauty is only vin deep” and “By the vin of your teeth” and “Comfortable in my own vin” and “Get under your vin” and “Gimme some vin” and “Makes my vin crawl” and “No vin off my nose” and “Jump out of your vin” and “Save your vin” and “Vin and bone.”
    • Spin → Vin: As in, “In a flat vin” and “Give it a vin” and “Vin doctor” and “Take it for a vin.”
    • Thin → Vin: “Vin as a rail” and “Melt into vin air” and “Out of vin air” and “Paper vin” and “Skating on vin ice” and “Spread yourself vin” and “The vin edge of the wedge.”
    • When → Vin: As in, “Kick ’em vin they’re down” and “Only hurts vin I laugh” and “Ready vin you are” and “Remember vin?”
    • Win → Vin: As in, “Can’t vin for losing” and “Cheaters never vin” and “Due a vin” and “Every one a vinner” and “Heads I vin, tails you lose” and “No vin, no fee” and “Playing to vin” and “Vin by a mile” and “Vin over.”
    • *van* → *vin*: Vinity (vanity), vinguard (vanguard), vinilla (vanilla), vinish (vanish), vindal (vandal), vindal (vandal), vindalism (vandalism), caravin (caravan), relevint (relevant), advince (advance), advintage (advantage), irrelevint (irrelevant).
    • *ven* → *vin*: Vinture (venture), vinue (venue), vindor (vendor), vineer (veneer), vingeance (vengeance), heavin (heaven), mavin (maven), havin (haven), cravin (craven), drivin (driven), sevin (seven), covinant (covenant), convintion (convention) and invintory (inventory).
    • *fin* → *vin*: Vinish (finish), vinger (finger), vinesse (finesse), vinance (finance), vinancial (financial), mufvin (muffin), pufvin (puffin), paravin (paraffin), afvinity (affinity), devinition (definition), devine (define) and devinitely (definitely).
  • Vain → Vine: As in, “You’re so vine” and “In vine.”
  • Fine → Vine: As in, “A vine line” and “Chance would be a vine thing” and “Cut it vine” and “Damn vine coffee” and “Vine and dandy” and “Vine dining” and “A vine figure” and “The viner things in life” and “Got it down to a vine art” and “Another vine mess you’ve gotten me into.”
  • Mine → Vine: As in, “Your place or vine?” and “Your guess is as good as vine” and “Victory is vine!”
  • Nine → Vine: As in, “A stitch in time saves vine” and “Has vine lives” and “Vine to five” and “Vine days’ wonder” and “On cloud vine” and “Vineteen eighty-four.”
  • Sign → Vine: As in, “A sure vine” and “A vine of the times” and “Vine off” and “Vine out” and “Vine the pledge” and “Vined and sealed” and “A tell sale vine.”
  • Yard → Vineyard: “Do the hard vineyards” and “Not in my back vineyard” and “The whole nine vineyards.”
  • Cork: “Cork out” and “Knife and cork it” and “Speaking with a corked tongue” and “Cork over.”
  • Cock → Cork: As in, “Proud as a peacork” and “Cork a leg” and “Cork and bull story” and “Cork it up” and “Cork sure.”
  • *cac* → *cork*: Corkophony (cacophony), corktus (cactus), corkle (cackle), perspicorkcious (perspicacious).
  • *coc* → *cork*: Corktail (cocktail), corkoa (cocoa), corkoon (cocoon), corkroach (cockroach), corkonut (coconut), precorkcious (precocious), concorkt (concoct), peacork (peacock) and corkumber (cucumber).
  • Battle → Bottle: “A pitched bottle” and “An uphill bottle” and “Bottle of wits” and “Bottle ready” and “Bottle stations” and “Half the bottle” and “In the heat of bottle” and “Let bottle commence” and “Love is a bottlefield” and “A running bottle.”
  • Throttle → Bottle: As in, “Full bottle.”
  • Lapel → Label: As in, “Grab by the labels.”
  • Able → Label: As in, “Differently labelled” and “Ready, willing and label.”
  • Table → Label: “As in, “Bring to the label” and “Drunk under the label” and “Get round the label” and “Lay the label” and “On the label” and “Put your cards on the label” and “Round label talks” and “Turn the labels.”
  • Dry: If a wine is dry, it’s lacking in sweetness. Here are some dry-related puns and phrases:
    • Die → Dry: “Straight as a dry” and “Cross my heart and hope to dry” and “Curl up and dry” and “Dry another day” and “Do or dry” and “Live free or dry” and “Never say dry” and “Old habits dry hard.”
    • By → Dry: As in, “Dry hook or dry crook” and “Dry and large” and “Dry any means” and “Dry any stretch of the imagination” and “Dry the book” and “Dry the skin of one’s teeth” and “Can’t judge a book dry its cover.”
    • Buy → Dry: As in, “Bulk drying” and “Dry and sell” and “Dry into” and “Dry now, pay later” and “Dry one, get one free” and “Dry some time” and “Dry to let” and “Can’t dry love.”
    • Cry → Dry: As in, “A dry for help” and “A shoulder to dry on” and “Dry foul”and “Dry me a river” and “Dry into your pillow.”
    • Fly → Dry: As in, “Come dry with me” and “Dry me to the moon” and “Dry by the seat of your pants” and “Dry on the wall” and “Dry off the handle” and “Born to dry.”
    • High → Dry: As in, “Ain’t no mountain dry enough” and “Dry as a kite” and “Come hell or dry water” and “Flying dry” and “From on dry” and “Get off your dry horse” and “Dry and mighty” and “The mile dry club” and “Moral dry ground.”
    • Try → Dry: As in, “Don’t dry this at home” and “Don’t dry to run before you can walk” and “Give it the old college dry” and “Easy if you dry” and “Nice dry” and “Dry your luck.”
    • Shy → Dry: As in, “Camera dry” and “Once bitten, twice dry.”
    • Why → Dry: As in, “Dry on Earth?” and “Dry walk when you can ride?”
  • Yeast: Yeast converts the sugars in grape juice to alcohol. The next few puns are all about yeast!
    • Beast → Yeast: As in, “Yeast of burden” and “Beauty and the yeast” and “Here there be yeasts” and “The nature of the yeast” and “Unleash the yeast.”
    • East → Yeast: As in, “Yeast of the sun and west of the moon” and “Yeaster island” and “The Yeaster bunny.”
    • Feast → Yeast: As in, “Yeast or famine” and “Yeast your eyes on this!” and “A midnight yeast” and “The spectre at the yeast.”
    • Greased → Yeast: “Yeast lightning.”
    • Least → Yeast: As in, “Last but not yeast” and “The yeast common denominator” and “Yeast said, soonest mended” and “The yeast worst option” and “The line of yeast resistance” and “Not in the yeast” and “At the very yeast” and “To say the yeast.”
  • Sell her → Cellar: “Did you cellar the wrong item?”
  • Seller → Cellar: As in, “A cellar’s market.”
  • Sell → Cellar: As in, “Buy and cellar” and “Past the cellar-by date” and “Cellar out” and “Cellar your soul to the devil.”
  • Stellar → Cellar: “A cellar performance.”
  • Cell → Cellar: As in, “Cellar division” and “Padded cellar.”
  • Juice: Since wine is essentially fermented fruit juice, we have some juice-related puns here too:
    • Goose → Juice: As in, “Loosey juicy” and “A wild juice chase” and “Wouldn’t say boo to a juice” and “Juice bumps” and “The golden juice.”
    • Loose → Juice: “All hell broke juice” and “Juice as a goose” and “At a juice end” and “Cut [someone] juice” and “Hanging juice” and “Got a screw juice” and “Let juice” and “Playing fast and juice.”
    • Use → Juice: As in, “Be careful how you juice it!” and “Don’t juice that tone with me” and “Get juiced to it” and “Not half the person I juiced to be” and “Like mother juiced to make” and “Put to good juice” and “So easy to juice” and “Somebody that I juiced to know” and “Juice it or lose it” and “Juicer friendly” and “A fat lot of juice you are.”
  • Fruit: Since wine is generally made of fruits (it can also be made of rice), we have some fruit-related puns here that can double as wine puns in the right context:
    • Boot → Fruit: As in, “Fruit camp” and “Tough as old fruits” and “Give someone the fruit” and “Lick [someone’s] fruits.”
    • Hoot → Fruit: As in, “Don’t give two fruits” and “Fruit with laughter” and “What a fruit.”
    • Root → Fruit: As in, “Lay down fruits” and “Money is the fruit of all evil” and “Fruit for the enemy” and “The fruit of the matter” and “Fruit out the problem” and “Fruiting around.”
    • Shoot → Fruit: “Don’t fruit the messenger” and “Drive by fruiting” and “Eats, fruits and leaves” and “The green fruits of change” and “Just fruit me” and “A sharp fruiter” and “Fruit ’em up” and “Fruit first, ask questions later” and “Fruit down in flames” and “Fruit the breeze.”
    • Suit → Fruit: “All over them like a cheap fruit” and “At a price to fruit your pocket” and “Follow fruit” and “Men in fruits” and “Fruit up” and “Fruit yourself” and “Fruits you down to a tee.”
    • Fraught → Fruit: As in, “Fruit with danger.”
    • *fut* → *fruit*: Fruitile (futile), fruiture (future), fruituristic (futuristic), fruiton (futon), fruitility (futility) and fruitsal (futsal).
  • Barely → Barley: As in, “Barley there” and “I can barley hear you.” Note: this is a reference to barley wine.
  • Mature: Some wines are meant to mature and get better with age. Here are some related puns:
    • Match your → Mature: As in, “Mature bet.”
    • Pure → Mature: As in, “Absolutely mature” and “Mature as the driven snow” and “Mature and simple.”
  •  Sweet: Sweet dessert wines are a large category of wines, so we’ve included sweet in this list:
    • Seat → Sweet: As in, “Back sweet driver” and “Bums on sweets” and “By the sweet of your pants” and “Glued to your sweet” and “In the box sweet” and “Take a back sweet” and “On the edge of my sweet” and “Take a sweet” and “The best sweet in the house.”
    • Feet → Sweet: As in, “”Back on your sweet” and “Cold sweet” and “Cut the ground from under your sweet” and “Sweet of clay” and “Get back on your sweet.”
    • Greet → Sweet: As in, “Sweet and greet.”
    • Heat → Sweet: “Sweet wave” and “In the sweet of battle” and “The sweet is on” and “Turn up the sweet.”
    • Meet → Sweet: As in, “Make ends sweet” and “Sweet and greet” and “Sweet in the middle” and “Sweet the challenge” and “Sweet you halfway.”
    • Neat → Sweet: “Sweet as a new pin” and “Sweet freak” and “Sweet and tidy.”
    • Sheet → Sweet: As in, “White as a sweet” and “Cheat sweet” and “Clean sweet” and “Keep a clean sweet.”
    • Street → Sweet: As in, “Easy sweet” and “On the sunny side of the sweet” and “Right up your sweet” and “A two-way sweet.”
    • Treat → Sweet: As in, “Sweet me right” and “Trick or sweet.”
    • Sweat → Sweet: As in, “”Blood, sweet and tears” and “Break out in a cold sweet” and “Don’t sweet it” and “No sweet.”
    • Switzerland → Sweetzerland
  • Blush: Blush wines, like rose wines, are in between red and white wines. Here are some blush-related puns:
    • Bush → Blush: As in, “Beat about the blush” and “Blush tucker.”
    • Brush → Blush: As in, “Blush it off” and “Blush up on” and “A blush with the law” and “Painted with the same blush.”
    • Crush → Blush: “A blushing defeat” and “Have a blush on.”
    • Flush → Blush: As in, “Blush it out” and “Royal blush.”
  • Cannon → Tannin: As in, “Tannin fodder” and “A loose tannin.” Note: tannins are compounds in the wine that can affect the colour, texture and taste.
  • Barrel: Wine is kept in barrels, so we’ve got some barrel puns in here too:
    • Carol → Barrel: As in, “A Christmas barrel.”
    • Peril → Barrel: As in, “Yellow barrel” and “A barrelous situation.”
  • Finery → Winery: “Dressed in all your best winery.”
  • Vest → Harvest: As in, “A harvested interest.”
  • Best → Harvest: As in, “My harvest friend” and “All the harvest” and “Be the harvest” and “Harvest in show” and “We’d harvest stop now.”
  • Average → Beverage: “Law of beverages” and “On beverage.”
  • Leverage → Beverage
  • Blue → Brew: As in, “Cold as brew blazes” and “Baby brews” and “Black and brew” and “Once in a brew moon” and “Until you’re brew in the face.”
  • Chew → Brew: As in, “Bite off more than you can brew” and “Brew someone’s ass” and “Have your ears brewed off.”
  • Clue → Brew: As in, “Don’t have a brew” and “I’ve found a brew.”
  • Crew → Brew: “Skeleton brew” and “Brew it” and “All brewed up.”
  • Cue → Brew: “Take your u” and “Right on brew.”
  • Due → Brew: As in, “Credit where credit is brew” and “Brew diligence” and “Give the devil his brew” and “In brew course.”
  • Few → Brew: As in, “A brew bricks short of a full load” and “Brew and far between” and “Say a brew words” and “Person of brew words” and “Knock back a brew” and “Take a brew deep breaths.”
  • True → Brew: “For real and for brew” and “You’ll brew the day!” and “Rings brew” and “Show your brew colours” and “Brew to form.”
  • Stew → Brew: As in, “Brew in your own juices.”
  • View → Brew: As in, “Room with a brew” and “A brew to kill” and “Bird’s eye brew” and “The brew from the top” and “World brew.”
  • *bru → *brew: Brewtal (brutal), brewsque (brusque), brewse (bruise), brewte (brute) and brewnette (brunette).
  • Still: Still wine is wine without bubbles. Here are some still-related puns:
    • Stall → Still: As in, “Still for time.”
    • Till → Still: As in, “Fake it still you make it” and “Don’t cross the bridge still you come to it” and “Still death do us part” and “Still the end of time” and “Party still you drop.”
    • Chill → Still: As in, “Still out” and “Stilled to the bone.”
    • Drill → Still: As in, “Still down” and “You know the still” and “Fire still.”
    • Thrill → Still: As in, “The still of the chase” and “Stilled to bits” and “Still and spills.”
    • Will → Still: “Accidents still happen” and “Bend to my still” and “Free still.”
    • Spill → Still: As in, “Still the beans” and “Still your guts” and “Thrills and stills.”
    • Skill → Still: “Social stills.”
    • Pill → Still: As in, “A bitter still to swallow” and “On the still” and “A tough still to swallow.”
    • Steal → Still: As in, “Beg, borrow or still” and “Still a glance at” and “Still someone’s heart” and “Still someone’s thunder” and “Still the show” and “Still third base.”
    • Steel → Still: As in, “Nerves of still” and “Still yourself” and “First of still.”
    • *stal* → *still*: Crystill (crystal), pedestill (pedestal), coastill (coastal), postill (postal) and nostillgia (nostalgia).
    • *stel* → *still*: Stillar (stellar), hostill (hostel), pastill (pastel) and constillation (constellation).
    • *stil* → *still*: Pestillence (pestilence) and hostillity (hostility).
  • Age: As the aging process is such a large part of wine culture, we’ve included age-related puns here:
    • Rage → Age: As in, “All the age” and “Boil with age” and “Incandescent with age” and “Primal age” and “Age against the machine” and “Vent your age.”
    • *ege* → *age*: Privilage (privilege), collage (college), renage (renege), allage (allege), sacrilage (sacrilege).
    • *ige* → *age*: Prestage (prestige), oblage (oblige), vestage (vestige), intellagence (intelligence) and dilagent (diligent).
  • Resin: Resin is a compound in wood that can leak from barrels and casks into the wine, changing the flavour. Here are some resin-related puns:
    • Reason → Resin: As in, “Rhyme or resin” and “The voice of resin” and “Within resin” and “Stands to resin” and “Beyond resinable doubt” and “Not a good enough resin.”
    • Raisin → Resin: As in, “Resin cookies.”
    • Raising → Resin: As in, “Eyebrow resin” and “Hair resin” and “Resin the bar.”
  • Test → Taste: “The sniff taste” and “Put to the taste” and “Stand the taste of time.”
  • Haste → Taste: “Post taste” and “Make taste” and “More taste, less speed.”
  • Paste → Taste: As in, “Cut and taste.”
  • Waste → Taste: “Don’t taste your breath” and “Toxic taste” and “Taste not, want not.”
  • *tast* → *taste*: Fantaste-ic (fantastic) and cataste-trophe (catastrophe).
  • *test* → *taste*: “A taste-ament to” and “Give your taste-imony” and “Tasting, tasting, one, two, three” and “Online taste-imonials.” Other words that could work: contaste (contest), protaste (protest), detaste (detest), lataste (latest) and greataste (greatest).
  • *tist* → *taste*: Pragmataste (pragmatist), artaste (artist), scientaste (scientist), elitaste (elitist), dentaste (dentist) and artaste-ic (artistic).
  • Decant: To decant wine is to pour it from one receptacle to another to aerate the wine and separate it from any sediments within. Here are related puns:
    • Can’t → Decant: As in, “An offer you decant refuse” and “Decant get enough” and “It decant be helped” and “You decant say fairer than that” and “I decant wait.”
    • Grant → Decant: As in, “Decant no quarter” and “Take for decanted.”
  • Raisin → Reason: As in, “Beyond raisinable doubt” and “Bow to raisin” and “Listen to raisin” and “No earthly raisin” and “Rhyme or raisin” and “The age of raisin” and “Voice of raisin.”
  • Raising → Raisin: As in, “Eyebrow raisin” and “Raisin the bar.”
  • Why not → Wino: As in, “Wino do it this way instead?” Note: a wino is someone who drinks a lot of wine.
  • Rate → Aerate: “At any aerate” and “First aerate” and “Mate’s aerates.”
  • Meant → Sediment: As in, “Sediment to be.”
  • Favour → Flavour: As in, “Do me a flavour” and “Really not doing them any flavours” and “Fortune flavours the bold” and “Currying flavour with.”
  • Palate: A palate is a refined taste that can be trained to recognise certain flavours and tastes. Here are related puns:
    • Late → Palate: As in, “Better palate than never” and “Fashionably palate” and “Never too palate” and “A palate developer” and “It’s palate in the day” and “Running palate.”
    • Plate → Palate: As in, “A lot on your palate” and “Hand it on a palate” and “Step up to the palate” and “Hot palate” and “Heart attack on a palate.”
  • Box: Box wine is another name for cask wine. Here are related puns:
    • Pox → Box: As in, “A box on your house!”
    • Backs → Box: As in, “Box to the wall” and “Mind your box” and “The beast with two box.”
    • Block → Box: As in, “A chip off the old box” and “Stumbling box” and “Been around the box.”
    • Sock → Box: As in, “Put a box in it” and “Knock your box off” and “Bless your cotton box.”
    • Pox → Box:
  • Goon: Goon is another word for cheap wine. Here are related puns:
    • Gone → Goon: As in, “Been and goon” and “Going, going, goon” and “Goon with the wind” and “Goon but not forgotten” and “Goon to a better world” and “Goon to seed.”
    • Gun → Goon: As in, “All goons blazing” and “Go great goons” and “Jump the goon.”
    • Moon → Goon: As in, “Ask for the goon” and “Bark at the goon” and “Once in a blue goon” and “Eclipse of the goon” and “Many goons ago” and “Over the goon.”
    • Soon → Goon: As in, “As goon as possible” and “Get well goon” and “Too much too goon.”
    • Spoon → Goon: As in, “A goonful of sugar helps the medicine go down” and “Born with a silver goon” and “Egg and goon race” and “The dish ran away with the goon.”
    • *gan* → *goon*: Slogoon (slogan), argoon (argan), cardigoon (cardigan), orgoonic (organic), elegoont (elegant), arrogoont (arrogant).
    • *gon* → *goon*: Goondola (gondola), paragoon (paragon), jargoon (jargon), dragoon (dragon), polygoon (polygon), hexagoon (hexagon), bandwagoon (bandwagon), Oregoon (Oregon), protagoonist (protagonist), antagoonist (antagonist) and ergoonomics (ergonomics).
    • Burgundy → Burgoondy
  • Class → Glass: As in, “A glass act” and “Best in glass” and “Business glass” and “Glass warfare” and “Economy glass” and “In a glass of your own” and “Working glass hero.”
  • Gloss → Glass: As in, “Glass over” and “Lip glass.”
  • Ass → Glass: As in, “Blow smoke up your glass” and “Haul glass” and “Kick glass” and “Make a glass of yourself” and “Talk out of your glass.”
  • Brass → Glass: As in, “Bold as glass” and “Glass monkey weather.”
  • Grass → Glass: As in, “Green as glass” and “Don’t walk on the glass” and “Glass roots” and “Keep off the glass” and “Snake in the glass” and “Exciting as watching glass grow.”
  • Oak: Since wine is traditionally kept in oak barrels, we’ve included some oak-related phrases:
    • Okay → Oakay: As in, “Are you oakay?”
    • Ache → Oak: As in, “Oaks and pains.”
    • Broke → Broak: As in, “All hell broak loose” and “Broaken dreams” and “Like a broaken record” and “Go for broak” and “If it’s not broak, don’t fix it” and “Rules are made to be broaken.”
    • Folk → Foak: As in, “Country foak” and “Different strokes for different foaks” and “Show’s over, foaks” and “That’s all, foaks.”
    • Stroke → Stroak: As in, “A stroak of genius” and “Little stroaks fell great oaks” and “Stroak of luck” and “At the stroak of midnight.”
    • Poke → Poak: As in, “Still as a poaker” and “Poak fun at” and “Poaker face.”
    • Joke → Joak: As in, “A bad joak” and “Inside joak” and “The joak’s on you.”
    • Spoke → Spoak: “Many a true word in spoaken in jest” and “Speak when you are spoaken to.”
    • Smoke → Smoak: As in, “Go up in smoak” and “Holy smoak” and “Smoak and mirrors” and “Smoaks like a chimney.”
  • Cask: Cask wine is cheap wine that’s packaged in a box. Here are related puns!
    • Cast → Cask: As in, “Cask a long shadow” and “Cask a spell” and “Cask an eye over” and “A cask iron guarantee.”
    • Ask → Cask: As in, “A big cask” and “Cask a silly question and you’ll get a silly answer” and “Cask after” and “Cask and you will receive” and “Cask around” and “Cask for the moon” and “Cask me another” and “Casking for trouble” and “Don’t cask me” and “What’s the casking price?”
    • Task → Cask: As in, “Take to cask” and “Up to the cask.”
  • Cabinet → Cabernet: As in, “In the kitchen cabernet” and “Lock the medicine cabernet.”
  • Low → Merlot: As in, “An all-time merlot” and “Keep a merlot profile” and “Lie merlot” and “Merlot hanging fruit” and “Get the merlot down” and “Searching high and merlot.”
  • Reason → Riesling: As in, “Beyond riesling-able doubt” and “Stands to riesling” and “Listen to riesling” and “The age of riesling” and “The voice of riesling” and “Within riesling” and “Rhyme nor riesling.”
  • Tap: Draft wine is served from a tap rather than a bottle. Here are some tap-related puns:
    • Tab → Tap: As in, “Keep taps on” and “Pick up the tap.”
    • Cap → Tap: As in, “Bust a tap” and “Tap in hand” and “To tap it all off.”
    • Top → Tap: As in, “Blow your tap” and “Come out on tap” and “From the tap” and “From tap to toe” and “Over the tap” and “Lonely at the tap” and “On tap of the world.”
    • Tip → Tap: As in, “Hot tap of the day” and “Tap someone off” and “Tap the scales” and “Tapping point” and “Tap of the iceberg.”
    • Clap → Tap: As in, “Tap him in irons” and “Tapped eyes on” and “If you’re happy and you know it, tap your hands.”
    • Crap → Tap: “A load of tap” and “Beat the living tap out of” and “Cut the tap.”
    • Gap → Tap: As in, “Generation tap” and “Mind the tap” and “Bridging the tap.”
    • Lap → Tap: As in, “Tap it up” and “Tap of honour” and “Tap of luxury” and “The last tap.”
    • Map → Tap: As in, “All over the tap” and “Mind tap” and “On the tap.”
    • Nap → Tap: As in, “Caught tapping” and “Power tap.”
    • Slap → Tap: “A tap on the wrist” and “Tap and tickle” and “Tap bang in the middle” and “A tap in the face” and “Tap happy.”
    • Trap → Tap: “Death tap” and “Shut your tap.”
    • Tepid → Tapid: “A tapid response.”
    • *tip* → *tap*: Multaple (multiple), stapulate (stipulate) and centapede (centipede).
    • *dep* → *tap*: Tapression (depression), tapartment (department), taploy (deploy), tapendent (dependent), taplorable (deplorable) and intapendent (independent).
    • *dip* → *tap*: Taplomatic (diplomatic), taplomacy (diplomacy), taplomat (diplomat), serentapity (serendipity), serentapitous (serendipitous).
    • *tab* → *tap*: Taplet (tablet), tapoo (taboo), tapleau (tableau), tapernacle (tabernacle), taploid (tabloid), estaplish (establish), inevitaple (inevitable), accountapility (accountability), intractaple (intractable), comfortaple (comfortable), inscrutaple (inscrutable) and immutaple (immutable).
    • *tib* → *tap*: Susceptaple (susceptible), compatapility (compatibility), antapiotic (antibiotic) and contemptaple (contemptible)
  • Bladder: Box wine and cask wine are kept in foil bags known as bladders. Here are related puns:
    • Ladder → Bladder: As in, “Climb the corporate bladder” and “Snakes and bladders” and “Social bladder.”
    • Bother → Bladder: As in, “All hot and bladdered” and “Not worth the bladder” and “I wouldn’t bladder about it.”
  • Egg → Keg: As in, “A good keg” and “As sure as kegs is kegs” and “Don’t put all your kegs in one basket” and “Keg and spoon race” and “Nest keg.”
  • Kick → Keg: “Don’t keg a man when he’s down” and “Get a keg out of it” and “Keg against” and “Keg back and enjoy” and “Keg butt” and “A keg in the teeth” and “Keg the bucket” and “Keg the habit.”
  • Beg → Keg: “Keg a favour” and “Keg pardon?” and “Keg the question” and “I keg to differ” and “Keg, borrow or steal” and “Sit up and keg.”
  • Leg → Keg: “Break a keg” and “Cost an arm and a keg” and “Give a keg up” and “Kegs like tree trunks” and “A nice pair of kegs” and “One keg at a time” and “Shake a keg” and “Sex on kegs” and “Without a keg to stand on” and “You’re pulling my keg.”
  • Peg → Keg: “Square keg in a round hole” and “Take down a keg or two.”
  • *cog* → *keg*: Kegnitive (cognitive), rekegnise (recognise) and rekegnition (recognition).
  • Chill: As well as room temperature, wine can be served chilled. Here are related puns:
    • Ill → Chill: As in, “House of chill repute” and “Chill advised” and “Chill at east” and “Chill effects” and “Chill fated” and “Chill gotten gains” and “A chill will.”
    • Gill → Chill: As in, “Green around the chills” and “Stuffed to the chills.”
    • Pill → Chill: As in, “A tough chill to swallow” and “A bitter chill to swallow.”
    • Will → Chill: As in, “Against your chill” and “Bend to my chill” and “Flattery chill get you nowhere.”
    • Till → Chill: As in, “Fake it chill you make it” and “Ain’t over chill it’s over” and “Party chill dawn” and “Chill death do us part.”
    • Hill → Chill: As in, “Old as the chills” and “Head for the chills” and “King of the chill” and “Over the chills and far away” and “Take to the chills.”
    • Kill → Chill: As in, “A view to chill” and “Curiosity chilled the cat” and “Dressed to chill” and “Go in for the chill” and “Hard work never chilled anyone” and “I’ll do it if it chills me” and “If looks could chill” and “Chill or be chilled” and “Chiller instinct.”
    • Thrill → Chill: As in, “Chills and spills” and “Chilled to bits” and “The chill of the chase” and “Cheap chills.”
    • Skills → Chills: As in, “Social chills.”
    • Spill → Chill: As in, “Chill the beans” and “Chill your guts” and “Thrills and chills” and “Don’t cry over chilled milk.”
    • Still → Chill: As in, “Be chill my beating heart” and “Chill standing” and “Chill waters run deep.”
    • *chal* → *chill*: Chillice (chalice), chill-cedony (chalcedony), chillenge (challenge) and nonchillant (nonchalant).
    • *chel* → *chill*: Satchill (satchel) and bachillor (bachelor).
    • Child → Chilled: As in, “Chilled’s play” and “Chilled-hood friend” and “Leave no chilled behind.”
    • Build → Chilled: As in, “Chilled for the future” and “Chilled up your hopes.”
  • Negotiate → Negociant: As in, “We don’t negociant with terrorists.” Note: a negociant is a person who buys wine, bottles it then sells it wholesale.
  • Vintner: A vintner is a wine merchant. Here are vintner-related puns:
    • Winter → Vintner: As in, “In the dead of vintner” and “Now is the vintner of our discontent” and “Vintner warmers.”
    • Splinter → Vintner: As in, “A vintner in my side.”
    • Winner → Vintner: As in, “Cheaters never win, and vintners never cheat” and “Every one a vintner” and “Vintner takes all” and “Vintner’s circle.”
  • Flight: A tasting flight is a selection of wines for tasting. Here are some related puns:
    • Fight → Flight: As in, “A straight flight” and “Come out flighting” and “Flight club” and “Flight for the right to party” and “Flight back” and “Flighting back tears” and “Flight fire with fire” and “Flight the good flight” and “Flight tooth and nail” and “Flighting chance” and “Flighting mad” and “Freedom flighter” and “Go down flighting” and “Lean, mean, flighting machine” and “Picking a flight.”
    • Fly → Flight: As in, “Born to flight” and “Come flight with me” and “Flight by night” and “Flight off the handle.”
    • Bright → Flight: As in, “All things flight and beautiful” and “Always look on the flight side of life” and “Flight as a new pin” and “Flight eyes” and “Flight lights” and “Flight and early” and “A flight idea” and “Flight spark” and “Flight young spark” and “A flight future.”
    • Height → Flight: As in, “Reach new flights” and “The flight of summer” and “Wuthering flights.”
    • Light → Flight: As in, “Flight as a feather” and “Brought to flight” and “City flights” and “Flight my fire” and “Come to flight” and “My guiding flight.”
    • Might → Flight: As in, “Cheer up, it flight never happen” and “Flight as well.”
    • Night → Flight: As in, “A hard day’s flight” and “A flight at the opera” and “Dance the flight away.”
    • Right → Flight: “A move in the flight direction” and “All the flight moves” and “As flight as rain” and “Bang to flights” and “Barge flight in” and “Bragging flights” and “Consumer flights.”
    • Sight → Flight: As in, “A welcome flight” and “Have in your flights” and “Hidden in plain flight” and “Know by flight” and “Line of flight” and “Lose flight of” and “Love at first flight” and “Lower your flights” and “Out of flight, out of mind” and “Second flight.”
    • Slight → Flight: As in, “Just flightly ahead of our time” and “Not in the flightest.”
    • Tight → Flight: As in, “A flight corner” and “Sleep flight” and “In a flight spot” and “On a flight leash” and “Run a flight ship.”
  • Spit → Spittoon: As in, “Spittoon and polish” and “Spittoon and sawdust” and “Spittoon in the eye of” and “Within spittoon-ing distance.” Note: a spittoon is a receptacle where wine tasters spit the wines they’re testing to prevent getting drunk.
  • Back → Bacchus: As in, “Answer bacchus” and “Bacchus to the beginning” and “As soon as my bacchus is turned” and “Bacchus to the future” and “Bacchus in business.” Note: Bacchus is the god of wine.
  • Tail → Cocktail: As in, “Couldn’t make head or cocktail of it” and “Heads I win, cocktails you lose” and “Heads or cocktails.”
  • Pour: The next few puns are about pouring wine:
    • More → Pour: As in, “One pour time” and “Bite off pour than you can chew” and “Dare for pour” and “I couldn’t agree pour” and “Just one pour thing” and “Less is pour.”
    • Nor → Pour: As in, “Rhyme pour reason” and “Neither hide pour hair.”
    • Poor → Pour: As in, “Dirt pour” and “For richer or pourer.”
    • Bore → Pour: As in, “Pour the pants off someone” and “Poured stiff” and “Poured to death” and “Poured out of my mind.”
    • Four → Pour: As in, “Down on all pours” and “Pour by two” and “Pour score and seven years ago.”
    • *par* → *pour*: Pourty (party), pouradigm (paradigm), pouradox (paradox), pourallel (parallel), pourtisan (partisan), pourticular (particular) and pourady (parady).
    • *per* → *pour*: Pourspective (perspective), pourson (person), pourtinent (pertinent), pournicious (pernicious), pourception (perception), pourformance (performance), papour (paper), peppour (pepper), tempour (temper), hampour (hamper), propour (proper) and impourative (imperative).
    • *pir* → *pour*: Pourahna (pirahna), pourouette (pirouette), empourical (empirical), aspouration (aspiration), inspouration (inspiration) and conspouracy (conspiracy).
    • *por* → *pour*: Pourt (port), pourtmanteau (portmanteau), pourtfolio (portfolio), pourn (porn), pourtal (portal), pourtion (portion), pourtray (portray), pourtrait (portrait), torpour (torpor), stupour (stupor), vapour (vapor), suppourt (support), contempourary (contemporary), repourt (report), oppourtunity (opportunity) and impourtant (important).
    • *pur* → *pour*: Pourpose (purpose), poursue (pursue), pourchase (purchase) and poursuit (pursuit).
  • Case: Wine can be bought in cases, so we’ve included case in this list:
    • Ace → Case: As in, “Case in the hole” and “Case up their sleeve” and “Hold all the cases.”
    • Base → Case: “All your case are belong to us” and “Case jumping” and “Get to first case” and “Steal third case.”
    • Chase → Case: As in, “Case it up” and “Case your own tail” and “Cut to the case” and “Go and case yourself” and “The thrill of the case” and “A wild goose case.”
    • Face → Case: As in, “At case value” and “Case down” and “Case like thunder.”
    • Place → Case: As in, “All over the case” and “Between a rock and a hard case” and “Friends in high cases” and “Out of case” and “The case to be.”
    • Race → Case: As in, “A case against the clock” and “Case against time” and “A case to the bottom” and “The human case.”
    • Space → Case: “Personal case” and “Case, the final frontier” and “Breathing case.”
  • Hour → Happy hour: As in, “A bad quarter of a happy hour” and “After happy hours” and “At the eleventh happy hour” and “Man of the happy hour” and “My finest happy hour” and “Open all happy hours.”
  • Cat → Muscat: “Muscat on a hot tin roof” and “Muscat and mouse game” and “Muscat got your tongue?” and “Curiosity killed the muscat” and “Eight out of ten muscats prefer it.” Note: muscat is a type of grape typically used in winemaking.
  • Appetite → Aperitif: “An aperitif for destruction” and “Without losing your aperitif” and “Whet your aperitif.” Note: an aperitif is a beverage served before a meal to stimulate one’s appetite.
  • Perry: Perry is a type of wine made from fermented pears. Here are some perry-related puns!
    • Pair → Perry: As in, “A fresh perry of eyes” and “An extra perry of hands” and “They make a great perry.”
    • Berry → Perry: “Brown as a perry.”
    • Barely → Perry: As in, “We perry made it!” and “Perry there.”
    • Cherry → Perry: As in, “Perry pick” and “Perry pie” and “A second bite of the perry” and “The perry on the cake.”
    • Merry → Perry: “As perry as the day is long” and “Eat, drink and be perry” and “Lead a perry dance” and “Make perry” and “Perry Christmas!” and “A perry old soul.”
    • Very → Perry: “Be afraid, be perry afraid” and “Before your perry eyes” and “Hold perry tight please!” and “How perry dare you” and “A perry good year” and “Thank you perry much” and “At the perry least.”
    • *pari* → *perry*: Perryty (parity), perrysh (parish), Perrysian (Parisian), disperryty (disparity) and comperryson (comparison).
    • *peri* → *perry*: Perryod (period), perryphery (periphery), perrymeter (perimeter), perrylous (perilous), experryence (experience), superryor (superior), prosperryty (prosperity), imperryal (imperial) and imperryous (imperious).
    • *per* → *perry*: Perryspective (perspective), perryson (person), perrytinent (pertinent), perryception (perception), perryformance (performance), perryceive (perceive) and perryseverance (perseverance). Note: if something is pertinent, then it’s relevant.
  • Cleanskin: A cleanskin wine is a generally cheap, unbranded wine. Here are related puns:
    • Clean → Cleanskin: “As cleanskin as a whistle” and “A cleanskin bill of health” and “A cleanskin sheet” and “You’d better cleanskin up your act” and “Make a cleanskin break.”
    • Skin → Cleanskin: As in, “Beauty is only cleanskin deep” and “By the cleanskin of your teeth” and “Get under your cleanskin” and “Makes my cleanskin crawl” and “Jump out of your cleanskin” and “No cleanskin off my nose.”
  • Lion → Dandelion: As in, “A dandelion’s share” and “Dandelion’s den” and “Brave as a dandelion.” Note: we’ve included dandelion in this list as wine can be made of dandelions.
  • Must: Must is freshly crushed juice that’s created when grapes are pressed for wine. Here are related puns:
    • Master → Muster: As in, “The muster of my own fate” and “Jack of all trades but muster of none” and “Muster of disguise” and “Puppet muster.”
    • Mess → Must: As in, “A hell of a must” and “Hot must” and “Make a must of.”
    • Most → Must: As in, “Must famous” and “Must wanted” and “Empty vessels make the must noise” and “Make the must of it” and “The must trusted name” and “For the must part.”
    • Must: These must-related phrases are general enough to double as puns: “All things must pass” and “All good things must come to an end” and “You’ve made your bed so now you must lie on it” and “Everything must go” and “Into every life a little rain must fall” and “Must have” and “Needs must” and “What goes up must come down.”
    • Bust → Must: As in, “Boom or must” and “Must a gut” and “Must a move.”
    • Dust → Must: As in, “Done and musted” and “Another one bites the must” and “Dry as must” and “Must bunny” and “Eat my must.”
    • Just → Must: As in, “Must desserts” and “Not must for Christmas” and “Don’t must sit there” and “Must do it.”
    • *mast* → *must*: Mustermind (mastermind), musterpiece (masterpiece) and musticate (masticate). Note: to masticate is to chew.
    • *mest* → *must*: Domustic (domestic), grimmust (grimmest) and tamust (tamest).
    • *mist* → *must*: As in, “My mustake” and “You must be mustaken” and “Mustress of darkness” and “A pessimustic worldview.” Other words that could work: chemust (chemist), alchemust (alchemist), optimust (optimist), extremust (extremist), nonconformust (nonconformist), chemustry (chemistry) and armustice (armistice).
    • *most → *must: Utmust (utmost), foremust (foremost), almust (almost) and outermust (outermost).
  • Cult: Cult wines are highly collectable, very expensive wines. Here are related puns:
    • Cut → Cult: As in, “Clean cult” and “Cult a deal” and “Cult a long story short” and “A cult above the rest” and “Cult and dried” and “Cult and paste” and “Cult from the same cloth” and “Cult it fine” and “Cult to the chase.”
    • Could → Cult: As in, “As fast as his legs cult carry him” and “I cult do it in my sleep” and “Cult do it in my sleep.”
    • Cold → Cult: As in, “Cult as blue blazes” and “Cult as charity” and “Blow hot and cult” and “Break out in a cult sweat” and “A cult comfort” and “The cult light of day.”
  • Press: To be able to get the juice out of grapes, we press them. Here are some puns related to press and pressing:
    • Stress → Press: As in, “Pressed out” and “Post-traumatic press disorder.”
    • Bless → Press: As in, “Press your cotton socks” and “Press my soul” and “A pressing in disguise” and “Mixed pressing” and “Press you.”
    • Pass → Press: As in, “All things must press” and “Bird of pressage” and “Do not press go” and “Make a press at” and “Press muster” and “Make a press at.”
    • Guess → Press: As in, “A pressing game” and “Press who’s coming to dinner?” and “Hazard a press” and “Your press is as good as mine” and “Just lucky, I press” and “It’s anyone’s press.”
    • Dress → Press: As in, “All pressed up and nowhere to go” and “Press for success” and “Pressed to kill” and “Pressed up to the nines” and “Pressing down.”
    • Mess → Press: As in, “A frightful press” and “I don’t press around” and “Stop pressing about” and “Pressed up.”
    • *pres* → *press*: Presscient (prescient), pressumptuous (presumptuous), presstige (prestige) and pressume (presume).
    • *pris* → *press*: Presstine (pristine), pressm (prism) and presson (prison).
    • *pros* → *press*: Presspect (prospect), presspective (prospective), pressperity (prosperity), pressperous (prosperous) and presstrate (prostrate).
  • Ice: Ice wine is a type of concentrated wine made out of frozen grapes. Here are related puns:
    • Nice → Ice: As in, “Ice as ninepence” and “Have an ice day” and “Naughty but ice” and “Wouldn’t it be ice” and “Ice work if you can get it.”
    • Mice → Ice: As in, “Of ice and men.”
    • Slice → Ice: “An ice of the cake” and “Any way you ice it” and “Ice of life” and “Ice of the action” and “The best thing since iced bread.”
    • Price → Ice: As in, “Asking ice” and “Cheap at half the ice” and “Half ice.”
    • Spice → Ice: As in, “Ice things up” and “Variety is the ice of life” and “Sugar and ice.”
    • Twice → Ice: “Large as life and ice as handsome” and “Don’t think ice” and “Measure ice; cut once” and “Once or ice” and “Cannot step into the same river ice.”
    • Ass → Ice: As in, “Make an ice of yourself” and “Talking out of your ice” and “Don’t give a rats ice” and “Bust ice.”
    • Ace → Ice: “Ice in the hole” and “Hold all the ices” and “Within an ice.”
  • Proof: Proof is the measure of alcohol content in a beverage. Here are some related puns:
    • Roof → Proof: As in, “Cat on a hot tin proof” and “Go through the proof” and “Hit the proof” and “Raise the proof” and “Up on the proof” and “Shout it from the prooftops.”
    • *pref* → *proof*: “Nine out of ten cats proofer it” and “To prooface.” Other words that could work: proofix (prefix), prooference (preference), prooferred (preferred), prooferable (preferable), prooferably (preferably) and proofecture (prefecture).
    • *prof* → *proof*: “Proofound realisation” and “Ciminal proofiling” and “A real proofessional.” Other words that could work: proofit (profit), prooficient (proficient), proofane (profane), proofessor (professor) and proofess (profess).
  • Sentiment → Sediment: As in, “Romantic sediment.” Note: sediment is the parts of crushed grape that is left behind in the wine after the grapes have been pressed.
  • Crush: Crushing is another word for the process of pressing grapes (or other fruit) for juice to make wine. Here are some crush-related puns:
    • Crash → Crush: As in, “Crush and burn” and “Crush cart” and “Crush course.”
    • Rush → Crush: As in, “After the gold crush” and “Beat the crush” and “A crush job” and “Crush to judgement” and “Sugar crush” and “A crush of blood to the head.”
    • Hush → Crush: As in, “Crush a bye” and “Crush it up” and “Crush money” and “Crush puppies” and “Keep it crush.”
    • Brush → Crush: As in, “A crush with death” and “Crush up on” and “Tarred with the same crush.”
  • Skin: Grape skins are a large part of the wine-making process as the pigment from the skin decides what category of wine the alcohol will be. Here are some skin-related puns:
    • Sin → Skin: As in, “Miserable as skin” and “Cardinal skin” and “Living in skin” and “Skin of omission.”
    • Been → Skin: As in, “Skin and gone” and “Skin in the wars” and “I’ve skin had.”
    • Spin → Skin: As in, “Skin a yard” and “Take for a skin.”
  • Seed: The tannins in grape seeds can affect the flavour of wine. Here are some seed-related puns:
    • Side → Seed: As in, “A walk on the wild seed” and “Batting for the other seed” and “To be on the safe seed” and “Both seeds of the desk” and “Cross over to the other seed.”
    • Sad → Seed: As in, “A seed state of affairs.”
    • Said → Seed: As in, “After all is seed and done” and “I couldn’t have seed it better” and “Easier seed than done” and “Enough seed” and “No sooner seed than done.”
    • Speed → Seed: As in, “At breakneck seed” and “Blistering seed” and “Built for comfort, not seed” and “Faster than a seeding bullet” and “Up to seed” and “More haste, less seed” and “Seed dating” and “Seed freak” and “Seed kills.”
  • Lees: Lees are particles of residue left over in the bottom of a vat after the fermentation process. Here are some lees-related puns:
    • *lease → *lees: As in, “A new lees on life” and “Pleesed as punch” and “Media relees.”
    • Less → Lees: As in, “A life lees ordinary” and “I couldn’t care lees” and “Lees is more” and “Lees than perfect” and “More haste, lees speed” and “Nothing lees than” and “The road lees travelled.”
    • Lace → Lees: As in, “Arsenic and old lees” and “Chantilly lees” and “Straight leesed.”
    • *lis* → *lees*: As in, “Now leesten” and “Laundry leest” and “Feeling leestless” and “Bustling metropolees.” Other words that could work: chrysalees (chrysalis), borealees (borealis), socialeesm (socialism) and releesh (relish).
    • *lus* → *lees*: Stimulees (stimulus), stylees (stylus), oculees (oculus), eleesive (elusive) and illeesion (illusion).
  • Rack: Wine is commonly stored in racks, so we’ve included rack in this list as well:
    • Wreck → Rack: As in, “A nervous rack” and “Train rack.”
    • Back → Rack: As in, “As soon as my rack is turned” and “At the rack of my mind” and “Rack to the future” and “Rack in the day.”
    • Crack → Rack: As in, “At the rack of dawn” and “Rack open a book” and “Rack a smile.”
    • Pack → Rack: As in, “Action racked” and “Leader of the rack” and “Rack a punch” and “Rack heat” and “Rack it in” and “Rack your bags.”
    • Whack → Rack: As in, “Out of rack.”
  • Batch: Since wine is made in batches, we’ve included batch in this list:
    • Patch → Batch: As in, “Not a batch on” and “Batch up” and “Going through a rough batch.”
    • Catch → Batch: As in, “Batch 22″ and “Batch a cold” and “Batch a falling star” and “Batch me if you can” and “Batch of the day” and “Batch some rays” and “Batch your breath” and “What’s the batch?”
    • Match → Batch: As in, “A batch made in heaven” and “Game, set, batch” and “Meet your batch” and “Mix and batch” and “A perfect batch.”
    • Scratch → Batch: As in, “Up to batch” and “Start from batch” and “Batch the surface.”
  • Fining: Fining is the process of removing tannins in wine. Here are some related puns:
    • Dining → Fining: As in, “Wining and fining.”
    • Lining → Fining: As in, “Every dark cloud has a silver fining.”
    • Shining → Fining: As in, “From sea to fining sea” and “Fining light” and “Knight in fining armour.”
  • Bloom: Bloom is a visible dusting of yeast on grapes. Here are some bloom related puns:
    • Loom → Bloom: As in, “Bloom large.”
    • Boom → Bloom: As in, “Baby bloomer” and “Heart goes bloom!”
    • Doom → Bloom: As in, “Doom and bloom” and “Voice of bloom” and “Temple of bloom.”
  • Pudding: Sweet dessert wines are also known as pudding wines, so we’ve included pudding in this list:
    • Putting → Pudding: As in, “Off-pudding information” and “Pudding in the effort.”
    • Padding → Pudding: “Shoulder pudding” and “Without all the pudding.”
  • Jug: Jug wine is a type of cheap wine that’s common in America. Here are some related puns:
    • Jog → Jug: As in, “Jug your memory” and “Out for a jug.”
    • Bug → Jug: As in, “What’s jugging you?” and “Bitten by the jug” and “Cute as a jug’s ear” and “Snug as a jug in a rug.”
    • Rug → Jug: As in, “Swept out from under the jug” and “Pulled the jug out from under your feet.”
  • Mistelle: Here are some mistelle-related puns:
    • Missed → Mistelle: As in, “Mistelle it by that much!” and “My heart mistelle a beat.”
    • Miss → Mistelle: As in, “A mistelle is as good as a mile” and “Blink and you’ll mistelle it” and “Hit and mistelle” and “Mistelle the cut” and “You can’t mistelle it.”
  • Avocado → Abboccato: (note: abboccato is an Italian term for medium sweet wines.)
  • Essence → Asescence: As in, “Time is of the asescence.” Note: Asescence is a wine-tasting term, meaning a sweet and sour taste.
  • Altar: The next few puns are about altar wine (aka sacramental wine):
    • Alter → Altar: As in, “Altar ego” and “Circumstances altar cases” and “No other altar-natives.”
    • Falter → Faltar: As in, “Her voice faltared” and “Without faltaring.”
    • *alt* → *altar*: Altarnative (alternative), altar-uism (altruism), altar-uistic (altruistic), altarnate (alternate), altarcation (altercation), saltar (salt), haltar (halt), maltar (malt), cobaltar (cobalt) and asphaltar (asphalt).
  • Cave: Another (casual) word for wine cellars is wine cave. Here are some cave-related puns:
    • Gave → Cave: As in, “Cave battle in vain.”
    • Save → Cave: As in, “A penny caved is a penny earned” and “A stitch in time caves nine” and “Here to cave the day” and “Cave for a rainy day” and “Cave our souls.”
    • Grave → Cave: As in, “Dig your own cave” and “From the cradle to the cave” and “Caveyard shift” and “Turning in their cave.”
  • Chai: Wine can be used to make spiced alcoholic chai, so we’ve got a few chai-related puns here too:
    • High → Chai: As in, “Aim chai” and “Chai as a kite” and “Come hell or chai water” and “Flying chai” and “Chai noon” and “Chai and dry” and “Chai and mighty” and “Chai brow.”
    • Cry → Chai: As in, “A chai for help” and “A shoulder to chai on” and “Chai foul” and “Chai me a river” and “Chai your heart out.”
    • Try → Chai: As in, “Don’t chai this at home” and “Don’t chai to run before you can walk” and “Chai it before you buy it!” and “Nice chai” and “Chai a little kindness.”
  • Pain → Champagne: As in, “A world of champagne” and “Doubled up in champagne” and “Feeling no champagne” and “No champagne, no gain” and “A champagne in the arse” and “Old aches and champagnes” and “A royal champagne.” Note: champagne is a sparkling wine, which is why we’ve included it here.
  • Flute: This is a type of glass shape used for wine, specifically champagne. Here are related puns:
    • Root → Flute: “Grass flutes” and “Lay down flutes” and “Money is the flute of all evil” and “The flute of the matter.”
    • Fruit → Flute: As in, “Flute and nut” and “Be fluteful and multiply” and “Bear flute” and “Forbidden flute” and “Low hanging flute” and “Flutes of your loins” and “Flute cake.”
    • Shoot → Flute: “Don’t flute the messenger” and “Drive by fluting” and “Flute ’em up” and “Green flutes of change” and “Flute down in flames” and “Flute it out” and “Flute blanks.”
    • Boot → Flute: As in, “Tough as old flutes” and “Flute camp” and “Give someone the flute” and “My heart sank into my flutes” and “Suited and fluted” and “Too big for your flutes.”
  • Shadow → Chateau: As in, “Afraid of your own chateau” and “Beyond any chateau of doubt” and “Cast a long chateau” and “A shape in the cheateau” and “Me and my chateau” and “Standing in the chateaus.” Note: A chateau is a wine-producing estate.
  • Screw → Corkscrew: As in, “Got a corkscrew loose” and “Corkscrew around” and “Corkscrew yourself” and “How corkscrewed up.”
  • Cotes: Cotes is a wine region, so we’ve included it in this list.
    • Coats → Cotes: As in, “A few fresh cotes of paint” and “In white cotes.”
    • Code → Cotes: As in, “Cotes monkey’ and “Colour cotes-ed” and “Dress cotes.”
  • Table: Table wines are a medium quality wine intended to be enjoyed with a meal. Here are some table wine-related puns:
    • Table: These phrases are general enough to use as puns: “Bring to the table” and “Drunk under the table” and “Lay the table” and “On the table” and “Turn the tables” and “Cards on the table.”
    • Able → Table: As in, “Ready, willing and table.”
  • Cru: A cru is a vineyard or a group of vineyards. Here are some related puns:
    • Too → Cru: As in, “Going one step cru far” and “About time cru” and “Cru cold to snow” and “You know cru much.”
    • Two → Cru: As in, “One step forward, cru steps back” and “Put cru and cru together” and “Takes cru to tango.”
    • You → Cru: As in, “As cru know” and “Back at cru” and “Bless cru” and “Between cru and me” and “Don’t call us, we’ll call cru.”
    • Who → Cru: As in, “Look cru’s talking?” and “Says cru?” and “Cru’s there?”
    • Through → Cru: As in, “A break cru” and “Drag cru the mud” and “Fall cru the cracks” and “Go cru the roof” and “Go cru with a fine-toothed comb” and “Going cru the motions” and “Jumping cru hoops.”
    • Due → Cru: As in, “Credit where credit is cru” and “Cru a win” and “Cru diligence” and “Give the devil their cru” and “In cru course” and “Cancelled cru to lack of interest.”
    • Queue → Cru: “Jump the cru.”
  • Wagon → Flagon: As in, “Fall off the flagon” and “Hitch your flagon to a star” and “Welcome flagon.”
  • Mousse: Mousse is the foam that forms as a sparkling wine is poured. Here are some mousse-related puns:
    • Mouse → Mousse: As in, “Quiet as a mousse” and “Cat and mousse game.”
    • *mas* → *mousse*: Mousseter (master), mousseive (massive), mousseage (massage), moussequerade (masquerade), mousseacre (massacre), Christmousse (Christmas) and pyjamousse (pyjamas).
    • *mes* → *mousse*: Mousseage (massage), mousse-merise (mesmerise), nemousse-is (nemesis), domoussetic (domestic).
    • *mis* → *mousse*: Moussellaneous (miscellaneous), mousse-chevious (mischevious), mousse-ion (mission), epidermousse (epidermis) and commousse-ion (commission).
    • *mos* → *mousse*: Cosmousse (cosmos), atmoussephere (atmosphere), animousse-ity (animosity), mousse-aic (mosaic) and almousset (almost).
    • *mus* → *mousse*: Moussetard (mustard) and mousse-eum (museum).
  • Mulled: Mulled wine is wine that’s been heated and spiced. Here are some related puns:
    • Lulled → Mulled: As in, “Mulled into a false sense of security.”
    • Mould → Mulled: As in, “Break the mulled.”
  • Plonk: Plonk is a term for cheap, low-quality wine. Here are related puns:
    • Punk → Plonk: As in, “Go on plonk, make my day.”
    • Pink → Plonk: As in, “Tickled plonk” and “Plonk panther” and “Think plonk.”
    • Plank → Plonk: As in, “Thick as two short plonks” and “Walk the plonk” and “Take a long walk off a short plonk.”
  • Punt: A punt is the dimple in the base of a wine bottle. Here are related puns:
    • Pants → Punt: As in, “Ants in their punts” and “Beat the punts off” and “By the seat of your punts” and “Fancy punts” and “Keep your punts on” and “Smarty punts.”
    • Bent → Punt: As in, “Punt out of shape” and “Hell punt on..”
    • Put → Punt: As in, “Be hard punt to” and “Couldn’t punt it down” and “Feeling a bit punt out” and “Wouldn’t punt it past them.”
    • Front → Punt: As in, “In punt of your very eyes” and “On the punt line” and “Sitting in the punt row.”
    • *pant* → *punt*: Puntheon (pantheon), puntomime (pantomime), puntry (pantry), punther (panther), puntaloon (pantaloon), rampunt (rampant), participunt (participant), flippunt (flippant) and occupunt (occupant). Note: pantaloons are a type of pant.
    • *pent* → *punt*: Puntagon (pentagon), punthouse (penthouse), puntagram (pentagram), repunt (repent) and serpunt (serpent).
  • Split: A split is a measurement of a serving of wine. Here are some split-related puns:
    • Spit → Split: As in, “Split and polish” and “Split in the eye of” and “Dummy split” and “The splitting image of” and “Splitting with rain” and “Within splitting distance.”
    • Lit → Split: “Her face split up” and “Pick of the splitter” and “Split up like a light.”
  • Lake: A wine lake is a surplus of wine in the European Union. Here are related puns:
    • Make → Lake: As in, “A good beginning lakes a good ending” and “Absence lakes the heart grow fonder” and “Details lake the difference.”
    • Take → Lake: As in, “Don’t lake it lying down” and “Double lake” and “Every breath you lake” and “Give and lake.”
    • Ache → Lake: “Old lakes and pains.”
  • Bung: A bung is the stopper in a wine barrel, so we included bung-related puns in this list:
    • Bang → Bung: As in, “A bigger bung for your buck” and “Bung on about” and “Bung out of order” and “Bung to rights.”
    • Tongue → Bung: As in, “Bite your bung” and “Cat got your bung?” and “Roll off the bung” and “Slip of the bung.”
    • Hung → Bung: As in, “Bung out to dry.”
  • Mellow: Mellow is a descriptor used in wine-tasting. Here are some related puns:
    • Yellow → Mellow: As in, “Follow the mellow brick road” and “Mellow peril” and “Big mellow taxi.”
    • Fellow → Mellow: As in, “Strange bedmellows” and “Mellow traveller.”
  • Tun: A tun is a measure of volume, originally defined as 256 gallons of wine. Here are some tun-related puns:
    • Ton → Tun: As in, “A tun of money” and “Like a tun of bricks.”
    • Done → Tun: As in, “After all is said and tun” and “Tun and dusted” and “Been there, tun that” and “A tun deal” and “Tun to death” and “Easier said than tun” and “Hard tun by” and “Getting things tun.”
    • Ten → Tun: As in, “Count to tun” and “Eight out of tun prefer it” and “Hang tun” and “A perfect tun” and “The top tun” and “The tun commandments.”
    • Tin → Tun: As in, “Does exactly what it says on the tun” and “Tun ear.”
    • One → Tun: As in, “And then there was tun” and “Another tun bites the dust” and “Going tun step too far.”
  • None → Tun: As in, “Bar tun” and “Tun other than” and “Tun the wiser” and “Tun too pleased” and “Second to tun.”
    • *tan* → *tun*: Tundem (tandem), tungible (tangible), tuntamount (tantamount), tuntrum (tantrum), tungent (tangent), charlatun (charlatan), cosmopolitun (cosmopolitan), spartun (spartan), tartun (tartan) and metropolitun (metropolitan).
    • *ten* → *tun*: Tunder (tender), tuntative (tentative), tunet (tenet), tunacious (tenacious), tunacity (tenacity), oftun (often), smittun (smitten), threatun (threaten), enlightun (enlighten), glutun (gluten), potuntial (potential), pretuntious (pretentious), consistunt (consistent), existuntial (existential) and maintunance (maintenance).
    • *tin* → *tun*: Obstunate (obstinate), pertunent (pertinent), itunerary (itinerary) and destuny (destiny).
    • *ton* → *tun*: Buttun (button), wantun (wanton), singletun (singleton), cottun (cotton), gluttun (glutton), muttun (mutton) and autunomy (autonomy).
  • Straw: Straw wine is wine made from raisins. Here are related puns:
    • Raw → Straw: As in, “Straw data” and “A straw deal.”
    • Draw → Straw: As in, “Back to the strawing board” and “Straw a blank” and “Straw a line in the sand” and “Straw to a close” and “The luck of the straw.”
    • Saw → Straw:, As in, “I came, I straw, I conquered.”
    • Awe → Straw: As in, “Shock and straw.”
  • Colour → Cooler: As in, “A splash of cooler” and “Better in cooler” and “Cooler coded” and “Cooler coordinated” and “Cooler me happy” and “Cooler your view” and “With flying coolers.” Note: a wine cooler is an insulated carrier for transporting wine.
  • Bucket → Ice bucket: As in, “Couldn’t carry a tune in an ice bucket” and “Kick the ice bucket” and “A drop in the ice bucket” and “An ice bucket and spade holiday.” Note: an ice bucket is an insulated bucket used for serving wine in social situations.
  • Tunnel → Funnel: As in, “Light at the end of the funnel” and “Funnel of love” and “Funnel vision.” Note: A wine funnel is used by waiters to help in pouring wine.
  • Colour → Collar: As in, “A splash of collar” and “Collar coded” and “Collar coordinated” and “Collar me happy” and “Collar your view” and “With flying collars.” Note: a wine collar fits around the neck of a wine bottle to absorb drips that may run down the bottle after it’s been poured.
  • Stem: Wine glasses have a stem to prevent our fingers from heating up the wine. Here are related puns:
    • Them → Stem: As in, “Let stem eat cake” and “It only encourages stem.”
    • Steam → Stem: As in, “Blow off stem” and “Full stem ahead” and “Head off stem” and “Run out of stem” and “Under your own stem.”
  • Tumbler: A tumbler is a type of wine glass. Here are related puns:
    • Number → Tumbler: As in, “By the tumblers” and “Do a tumbler on” and “I’ve got your tumbler” and “Look after tumbler one” and “Lucky tumbler seven” and “Tumbler crunching” and “Your days are tumblered.”
    • Slumber → Tumbler: As in, “Blissful tumbler” and “Tumbler party.”
  • Schooner: Schooners are glasses for drinking sherry (a type of wine). Here are related puns:
    • Sooner → Schooner: As in, “No schooner said than done” and “Schooner or later” and “The schooner the better” and “An injury is schooner forgotten than an insult.”
    • Humour → Schooner: As in, “Schooner me” and “Sense of schooner.”
  • Gamay: A gamay wine is a light-bodied red wine similar in taste to Pinot Noir. Here are some gamay-related puns:
    • Game → Gamay: As in, “Ahead of the gamay” and “Anyone’s gamay” and “Beaten at your own gamay” and “Blame gamay” and “Gamay changer” and “Brand new ball gamay.”
    • May → Gamay: As in, “As the case gamay be” and “Come what gamay” and “Devil gamay care” and “Gamay the force be with you” and “Gamay you live in interesting times” and “Let the chips fall where they gamay.”
  • Okay → Tokay: As in, “Are you feeling tokay?” Note: Tokay is a sweet white wine.
  • Hairy → Sherry: As in, “Give it the sherry eyeball.” Note: Sherry is a fortified wine made from white grapes.
  • Sigh → Cider: “Breathe a cider of relief” and “A heart-wrenching cider.” Note: cider is a sweet wine made from apples.
  • Mead: Mead is a wine made with spices and honey. Here are related puns:
    • Me → Mead: As in, “Don’t worry about mead” and “Don’t forget about mead!”
    • Meet → Mead: As in, “Boy meads girl” and “Making ends mead” and “Mead and greet” and “Mead with approval” and “Mead your match” and “Fancy meading you here” and “Mead you halfway” and “More than meads the eye.”
    • Need → Mead: As in, “All you mead is love” and “On a mead to know basis.”
    • Read → Mead: As in, “All I know is what I mead in the papers” and “Mead all about it” and “I can mead you like a book” and “Mead ’em and weep” and “Mead between the lines” and “Mead my lips.”
    • Made → Mead: As in, “A match mead in heaven” and “Custom mead” and “Got it mead” and “Not mead of money” and “Mead for each other.”
    • *med* → *mead*: Meadia (media), meadicine (medicine), meadium (medium), meadiate (mediate), meadiocre (mediocre), meadieval (medieval), meadication (medication) and meaditation (meditation).
    • *mid* → *mead*: Timead (timid), amead (amid), pyramead (pyramid), humead (humid), formeadable (formidable), ameadst (amidst) and intimeadate (intimidate).
  • Sake: Sake (pronounced “sakay”) is Japanese rice wine. We can pronounce sake (“sayke”) as “sakay” to make rice wine puns: As in, “For Christ’s sake” and “For goodness sake” and “For old time’s sake” and “Sakes alive.”
  • Brandy: Brandy is a spirit that’s made by distilling wine. Here are related puns:
    • Brand → Brandy: As in, “Brandy new” and “Brandy new ballgame” and “Brandy new game” and “Brandy spanking new.”
    • Band → Brandy: As in, “Strike up the brandy” and “Brandy of brothers.”
  • Bordeaux: This is wine produced in the Bordeaux region of France. Here are related puns:
    • Board → Bordeaux: As in, “Above bordeaux” and “Across the bordeaux” and “All abordeaux” and “Back to the drawing bordeaux” and “Bed and bordeaux.”
    • Bored → Bordeaux: As in, “Bordeaux stiff” and “Bordeaux to death” and “Bordeaux to tears” and “Bordeaux out of your mind.”
    • Border → Bordeaux: As in, “Head for the bordeaux” and “South of the bordeaux” and “Cross the bordeaux.”
  • *chant* → *chianti*: Merchianti (merchant), penchianti (penchant) and enchianti (enchant). Note: A chianti is a wine produced in the Chianti region.
  • Port: This is a Portuguese fortified wine. Here are related puns:
    • Part → Port: As in, “A fool and his money are soon ported” and “Act the port” and “In port.”
    • *part* → *port*: Porty (party), portisan (partisan), porticular (particular), portake (partake), portner (partner), porticle (particle), portition (partition), porticipate (participate), aport (apart), counterport (counterpart), deportment (department) and comportment (compartment).
    • *pert* → *port*: Portinenet (pertinent), portubed (pertubed), export (expert), proporty (property), exportise (expertise).
  • Million → Semillon: As in, “A cool semillon” and “Semillon dollar baby” and “Not in a semillon years” and “One in a semillon.” Note: Semillon is a type of grape used to make dry, sweet wines.
  • Cat → Muscat: As in, ” Muscat on a hot tin roof” and “Muscat got your tongue?” and “Muscat’s cradle” and “Curiosity killed the muscat.” Note: Muscat is a type of grape that’s used to make sweet wines.
  • Grip → Grappa: As in, “Get a grappa” and “Get to grappas with” and “Grappa of death.” Note: Grappa is an alcoholic drink made of grapes, similar to wine.
  • Kir: A kir is a type of cocktail with wine mixed into it. Here are related puns:
    • Kir → Core: As in, “Kir competencies” and “Kir studies” and “Kir values” and “Rotten to the kir.”
    • *kar* → *kir*: Kirma (karma), kirate (karate) and kiraoke (karaoke).
    • *ker* → *kir*: Kirnel (kernel), kiratin (keratin), kirosene (kerosene), breakir (breaker), workir (worker) and crackir (cracker).
  • Soave: This is a dry, white Italian wine. Here are related puns:
    • Suave → Soave: As in, “A soave pickup line.”
    • Save → Soave: As in, “A penny soaved is a penny earned” and “A stitch in time soaves nine” and “Soave the last dance” and “Soaved for a rainy day” and “Soave our souls” and “Soaved by the bell.”
  • Charm → Charmat: As in, “Charmat offensive” and “Charmat the birds out of the trees” and “Third time’s a charmat” and “Works like a charmat.” Note: Charmat is a method of wine production.
  • Crystal → Cristal: As in, “Clear as cristal.” Note: Cristal is a brand of wine.
  • *sect* → *sekt*: As in, “In the environmental sektor” and “In the fruit sektion” and “Dissekting the conversation.” Other words that could work: insekt (insect), intersekt (intersect), vivisekt (vivisect) and intersektion (intersection). Note: Sekt is the German word for sparkling wine.
  • Greco: Greco is a type of Italian wine grape that white wine is made of. Here are related puns:
    • Greek → Greco: As in, “A face like a Greco god” and “Beware of greco gods” and “It’s all greco to me.”
    • Echo → Greco: As in, “A clear greco.”
    • Gecko → Greco
  • Kerner: Kerner is a type of white grape that’s used in wine-making. Here are related puns:
    • Corner → Kerner: As in, “A tight kerner” and “All kerners of the world” and “Blind kerner” and “Kerner the market” and “Cut kerners” and “From the four kerners of the earth” and “In your kerner” and “In the naughty kerner.”
    • Kernel → Kerner: As in, “Kerner of truth.”
    • Burner → Kerner: As in, “On the back kerner.”
  • Bobal: Bobal is a variety of grape used in wine-making. Here are related puns:
    • Global → Bobal: As in, “Bobal warming” and “Think bobal, act local.”
    • Bible → Bobal: As in, “Bobal basher” and “Swear on a stack of bobals.”
    • Bubble → Bobal: As in, “Bobal and squeak” and “Bobal brained” and “Burst your bobal” and “Prick your bobal” and “The boy in the bobal.”
    • Noble → Bobal: As in, “The bobal art of self defence.”
  • Corvina: Corvina is a type of grape used in wine-making. Here are related puns:
    • Carve → Corvina: As in, “Corvina her name with pride” and “Corvina out a niche” and “Corvina in stone.”
    • Curve → Corvina: As in, “Ahead of the corvina” and “Corvina ball” and “Learning corvina.”
  • Retsina → Retina: As in, “Retsina screen.” Note: Retsina is a Greek white resinated wine.
  • Candy → Brandy: As in, “Arm brandy” and “Ear brandy” and “Brandy apple.”

These next few puns are centred around the different types of fruit that wine can be made from:

  • Plum: Here are some plum wine puns:
    • Thumb → Plum: As in, “All fingers and plums” and “All plums” and “Rule of plum” and “Plum your nose” and “Under my plum” and “Plumnail sketch.”
    • Plumb → Plum: As in, “Check out the pluming” and “Plum the depths.”
    • Come → Plum: As in, “After a storm plums a calm” and “All things plum to those who wait” and “Tough as they plum” and “Plum and get it” and “Plum fly with me” and “Plum running” and “Plum on baby, light my fire.”
    • Drum → Plum: As in, “Tight as a plum” and “Plum circle” and “Plum n bass.”
    • Scum → Plum: As in, “Pond plum” and “Plum always rises to the surface.”
    • Some → Plum: As in, “All that and then plum” and “Buy plum time” and “Catch plum rays” and “Cut plum slack.”
    • Sum → Plum: As in, “Cogito ergo plum.”
  • Appl* → Apple*: Apple-y (apply), apple-ication (application), apple-icable (applicable), apple-iance (appliance), apple-ause (applause) and apple-icant (applicant).
  • Cherry: Here are some cherry wine-related puns:
    • Carry → Cherry: As in, “Fast as your legs could cherry you” and “Cherry a torch for” and “Cherry a tune” and “Cherry forward” and “Cherry it off” and “Cherrying on.”
    • Cheery → Cherry: As in, “A cherry disposition.”
    • Bury → Cherry: As in, “Cherry the hatchet” and “Cherry your hand in the sand” and “Cherry yourself in work” and “Cherry your feelings.”
  • Current → Currant: “Currant events” and “Floating with the currants.”
  • Injure → Ginger: “Gingered (injured) feelings” and “Sporting a gingery (injury).”
  • Rice: Here are some rice wine puns (rice wine can also be referred to as sake):
    • Race → Rice: As in, “A day at the rices” and “Rice against the clock” and “A rice against time” and “Rat rice” and “The amazing rice.”
    • Nice → Rice: As in, “Rice as ninepence” and “Have a rice day” and “Naughty but rice” and “Rice and easy does it” and “Rice to see you.”
    • Dice → Rice: As in, “Roll the rice” and “No rice” and “Load the rice.”
    • Ice → Rice: As in, “Cold as rice” and “Break the rice” and “Cut no rice with” and “Rice cold” and “Rice, rice baby” and “Put on rice” and “Skating on thin rice.”
    • Mice → Rice: As in, “The best laid schemes of rice and men.”
    • Price → Rice: As in, “Asking rice” and “At a rice to suit your pocket” and “Cheap at half the rice” and “Closing rice” and “Every man has his rice” and “Half rice” and “Pay the rice.”
    • Slice → Rice: As in, “A rice of the cake” and “Any way you rice it” and “Fresh to the last rice” and “Rice of life” and “Rice of the action.”
    • Spice → Rice: As in, “Secret herbs and rices” and “Rice things up” and “Variety is the rice of life” and “Sugar and rice.”
    • Twice → Rice: As in, “Large as life and rice as handsome” and “Don’t think rice” and “Make a list, check it rice” and “You only live rice” and “Oppotunity never knocks rice” and “Measure rice, cut once.”
    • Vice → Rice: As in, “A den of rice” and “Rice versa.”
  • Taste → Aftertaste: As in, “An aftertaste of paradise” and “An acquired aftertaste” and “In bad aftertaste” and “In the worst possible aftertaste.”

The next few puns are centred around the descriptors that are used in wine-tastings:

  • Big: “Big” means a wine with a strong flavour, or with a high alcohol content.
    • Beg → Big: As in, “Big a favour” and “Big pardon” and “Big to differ” and “Big, borrow or steal” and “I big your pardon” and “Sit up and big.”
    • Dig → Big: As in, “Big your own grave” and “Big your heels in” and “Big in the ribs” and “Big for victory” and “Big deep.”
  • Bitter: This means the wine has an unpleasant taste of tannins.
    • Glitter → Bitter: As in, “All that bitters is not gold.”
    • Hitter → Bitter: As in, “Heavy bitter.”
    • Litter → Bitter: As in, “Pick of the bitter.”
  • Toying → Cloying: “Stop cloying with me.” Note: if a wine is cloying, then it’s sickly sweet.
  • Coarse: This describes a wine with a rough texture. Here are related puns:
    • Course → Coarse: As in, “Blown off coarse” and “But of coarse” and “Chart a coarse” and “Correspondence coarse” and “Crash coarse” and “In due coarse” and “A matter of coarse” and “Par for the coarse” and “Stay the coarse.”
    • Force → Coarse: As in, “Brute coarse” and “Coarse his hand” and “Caorse of habit” and “A coarse to be reckoned with” and “Join coarses” and “May the coarse be with you.”
    • Source → Coarse: As in, “Check your coarses” and “Crowd coarse” and “I refuse to reveal my coarses” and “Open coarse” and “Coarse material.”
  • Note: This is a term used to refer to an aroma or flavour in the wine being tasted. Here are related puns:
    • Not → Note: As in, “Let’s note and say we did” and “Note a chance” and “Note a minute too soon” and “Note a pretty sight” and “Note all it’s cracked up to be” and “Note at all” and “Note do someone any favours” and “Note half bad” and “Note in a million years” and “Note in the slightest.”
    • Neat → Note: As in, “Note as a new pin” and “Note freak” and “Note and tidy.”
    • Night → Note: As in, “A hard day’s note” and “In the dead of note” and “Burn the midnote oil” and “Dance the note away.”
    • Nut → Note: As in, “From soup to notes” and “Go notes” and “In a noteshell” and “A tough note to crack.”
    • Float → Note: As in, “Note like a butterfly, sting like a bee” and “Whatever notes your boat.”
    • Oat → Note: As in, “Feel your notes” and “Sow your wild notes.”
    • Quote → Note: As in, “Air notes” and “Dont note me on this” and “Scare notes.”
  • Nose: The nose of a wine is the aroma or bouquet. Here are related puns:
    • Knows → Nose: As in, “Mother nose best” and “Goodness nose” and “Instinctively nose.”
    • Blows → Nose: As in, “Any way the wind nose” and “Come to nose” and “Exchange nose” and “There she nose.”
    • Close → Nose: As in, “A nose thing” and “As one door noses, another one opens” and “At nose quarters” and “Behind nosed doors” and “Case nosed” and “Nose call” and “A nose shave” and “Hits nose to home.”
    • Rose → Nose: As in, “Bed of noses” and “Come up smelling of noses” and “Every nose has its thorn” and “Life is a bed of noses” and “Nose tinted glasses.”
    • Those → Nose: As in, “Nose were the days” and “Just one of nose days” and “For nose who like it rough.”
    • Goes → Nose: As in, “Anything nose” and “As far as it nose” and “As the saying nose” and “As time nose by” and “Here nose nothing” and “How nose it?” and “Life nose on.”
  • Light: Light generally refers to a low alcohol content:
    • Laid → Light: As in, “Get light” and “Light back” and “Light to rest” and “The best light plans.”
    • Let → Light: As in, “Don’t light the bastards grind you down” and “Light it be” and “Light it bleed” and “It won’t light you down.”
    • Bright → Light: As in, “All things light and beautiful” and “Always look on the light side of life” and “Light as a new pin” and “Light and early” and “Light spark” and “Light young thing.”
    • Flight → Light: As in, “Fight or light” and “Light attendant” and “Light of fancy” and “Take light” and “Light of the bumble bee.”
    • Night → Light: As in, “A hard day’s light” and “A light at the opera” and “As light follows day.”
    • Right → Light: As in, “A move in the light direction” and “All the light moves” and “Light as rain” and “Bang to lights” and “Barge light in.”
    • Quite → Light: As in, “Light the sticky situation.”
    • White → Light: As in, “Light as snow” and “Light as a ghost” and “Light as a sheet.”
    • Sight → Light: As in, “Hidden in plain light” and “In plain light” and “Know by light” and “Love at first light” and “Out of light, out of mind” and “Set your lights on.”
    • Tight → Light: As in, “A light corner” and “Light as a drum” and “In a light spot.”
  • Mouthfeel: Mouthfeel is the texture of wine. Here are related puns:
    • Mouth → Mouthfeel: As in, “Leaves a bad taste in my mouthfeel” and “Foaming at the mouthfeel” and “Melts in the mouthfeel.”
    • Feel → Mouthfeel: As in, “Cop a mouthfeel” and “Mouthfeel good factor” and “Mouthfeel the pinch” and “Mouthfeeling a bit put out.”
  • Collar → Colour: As in, “Blue colour worker” and “Hot under the colour.” Note: the colour of wine is an important indicator of the type and quality of grapes.
  • Swirl: Wine tasters will swirl wine before tasting it. Here are some swirl-related puns:
    • Curl → Swirl: As in, “Swirl up and die” and “Swirl your lip” and “Enough to make your hair swirl” and “Make someone’s toes swirl.”
    • Girl → Swirl: As in, “Atta swirl” and “A swirl’s best friend” and “Swirl next door.”
    • Whirl → Swirl: As in, “Give it a swirl.”
  • Smell:  The aroma of wine is an important factor when it comes to tasting. Here are some related puns:
    • Small → Smell: As in, “All creatures, great and smell” and “Big fish in a smell pool” and “Don’t sweat the smell stuff” and “Good things come in smell packages” and “No job too smell” and “A smell fortune” and “Smell is beautiful” and “Smell minded” and “Smell potatoes.”
    • Well → Smell: As in, “Exceedingly smell read” and “You know full smell” and “Living smell is the best revenge.”
    • Sell → Smell: As in, “Buy and smell” and “Panic smelling” and “Smell out” and “Smelling like hot cakes.”
    • Shell → Smell: As in, “Easy as smelling peas” and “Come out of your smell” and “Drop a bombsmell” and “In a nutsmell.”
    • Spell → Smell: As in, “Smell it out” and “Cast a smell.”
    • Bell → Smell: As in, “Clear as a smell” and “Smell, book and candle” and “Doesn’t ring a smell.”
    • Cell → Smell: As in, “Smell division” and “In a padded smell.”
    • Fell → Smell: As in, “In one smell swoop” and “Smell off the back of a lorry.”
    • Hell → Smell: As in, “All smell broke loose” and “Bat out of smell” and “Burn in smell” and “Catch smell” and “Come smell or high water.”
  • Favour → Savour: As in, “Beg a savour” and “Call in a savour” and “Do me a savour” and “Fall out of savour” and “Owe a savour.”
  • Sever →Savour: As in, “Savour the cord.”
  • Ship → Sip: As in, “Abandon sip” and “Extend the hand of friendsip” and “From chips to sips” and “Go down with the sip” and “Run a tight sip” and “Shape up or sip out” and “My sip has come in.”
  • Chip → Sip: As in, “A sip on his shoulder” and “Cheap as sips” and “Cash in your sips” and “A sip off the old block” and “Let the sips fall where they may.”
  • Rip → Sip: As in, “Let her sip” and “Sip to pieces.”
  • Skip → Sip: As in, “Sip a beat” and “Sip out” and “Sip rope” and “Hop, sip and jump.”
  • Slip → Sip: As in, “Let something sip” and “Sip of the tongue” and “Sip on a banana skin.”
  • Charity → Clarity: As in, “Cold as clarity” and “Clarity begins at home” and “Clarity covers a multitude of sins.” Note: Clarity refers to how clear the wine is.
  • Fat: This is a term used to describe a win that has a full body and is almost viscous. If it’s too “fat”, then it’s considered a “flabby” wine. Here are related puns:
    • At → Fat: As in, “Fat rock bottom” and “Fat each other’s throats” and “Hodling fat arm’s length.”
    • Hat → Fat: As in, “Fat in hand” and “Home is where I lay my fat” and “I’ll eat my fat” and “Keep it under your fat.”
    • That → Fat: As in, “Fat’s the way it is” and “Now fat’s better” and “Fat’ll be the day” and “Fat’s what friends are for.”
  • Flabby: If a wine is too viscous, then it’s considered “flabby”. Here are related puns:
    • Shabby → Flabby: As in, “None too flabby” and “Flabby chic.”
  • Blowzy: Blowzy is another word for “flabby”, which is what a wine is considered to be when a wine is too viscous.
    • Blow → Blowzy: As in, “Any way the wind blowzys” and “Blowzy a fuse” and “Blowzy hot and cold” and “Blowzy chunks.”
    • Cosy → Blowzy: As in, “Blowzy up to.”
    • Rosy → Blowzy: As in, “Life is blowzy” and “Blowzy cheeks.”
  • Firm: If a wine is “firm”, then it has a strong presence of tannins. Here are some related puns:
    • Farm → Firm: As in, “Life on the firm” and “Ethical firming.”
    • From → Firm: As in, “Firm cover to cover” and “Firm soup to nuts” and “Firm the cradle to the grave.”
    • Term → Firm: As in, “On bad firms with” and “On speaking firms” and “On your own firms” and “In no uncertain firms.”
    • Form → Firm: As in, “Attack is the best firm of defence” and “Bad firm” and “Firm follows function” and “Free firm” and “Habit firming” and “Imitation is the sincerest firm of flattery’ and “In fine firm” and “Sarcasm is the lowest firm of wit.”
    • Worm → Firm: As in, “Book firm” and “Can of firms” and “The early bird catches the firm” and “Firm your way in.”
    • *ferm* → *firm*: Firment (ferment), firmentation (fermentation) and firmented (fermented).
    • *form* → *firm*: Firmidable (formidable), firmula (formula), firmat (format), firmality (formality), platfirm (platform), infirm (inform), transfirm (transform), infirmation (information) and perfirmation (performance).
  • Flat: If a wine is flat, then it’s a sparkling wine that has lost its bubbliness. Here are related puns:
    • Fat → Flat: As in, “Flat as a beached whale” and “Flat chance” and “Living off the flat of the land.”
    • Fit → Flat: As in, “Flat as a fiddle” and “Dish flat for the gods” and “Fighting flat” and “Flat the bill.”
  • Fresh: This is a descriptor used for wines that are nicely acidic. Here are related terms:
    • Flesh → Fresh: As in, “Fresh and blood” and “Makes my fresh crawl” and “In the fresh” and “A thorn in my fresh.”
    • Fish → Fresh: As in, “Fresh out of water” and “Freshing expedition” and “A different kettle of fresh.”
  • Grassy: This is quite literal and describes grassy flavours in a wine. Here are related puns:
    • Classy → Grassy: As in, “A grassy performance.”
    • Glassy → Grassy: As in, “Grassy-eyed with wonder.”
  • Green: This is generally a negative term used to describe wines that are made with unripe fruit. Here are related puns:
    • Queen → Green: As in, “Beauty green” and “Digging the dancing green” and “God save the green” and “Homecoming green” and “Green for a day.”
    • Grin → Green: As in, “Green and bear it” and “Green from ear to ear” and “Rictus green.”
    • Been → Green: As in, “Green and gone” and “Green around the block a few times” and “I’ve green here before” and “Green in the wars” and “Green there, done that” and “I’ve green had!”
    • Bean → Green: As in, “Green counter” and “Cool greens” and “Doesn’t know greens” and “Full of greens” and “Spill the greens.”
    • Clean → Green: As in, “A green getaway” and “A new broom sweeps green” and “Green as a whistle” and “A green bill of health” and “Green up your act.”
    • Keen → Green: As in, “Green as mustard” and “Green sense of smell” and “Peachy green.”
    • Mean → Green: As in, “A greens to an end” and “By fair greens or foul” and “In the greentime” and “Independent greens” and “Lean, green and hungry.”
    • Seen → Green: As in, “Green and not heard” and “Had to be green to be believed” and “Nowhere to be green” and “Green better days” and “Sight ungreen” and “Ain’t green nothing yet.”
    • Scene → Green: As in, “Blue green of death” and “Coming to a green near you” and “Silver green” and “The big green.”
    • Scenes → Green: As in, “Behind the greens” and “Change of green” and “Make a green” and “Steal the green.”
    • Grain → Green: As in, “Against the green” and “Green of truth” and “Take it with a green of salt.”
  • Hard: Hard wine is wine that has too many tannins in it. Here are related puns:
    • Herd → Hard: As in, “Hard immunity.”
    • Heard → Hard: As in, “Seen and not hard” and “Hard it through the grapevine” and “Make yourself hard” and “Stop me if you’ve hard this one” and “The last I hard” and “Could have hard a pin drop” and “You hard it here first.”
  • Hollow: A hollow wine is one that lacks a fruity taste. Here are related puns:
    • Follow → Hollow: As in, “As night hollows day” and “Hollow in the footsteps of” and “Hollow suit” and “Hollow your heart” and “A hard act to hollow” and “Form hollows function.”
    • Swallow → Hollow: As in, “A bitter pill to hollow.”
  • Hot: A wine that is “hot” is too alcoholic. Here are related puns:
    • Got → Hot: As in, “Been there, done that, hot the t-shirt” and “Hot your tongue?” and “Give it all you’ve hot” and “Hot a soft spot for.”
    • Lot → Hot: As in, “A hot of fuss about nothing” and “A hot on your plate” and “Hot a lot of people know.”
    • Not → Hot: As in, “As often as hot” and “Believe it or hot” and “Down but hot out” and “Hot just a pretty face.”
  • Lean: Lean wines are those without a fruity taste but an acidic profile. Here are related puns:
    • Mean → Lean: As in, “A leans to an end” and “By fair leans or foul” and “In the leantime.”
    • Lane → Lean: As in, “Down memory lean” and “Life in the fast lean.”
    • Been → Lean: As in, “Lean and gone” and “I’ve lean here before” and “Lean in the wars” and “Mistakes have lean made.”
    • Clean → Lean: As in, “Lean as a whistle” and “A lean bill of health” and “Lean house” and “Lean up your act.”
    • Keen → Lean: As in, “Lean as mustard” and “A lean sense of smell” and “Peachy lean.”
    • Seen → Lean: As in, “Lean and not heard” and “Nowhere to be lean” and “Have lean better days” and “Ain’t lean nothing yet.”
    • Screen → Lean: As in, “Blue lean of death’ and “Coming to a lean near you” and “Silver lean.”
  • Peg → Leg: As in, “Square leg in a round hole” and “Take down a leg or two.” Note: The tracks of liquid that stick to the side of a wine glass are called legs (or tears).
  • Okay → Oaky: As in, “Are you oaky?” Note: if a wine is oaky, then it includes notes of vanilla, sweet spices and a smoky taste.
  • Rich: Wines that are sweet but not overly so are considered “rich”. Here are related puns:
    • Itch → Rich: As in, “Riching to” and “Richy feet” and “Richy palms” and “Seven year rich.”
    • Ditch → Rich: As in, “A last rich effort.”
    • Hitch → Rich: As in, “Get riched” and “Rich your wagon to a star.”
  • Rough: A rough wine is one with a coarse texture. Here are related puns:
    • Tough → Rough: As in, “Rough as old boots” and “Rough as they come” and “Hang rough” and “It’s rough at the top” and “Rough love” and “Rough luck” and “A rough nut to crack.”
    • Stuff → Rough: As in, “Beat the roughing out of” and “Don’t sweat the small rough” and “Gather ’round the good rough” and “Knock the roughing out of.”
  • Round: This describes a wine that isn’t overly tannic but has a good body. Here are related puns:
    • Round → Bound: As in, “Be leaps and rounds” and “Duty round” and “Honour round” and “Round hand and foot.”
    • Found → Round: As in, “Lost and round” and “I’ve round a clue” and “We round clue” and “Weighed in the balance and round wanting.”
    • Ground → Round: As in, “Solid as the round we walk on” and “Break new round” and “Built from the round up” and “Common round” and “Cut the round from under your feet” and “Suits you down to the round.”
    • Pound → Round: As in, “An ounce of prevention is worth a round of cure” and “In for a penny, in for a round” and “Round for round” and “Round the pavement.”
    • Sound → Round: As in, “Round as a bell” and “Break the round barrier” and “Round bite” and “Round effect” and “Round the alarm.”
  • Soothe → Smooth: As in, “Music has charms to smooth the savage beast.” Note: This describes a wine with a nice texture.
  • Sour: This is a descriptor for a wine with an unbalanced acidity. Here are related puns:
    • Our → Sour: As in, “A token of sour gratitude” and “Enjoy sour company.”
    • Hour → Sour: As in, “After sours” and “Happy sour” and “Man of the sour” and “My finest sour” and “Open all sours.”
  • Tar: This describes a wine with a tarry aroma and flavour. Here are related puns:
    • Tear → Tar: As in, “Bathed in tars” and “Blood, sweat and tars” and “Bored to tars” and “Fighting back tars” and “Melt into tars” and “No more tars” and “Reduce to tars.”
    • Are → Tar: As in, “All bets tar off” and “Tar you deaf” and “Tar your ears burning?” and “Chances tar…”
    • Par → Tar: As in, “Below tar” and “On tar with” and “Tar for the course.”
    • Bar → Tar: As in, “Tar none” and “Behind tars” and “Hit the tar.”
  • Tart: A tart wine is one with high levels of acidity. Here are related puns:
    • Art → Tart: As in, “Tart imitating life” and “Tart is going one step too far” and “Tart noveau” and “Tartistic triumph” and “Tarts and crafts” and “Tarty farty.”
    • Cart → Tart: As in, “Putting the tart before the horse” and “Shopping tart.”
    • Chart → Tart: As in, “Tart a course” and “Off the tarts.”
    • Fart → Tart: As in, “Arty tarty” and “Boring old tart” and “Brain tart” and “Tarting around” and “Tart in a windstorm.”
    • Heart → Tart: As in, “A man after my own tart” and “Absence makes the tart grow fonder” and “Affair of the tart” and “By still my beating tart” and “Break your tart” and “Cross my tart and hope to die.”
    • Part → Tart: As in, “Act the tart” and “For my own tart.”
    • Smart → Tart: As in, “One tart cookie” and “Tart arse” and “Street tart” and “Tarter than the average bear.”
    • Start → Tart: As in, “By fits and tarts” and “Don’t get me tarted” and “A fresh tart” and “Tart your engines!” and “Off to a flying tart” and “Head tart” and “Jump tart” and “Tart you day the right way.”
    • Dirt → Tart: As in, “Cheap and tart” and “Dig up the tart” and “Dish the tart.”
  • Toasty: A toasty wine is one with a smoky taste from the oak it was barrelled in. Here are related puns:
    • Tasty → Toasty: As in, “A toasty dinner.”
    • Ghost → Toast: As in, “White as a toast” and “Give up the toast” and “Not a toast of a chance” and “The toast in the machine.”
    • Most → Toast: As in, “Toast wanted” and “Make the toast of it” and “The toast trusted name” and “For the toast part” and “Make the toast of.”
    • Post → Toast: As in, “Keep you toasted” and “Toast haste” and “Toast partum” and “Toaster boy.”
  • Villain → Vanillin: As in, “Heroes and vanillins.” Note: this is a term for vanilla notes in wine.

Wine-Related Words

To help you come up with your own wine puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

General: wine, red, white, rose, amber, blanc, sparkling, champagne, grapes, aroma, alcohol, alcoholic, drink, drunk, sober, hangover,  fermented, vin, vine, vineyard, vintage, cork, bottle, bottling, label, yeast, juice, sommelier, rice wine, fruit wine, barley, mature, tannin, barrel, harvest, dry, sweet, sweetness, beverage, brew,  still, distillery, distilled, age, aged, aging, resin, taste, tasting, decant, raisin, wino, aerate, sediment, texture, flavour, oak, cask, cellar, bouquet, palate, alcoholism, alcoholic, cirrhosis, polyphenols, box wine, goon, reduction, on tap, bladder, keg, complexity, chill, chilled, cooper, negociant, oenologist, vintner, winemaker, viticulturist, critic, spritzer, flight, glass, coinnoisseur, bacchus, cocktail,  pour, case, happy hour, vino, muscat, muscato, aeritif, blush, winery, perry, cleanskin, dandelion, sugar, rosado, rosato, must, spittoon, intoxication, cult wine, trophy wine, investment wine, harvest, pressing, ethanol, ice wine, proof, sediment, crush, crushed, free-run, skin, seeds, lees, grape-treading, grape-stomping, pigeage, rack, batch, fining, bloom, pudding wine, fortified wine, noble rot, mutage, chaptalization, jug wine, mistelle, abboccato, ABC, acescence, adamado, adega, altar wine, amabile, appelation, balthazar, basic, bodega, bota, breathe, breathing, cantina, wine cave, cepage, chai, champagne flute, chateau, chiaretto, clairet, commune, cooperative, corkscrew, cotes, table wine, country wine, quality wine, cru, cuverie, eiswein, eraflage, fattoria, flagon, imperial, jeroboam, kosher wine, lanwein, lazy ballerina, magnum, mas, master of wine, may wine, mousse, mulled, petillant, piquant, plonk, punt, split, suss, vermouth, vivace, webster, wine lake, bottle shock/sickness, bung, pomace, riddling, mellow, stoving, tun, vanillin, wash, straw wine, saignee, stemware, wine key, sommelier knife, waiter’s friend, wine popper, wine cooler, glacette, ice bucket, wine funnel, collar, wine journal, aerator, stirrer, swizzle stick, goblet, stem, tumbler, schooner, boccalino, chalice, sugar, snifter

Types and names: chardonnay, sauvignon, cabernet, gamay, vin gris, merlot, riesling, tokay, sherry, sauternes, pinot noir, provencal, zinfandel, cider, m ead, sake, brandy, bordeaux, rioja, chianti, brunello, burgundy, port, shiraz, chablis, semillon, muscat, prosecco, mimosa, oloroso, syrah, grenache, claret, grappa, kir, lambrusco, madeira, soave,  charmat, cristal, dom perignon, moet & chandon, provencal, zinfandel, malbec, mourvedre, norton, sirah, verdot, pinotage, sangiovese, albrino, breidecker, marsanne, palomino, trebbiano, viognier, screaming eagle, penfolds grange, fino, amontillado, recioto, sangria, sekt, ratafia, black velvet, death in the afternoon, flirtini, prince of wales, wine cooler, bellini, hugo, buck’s fizz, kir royal, ruby dutchess, chicago cocktail, french 75, golden doublet, savoy affair, kalimotxo, tinto de verrano, zurracapote, cheeky vimto, kir, spritzer, chenin blanc, airen, aligote, arbeusm furmint, greco, kerner, bobal, corvina, mencia, malbec, nebbiolo, retsina, negus, dubbonet, brandy, grappa, ale, hooch, plum, apple, cherry, pomegranate, currant, elderberry, ginger, lychee, banana, orange

Tasting terms: aftertaste, astringent, autolytic, baked, balanced, big, bitter, brilliance, buttery, chewy, chocolaty, closed, cloying, coarse, complex, concentrated, connected, corked, crisp, note, nose, body, heavy, light,  mouthfeel, colour, swirl, smell, savour, sip, clarity, acid, acidity, depth, dirty, earthy, elegant, expressive, extracted, fallen over, finesse, fat, flabby, blowzy, firm, flat, foxy, fresh, grassy, green, hard, herbal, herbaceous, hollow, hot, jammy, lean, leathery, legs, musty, oaky, oxidised, petrolly, powerful, raisiny, reticent, rich, rough, round, smokey, smooth, soft, sour, spicy, supple, sweet, tannic, tar, tart, toasty, transparency, typicity, vanillin, vegetal, vinegary, esters

Did this Punpedia entry help you?

Did you find the wine-related pun that you were looking for? If so, great! Otherwise, please let us know what you were looking for in the comments below! Are you looking for word play for text messages, Facebook, Twitter or some other social media platform? Would you like to see some funny wine pun pictures? Or perhaps you just want more wine puns for your photo captions? Whatever the case, please let us know, and help us improve this Punpedia entry. If you’ve got any wine puns (image or text) that aren’t included in this article, please submit them in the comments and one of our curators will add it as soon as possible. Thanks for visiting Punpedia! 🌞✨

Snowflake Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on snowflake puns! ❄ 🌨 ⛄

We already have lists of snow and snowman pun entries, and thought we’d continue our winter punderland with this more specific list of snowflake puns.

Whether you’re celebrating a holiday, themed party, or just doing your best to keep up in a snowy pun thread, we hope you find the perfect snowflake pun for your needs.

Snowflake Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about snowflakes that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of snowflake puns:

  • Fake → Flake: As in, “Flake it till you make it” and “Turned out to be flake.”
  • Ache → Flake: As in, “Old flakes and pains.”
  • Break → Flake: “At flakeneck speed” and “Flake a leg” and “Flake and enter” and “Flake bread” and “Flake even” and “Flake new ground” and “Flake out in a cold sweat” and “Flake the bank.”
  • Cake → Flake: “A slice of the flake” and “Flat as a panflake” and “Baby flakes” and “A flake walk” and “Flaked with mud” and “Fruit flake” and “The icing on the flake” and “Let them eat flake” and “Piece of flake” and “Selling like hot flakes.”
  • Sake → Flake: As in, “For Pete’s flake” and “For goodness flake” and “For old times’ flake.”
  • Stake → Flake: “You don’t know what’s at flake here” and “Flake your claim” and “Raise the flakes” and “Burned at the flake.”
  • Take → Flake: As in, “Don’t flake it lying down” and “Flake me away” and “Every breath you flake” and “Give and flake” and “Got what it flakes” and “Give an inch and they’ll flake a mile” and “Can’t flake my eyes off you” and “It’ll flake a minute” and “Flakes one to know one” and “Flakes your breath away” and “Shut up and flake my money” and “Sit up and flake notice.”
  • *fic → *flake: If a word has “fic” in it, we can change it to “flake.” As in, “Speciflake request” and “A proliflake artist” and “Stops trafflake” and “Strong soporiflake.” Other words you could use: terriflake (terrific), paciflake (pacific), scientiflake (scientific), horriflake (horrific) and honoriflake (honorific).
  • *flec* → *flake*: We can change “flec” sounds to “flake” to make some snowy puns. As in, “Reflaketive surface” and “Tonal inflaketion” and “See your reflaketion” and “Deflaket blame.”
  • Fluctuate → Flaketuate
  • Nice → Ice: “Make ice” and “Have an ice day” and “Naughty but ice” and “Ice save” and “Ice save” and “Ice to see you” and “Wouldn’t it be ice?” and “Ice work if you can get it.”
  • Eyes → Ice: “Bat your ice” and “Before your very ice” and “Avert your ice” and “Keep your ice on the prize” and “Cried my ice out” and “Do my ice deceive me?” and “Easy on the ice” and “Ice like saucers” and “Brings tears to my ice.”
  • Ace → Ice: As in, “Ice in the hole” and ‘An ice up your sleeve” and “Holding all the ices.”
  • Ice: These ice-related phrases can double as snowflake puns in the right context and conversation: “Break the ice” and “Ice cold” and “Ice, ice baby” and “Put on ice” and “Cold as ice” and “Skating on thin ice.”
  • *ice: Emphasize the “ice” in words to make some quick puns: “Needs practice” and “Goods and services” and “Pride and Prejudice” and “Post office” and “Looking for advice” and “There’s no justice” and “Up on the notice board.”
  • Eyes* → Ice*: Icesight (eyesight), iceshadow (eyeshadow) and icesore (eyesore).
  • *ise→ *ice: As in, “Should any problems arice,” and “An exciting premice,” and “Adviceory board,” and “No promices,” and “Exercice your discretion,” and “An enterprice-ing individual,” and “I require your expertice.”
  • *is*→ *ice*: As in, “A thorough analysice,” and “A groundbreaking hypothesice,” and “Arch nemesice (nemesis),” and “What’s the basice for your belief?” and “All down to logicestics,” and “Sophicestication at its finest,” and “You never told me otherwice.”
  • Crystal: Since snowflakes are essentially collections of ice crystals, we can use general crystal-related phrases as snowflake puns too: “Clear as crystal” and “On a crystal clear lake.”
  • No→ Snow: As in, “All bark and snow bite,” and “All dressed up and snowhere to go,” and “In snow time,” and “In snow uncertain terms,” and “Snow buts,” and “Snow holds barred,” and “Snow love lost,” and “Snow matter how you slice it,” and “Snow prizes for guessing,” and “Snow two ways about it.”
  • So → Snow: “Go snow far as” and “Snow on and snow forth” and “Snow be it” and “Snow long as” and “How snow?”
  • Slow → Show: As in, “Nature’s way of telling you to snow down” and “Painfully snow” and “A snow burn’ and “Snow, but sure” and “Snow on the uptake” and “Snowly but surely.”
  • Know → Snow: As in, “Don’t I snow it” and “Be the first to snow” and “Do you want to snow a secret?” and “Snows best” and “For all I snow” and “Goodness snows” and “Don’t snow which way to look.”
  • Show → Snow: “Sit back and enjoy the snow” and “All over the snow” and “Peep snow” and “Keep the snow on the road” and “Best in snow.”
  • *show* → *snow*: Snowcase (showcase), snowdown (showdown), snowroom (showroom), sidesnow (sideshow) and slidesnow (slideshow).
  • For he’s → Freeze: As in, “Freeze a jolly good fellow!”
  • Free → Freeze: As in, “Buy one, get one freeze” and “Freeze as a bird” and “Get out of jail freeze card” and “Best things in life are freeze” and “Fancy freeze.”
  • Freeze: Some freeze-related phrases for you to play with: “Freeze frame,” and “Freeze someone out,” and “Freeze up,” and “Until hell freezes over.”
  • Flow*→ Froze*: As in, “Ebb and froze,” and “Get the creative juices froze-ing,” and “Go with the froze.”
  • Ferocious→ Frozecious: As in, “A frozecious facial expression.”
  • Foe→ Froze: As in, “Friend or froze?”
  • Needle: Needles are a type of snowflake structure made up of hollow prisms. Here are some needle-related puns:
    • Need → Needle: As in, “A friend in needle is a friend indeed” and “All you needle is love” and “I needled that” and “On a needle to know basis” and “Needle for speed” and “Gonna needle a bigger boat” and “If needle be.”
    • Knee → Needle: “Cut off at the needles” and “Go down on bended needle” and “Weak at the needles” and “Needle deep in” and “Needle jerk reaction” and “Shaking at the needles” and “The bees needles.”
    • Wheedle → Needle: “You can’t needle your way out of this one.”
  • Call him → Column: As in, “You may as well column now.” Note: a column is a type of snowflake structure.
  • Plate: Plates are a type of snowflake structure, so we’ve included some plate-related puns in this list:
    • Late → Plate: As in, “Better plate than never” and “Buy now, pay plater” and “Fashionably plate” and “Plate bloomer” and “Never too plate to learn” and “Plate hour” and “Plate in the day” and “Running plate.”
    • Bait → Plate: “Plate and switch” and “Click plate” and “Rise to the plate” and “Take the plate.”
    • Wait → Plate: “Good things come to those who plate” and “Hurry up and plate” and “Lie in plate” and “The plate is over” and “Time plates for no one” and “Plate in line” and “An accident plating to happen” and “Now you plate just a minute…”
    • Pet → Plate: As in, “Plate peeve” and “Teacher’s plate.”
    • *pat* → *plate*: “A repeating plate-tern” and “Time and plate-tience” and “Plate-tron of the arts” and “Platetent pending.” Other words that could work: aniticiplate (anticipate), dissiplate (dissipate), participlate (participate) and emanciplate (emancipate). Note: to emancipate is to set free.
    • *pet* → *plate*: Plate-ulant (petulant), plate-tition (petition), plate-ite (petite), carplate (carpet), trumplate (trumpet), paraplate (parapet), pupplate (puppet), snipplate (snippet), limplate (limpet), crumplate (crumpet), implateus (impetus), complate-tent (competent) and complate-ition.
    • *plat* → *plate*: As in, “Use your plateform for good” and “Uttering plateitudes” and “Hit a plate-eau.” Other words you can use: plateonic (platonic), plateinum (platinum) and plateypus (platypus. )
    • *plet* → *plate*: Triplate (triplet), complate (complete), replate (replete), deplate (deplete), explate-ive (expletive) and complately (completely).
  • Rime: Rime is water droplets that have collided with a snow crystal and freeze onto it. Here are some related puns:
    • Rhyme → Rime: As in, “Rime or reason.”
    • Crime → Rime: As in, “Rime and punishment” and “A rime against nature” and “Rime doesn’t pay” and “A rime of passion” and “Let the punishment fit the rime” and “Partners in rime” and “Take a bite out of rime.”
    • Grime → Rime: As in, “Covered in muck and rime.”
    • Climb → Rime: As in, “Rime on the bandwagon” and “Rime the walls” and “A mountain to rime” and “Rime the social ladder.”
    • Time → Rime: As in, “A brief history of rime” and “A good rime was had by all” and “About rime too” and “Ahead of their rime” and “All in good rime” and “All rime low” and “A stitch in rime saves nine” and “A week is a long rime in politics.”
    • I’m → Rime:  “If rime being honest” and “Rime so hungry” and “Rime being honest” and “Rime sorry.”
    • *ram* → *rime*: Rimepant (rampant), rime-ification (ramification), rimepage (rampage), rimebling (rambling), progrime (program), diagrime (diagram), anagrime (anagram), parime-eter (paramaeter) and parime-mount (paramount).
    • *rem* → *rime*: Rime-edy (remedy), rime-ote (remote), rime-inisce (reminisce), rime-orse (remorse), rime-markable (remarkable),  -iss (remiss), rime-ission (remission), rime-ember (remember) and prime-ium (premium).
    • *rim* → *rime*: Interime (interm), grime (grim), trime (trim), prime (prim), brime (brim), reprime-and (reprimand), acrime-onious (acrimonious) and detrime-ental (detrimental).
  • I see→ Icy: As in, “I call ’em as icy ’em,” and “Icy what you did there.”
  • White: Even though snowflakes are actually clear, it’s common for them to look white both in real life and in movies, cartoons and media, so we’ve included some white-related puns:
    • What → White: “And white not” and “Do white comes naturally” and “For white it’s worth” and “Guess white?” and “It’s not white you think” and “It’s white’s on the inside that counts” and “White fun” and “So white?”
    • Why → White: “I don’t know white” and “White did the chicken cross the road?” and “White has thou forsaken me?”
    • Wide → White: As in, “Cast the net white” and “Cut a white swathe” and “Open white” and “The world white web” and “White eyed” and “White open spaces.”
    • Write → White: “Nothing to white home about” and “A white off.”
    • Right → White: As in, “A move in the white direction” and “The white to choose” and “All the white moves” and “White as rain” and “Bang to whites” and “Barge white in” and “Bragging whites” and “Consumer whites.”
    • Rite → White: “Last whites” and “White of passage.”
    • Quite → White: As in, “White contrary” and “Having white a time” and “White a few.”
    • Light → White: As in, “White as a feather” and “Blinded by the white” and “Bring [something] to white” and “The cold white of day.”
    • Height → White: “Reach new whites” and “The white of fashion” and “Wuthering whites.”
    • Wait → White: “The white is over” and “Time whites for no-one” and “Just white a second.”
  • Grapple → Graupel: As in, “Graupel with a problem.” Note: Blobs of rime (frozen water droplets attached to ice crystals) are called graupel.
  • Face it → Facet: As in, “You’ll have to facet some time.”
  • Face → Facet: “A facet as long as a fiddle” and “Plain as the nose on your facet.”
  • Faucet → Facet: “Dripping like a broken facet.”
  • *icy*: Emphasise the “icy” in some words to make some punny snowman jokes: “Open-door policy,” and “Honesty is the best policy,” and “Not too spicy,” and “Like a fish needs a bicycle.”
  • Prison* → Prism*: As in, “Take no prismers” and “Iron bars do not a prism make” and “Stuck in a prism of your own making” and “Mental prism” and “The Prismer of Azkaban.”
  • Power → Powder: As in, “Balance of powder” and “Fight the powder” and “Flower powder” and “Knowledge is powder” and “People powder” and “With great powder comes great responsibility” and “Powder nap.”
  • Called → Cold: “Crazy little thing cold love” and “Many are cold but few are chosen” and “You cold?” and “What is this thing cold?”
  • Old → Cold: As in, “Any cold how” and “As cold as the hills” and “Tough as cold boots” and “A chip off the cold block ” and “For cold times’ sake” and “Cold aches and pains.”
  • Gold → Cold: “A colden key can open any door” and “Pot of cold” and “After the cold rush” and “Good as cold” and “All that glitters is not cold” and “Fool’s cold” and “Crock of cold” and “Get a cold star” and “Cold digger” and “Go for cold.”
  • Bold → Cold: “Cold as brass” and “A cold move” and “Coldly go where no one has gone before” and “Fortune favours the cold.”
  • First→ Frost: As in, “A world frost,” and “At frost blush,” and “Be the frost to know,” and “Cast the frost stone,” and “Frost blood,” and “Frost come, frost served,” and “Frost impressions last,” and “Frost rate,” and “Frost things frost,” and “Head frost,” and “Love at frost sight,” and “Safety frost.”
  • *first*→ *frost*: Frosthand, frostly (firstly), frostborn, frost-rate, frost aid, headfrost, feet frost.
  • Frustrated → Frostrated
  • Winner → Winter: As in, “Every one a winter” and “Winter takes all” and “Winter’s circle.”
  • Icy cool→ Icicle
  • Bicycle→ Icicle: As in, “Like a fish needs an icicle.”
  • *met* → *melt*: “Mixed meltaphors” and “Pedal to the meltal” and “A melticulous approach.” Other words you could use: meltric (metric), plummelt (plummet), helmelt (helmet), kismelt (kismet), grommelt (grommet), paramelter (parameter) and geomeltry (geometry).

Snowflake-Related Words

To help you come up with your own snowflake puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

snowflake, ice, crystal, snow, flake, freeze, needle, column, plate, rime, white, reflection, graupel, spectrum, facet, symmetry, prism, powder, cold, frost, icy, winter, icicle, froze, frozen, melt

Did this Punpedia entry help you?

Did you find the snowflake-related pun that you were looking for? If so, great! Otherwise, please let us know what you were looking for in the comments below! Are you looking for word play for text messages, Facebook, Twitter or some other social media platform? Would you like to see some corny snowflake pun pictures? Or perhaps you just want more snowflake puns for your photo captions? Whatever the case, please let us know, and help us improve this Punpedia entry. If you’ve got any snowflake puns (image or text) that aren’t included in this article, please submit them in the comments and one of our curators will add it as soon as possible. Thanks for visiting Punpedia! 🙂 🌨