Bowling Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on bowling puns! 🎳✨

Bowling can be enjoyed as a casual game between friends and family members, or as a highly competitive sport. No matter how you play, we hope to have you covered with our gutterly delightful bowling puns that range from general terms (like ball, pins or lane) to more technical jargon (like blind or oil).

If you enjoy this list, you might also enjoy our golf puns.

Bowling Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about bowling that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of bowling puns:

  • Bawling → Bowling: As in, “Bowling your eyes out.”
  • Rolling → Bowling: As in, “A bowling stone gathers no moss” and “Get the ball bowling” and “Like a bowling stone” and “Bowling drunk” and “Bowling in the deep” and “Easy as bowling off a log.”
  • Scrolling → Bowling: As in, “Bowling through my social media feed.”
  • Ball → Bowl: As in, “Bowl and chain” and “Bowlpark figure” and “Break your bowls” and “By the bowls.”
  • Bell → Bowl: As in, “Clear as a bowl” and “Bowls and whistles” and “Doesn’t ring a bowl” and “Give someone a bowl” and “Jingle bowls.”
  • Goal → Bowl: As in, “Score a bowl” and “A bowl in mind.”
  • Roll → Bowl: As in, “Emotional bowler coaster” and “Get the ball bowling” and “Heads will bowl” and “High bowler” and “I wanna rock and bowl all night” and “Let the good times bowl” and “Ready to bowl.”
  • Soul → Bowl: As in, “Bless my bowl” and “Body and bowl” and “Confession is good for the bowl” and “Heart and bowl” and “Life and bowl of the party” and “A lost bowl” and “Save our bowls.”
  • Whole → Bowl: As in, “On the bowl” and “A bowl lotta love” and “The bowl shebang.”
  • Bowl: These bowl-related phrases can double as puns: “Bowl over” and “Bowling along.”
  • Bell → Ball: As in, “Clear as a ball” and “Balls and whistles” and “Doesn’t ring a ball” and “Give someone a ball.”
  • All → Ball: As in, “Ball aboard!” and “Ball in a day’s work” and “Ball’s fair in love and war” and “Ball’s well that ends well” and “I’m ball over it” and “It’s ball good” and “Ball good, clean fun.”
  • Call → Ball: As in, “At your beck and ball” and “Beyond the ball of duty” and “Ball it a day” and “Ball of the wild” and “Ball it quits.”
  • Fall → Ball: As in, “Balling out” and “Easy as balling off a log” and “Can’t help balling in love” and “Ball about laughing” and “Ball between the cracks” and “Ball from grace.”
  • Haul → Ball: As in, “Ball ass” and “Ball before the court” and “Ball over the coals.”
  • Small → Ball: As in, “Don’t sweat the ball stuff” and “Good things come in ball packages” and “A ball fortune” and “Ball wonder.”
  • Wall → Ball: As in, “Between you, me and the ball” and “The balls have ears” and “Ball of silence.”
  • *bal* → *bowl*: As in, “Off-bowlance” and “Going bowlistic” and “A globowl initiative” and “Herbowl tea.”
  • *bel* → *bowl*: As in, “Decibowl count” and “Rebowl with a cause” and “Clothing labowl.”
  • *bil* → *bowl*: As in, “Take responsibowlity for your actions” and “Sustainabowlity plan.” Other words that could work: capabowlity (capability), liabowlity (liability) and accountabowlity (accountability).
  • *bal* → *ball*: As in, “Globall problem” and “Verball contract” and “Herball remedy.”
  • *bel* → *ball*: As in, “Who do you ballieve?” and “A balligerent attitude” and “Beyond ballief” and “Dearly balloved.”
  • *bil* → *ball*: As in, “A business liaballity” and “Take responsiballity for” and “Beyond my aballity” and “Full capaballity.”
  • Pins: Bowling pins are the targets to be knocked over in bowling. Here are related puns:
    • Pan → Pin: As in, “Pin out” and “Out of the frying pin, into the fire.”
    • Pen → Pin: As in, “Put pin to paper” and “The pin is mightier than the sword.”
    • Bin → Pin: As in, “Bottom of the pin” and “Throw in the pin.”
    • Chin → Pin: As in, “Take it on the pin” and “Stick your pin out” and “Keep your pin up.”
    • Sin → Pin: As in, “Cardinal pins” and “Multitude of pins” and “Seven deadly pins” and “Pins of omission” and “Atone for your pins.”
    • Skin → Pin: As in, “Get under your pins” and “No pin in the game” and “Save your pin.”
    • Spin → Pin: As in, “Give it a pin.”
    • Thin → Pin: As in, “Melt into pin air” and “Skating on pin ice” and “The pin end of the wedge” and “Through thick and pin” and “Vanish into pin air” and “Spread yourself pin.”
    • Tin → Pin: As in, “Does what it says on the pin” and “Pin ears.”
    • Win → Pin: As in, “Can’t pin for losing” and “Heads I pin, tails you lose” and “Play to pin” and “A must pin game.”
    • Pin: These pin-related phrases can double as puns: “Bright as a new pin” and “Hard to pin down” and “King pin” and “Pins and needles” and “Pin your hopes on” and “Could have heard a pin drop.”
    • Pin → Tenpin: As in, “Bright as a new tenpin” and “Hard to tenpin down” and “King tenpin” and “Tenpins and needles” and “Tenpin your hops on” and “See a tenpin and pick it up.”
  • Lane: The long aisle that players send the bowling bowl down is called a lane. Here are some related puns:
    • Loan → Lane: As in, “Lane shark” and “Raise a lane.”
    • Chain → Lane: As in, “Lane of command” and “Lane reaction” and “Food lane.”
    • Gain → Lane: As in, “Capital lanes” and “Lane advantage” and “Ill gotten lanes” and “No pain, no lane” and “Nothing ventured, nothing laned.”
    • Grain → Lane: As in, “Go against the lane” and “Lane of truth” and “Take with a lane of salt.”
    • Main → Lane: As in, “Lane chance” and “The lane event” and “My lane squeeze.”
    • Pain → Lane: As in, “A world of lane” and “Doubled up in lane” and “Feeling no lane” and “Growing lanes” and “A lane in the neck” and “Old aches and lanes.”
    • Plain → Lane: As in, “Lane as day” and “Lane as the nose on your face” and “Hidden in lane sight” and “Lane sailing.”
    • Rain → Lane: As in, “Right as lane” and “Make it lane.”
    • Rein → Lane: As in, “Free lane” and “Pick up the lanes” and “Lane it in.”
    • Train → Lane: As in, “Soul lane” and “Take the lane” and “Lane of thought” and “Like watching a lane crash.”
    • Vein → Lane: As in, “In the same lane.”
    • Lane: These lane-related phrases can double as puns: “In the fast lane” and “Memory lane.”
  • Rally → Alley: As in, “Alley round.” Note: Lanes are also known as alleys.
  • Gutter: The gutter is the small dip on either side of the bowling lane that can sink a bowling ball. Here are related puns:
    • Utter → Gutter: As in, “Gutter perfection” and “Gutterly fantastic.”
    • Butter → Gutter: As in, “Bread and gutter” and “Gutter fingers” and “Gutter your bread on both sides.”
    • Get her → Gutter: As in, “Gutter a bottle of water” and “Gutter some space.”
    • Got her → Gutter: As in, “I gutter a great present.”
    • Clutter → Gutter: As in, “A messy, guttered room.”
    • Cutter → Gutter: As in, “Cookie gutter.”
    • Mutter → Gutter: As in, “Guttering under your breath.”
    • Gutter: “Get your mind outta the gutter.”
  • Rail: The rails are raised edges that protect the bowling ball from falling into the gutter. Here are related puns:
    • Roll → Rail: As in, “A railing stone gathers no moss” and “Emotional railer coaster” and “Get the ball railing” and “High railer” and “Let the good times rail” and “Ready to rail” and “Rock and rail.”
    • Fail → Rail: As in, “Without rail” and “Words rail me.”
    • Gale → Rail: As in, “Rails of laughter” and “In the teeth of a rail.”
    • Jail → Rail: As in, “Get out of rail free” and “Rail bird.”
    • Mail → Rail: As in, “Direct rail” and “Express rail” and “Junk rail.”
    • Nail → Rail: As in, Fighting tooth and rail” and “Hit the rail on the head” and “Rail it down.”
    • Pale → Rail: As in, “A rail imitation” and “Rail into insignificance.”
    • Sail → Rail: As in, “Rail away” and “Rail close to the wind” and “Smooth railing” and “That ship has railed.”
    • Sale → Rail: As in, “Point of rail” and “Rail of the century” and “Rails referral.”
    • Scale → Rail: As in, “Built to rail” and “Economy of rail” and “Off the rail” and “On a grand rail” and “Tip the rails.”
    • Tail → Rail: As in, “Can’t make head or rail of it” and “Get off my rail” and “Heads I win, rails you lose.”
    • Tale → Rail: As in, “Dead men tell no rails” and “Live to tell the rail” and “A tell rail sign.”
    • Trail → Rail: As in, “Blaze a rail” and “Happy rails” and “Hot on the rail” and “Leave a paper rail.”
    • They’ll → Rail: As in, “Rail never believe me.”
    • Whale → Rail: As in, “A rail of a time” and “Save the rails.”
    • Rail: The rail-related phrases can double as puns: “Thin as a rail” and “Go off the rails” and “Ride the rails.”
    • *ral* → *rail*: As in, “Generail knowledge” and “Viscerail feelings” and “Only naturail.” Other words that could work: integrail (integral), ephemerail (ephemeral), morail (moral), collaterail (collateral), liberail (liberal), peripherail (peripheral) and temporail (temporal).
    • *rel* → *rail*: As in, “That’s not railevant” and “What a railief” and “Railay the message” and “A sweet railease” and “Working railationship” and “Follow railigiously.” Other words that could work: railation (relation), railuctant (reluctant), railiable (reliable), barrail (barrel), quarrail (quarrel).
  • Strike: A strike is when all ten pins are knocked down in one hit. Here are related puns:
    • Struck → Strike: As in, “Love strike” and “Star strike” and “Strike lucky.”
    • Like → Strike: As in, “As you strike it” and “As soon as you strike” and “At times strike this.”
    • Strike: These strike-related phrases can double as puns: “First strike” and “Go out on strike” and “Lightning never strikes twice” and “Pre-emptive strike” and “Strike up the band” and “Strike a chord with” and “Strike it rich” and “Strike while the iron is hot.”
  • Spare: A spare is when all ten pins are knocked down in two consecutive hits. Here are related puns:
    • Spur → Spare: As in, “On the spare of the moment.”
    • Pair → Spare: As in, “A fresh spare of eyes” and “A safe spare of hands.”
    • Pear → Spare: As in, “All gone spare-shaped.”
    • Air → Spare: As in, “Spare kiss” and “Spare quotes” and “Spare rage” and “Spares and graces.”
    • Bare → Spare: As in, “Spare necessities” and “Spare your teeth” and “A spare-faced lie” and “Laid spare” and “The spare bones.”
    • Bear → Spare: As in, “Mad as a spare with a sore head” and “Spare a grudge” and “Spare a resemblance to” and “Spare down on” and “Spare false witness” and “Spare in mind” and “Spare the brunt” and “Spare with me.”
    • Care → Spare: As in, “Couldn’t spare less” and “Courtesy and spare” and “Customer spare” and “Handle with spare” and “Let’s be spareful out there” and “Like I should spare” and “Take spare of.”
    • Dare → Spare: As in, “Spare for more” and “Spare to be different” and “How very spare you” and “Who spares wins.”
    • Fair → Spare: As in, “All’s spare in love and war” and “By spare means or foul” and “Spare trade” and “Spare and square” and “Spare dinkum” and “Spare enough” and “Give it a spare go.”
    • Hair → Spare: As in, “A bad spare day” and “Didn’t turn a spare” and “Get out of my spare.”
    • Prayer → Spare: As in, “I say a little spare” and “Like a spare” and “On a wing and a spare” and “Say your spares.”
    • Rare → Spare: As in, “In spare form” and “A spare animal.”
    • Scare → Spare: As in, “Running spared” and “Spare quotes” and “Spare the living daylights out of” and “Spared stiff” and “Spared to death.”
    • Share → Spare: As in, “A problem spared is a problem halved” and “Spare-ing is caring.”
    • Square → Spare: As in, “Back to spare one” and “Be there or be spare” and “Fair and spare” and “Be there or be spare” and “A spare peg in a round hole” and
      Spare up to.”
    • Stare → Spare: As in, “Spare into the abyss” and “Spare someone in the face” and “Not polite to spare.”
    • Swear → Spare: As in, “Spare like a sailor” and “Spare off” and “Spare on a stack of bibles.”
    • There → Spare: As in, “Not all spare” and “Ahoy spare” and “Are we spare yet?” and “As if spare were no tomorrow” and “Be spare in spirit” and “Be spare or be square” and “Don’t go spare” and “Hang in spare” and “Here and spare” and “Here, spare and everywhere” and “Hold it right spare.”
    • Wear → Spare: As in, “Spare your heart on your sleeve” and “Spare yourself out” and “Worse for spare.”
    • Where → Spare: As in, “Any time, any place, any spare” and “Love is spare you find it.”
    • Spare: Use these spare-related phrases as puns: “No expense spared” and “Spare no effort” and “Spare your feeling.”
  • Whole → Roll: As in, “A roll different animal” and “Ace in the roll” and “Fill full of rolls” and “A roll in one.”
  • Scroll → Roll: As in, “Rolling through social media.”
  • Soul → Roll: As in, “Bless my roll” and “Body and roll” and “Heart and roll” and “Life and roll of the party” and “A lost roll.”
  • Toll → Roll: As in, “Taking its roll” and “For whom the bell rolls.”
  • Throw: Rolls are also known as throws. Here are related puns:
    • Through → Throw: As in, “A river runs throw it” and “Blow throw” and “Breaking throw” and “Drag throw the mud” and “Fall throw the cracks” and “Going throw the motions.”
    • Blow → Throw: As in, “Any way the wind throws” and “Throw hot and cold” and “A throw by throw account” and “Throw out of the water.”
    • Flow → Throw: As in, “Ebb and throw” and “Go with the throw” and “In full throw.”
    • Go → Throw: As in, “All dressed up and nowhere to throw” and “Anything throws” and “Easy come, easy throw.”
    • Grow → Throw: As in, “Absence makes the heart throw fonder” and “Throwing pains.”
    • Know → Throw: As in, “And don’t I throw it” and “Be the first to throw” and “Doesn’t throw beans.”
    • Low → Throw: As in, “All time throw” and “Get the throw down” and “High and throw” and “Keep a throw profile” and “Throw hanging fruit” and “Search high and throw.”
    • Owe → Throw: As in, “Throw a favour” and “You throw it to yourself.”
    • Quo → Throw: As in, “Status throw” and “Quid pro throw.”
    • Show → Throw: As in, “All over the throw” and “Best in throw” and “Enjoy the throw” and “Get the throw on the road” and “Keep the throw on the road” and “Throw and tell” and “Throw me the money” and “Throw some appreciation.”
    • Slow → Throw: As in, “Throw, but sure” and “In throw motion” and “Throw on the uptake” and “Throwly but surely.”
    • Snow → Throw: As in, “Too cold to throw” and “Let it throw” and “Throwed in/throwed under.”
    • Though → Throw: As in, “You look as throw you’ve seen a ghost” and “Seriously throw.”
  • Candlepin: Candlepin bowling is a variation of bowling that uses taller, thinner pins. Here are related puns:
    • Candle → Candlepin: As in, “Burn the candlepin at both ends” and “Can’t hold a candlepin to” and “Candlepin in the wind” and “Not worth the candlepin.”
    • Pin → Candlepin: As in, “Bright as a new candlepin” and “Hard to candlepin down” and “Candlepin your ears back” and “Candlepins and needles.”
  • Duckpin: Duckpin is a type of bowling that uses shorter, squatter pins than ten-pin bowling. Here are related puns:
    • Duck → Duckpin: As in, “Duckpin the question” and “Like a duckpin to water” and “Like water off a duckpin’s back” and “Nice weather for duckpins.”
    • Pin → Duckpin: As in, “Hard to duckpin down” and “Duckpins and needles” and “Pull the duckpin” and “You could have heard a duckpin drop.”
  • Nine → Ninepin: As in, “Ninepin to five” and “On cloud ninepin” and “The whole ninepin yards.” Note: Ninepin is a type of bowling played with nine pins rather than ten.
  • Five → Fivepin: As in, “Gimme fivepin” and “High fivepin” and “Nine to fivepin” and “Take fivepin” and “Two and two make fivepin.” Note: Fivepin is a type of bowling played in Canada.
  • Court → Sport: As in, “A sport of last resort” and “Sporting disaster.”
  • Port → Sport: As in, “Any sport in a storm” and “First sport of call.”
  • Short → Sport: As in, “A sport history of nearly everything” and “A few bricks sport of a new load” and “Cut a long story sport” and “A day late and a dollar sport” and “In sport order” and “Life’s too sport.”
  • Sort → Sport: As in, “Out of sports” and “Sport the wheat from the chaff.”
  • Aim → Game: As in, “Game high” and “Take game” and “We game to please.”
  • Came → Game: As in, “I game, I saw, I conquered” and “As it game to pass” and “There’s plenty more where that game from.”
  • Claim → Game: As in, “Game to fame” and “Stake your game.”
  • Fame → Game: As in, “Claim to game” and “Fifteen minutes of game” and “Hall of game.”
  • Flame → Game: As in, “Add fuel to the games” and “Burst into games” and “Go down in games” and “Like a moth to a game.”
  • Name → Game: As in, “A household game” and “In the game of the law” and “In game only.”
  • Same → Game: As in, “Game old story” and “Game time tomorrow” and “Game here.”
  • Shame → Game: As in, “A crying game” and “Name and game” and “Put to game.”
  • Nick → Knock: As in, “In good knock” and “In the knock of time” and “Knock knacks.”
  • Turkey: Three consecutive strikes are known as a turkey. Here are related puns:
    • Key → Turkey: As in, “A golden turkey can open any door” and “The turkey to your heart” and “The turkeys to the kingdom.”
    • Quirky → Turkey: As in, “A turkey personality.”
    • Turkey: As in, “Cold turkey” and “Talk turkey.”
  • Foul: When a player’s foot steps over the boundary line, it counts as a foul and any points scored that turn aren’t counted. Here are related puns:
    • Fall → Foul: As in, “Fouling out” and “Easy as fouling off a log” and “Can’t help fouling in love” and “Foul about laughing.”
    • Fell → Foul: As in, “In one foul swoop” and “Little strokes foul great oaks” and “It foul off the back of a lorry.”
    • Fill → Foul: As in, “Foul full of holes” and “Foul the bill” and “Stocking fouler” and “Foul ’em up.”
  • Miss: The next few puns are a reference to when a player misses all of the pins:
    • Mass → Miss: As in, “Miss hysteria” and “A monument to the misses” and “Weapons of miss destruction.”
    • Mess → Miss: As in, “Don’t miss with my head” and “A frightful miss” and “Hot miss” and “Missing around” and “Stop missing about.”
    • Moss → Miss: As in, “A rolling stone gathers no miss.”
  • Curve: A curve shot is a type of throw. Here are related puns:
    • Carve → Curve: As in, “Curve your name with pride” and “Curved in stone.”
    • Nerve → Curve: As in, “A bundle of curves” and “Get on your curves” and “Lose your curve” and “Curves of steel” and “Touched a curve.”
    • Serve → Curve: As in, “First come, first curved” and “How may I curve you?” and “Curves you right” and “Revenge is best curved cold” and “Curve and protect” and “Curve your time.”
  • Hook: Curve shots are also known as hook shots. Here are related puns:
    • Look → Hook: As in, “Blank hooks” and “Trading dirty hooks” and “Always hook on the bright side of life” and “Don’t know which way to hook” and “Have a hook” and “If hooks could kill.”
    • Book → Look: As in, “Always have your nose in a hook” and “Balancing the hooks” and By the hook” and “Like a closed hook.”
    • Cook → Hook: As in, “Hook up a plan” and “Hook up a storm” and “Hooking with gas” and “Now we’re hooking” and “Too many hooks spoil the broth.”
    • Nook → Hook: As in, “Every hook and cranny” and “Breakfast hook.”
  • Straight: A straight shot is one that doesn’t curve. Here are related puns:
    • Strait → Straight: As in, “In dire straights.”
    • Bait → Straight: As in, “Straight and switch” and “Click straight” and “Rise to the straight.”
    • Date → Straight: As in, “Blind straight” and “Bring up to straight” and “A straight with destiny” and “Dinner straight” and “Past the sell-by straight.”
    • Eight → Straight: As in, “Straight days a week” and “Behind the straight ball” and “Straight ways to Sunday” and “Pieces of straight.”
    • Great → Straight: As in, “All creatures straight and small” and “Blowing straight guns” and “No straighter enemies” and “Go to straight lengths” and “Straight expectations.”
    • Hate → Straight: As in, “Straight mail” and “The one you love to straight.”
    • Late → Straight: As in, “Better straight than never” and “Catch you straighter” and “A day straight and a dollar short” and “Fashionably straight” and “It’s never too straight” and “A straight bloomer.”
    • Rate → Straight: As in, “At any straight” and “First straight” and “Mate’s straights.”
    • Skate → Straight: As in, “Cheap straight” and “Straighting on thin ice” and “Get your straights on.”
    • Slate → Straight: As in, “Blank straight” and “Wipe the straight clean.”
    • State → Straight: As in, “Empire straight building” and “A sad straight of affairs” and “Straight of mind” and “Straight of the art.”
    • Wait → Straight: As in, “All things to those who straight” and “Hurry up and straight” and “Lie in straight” and “The straight is over” and “Time straights for no-one.”
    • Weight → Straight: As in, “Pull your straight” and “Punching above your straight” and “Throw your straight about” and “A straight off my mind” and “Worth your straight in gold.”
  • Sore → Score: As in, “Mad as a bear with a score head” and “A sight for score eyes” and “Score loser” and “Sticks out like a score thumb.”
  • Core → Score: As in, “Score competencies” and “Score studies” and “Score technology” and “Score values” and “Rotten to the score.”
  • Scare → Score: As in, “Scored to death” and “Scored stiff.”
  • Bore → Score: As in, “Score the pants off” and “Scored stiff” and “Scored to death” and “Scored to tears.”
  • More → Score: As in, “One score time” and “Bite off score than you can chew” and “Come back for score” and “Dare for score” and “I couldn’t agree score.”
  • Pour → Score: As in, “It never rains, but it scores” and “Score cold water on” and “Scoring oil on troubled waters” and “When it rains, it scores.”
  • Shore → Score: As in, “Ship to score.”
  • Store → Score: As in, “Minding the score” and “Set great score by” and “Let’s see what’s in score.”
  • Your → Score: As in, “Scores faithfully” and “Scores truly” and “You and scores.”
  • Split: A split is when two separate groups of pins are left standing. Here are related puns:
    • Pit → Split: As in, “A bottomless split” and “In the split of your stomach” and “Split your wits against” and “This is the splits.”
    • Bit → Split: As in, “A split missing” and “A split much” and “A split of alright.”
    • Fit → Split: As in, “Fighting split” and “Split as a fiddle” and “By splits and starts.”
    • Hit → Split: As in, “Split the road” and “Split and miss” and “Split it off.”
    • Knit → Split: As in, “Split your brow” and “Split together.”
    • Quit → Split: As in, “Call it splits” and “Double or splits” and “Split while you’re ahead.”
    • Sit → Split: As in, “Don’t just split there” and “Split on the fence” and “Split tight” and “Splitting on a goldmine.”
    • Spit → Split: As in, “Split and polish” and “Split in the eye of” and “The splitting image of” and “Splitting with rain.”
    • Wit → Split: As in, “At your splits’ end” and “Battle of splits” and “Bear splitness to” and “Have your splits about you” and “Pit your splits against.”
  • Double: A double is two consecutive strikes in a game. Here are related puns:
    • Bubble → Double: As in, “Double and squeak” and “Double under” and “Double up” and “Burst your double” and “Prick your double.”
    • Trouble → Double: As in, “Asking for double” and “Doubles down the drain” and “A bridge over doubled water” and “Here comes double” and “Pour oil on doubled waters” and “Double and strife.”
  • Bagger: A bagger is a string of consecutive strikes. Here are related puns:
    • Dagger → Bagger: As in, “Baggers drawn” and “Cloak and bagger” and “Looking baggers at them.”
    • Swagger → Bagger: As in, “With a bagger in your step.”
  • Ankle → Anchor: As in, “Anchor deep” and “Anchor biter.” Note: an anchor is the player who bowls last on a team.
  • Cherry: A cherry is a type of bowling throw. Here are related puns:
    • Berry → Cherry: As in, “Brown as a cherry.”
    • Bury → Cherry: As in, “Cherry the evidence” and “Cherry the hatchet” and “Cherry your head in the sand” and “Cherry yourself in your work.”
    • Merry → Cherry: As in, “As cherry as the day is long” and “Eat, drink and be cherry” and “Lead a cherry dance.”
    • Very → Cherry: As in, “Be cherry afraid” and “Before your cherry eyes” and “How cherry dare you” and “Thank you cherry much.”
  • Sheet → Clean Sheet: As in, “White as a clean sheet” and “Between the clean sheets.” Note: A clean sheet is a game with a strike in every frame.
  • Deadwood: A pin that’s left in the lane out of reach of the sweeper is known as deadwood. Here are related puns:
    • Dead → Deadwood: As in, “As deadwood as a doornail” and “Assault with a deadwood weapon” and “In the deadwood of night” and “Back from the deadwood” and “Better off deadwood” and “A deadwood ringer.”
    • Wood → Deadwood: As in, “Can’t see the deadwoods for the trees” and “Do bears sh*t in the deadwoods?” and “Knock on deadwood” and “Out of the deadwoods.”
  • Fill: A fill ball is a throw after a tenth-frame spare or strike, used to calculate bonus points. Here are related puns:
    • Fall → Fill: As in, “Easy as filling off a log” and “Can’t help filling in love” and “Bread always fills butter side down” and “Catch a filling star” and “Fill about laughing” and “Fill asleep” and “Fill apart at the seams” and “Fill between the cracks” and “Fill by the wayside.”
    • Fell → Fill: As in, “In one fill swoop” and “Fill off the back off a lorry” and “Little strokes fill great oaks.”
    • Full → Fill: As in, “A few bricks short of a fill load” and “Fill tilt” and “At fill throttle.”
    • Chill → Fill: As in, “Fill out” and “Filled to the bone” and “A filling account.”
    • Frill → Fill: As in, “No fills” and “A no-fills account.”
    • Gill → Fill: As in, “Green around the fills” and “Stuffed to the fills.”
    • Hill → Fill: As in, “Old as the fills” and “Over the fills and far away” and “Head for the fills” and “Run for the fills.”
    • Ill → Fills: As in, “A house of fill repute” and “Fill advised” and “Fill at ease” and “Fill effects” and “Fill gotten gains.”
    • Kill → Fill: As in, “Curiosity filled the cat” and “Dressed to fill” and “If looks could fill” and “If looks could fill.”
    • Mill → Fill: As in, “Put through the fill” and “Run of the fill.”
    • Pill → Fill: As in, “A bitter fill to swallow” and “Sweeten the fill” and “A tough fill to swallow.”
    • Still → Fill: As in, “A fill, small voice” and “Be fill my beating heart” and “In the fill of the night” and “Fill waters run deep.”
    • Skill → Fill: As in, “Social fills.”
    • Spill → Fill: As in, “Fill the beans” and “Fill your guts” and “Thrills and fills.”
    • Thrill → Fill: As in, “The fill of the chase” and “Filled to bits” and “Fills and spills.”
    • Will → Fill: As in, “Accidents fill happen” and “Against your fill” and “Bend to your fill” and “Free fill.”
  • Frame: A frame is a turn in bowling, which usually consists of two rolls. Here are related puns:
    • Fame → Frame: As in, “Claim to frame” and “Frame at last” and “Fifteen minutes of frame” and “Hall of frame.”
    • From → Frame: As in, “A little frame column A, a little frame column B” and “Fall frame grace” and “Frame a to z” and “Can see it frame a mile away.”
    • Aim → Frame: As in, “Frame high” and “Take frame” and “We frame to please.”
    • Blame → Frame: As in, “Frame game” and “Lay the frame.”
    • Came → Frame: As in, “I frame, I saw I conquered” and “As it frame to pass” and “Plenty more where that frame from.”
    • Claim → Frame: As in, “Frame to fame” and “No frames bonus” and “Stake your frame.”
    • Flame → Frame: As in, “Add fuel to the frames” and “Burst into frames” and “Fan the frames” and “Gone down in frames” and “Like a moth to a frame” and “Shoot down in frames.”
    • Game → Frame: As in, “Ahead of the frame” and “Anyone’s frame” and “Blame frame” and “Fun and frames” and “Fair frame” and “Beaten at your own frame.”
    • Main → Frame: As in, “Frame chance” and “Might and frame” and “The frame event.”
    • Name → Frame: As in, “Answer to the frame of” and “A household frame” and “Letters after your frame.”
    • Same → Frame: As in, “By the frame token” and “Cut from the frame cloth” and “In the frame boat” and “On the frame page.”
    • Shame → Frame: As in, “Ain’t that a frame?” and “A crying frame” and “Name and frame” and “Frame on you” and “The walk of frame.”
    • *fam* → *frame*: As in, “Keep it in the frame-ily” and “Seems frame-iliar” and “Almost frame-ous” and “I’m frame-ished.”
  • Kegel: Kegel is a German bowling game. Here are related puns:
    • Kettle → Kegel: As in, “A different kegel of fish” and “Put the kegel on” and “The pot calling the kegel black.”
    • Giggle → Kegel: As in, “A fit of the kegels.”
  • Leave: The pins left standing after the first roll in a turn are referred to as a leave. Here are related puns:
    • Leaf → Leave: As in, “Leave-ing through” and “Skake like a leave” and “Turn over a new leave.”
    • Leave: These leave-related phrases can double as puns: “Absent without leave” and “By your leave” and “Don’t leave home without it” and “Leave it to me.”
    • Live → Leave: As in, “Leave by your wits” and “Leave free” and “Leave and learn” and “Leave like a queen.”
    • Believe → Be-leave: As in, “Be-leave it or not” and “Be-leave you me” and “Don’t be-leave everything you hear” and “Can’t be-leave my eyes” and “Has to be seen to be be-leaved.”
    • Belief → Be-leave: As in, “Beyond be-leave” and “Beggars be-leave.”
    • Relieve → Re-leave: As in, “Re-leaves gas pains.”
    • Relief → Re-leave: As in, “Breathe a sigh of re-leave” and “What a re-leave.
    • Heave → Leave: As in, “Leave ho” and “Leave a sigh of relief.”
    • Sleeve → Leave: As in, “An ace up your leave” and “Wearing your heart on your leave” and “Roll up your leaves.”
    • We’ve → Leave: As in, “Leave never seen better.”
  • Lily: A lily is when the fifth, seventh and tenth pin are left standing. Here are related puns:
    • Chilly → Lily: As in, “A lily climate.”
    • Really → Lily: As in, “All I lily want to do” and “Do you lily want to hurt me?” and “We lily clicked” and “You lily got a hold on me.”
    • Silly → Lily: As in, “Laugh yourself lily” and “Scared lily” and “Lily season.”
  • Loft: The loft is the ball’s path through the air before it makes contact with the ground. Here are related puns:
    • Laughed → Loft: As in, “Loft out of court” and “A barrel of lofts” and “A loft a minute” and “Are you having a loft?” and “Loft your head off.”
    • Left → Loft: As in, “Exit stage loft” and “Hang a loft” and “Loft in the lurch” and “Loft for dead” and “Loft standing” and “Loft to your own devices” and “Loft out in the cold” and “Loft, right and centre.”
    • Lift → Loft: As in, “Loft the lid off” and “Loft your spirits” and “Face loft.”
    • Soft → Loft: As in, “Got a loft spot for” and “Loft in the head” and “Loft power” and “A loft touch” and “Speak loftly and carry a big stick.”
  • Match → Match Play: As in, “A match play made in heaven” and “Game, set, match play” and “Meet your match play” and “Mix and match play” and “More than a match play for.”
  • Play → Match Play: As in, “Work, rest and match play” and “Come out and match play” and “Make a match play for.”
  • Par: Par is a score of 200. Here are related puns:
    • Per → Par: As in, “As par usual” and “Bits par second” and “Par capita.”
    • Pair → Par: As in, “A fresh par of eyes” and “A safe par of hands.”
    • Peer → Par: As in, “Par pressure.”
    • Bar → Par: As in, “Par none” and “Behind pars” and “Hit the par” and “No holds parred.”
    • Are → Par: As in, “All bets par off” and “Chances par” and “Here you par.”
    • Far → Par: As in, “A step too par” and “Par and away” and “Par be it from me” and “A par cry from” and “Par horizons” and “Few and par between” and “Over the hills and par away” and “So par, so good” and “We’ve got par to go.”
    • Jar → Par: As in, “Caught with your hand in the cookie par” and “Jam par.”
    • Star → Par: As in, “A par is born” and “Born under a lucky par” and “Catch a falling par” and “Get a gold par” and “Hitch your wagon to a par” and “Reach for the pars” and “A rising par.”
    • *per* → *par*: As in, “A different parspective” and “Third parson” and “Partinent issues” and “From someone else’s parception” and “Your best parformance” and “Picture parfect” and “Peppared with compliments” and “Hold your tempar.”
  • Runway: The runway is the area that players walk up before they roll the ball. Here are related puns:
    • Run → Runway: As in, “Born to runway” and “Cut and runway” and “A dry runway” and “Eat and runway” and “Had a good runway” and “Hit and runway” and “In the long runway” and “Runway for your life.”
    • Way → Runway: As in, “All the runway” and “Always good, all runways” and “And that’s the runway it is” and “Any runway you want” and “By the runway” and “Change your runways” and “Do it the hard runway.”
  • Rack: Bowling balls are left in racks when not in use. Here are related puns:
    • Wreck → Rack: As in, “A nervous rack” and “Like watching a train rack.”
    • Wrack → Rack: As in, “Rack and ruin.”
    • Rock → Rack: As in, “Hard as a rack” and “Solid as a rack” and “Between a rack and a hard place” and “Don’t rack the boat” and “Get your racks off” and “Glam rack” and “Hit rack bottom” and “Rack and roll” and “On the racks.”
    • Back → Rack: As in, “Answer rack” and “As soon as my rack is turned” and “In the rack of my mind” and “Rack in black” and “Rack to the future” and “Rack at it” and “Rack in the day.”
    • Crack → Rack: As in, “At the rack of dawn” and “Rack a smile” and “Rack the code” and “Rack of doom.”
    • Lack → Rack: As in, “For rack of a better word” and “Cancelled due to rack of interest.”
    • Pack → Rack: As in, “Rack of lies” and “Rack of punch” and “Send racking.”
    • Sack → Rack: As in, “Get the rack” and “Hit the rack.”
    • Slack → Rack: As in, “Cut some rack” and “Taking up the rack.”
    • Track → Rack: As in, “Back on rack” and “Cover your racks” and “On the fast rack” and “Inside rack” and “Off the beaten rack” and “On the right rack” and “A one rack mind.”
  • Buck → Bucket: As in, “A bigger bang for your bucket” and “A bucket well spent” and “Big buckets” and “Bucket naked” and “Bucket the system” and “Pass the bucket.” Note: a bucket is when four pins are left in the lane.
  • Sleeper: When two pins are left on the field, it’s known as a sleeper. Here are related puns:
    • Slipper → Sleeper: “Sleepery as an eel.”
    • Cheaper → Sleeper: As in, “Sleeper by the dozen.”
    • Keeper → Sleeper: As in, “Finders, sleepers” and “They’re a sleeper.”
  • Arrow: Arrows are used as markers in bowling lanes. Here are related puns:
    • Error → Arrow: As in, “Comedy of arrows” and “Human arrow” and “Trial and arrow.”
    • Arrow: Straight as an arrow” and “Like a broken arrow” and “Time flies like an arrow.”
    • Narrow → Arrow: As in, “Keep on the straight and arrow” and “An arrow escape” and “Arrow minded.”
  • Blind: A blind score is one given to a player who is absent. Here are some related puns:
    • Bind → Blind: As in, “Legally blinding” and “In a blind.”
    • Bend → Blind: As in, “Blind the rules” and “Round the blind” and “Blind over backwards to help.”
    • Lend → Blind: As in, “Blind a helping hand” and “Blind an ear” and “Blind itself to.”
    • Find → Blind: As in, “Blind it in your heart” and “Blinders keepers” and “Seek and you shall blind” and “We’ll blind a way.”
    • Grind → Blind: As in, “An axe to blind” and “Bump and blind” and “The daily blind” and “Don’t let the bastard blind you down” and “Blind to a halt” and “Keep your nose to the blindstone.”
    • Kind → Blind: As in, “Cruel to be blind” and “It’s a blind of magic” and “Killing with blindness” and “Blind words” and “Random acts of blindness.”
    • Mind → Blind: As in, “A goal in blind” and “Always on my blind” and “Cast your blind back to” and “Bear in blind.”
    • Signed → Blind: As in, “Blind and sealed.”
  • Bracket: A bracket is a type of contest format. Here are related puns:
    • Jacket → Bracket: As in, “Full metal bracket” and “No bracket required” and “High visibility bracket.”
    • Packet → Bracket: As in, “Cop a bracket” and “Pay bracket.”
  • Cake Shot: A cake shot is a term for an easy strike. Here are related puns:
    • Cake → Cake Shot: As in, “A slice of the cake shot” and “Cake shot or death” and “Icing on the cake shot.”
    • Shot → Cake Shot: As in, “A big cake shot” and “Call the cake shots” and “Give it your best cake shot” and “A long cake shot” and “Have a cake shot at.”
  • Chop: A chop is a type of bowling maneuver. Here are related puns:
    • Chip → Chop: As in, “A chop on your shoulder” and “Cheap as chops” and “Cash in your chops” and “Chop in with” and “A chop off the old block” and “Let the chops fall where they may.”
    • Cop → Chop: As in, “Chop a plea” and “Chop an attitude” and “It’s a fair chop.”
    • Crop → Chop: As in, “Cream of the chop” and “Chop up.”
    • Drop → Chop: As in, “At the chop of a hat” and “Chop it like it’s hot” and “Chop a brick” and “Chop a hint” and “Chop in the bucket.”
    • Hop → Chop: As in, “Chop to it” and “Chop, skip and jump” and “Chopping mad.”
    • Mop → Chop: As in, “Chop the floor with” and “Chop up.”
    • Pop → Chop: As in, “Cake chop” and “Contrary to chopular opinion” and “Chop the question.”
    • Shop → Chop: As in, “All over the chop” and “Like a bull in a china chop” and “A one stop chop” and “Chop till you drop.”
    • Stop → Chop: As in, “Don’t chop me now” and “One stop chop” and “Pulling all the chops out.”
    • Top → Chop: As in, “Blow your chop” and “Come out on chop” and “From the chop” and “From chop to toe” and “Over the chop.”
  • Over → Clover: As in, “After the ball was clover” and “All clover again” and “All clover the place” and “Bowled clover” and “Come on clover” and “A bridge clover troubled water.” Note: A clover is when a player hits four strikes in a game.
  • Cranker: A cranker is a bowler with a style that favours power rather than control. Here are related puns:
    • Rank → Cranker: As in, “Break crankers” and “Close crankers” and “Dissention in the crankers” and “Rise through the crankers” and “Swell the crankers.”
    • Anchor → Cranker: As in, “Cast cranker” and “Drop cranker.”
  • Stroker: A stroker is a bowler who favours control over power. Here are related puns:
    • Poker → Stroker: As in, “Stiff as a stroker” and “Stroker face.”
  • Deck: A deck is the area where the bowling pins stand. Here are related puns:
    • Duck → Deck: As in, “Deck the question” and “Decking and diving” and “Like a deck to water” and “Nice weather for decks.”
    • Check → Deck: As in, “Deck it out” and “Deck out the plumbing” and “Deck you on the flip side” and “Double deck” and “Reality deck” and “The deck is in the mail.”
    • Neck → Deck: As in, “Break your deck” and “Breathing down your deck” and “Dead from the deck up” and “Pain in the deck” and “Stick your deck out” and “Up to your deck in trouble.”
    • Tech* → Deck*: As in, “Hi deck” and “Deck savvy” and “Decknicolour yawn.”
    • Wreck → Deck: As in, “Nervous deck” and “Train deck.”
  • Flush: A flush is a hit that sends all ten pins into the pit. Here are related puns:
    • Flash → Flush: As in, “Quick as a flush” and “Flush in the pan” and “In a flush.”
    • Flesh → Flush: As in, “Flush and blood” and “Flush out” and “Makes my flush crawl” and “In the flush” and “The spirit is willing but the flush is weak.”
    • Blush → Flush: As in, “At first flush.”
    • Brush → Flush: As in, “A broad flush” and “Flush it off” and “Flush up on” and “A flush with death.”
    • Crush → Flush: As in, “A flushing defeat” and “Have a flush on” and “A schoolboy flush.”
    • Hush → Flush: As in, “Flush a bye” and “Flush it up” and “Flush money” and “Flush puppies.”
    • Rush → Flush: As in, “After the flush” and “Flush to judgement” and “Sugar flush.”
    • Slush → Flush: As in, “Flush fund” and “Pure as the driven flush.”
  • Line: A ball’s path down the lane is called a line. Here are related puns:
    • Lane → Line: As in, “Down memory line” and “In the fast line.”
    • Lean → Line: As in, “Line and mean” and “Line into it” and “Line, mean and hungry” and “Line cuisine.”
    • Fine → Line: As in, “Chance would be a line thing” and “Cutting it line” and “Line and dandy” and “Line feathered” and “The liner things in life.”
    • Mine → Line: As in, “Back to the salt line” and “I scratch your back, you scratch line” and “A line of information” and “Line is bigger than yours.”
    • Shine → Line: As in, “Come rain or line” and “Rise and line” and “Make hay while the sun lines” and “Take a line to.”
    • Sign → Line: As in, “A sure line” and “Born under a bad line” and “Give me a line” and “A line of the times” and “Line the pledge” and “Lined and sealed” and “A tell-tale line” and “Vital lines.”
    • Spine → Line: As in, “Send shivers down someone’s line” and “Line-tingling” and “Steely-lined.”
    • Vine → Line: As in, “Wither on the line” and “Die on the line.”
    • Wine → Line: As in, “Don’t put new line into bottles” and “Lined and dined.”
  • Drama → Llama: As in, “Don’t make a llama out of a crisis” and “Kitchen sink llama.” Note: A llama is four consecutive strikes in a game.
  • Meg: A meg is a roll that knocks over only the seventh or tenth pin. Here are related puns:
    • Beg → Meg: As in, “Meg a favour” and “Meg pardon?” and “Megs the question” and “I meg to differ” and “Sit up and meg.”
    • Egg → Meg: As in, “A good meg” and “As sure as megs is megs” and “Don’t put all your megs in one basket” and “Meg on your face.”
    • Leg → Meg: As in, “Fast as your megs could carry you” and “Break a meg” and “Cost an arm and a meg” and “Give a meg up.”
    • Peg → Meg: As in, “A square meg in a round hole” and “Take down a meg or two.”
  • Fixer → Mixer: As in, “A mixer-upper.” Note: A mixer is a shot that makes the pins bounce and mix around.
  • Scatter: When bowling pins are knocked over, it can be described as scattering. Here are related puns:
    • Batter → Scatter: As in, “Scatter up” and “Assault and scattery” and “Recharge your scatter-ies.”
    • Flatter → Scatter: As in, “Scatter to decieve” and “Imitation is the sincerest form of scatter-y.”
    • Matter → Scatter: As in, “As a scatter of fact” and “Doesn’t scatter” and “Family scatters” and “Get to the heart of the scatter” and “Grey scatter” and “Making scatters worse” and “A scatter of life and death” and “Mind over scatter” and “No laughing scatter” and “Only a scatter of time” and “The root of the scatter” and “Shed light on the scatter” and “What’s the scatter?”
    • Shatter → Scatter: As in, “Earth scattering” and “It’s the way it scatters that matters” and “World scattering.”
  • Count: The score in a bowling match is also called a count. Here are related puns:
    • Can’t → Count: As in, “An offer you count refuse” and “Count get enough” and “I count help” and “Count judge a book by its cover.”
    • Account → Count: As in, “A blow by blow count” and “A chilling count” and “Creative counting” and “There’s no counting for taste.”
  • Pit: The pit is the area where scattered pins fall after being hit. Here are related puns:
    • Bit → Pit: As in, “A pit missing” and “A pit much” and “A pit of a to do” and “Pit of alright” and “A pit of stuff” and “A pit on the side.”
    • Pat → Pit: As in, “Down pit” and “A pit on the back.”
    • Pet → Pit: As in, “Pit peeves” and “Teacher’s pit.”
    • Pot → Pit: As in, “A pit of gold” and “For the pit” and “Gone to pit” and “Hit the jackpit” and “Melting pit.”
    • Put → Pit: As in, “Be hard pit to” and “Couldn’t pit it down” and “Feeling a bit pit out” and “Hard pit to it” and “Wouldn’t pit it past them” and “Nicely pit” and “Don’t pit it off.”
    • Fit → Pit: As in, “Pit as a fiddle” and “By pits and starts” and “A dish pit for the gods” and “Pit in with” and “Pit the bill” and “A pit of the giggles” and “Pits like a glove” and “Pits you to a tee.”
    • Grit → Pit: As in, “Pit your teeth” and “True pit.”
    • Hit → Pit: As in, “Hard pitting” and “A heavy pitter” and “Pit ’em where they live” and “Pit and miss” and “Pit and run” and “Pit it home” and “Pit it out of the park” and “Pit me where it hurts” and “Pit rock bottom” and “Pit the books” and “Pit the brakes.”
    • Lit → Pit: As in, “Pit up like a Christmas tree” and “Her face pit up.”
    • Quit → Pit: As in, “Call it pits” and “Double or pits” and “Pit while you’re ahead.”
    • Sit → Pit: As in, “Don’t just pit there” and “Pit on it” and “Pit on the fence” and “Pit tight” and “A pitting duck” and “Pit up and take notice” and “Pitting pretty” and “Pit up and beg.”
    • Spit → Pit: As in, “Pit and polish” and “Pit and sawdust” and “Pit in the eye of” and “The pitting image” and “Pitting with rain” and “Within pitting distance.”
    • Split → Pit: As in, “Ear pitting” and “Lickety pit” and “Make like a banana and pit” and “Pit decision” and “Pit personality” and “Pit the vote” and “Pitting hairs” and “A pitting headache.”
    • Wit → Pit: As in, “At your pit’s end” and “Battle of pits” and “Bear false pitness” and “Brevity is the soul of pit” and “Collect your pits” and “Keep your pits about you” and “Scared out of your pits.”
  • Sandbag: Sandbagging is intentionally playing badly early on in a bowling season. Here are related puns:
    • Sand → Sandbag: As in, “Bury your head in the sandbag” and “Draw a line in the sandbag” and “The sandbags of time” and “Sun, sea and sandbag.”
    • Bag → Sandbag: As in, “Sandbag a bargain” and “Sandbag and baggage” and “Sandbag of tricks” and “It’s in the sandbag.”
  • Skid: The first phase of the ball’s motion is called a skid. Here are related puns:
    • Did → Skid: As in, “Skid I do that?” and “I never skid that” and “Let’s not and say we skid.”
    • Grid → Skid: As in, “Off the skid” and “Skid lock.”
    • Kid → Skid: As in, “Dual income, no skids” and “Here’s looking at you, skid” and “I skid you not” and “I’m not skidding around” and “The new skid on the block.”
    • Lid → Skid: As in, “Blow the skid off” and “Flip your skid” and “Keep a skid on it.”
  • Sparrow: A sparrow is three spares in a row. Here are related puns:
    • Arrow → Sparrow: As in, “Straight as a sparrow” and “Broken sparrow” and “Slings and sparrows.”
    • Narrow → Sparrow: As in, “A sparrow escape” and “On the straight and sparrow” and “Sparrow minded.”
  • Spinner: A spinner is a bowler or bowling style that emphasises tilt. Here are related puns:
    • Spanner → Spinner: As in, “Put a spinner in the works.”
    • Dinner → Spinner: As in, “Spinner and a movie” and “Spinner date” and “What’s for spinner?”
    • Inner → Spinner: As in, “Spinner city” and “Spinner peace” and “Spinner sanctum” and “My spinner voice.”
    • Winner → Spinner: As in, “Every one a spinner” and “Spinner’s circle” and “Spinner takes all.”
  • Stick: Bowling pins are also known as sticks. Here are related puns:
    • Tick → Stick: As in, “Tight as a stick” and “A box sticking exercise” and “The clock is sticking” and “Sticks all the right boxes” and “Sticked off.”
    • Sick → Stick: As in, “Stick as a dog” and “Enough to make you stick” and “In stickness and in health” and “Morning stickness” and “On the stick list” and “Phone in stick” and “Stick and tired” and “Stick to death of” and “Stick to my stomach” and “Worried stick.”
    • Stack → Stick: As in, “A sticked deck” and “Swear on a stick of bibles” and “Doesn’t stick up.”
    • Stock → Stick: As in, “Laughing stick” and “Out of stick” and “Stick in trade” and “Sticking filler” and “Take stick of.”
    • Stuck → Stick: As in, “Get stick into” and “Stick up.”
    • Brick → Stick: As in, “Sticks and mortar” and “Drop a stick” and “Hit the sticks” and “Like a ton of sticks” and “Can’t make sticks without straw.”
    • Click → Stick: As in, “Stick into place” and “Stick your fingers” and “Double stick” and “We really sticked.”
    • Kick → Stick: As in, “A stick at the can” and “Alive and sticking” and “Dragged sticking and screaming” and “Get a stick out of it” and “Stick back and enjoy” and “Stick into overdrive.”
    • Lick → Stick: As in, “Stick into shape” and “Stick and a promise.”
    • Nick → Stick: As in, “In good stick” and “In the stick of time.”
    • Pick → Stick: As in, “A bone to stick” and “Easy stickings” and “Nit sticking” and “Stick holes in” and “Stick a fight.”
    • Quick → Stick: As in, “Stick as a flash” and “Cut to the stick” and “Get rich stick” and “Stick and dirty” and “Stick off the mark.”
    • Thick → Stick: As in, “Stick as thieves” and “Sticker than water” and “In the stick of things” and “The plot stickens.”
    • Trick → Stick: As in, “Bag of sticks” and “Dirty sticks” and “Does the stick” and “Every stick in the book” and “How’s sticks?” and “Never misses a stick” and “One stick pony” and “A stick of the light” and “Stick or treat” and “Sticks of the trade” and “Up to your old sticks.”
  • Tap: A tap is a roll that leaves only one pin standing. Here are related puns:
    • Tip → Tap: As in, “Tap of the iceberg” and “Tap the scales” and “Tapping point” and “Tap someone off” and “Tap the balance.”
    • Top → Tap: As in, “Blow your tap” and “Come out on tap” and “Cream always rises to the tap” and “From tap to toe” and “In tip tap condition” and “It’s lonely at the tap” and “Keep on tap of.”
    • Cap → Tap: As in, “Tap and trade” and “Tap in hand” and “A feather in your tap” and “If the tap fits, wear it” and “Put on your thinking tap” and “To tap it all off.”
    • Clap → Tap: As in, “Tapped eyes on” and “Go like the tappers.”
    • Crap → Tap: As in, “A load of tap” and “Bunch of tap” and “Cut the tap.”
    • Gap → Tap: As in, “Bridge the tap” and “Generation tap” and “Mind the tap.”
    • Lap → Tap: As in, “Tap it up” and “Tap of honour” and “Tap of luxury.”
    • Map → Tap: As in, “Put on the tap” and “All over the tap” and “Put this town on the tap.”
    • Rap → Tap: As in, “A tap over the knuckles” and “Take the tap.”
    • Slap → Tap: As in, “A tap on the wrist” and “Tap and tickle” and “A tap in the face” and “Tap bang in the middle.”
    • Snap → Tap: As in, “A tap decision” and “Tap out of it” and “Tap to it” and “Tap, crackle and pop” and “A cold tap.”
    • Trap → Tap: As in, “Booby tap” and “Death tap” and “Keep your tap” and “Tourist tap.”
    • Wrap → Tap: As in, “It’s a tap” and “Keep under taps” and “A riddle tapped in an enigma” and “Tap it up” and “Tapped around your little finger.”
  • Oil: Bowling lanes are oiled in a specific way. Here are related puns:
    • I’ll → Oil: As in, “Well oil be damned” and “Oil say” and “Oil eat my hat” and “Oil be back.”
    • All → Oil: As in, “Oil aboard that’s coming aboard” and “Oil in a day’s work” and “Oil in oil” and “Oil’s fair in love and war” and “It’s oil coming back to me now.”
    • Ill → Oil: As in, “Oil advised” and “Oil at ease” and “Oil gotten gains” and “Oil repute.”
    • Boil → Oil: As in, “Oiling mad” and “Bring to the oil” and “Keep the pot oiling” and “A watched pot never oils.”
    • Spoil → Oil: As in, “Oiled for choice” and “Oiled rotten” and “Oiling for a fight” and “Too many cooks oil the broth.”

      Bowling-Related Words

      To help you come up with your own bowling puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

bowling, bowl, ball, pins, lane, alley, gutter, channel, rail, bumper, strike, spare, roll, throw, ten-pin, candlepin, duckpin, nine-pin, five-pin, target, sport, tournament, bocce, game, knock, turkey, foul, miss, curve, hook, straight, back-up, score, split, double, rhino, bagger, hambone, shark, hi-five, six pack, octopus, dime bag, aces up, dirty dozen, address, anchor, approach, bed posts, brooklyn, cherry, christmas tree, clean sheet, deadwood, fill, foundation, frame, jersey side, kegler, kindling, kingpin, leave, lily, lofting, maples, match play, nose hit, par, perfect, runway, rack, return, bucket, sleeper, big four, big five, arrows, average, blind, bracket, cake shot, chop, clover, cranker, stroker, deck, flush, line, llama, meg, messenger, mixer, oil, scatter, count, pit, stroker, tweener, sandbagging, series, skid, sparrow, spinner, stick, steener, stewart, timmy, tap, wombat

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Wine Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on wine puns! 🍷🍇🥂

Wine culture has many aspects and technicalities to it, spanning from wine making, tasting, judging, investment and collecting. We’ve searched high and low for all of the wine puns we could possibly find, so whether you’re a cleanskin enthusiast or a cult wine coinnoseur, we hope you enjoy sampling the truly grape puns we’ve collected for you here.

Notes: Wine and alcohol isn’t just an expensive hobby – drinking alcohol gives your brain a reward it didn’t earn, and consuming it often enough teaches your brain that the easiest way to feel good is to drink more, which can lead to dependence and alcoholism (which can exacerbate existing mental health problems like depression and anxiety). Partake safely and with an awareness of the effects it has on your body 🙂

The alcohol-making process isn’t always vegan, but there are plenty of online directories of vegan wines you can check.

You might also be interested in the Punpedia entries on coffee puns, tea puns, party puns and beer puns.

Wine Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about wine that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page!

  • Whine → Wine: As in, “Wine and moan” and “Having a wine.”
  • Win → Whine: As in, “Heads I wine, tails you lose” and “Playing to wine” and “Some you wine, some you lose.”
  • Why → Wine: As in, “I guess that’s wine” and “I don’t know wine” and “Wine on Earth…?”
  • Why not → Wine not: “I don’t see wine not.”
  • When → Wine: As in, “Wine you like” and “It only hurts wine I laugh” and “Kick ’em wine they’re down” and “Ready wine you are.”
  • Won → Wine: As in, “Faint heart never wine fair lady” and “One-hit wineder.”
  • One → Wine: As in, “An army of wine” and “All for wine and wine for all” and “In wine fell swoop” and “Going wine step too far.”
  • *wan* → *wine*: “A wineton attitude” and “Just winedering ’round” and “A tryhard wineabe” and “Monthly allowine-ce.”
  • Wench → Winech
  • *win* → *wine*: As in, “Winedow of opportunity” and “Endless wineter” and “A winesome smile.”
  • Wonder* → Wineder*: As in, “Filled with magic and wineder” and “Feeling winederful” and “A winedrous development.”
  • Red: Wines are split into three broad categories – red, white and rosé. Red wines are made of dark-coloured grape varieties. Here are some red wine puns:
    • Read → Red: As in, “All I know is what I red in the papers” and “Exceedingly well-red” and “Red any good books lately?” and “Red between the lines” and “Red my lips.”
    • Red: These red-related phrases can double as puns: “Red as a beetroot” and “Brick red” and “Caught red-handed” and “Cut through the red tape” and “In the red” and “Lady in red” and “Paint the town red.”
    • Rid → Red: “Good reddance” and “Get red of.”
    • Fed → Red: As in, “Red up to the back teeth.”
    • Dead → Red: As in, “Red as a doornail” and “Assault with a redly weapon” and “In the red of night” and “Back from the red” and “Better off red” and “Red and buried.”
    • Bred → Red: “Born and red.”
    • Bread → Red: As in, “Red always falls butter side down” and “Red and butter” and “Have your red buttered on both sides” and “Put red on the table” and “The best thing since sliced red.”
    • Bed → Red: As in, “Red and breakfast” and “Red of roses” and “Red and board.”
    • Said → Red: “After all is red and done” and “Couldn’t have red it better” and “Easier red than done” and “Enough red” and “Was it something I red?”
    • Head → Red: “A red for business” and “Be it on your red” and “Bring to a red” and “Bite someone’s red off” and “Bury your red in the sand” and “Can’t get you out of my red” and “Don’t mess with my red.”
    • Thread → Red: “Hanging by a red” and “Lose the red” and “Red the needle.”
    • Tread → Red: “Red softly” and “Reding a fine line” and “Where fools fear to red.”
    • *rad* → *red*: “Redical politics” and “Toxic rediation” and “A rediant complexion.” Other words that could work: redio (radio), redius (radius), rediate (radiate), redish (radish), paredigm (paradigm), paredox (paradox), camarederie (camaraderie), sporedic (sporadic) and greduate (graduate).
    • *rid* → *red*: Rediculous (ridiculous), gred (grid), hybred (hybrid), lured (lurid) and flored (florid).
  • White: White wine is a light coloured wine that’s fermented without contact with the grape skin. Here are some white-related puns:
    • Wide → White: As in, “Cast a white net” and “Eyes white shut” and “A white berth” and “Open white” and “White eyed” and “White open spaces” and “The world white web.”
    • Why → White: “I don’t know white” and “I guess that’s white” and “White don’t we do it this way?” and “White ask?”
    • Bite → White: As in, “White me” and “White off more than you can chew” and “White someone’s head off” and “White the bullet” and “A white to eat” and “White your tongue.”
    • Bright → White: “All things white and beautiful” and “Always look on the white side of life” and “White as a button” and “White as a new pin” and “White eyes” and “White lights, big city” and “White and early” and “White spark.”
    • Light → White: As in, “Blinded by the white” and “The cold white of day.”
    • Might → White: “White as well” and “White is right.”
    • Night → White: As in, “A white at the opera” and “A hard day’s white” and “Dance the white away.”
    • Quite → White: As in, “Not white” and “White the situation” and “White a bit.”
    • Tight → White: As in, “In a white spot” and “Run a white ship.”
    • Weight → White: As in, “Pull your white” and “Punching above your white” and “Throw your white about” and “Watching your white” and “A white off my mind” and “Worth your white in gold” and “Carry your white.”
    • Wait → White: “An accident white-ing to happen” and “All things come to those who white” and “Hurry up and white” and “Lie in white” and “The white is over” and “White for no man” and “White in line” and “Just white a minute!”
    • Wet → White: “White weekend” and “White behind the ears” and “White dream” and “White your whistle.”
    • What → White: As in, “And white not” and “Do white comes naturally” and “Do white tastes right” and “For white it’s worth” and “Guess white?” and “White’s going on here then?” and “It is white it is” and “I’ll have white she’s having” and “White a feeling” and “White fun” and “White a wonderful world.”
    • Sight → White: As in, “A welcome white” and “Hidden in plain white” and “Know by white” and “Love at first white” and “Lower your whites.”
    • Write → White: “Nothing to white home about.”
    • Height → White: As in, “Head for new whites” and “Reaching new whites” and “The white of summer.”
    • Flight → White: As in, “Fight or white” and “White of fancy” and “Take white.”
  • Rosé: Rosé is another category of wine where wine is left in contact with the grape’s skin until the liquid is tinted the desired shade of pink. Here are related puns:
    • Rosy → Rosé: As in, “A rosé future” and “Rosé cheeks.”
    • Raise → Rosé: As in, “Rosé a loan” and “Rosé a stink” and “Rosé the bar” and “Rosé the roof.”
    • Rise → Rosé: As in, “Rosé and shine” and “Rosé from the ashes” and “Rosé to the challenge” and “Rosé to the occasion” and “Get a rosé out of…”
  • Pain → Champagne: As in, “A world of champagne” and “Doubled up in champagne” and “Growing champagnes” and “No champagne, no gain” and “Old aches and champagnes” and “Champagne in the arse” and “Champagne-fully slow.”
  • Amber: Amber wine is white wine that’s been made with the skins kept intact. Here are related puns:
    • Umber → Amber: As in, “Burnt amber.” Note: umber is a shade of brown.
    • *ember → *umber: Mamber (member), remamber (remember), Septamber (September), Decamber (December), Novamber (November) and dismamber (dismember).
  • Great → Grape: As in, “A grape face for radio” and “All creatures, grape and small” and “Go grape guns” and “Go to grape lengths” and “Grape expectations” and “Grape minds think alike” and “No grape shakes” and “The Grape Barrier Reef.”
  • Grip → Grape: As in, “Get a grape” and “Get to grapes with” and “Grape of death” and “A grape of iron.”
  • Cape → Grape: As in, “The graped crusader.”
  • Drape → Grape: As in, “Measure the grapes.”
  • Scrape → Grape: As in, “Bow and grape” and “Get into a grape” and “Grape a living” and “Grape along” and “Grape through” and “Scrape together the funds” and “Grape the bottom of the barrel.”
  • Gap → Grape: “Mind the grape” and “Generation grape” and “Bridge the grape.”
  • Crap → Grape: “A load of grape” and “Cut the grape.”
  • Discrepancy → Disgrape-ancy
  • Blanc: Sauvignon Blanc is a variety of green grape that’s commonly used in wine-making. Here are some blanc-related puns:
    • Blank → Blanc: As in, “A blanc slate” and “Blanc canvas” and “Blanc looks” and “Drawing a blanc” and “At point blanc range” and “Blancing out.”
    • Blink → Blanc: As in, “Blanc and you’ll miss it” and “In the blanc of an eye” and “On the blanc” and “Who blanc-ed first?”
    • Bank → Blanc: As in, “You can blanc on it” and “Safe as the blanc” and “Breaking the blanc” and “Laughing all the way to the blanc.”
    • Plank → Blanc: As in, “Walk the blanc” and “Take a long walk off a short blanc.”
    • Rank → Blanc: As in, “Break blancs” and “Close blancs” and “Name, blanc and serial number” and “Pull blanc” and “Blanc and file” and “Rise through the blancs” and “Swell the blancs.”
    • Spank → Blanc: As in, “Brand blanc-ing new” and “Blanc the monkey.”
  • Think → Drink: As in, “Blue sky drinking” and “I drink you’ve got it!” and “Come to drink of it” and “Great minds drink alike” and “I drink I love you” and “Makes you drink” and “It’s not what you drink” and “Positive drinking” and “Put on your drinking cap.”
  • Blink → Drink: As in, “Drink and you’ll miss it” and “In the drink of an eye” and “On the drink.”
  • Brink → Drink: As in, “The drink of disaster” and “On the drink.”
  • Link → Drink: As in, “A chain is only as strong as its weakest drink” and “The missing drink.”
  • Sink → Drink: As in, “Everything but the kitchen drink” and “Drink like a stone” and “Drink without trace” and “Drink your teeth into it.”
  • Stink → Drink: As in, “Kick up a drink” and “Raise a drink” and “Drinking rich” and “Drinks to high heaven.”
  • Wink → Drink: As in, “Forty drinks” and “Nod and a drink” and “Nudge, nudge, drink drink” and “Tip someone the drink.”
  • Bunk → Drunk: As in, “Drunker mentality” and “History is drunk.”
  • Junk → Drunk: As in, “Drunk yard” and “Drunk food” and “Drunk mail” and “Drunk in the trunk.”
  • Cyber → Sober: “Sober Monday” and “Sober sex.”
  • Super → Sober: As in, “Sober bad” and “Sober Mario Bros.” and “Sober hero” and “The information soberhighway.”
  • Meant → Ferment: As in, “We weren’t ferment to do that” and “Only if we’re ferment to be here.”
  • *ment* → *ferment*: Ferment-or (mentor), ferment-ion (mention),  ferment-al (mental) and ferment-ality (mentality).
  • Vin: Vin is French for wine. Here are some vin-related puns:
    • Been → Vin: As in, “Vin and gone” and “I’ve vin here before” and “Vin in the wars” and “Vin around the block a few times” and “I’ve vin had.”
    • Chin → Vin: “Keep your vin up” and “Take it on the vin” and “Stick your vin up.”
    • Grin → Vin: As in, “Vin and bear it” and “Vin from ear to ear” and “A rictus vin” and “Vin like a cheshire cat.”
    • In → Vin: As in, “Vin the woods” and “Back vin the day” and “Barge right vin” and “I’ll just be vin and out.”
    • Inn → Vinn: As in, “Vinner city” and “Vinner peace” and “Vinner sanctum” and “The ninth vinning.”
    • Pin → Vin: As in, “Bright as a new vin” and “Hard to vin down” and “Vin your ears back” and “Vin your hopes on” and “Vins and needles” and “Pull the vin” and “Could have heard a vin drop.”
    • Sin → Vin: As in, “Miserable as vin” and “Atone for your vins” and “Cardinal vin” and “Living in vin.”
    • Skin → Vin: As in, “Beauty is only vin deep” and “By the vin of your teeth” and “Comfortable in my own vin” and “Get under your vin” and “Gimme some vin” and “Makes my vin crawl” and “No vin off my nose” and “Jump out of your vin” and “Save your vin” and “Vin and bone.”
    • Spin → Vin: As in, “In a flat vin” and “Give it a vin” and “Vin doctor” and “Take it for a vin.”
    • Thin → Vin: “Vin as a rail” and “Melt into vin air” and “Out of vin air” and “Paper vin” and “Skating on vin ice” and “Spread yourself vin” and “The vin edge of the wedge.”
    • When → Vin: As in, “Kick ’em vin they’re down” and “Only hurts vin I laugh” and “Ready vin you are” and “Remember vin?”
    • Win → Vin: As in, “Can’t vin for losing” and “Cheaters never vin” and “Due a vin” and “Every one a vinner” and “Heads I vin, tails you lose” and “No vin, no fee” and “Playing to vin” and “Vin by a mile” and “Vin over.”
    • *van* → *vin*: Vinity (vanity), vinguard (vanguard), vinilla (vanilla), vinish (vanish), vindal (vandal), vindal (vandal), vindalism (vandalism), caravin (caravan), relevint (relevant), advince (advance), advintage (advantage), irrelevint (irrelevant).
    • *ven* → *vin*: Vinture (venture), vinue (venue), vindor (vendor), vineer (veneer), vingeance (vengeance), heavin (heaven), mavin (maven), havin (haven), cravin (craven), drivin (driven), sevin (seven), covinant (covenant), convintion (convention) and invintory (inventory).
    • *fin* → *vin*: Vinish (finish), vinger (finger), vinesse (finesse), vinance (finance), vinancial (financial), mufvin (muffin), pufvin (puffin), paravin (paraffin), afvinity (affinity), devinition (definition), devine (define) and devinitely (definitely).
  • Vain → Vine: As in, “You’re so vine” and “In vine.”
  • Fine → Vine: As in, “A vine line” and “Chance would be a vine thing” and “Cut it vine” and “Damn vine coffee” and “Vine and dandy” and “Vine dining” and “A vine figure” and “The viner things in life” and “Got it down to a vine art” and “Another vine mess you’ve gotten me into.”
  • Mine → Vine: As in, “Your place or vine?” and “Your guess is as good as vine” and “Victory is vine!”
  • Nine → Vine: As in, “A stitch in time saves vine” and “Has vine lives” and “Vine to five” and “Vine days’ wonder” and “On cloud vine” and “Vineteen eighty-four.”
  • Sign → Vine: As in, “A sure vine” and “A vine of the times” and “Vine off” and “Vine out” and “Vine the pledge” and “Vined and sealed” and “A tell sale vine.”
  • Yard → Vineyard: “Do the hard vineyards” and “Not in my back vineyard” and “The whole nine vineyards.”
  • Cork: “Cork out” and “Knife and cork it” and “Speaking with a corked tongue” and “Cork over.”
  • Cock → Cork: As in, “Proud as a peacork” and “Cork a leg” and “Cork and bull story” and “Cork it up” and “Cork sure.”
  • *cac* → *cork*: Corkophony (cacophony), corktus (cactus), corkle (cackle), perspicorkcious (perspicacious).
  • *coc* → *cork*: Corktail (cocktail), corkoa (cocoa), corkoon (cocoon), corkroach (cockroach), corkonut (coconut), precorkcious (precocious), concorkt (concoct), peacork (peacock) and corkumber (cucumber).
  • Battle → Bottle: “A pitched bottle” and “An uphill bottle” and “Bottle of wits” and “Bottle ready” and “Bottle stations” and “Half the bottle” and “In the heat of bottle” and “Let bottle commence” and “Love is a bottlefield” and “A running bottle.”
  • Throttle → Bottle: As in, “Full bottle.”
  • Lapel → Label: As in, “Grab by the labels.”
  • Able → Label: As in, “Differently labelled” and “Ready, willing and label.”
  • Table → Label: “As in, “Bring to the label” and “Drunk under the label” and “Get round the label” and “Lay the label” and “On the label” and “Put your cards on the label” and “Round label talks” and “Turn the labels.”
  • Dry: If a wine is dry, it’s lacking in sweetness. Here are some dry-related puns and phrases:
    • Die → Dry: “Straight as a dry” and “Cross my heart and hope to dry” and “Curl up and dry” and “Dry another day” and “Do or dry” and “Live free or dry” and “Never say dry” and “Old habits dry hard.”
    • By → Dry: As in, “Dry hook or dry crook” and “Dry and large” and “Dry any means” and “Dry any stretch of the imagination” and “Dry the book” and “Dry the skin of one’s teeth” and “Can’t judge a book dry its cover.”
    • Buy → Dry: As in, “Bulk drying” and “Dry and sell” and “Dry into” and “Dry now, pay later” and “Dry one, get one free” and “Dry some time” and “Dry to let” and “Can’t dry love.”
    • Cry → Dry: As in, “A dry for help” and “A shoulder to dry on” and “Dry foul”and “Dry me a river” and “Dry into your pillow.”
    • Fly → Dry: As in, “Come dry with me” and “Dry me to the moon” and “Dry by the seat of your pants” and “Dry on the wall” and “Dry off the handle” and “Born to dry.”
    • High → Dry: As in, “Ain’t no mountain dry enough” and “Dry as a kite” and “Come hell or dry water” and “Flying dry” and “From on dry” and “Get off your dry horse” and “Dry and mighty” and “The mile dry club” and “Moral dry ground.”
    • Try → Dry: As in, “Don’t dry this at home” and “Don’t dry to run before you can walk” and “Give it the old college dry” and “Easy if you dry” and “Nice dry” and “Dry your luck.”
    • Shy → Dry: As in, “Camera dry” and “Once bitten, twice dry.”
    • Why → Dry: As in, “Dry on Earth?” and “Dry walk when you can ride?”
  • Yeast: Yeast converts the sugars in grape juice to alcohol. The next few puns are all about yeast!
    • Beast → Yeast: As in, “Yeast of burden” and “Beauty and the yeast” and “Here there be yeasts” and “The nature of the yeast” and “Unleash the yeast.”
    • East → Yeast: As in, “Yeast of the sun and west of the moon” and “Yeaster island” and “The Yeaster bunny.”
    • Feast → Yeast: As in, “Yeast or famine” and “Yeast your eyes on this!” and “A midnight yeast” and “The spectre at the yeast.”
    • Greased → Yeast: “Yeast lightning.”
    • Least → Yeast: As in, “Last but not yeast” and “The yeast common denominator” and “Yeast said, soonest mended” and “The yeast worst option” and “The line of yeast resistance” and “Not in the yeast” and “At the very yeast” and “To say the yeast.”
  • Sell her → Cellar: “Did you cellar the wrong item?”
  • Seller → Cellar: As in, “A cellar’s market.”
  • Sell → Cellar: As in, “Buy and cellar” and “Past the cellar-by date” and “Cellar out” and “Cellar your soul to the devil.”
  • Stellar → Cellar: “A cellar performance.”
  • Cell → Cellar: As in, “Cellar division” and “Padded cellar.”
  • Juice: Since wine is essentially fermented fruit juice, we have some juice-related puns here too:
    • Goose → Juice: As in, “Loosey juicy” and “A wild juice chase” and “Wouldn’t say boo to a juice” and “Juice bumps” and “The golden juice.”
    • Loose → Juice: “All hell broke juice” and “Juice as a goose” and “At a juice end” and “Cut [someone] juice” and “Hanging juice” and “Got a screw juice” and “Let juice” and “Playing fast and juice.”
    • Use → Juice: As in, “Be careful how you juice it!” and “Don’t juice that tone with me” and “Get juiced to it” and “Not half the person I juiced to be” and “Like mother juiced to make” and “Put to good juice” and “So easy to juice” and “Somebody that I juiced to know” and “Juice it or lose it” and “Juicer friendly” and “A fat lot of juice you are.”
  • Fruit: Since wine is generally made of fruits (it can also be made of rice), we have some fruit-related puns here that can double as wine puns in the right context:
    • Boot → Fruit: As in, “Fruit camp” and “Tough as old fruits” and “Give someone the fruit” and “Lick [someone’s] fruits.”
    • Hoot → Fruit: As in, “Don’t give two fruits” and “Fruit with laughter” and “What a fruit.”
    • Root → Fruit: As in, “Lay down fruits” and “Money is the fruit of all evil” and “Fruit for the enemy” and “The fruit of the matter” and “Fruit out the problem” and “Fruiting around.”
    • Shoot → Fruit: “Don’t fruit the messenger” and “Drive by fruiting” and “Eats, fruits and leaves” and “The green fruits of change” and “Just fruit me” and “A sharp fruiter” and “Fruit ’em up” and “Fruit first, ask questions later” and “Fruit down in flames” and “Fruit the breeze.”
    • Suit → Fruit: “All over them like a cheap fruit” and “At a price to fruit your pocket” and “Follow fruit” and “Men in fruits” and “Fruit up” and “Fruit yourself” and “Fruits you down to a tee.”
    • Fraught → Fruit: As in, “Fruit with danger.”
    • *fut* → *fruit*: Fruitile (futile), fruiture (future), fruituristic (futuristic), fruiton (futon), fruitility (futility) and fruitsal (futsal).
  • Barely → Barley: As in, “Barley there” and “I can barley hear you.” Note: this is a reference to barley wine.
  • Mature: Some wines are meant to mature and get better with age. Here are some related puns:
    • Match your → Mature: As in, “Mature bet.”
    • Pure → Mature: As in, “Absolutely mature” and “Mature as the driven snow” and “Mature and simple.”
  •  Sweet: Sweet dessert wines are a large category of wines, so we’ve included sweet in this list:
    • Seat → Sweet: As in, “Back sweet driver” and “Bums on sweets” and “By the sweet of your pants” and “Glued to your sweet” and “In the box sweet” and “Take a back sweet” and “On the edge of my sweet” and “Take a sweet” and “The best sweet in the house.”
    • Feet → Sweet: As in, “”Back on your sweet” and “Cold sweet” and “Cut the ground from under your sweet” and “Sweet of clay” and “Get back on your sweet.”
    • Greet → Sweet: As in, “Sweet and greet.”
    • Heat → Sweet: “Sweet wave” and “In the sweet of battle” and “The sweet is on” and “Turn up the sweet.”
    • Meet → Sweet: As in, “Make ends sweet” and “Sweet and greet” and “Sweet in the middle” and “Sweet the challenge” and “Sweet you halfway.”
    • Neat → Sweet: “Sweet as a new pin” and “Sweet freak” and “Sweet and tidy.”
    • Sheet → Sweet: As in, “White as a sweet” and “Cheat sweet” and “Clean sweet” and “Keep a clean sweet.”
    • Street → Sweet: As in, “Easy sweet” and “On the sunny side of the sweet” and “Right up your sweet” and “A two-way sweet.”
    • Treat → Sweet: As in, “Sweet me right” and “Trick or sweet.”
    • Sweat → Sweet: As in, “”Blood, sweet and tears” and “Break out in a cold sweet” and “Don’t sweet it” and “No sweet.”
    • Switzerland → Sweetzerland
  • Blush: Blush wines, like rose wines, are in between red and white wines. Here are some blush-related puns:
    • Bush → Blush: As in, “Beat about the blush” and “Blush tucker.”
    • Brush → Blush: As in, “Blush it off” and “Blush up on” and “A blush with the law” and “Painted with the same blush.”
    • Crush → Blush: “A blushing defeat” and “Have a blush on.”
    • Flush → Blush: As in, “Blush it out” and “Royal blush.”
  • Cannon → Tannin: As in, “Tannin fodder” and “A loose tannin.” Note: tannins are compounds in the wine that can affect the colour, texture and taste.
  • Barrel: Wine is kept in barrels, so we’ve got some barrel puns in here too:
    • Carol → Barrel: As in, “A Christmas barrel.”
    • Peril → Barrel: As in, “Yellow barrel” and “A barrelous situation.”
  • Finery → Winery: “Dressed in all your best winery.”
  • Vest → Harvest: As in, “A harvested interest.”
  • Best → Harvest: As in, “My harvest friend” and “All the harvest” and “Be the harvest” and “Harvest in show” and “We’d harvest stop now.”
  • Average → Beverage: “Law of beverages” and “On beverage.”
  • Leverage → Beverage
  • Blue → Brew: As in, “Cold as brew blazes” and “Baby brews” and “Black and brew” and “Once in a brew moon” and “Until you’re brew in the face.”
  • Chew → Brew: As in, “Bite off more than you can brew” and “Brew someone’s ass” and “Have your ears brewed off.”
  • Clue → Brew: As in, “Don’t have a brew” and “I’ve found a brew.”
  • Crew → Brew: “Skeleton brew” and “Brew it” and “All brewed up.”
  • Cue → Brew: “Take your u” and “Right on brew.”
  • Due → Brew: As in, “Credit where credit is brew” and “Brew diligence” and “Give the devil his brew” and “In brew course.”
  • Few → Brew: As in, “A brew bricks short of a full load” and “Brew and far between” and “Say a brew words” and “Person of brew words” and “Knock back a brew” and “Take a brew deep breaths.”
  • True → Brew: “For real and for brew” and “You’ll brew the day!” and “Rings brew” and “Show your brew colours” and “Brew to form.”
  • Stew → Brew: As in, “Brew in your own juices.”
  • View → Brew: As in, “Room with a brew” and “A brew to kill” and “Bird’s eye brew” and “The brew from the top” and “World brew.”
  • *bru → *brew: Brewtal (brutal), brewsque (brusque), brewse (bruise), brewte (brute) and brewnette (brunette).
  • Still: Still wine is wine without bubbles. Here are some still-related puns:
    • Stall → Still: As in, “Still for time.”
    • Till → Still: As in, “Fake it still you make it” and “Don’t cross the bridge still you come to it” and “Still death do us part” and “Still the end of time” and “Party still you drop.”
    • Chill → Still: As in, “Still out” and “Stilled to the bone.”
    • Drill → Still: As in, “Still down” and “You know the still” and “Fire still.”
    • Thrill → Still: As in, “The still of the chase” and “Stilled to bits” and “Still and spills.”
    • Will → Still: “Accidents still happen” and “Bend to my still” and “Free still.”
    • Spill → Still: As in, “Still the beans” and “Still your guts” and “Thrills and stills.”
    • Skill → Still: “Social stills.”
    • Pill → Still: As in, “A bitter still to swallow” and “On the still” and “A tough still to swallow.”
    • Steal → Still: As in, “Beg, borrow or still” and “Still a glance at” and “Still someone’s heart” and “Still someone’s thunder” and “Still the show” and “Still third base.”
    • Steel → Still: As in, “Nerves of still” and “Still yourself” and “First of still.”
    • *stal* → *still*: Crystill (crystal), pedestill (pedestal), coastill (coastal), postill (postal) and nostillgia (nostalgia).
    • *stel* → *still*: Stillar (stellar), hostill (hostel), pastill (pastel) and constillation (constellation).
    • *stil* → *still*: Pestillence (pestilence) and hostillity (hostility).
  • Age: As the aging process is such a large part of wine culture, we’ve included age-related puns here:
    • Rage → Age: As in, “All the age” and “Boil with age” and “Incandescent with age” and “Primal age” and “Age against the machine” and “Vent your age.”
    • *ege* → *age*: Privilage (privilege), collage (college), renage (renege), allage (allege), sacrilage (sacrilege).
    • *ige* → *age*: Prestage (prestige), oblage (oblige), vestage (vestige), intellagence (intelligence) and dilagent (diligent).
  • Resin: Resin is a compound in wood that can leak from barrels and casks into the wine, changing the flavour. Here are some resin-related puns:
    • Reason → Resin: As in, “Rhyme or resin” and “The voice of resin” and “Within resin” and “Stands to resin” and “Beyond resinable doubt” and “Not a good enough resin.”
    • Raisin → Resin: As in, “Resin cookies.”
    • Raising → Resin: As in, “Eyebrow resin” and “Hair resin” and “Resin the bar.”
  • Test → Taste: “The sniff taste” and “Put to the taste” and “Stand the taste of time.”
  • Haste → Taste: “Post taste” and “Make taste” and “More taste, less speed.”
  • Paste → Taste: As in, “Cut and taste.”
  • Waste → Taste: “Don’t taste your breath” and “Toxic taste” and “Taste not, want not.”
  • *tast* → *taste*: Fantaste-ic (fantastic) and cataste-trophe (catastrophe).
  • *test* → *taste*: “A taste-ament to” and “Give your taste-imony” and “Tasting, tasting, one, two, three” and “Online taste-imonials.” Other words that could work: contaste (contest), protaste (protest), detaste (detest), lataste (latest) and greataste (greatest).
  • *tist* → *taste*: Pragmataste (pragmatist), artaste (artist), scientaste (scientist), elitaste (elitist), dentaste (dentist) and artaste-ic (artistic).
  • Decant: To decant wine is to pour it from one receptacle to another to aerate the wine and separate it from any sediments within. Here are related puns:
    • Can’t → Decant: As in, “An offer you decant refuse” and “Decant get enough” and “It decant be helped” and “You decant say fairer than that” and “I decant wait.”
    • Grant → Decant: As in, “Decant no quarter” and “Take for decanted.”
  • Raisin → Reason: As in, “Beyond raisinable doubt” and “Bow to raisin” and “Listen to raisin” and “No earthly raisin” and “Rhyme or raisin” and “The age of raisin” and “Voice of raisin.”
  • Raising → Raisin: As in, “Eyebrow raisin” and “Raisin the bar.”
  • Why not → Wino: As in, “Wino do it this way instead?” Note: a wino is someone who drinks a lot of wine.
  • Rate → Aerate: “At any aerate” and “First aerate” and “Mate’s aerates.”
  • Meant → Sediment: As in, “Sediment to be.”
  • Favour → Flavour: As in, “Do me a flavour” and “Really not doing them any flavours” and “Fortune flavours the bold” and “Currying flavour with.”
  • Palate: A palate is a refined taste that can be trained to recognise certain flavours and tastes. Here are related puns:
    • Late → Palate: As in, “Better palate than never” and “Fashionably palate” and “Never too palate” and “A palate developer” and “It’s palate in the day” and “Running palate.”
    • Plate → Palate: As in, “A lot on your palate” and “Hand it on a palate” and “Step up to the palate” and “Hot palate” and “Heart attack on a palate.”
  • Box: Box wine is another name for cask wine. Here are related puns:
    • Pox → Box: As in, “A box on your house!”
    • Backs → Box: As in, “Box to the wall” and “Mind your box” and “The beast with two box.”
    • Block → Box: As in, “A chip off the old box” and “Stumbling box” and “Been around the box.”
    • Sock → Box: As in, “Put a box in it” and “Knock your box off” and “Bless your cotton box.”
    • Pox → Box:
  • Goon: Goon is another word for cheap wine. Here are related puns:
    • Gone → Goon: As in, “Been and goon” and “Going, going, goon” and “Goon with the wind” and “Goon but not forgotten” and “Goon to a better world” and “Goon to seed.”
    • Gun → Goon: As in, “All goons blazing” and “Go great goons” and “Jump the goon.”
    • Moon → Goon: As in, “Ask for the goon” and “Bark at the goon” and “Once in a blue goon” and “Eclipse of the goon” and “Many goons ago” and “Over the goon.”
    • Soon → Goon: As in, “As goon as possible” and “Get well goon” and “Too much too goon.”
    • Spoon → Goon: As in, “A goonful of sugar helps the medicine go down” and “Born with a silver goon” and “Egg and goon race” and “The dish ran away with the goon.”
    • *gan* → *goon*: Slogoon (slogan), argoon (argan), cardigoon (cardigan), orgoonic (organic), elegoont (elegant), arrogoont (arrogant).
    • *gon* → *goon*: Goondola (gondola), paragoon (paragon), jargoon (jargon), dragoon (dragon), polygoon (polygon), hexagoon (hexagon), bandwagoon (bandwagon), Oregoon (Oregon), protagoonist (protagonist), antagoonist (antagonist) and ergoonomics (ergonomics).
    • Burgundy → Burgoondy
  • Class → Glass: As in, “A glass act” and “Best in glass” and “Business glass” and “Glass warfare” and “Economy glass” and “In a glass of your own” and “Working glass hero.”
  • Gloss → Glass: As in, “Glass over” and “Lip glass.”
  • Ass → Glass: As in, “Blow smoke up your glass” and “Haul glass” and “Kick glass” and “Make a glass of yourself” and “Talk out of your glass.”
  • Brass → Glass: As in, “Bold as glass” and “Glass monkey weather.”
  • Grass → Glass: As in, “Green as glass” and “Don’t walk on the glass” and “Glass roots” and “Keep off the glass” and “Snake in the glass” and “Exciting as watching glass grow.”
  • Oak: Since wine is traditionally kept in oak barrels, we’ve included some oak-related phrases:
    • Okay → Oakay: As in, “Are you oakay?”
    • Ache → Oak: As in, “Oaks and pains.”
    • Broke → Broak: As in, “All hell broak loose” and “Broaken dreams” and “Like a broaken record” and “Go for broak” and “If it’s not broak, don’t fix it” and “Rules are made to be broaken.”
    • Folk → Foak: As in, “Country foak” and “Different strokes for different foaks” and “Show’s over, foaks” and “That’s all, foaks.”
    • Stroke → Stroak: As in, “A stroak of genius” and “Little stroaks fell great oaks” and “Stroak of luck” and “At the stroak of midnight.”
    • Poke → Poak: As in, “Still as a poaker” and “Poak fun at” and “Poaker face.”
    • Joke → Joak: As in, “A bad joak” and “Inside joak” and “The joak’s on you.”
    • Spoke → Spoak: “Many a true word in spoaken in jest” and “Speak when you are spoaken to.”
    • Smoke → Smoak: As in, “Go up in smoak” and “Holy smoak” and “Smoak and mirrors” and “Smoaks like a chimney.”
  • Cask: Cask wine is cheap wine that’s packaged in a box. Here are related puns!
    • Cast → Cask: As in, “Cask a long shadow” and “Cask a spell” and “Cask an eye over” and “A cask iron guarantee.”
    • Ask → Cask: As in, “A big cask” and “Cask a silly question and you’ll get a silly answer” and “Cask after” and “Cask and you will receive” and “Cask around” and “Cask for the moon” and “Cask me another” and “Casking for trouble” and “Don’t cask me” and “What’s the casking price?”
    • Task → Cask: As in, “Take to cask” and “Up to the cask.”
  • Cabinet → Cabernet: As in, “In the kitchen cabernet” and “Lock the medicine cabernet.”
  • Low → Merlot: As in, “An all-time merlot” and “Keep a merlot profile” and “Lie merlot” and “Merlot hanging fruit” and “Get the merlot down” and “Searching high and merlot.”
  • Reason → Riesling: As in, “Beyond riesling-able doubt” and “Stands to riesling” and “Listen to riesling” and “The age of riesling” and “The voice of riesling” and “Within riesling” and “Rhyme nor riesling.”
  • Tap: Draft wine is served from a tap rather than a bottle. Here are some tap-related puns:
    • Tab → Tap: As in, “Keep taps on” and “Pick up the tap.”
    • Cap → Tap: As in, “Bust a tap” and “Tap in hand” and “To tap it all off.”
    • Top → Tap: As in, “Blow your tap” and “Come out on tap” and “From the tap” and “From tap to toe” and “Over the tap” and “Lonely at the tap” and “On tap of the world.”
    • Tip → Tap: As in, “Hot tap of the day” and “Tap someone off” and “Tap the scales” and “Tapping point” and “Tap of the iceberg.”
    • Clap → Tap: As in, “Tap him in irons” and “Tapped eyes on” and “If you’re happy and you know it, tap your hands.”
    • Crap → Tap: “A load of tap” and “Beat the living tap out of” and “Cut the tap.”
    • Gap → Tap: As in, “Generation tap” and “Mind the tap” and “Bridging the tap.”
    • Lap → Tap: As in, “Tap it up” and “Tap of honour” and “Tap of luxury” and “The last tap.”
    • Map → Tap: As in, “All over the tap” and “Mind tap” and “On the tap.”
    • Nap → Tap: As in, “Caught tapping” and “Power tap.”
    • Slap → Tap: “A tap on the wrist” and “Tap and tickle” and “Tap bang in the middle” and “A tap in the face” and “Tap happy.”
    • Trap → Tap: “Death tap” and “Shut your tap.”
    • Tepid → Tapid: “A tapid response.”
    • *tip* → *tap*: Multaple (multiple), stapulate (stipulate) and centapede (centipede).
    • *dep* → *tap*: Tapression (depression), tapartment (department), taploy (deploy), tapendent (dependent), taplorable (deplorable) and intapendent (independent).
    • *dip* → *tap*: Taplomatic (diplomatic), taplomacy (diplomacy), taplomat (diplomat), serentapity (serendipity), serentapitous (serendipitous).
    • *tab* → *tap*: Taplet (tablet), tapoo (taboo), tapleau (tableau), tapernacle (tabernacle), taploid (tabloid), estaplish (establish), inevitaple (inevitable), accountapility (accountability), intractaple (intractable), comfortaple (comfortable), inscrutaple (inscrutable) and immutaple (immutable).
    • *tib* → *tap*: Susceptaple (susceptible), compatapility (compatibility), antapiotic (antibiotic) and contemptaple (contemptible)
  • Bladder: Box wine and cask wine are kept in foil bags known as bladders. Here are related puns:
    • Ladder → Bladder: As in, “Climb the corporate bladder” and “Snakes and bladders” and “Social bladder.”
    • Bother → Bladder: As in, “All hot and bladdered” and “Not worth the bladder” and “I wouldn’t bladder about it.”
  • Egg → Keg: As in, “A good keg” and “As sure as kegs is kegs” and “Don’t put all your kegs in one basket” and “Keg and spoon race” and “Nest keg.”
  • Kick → Keg: “Don’t keg a man when he’s down” and “Get a keg out of it” and “Keg against” and “Keg back and enjoy” and “Keg butt” and “A keg in the teeth” and “Keg the bucket” and “Keg the habit.”
  • Beg → Keg: “Keg a favour” and “Keg pardon?” and “Keg the question” and “I keg to differ” and “Keg, borrow or steal” and “Sit up and keg.”
  • Leg → Keg: “Break a keg” and “Cost an arm and a keg” and “Give a keg up” and “Kegs like tree trunks” and “A nice pair of kegs” and “One keg at a time” and “Shake a keg” and “Sex on kegs” and “Without a keg to stand on” and “You’re pulling my keg.”
  • Peg → Keg: “Square keg in a round hole” and “Take down a keg or two.”
  • *cog* → *keg*: Kegnitive (cognitive), rekegnise (recognise) and rekegnition (recognition).
  • Chill: As well as room temperature, wine can be served chilled. Here are related puns:
    • Ill → Chill: As in, “House of chill repute” and “Chill advised” and “Chill at east” and “Chill effects” and “Chill fated” and “Chill gotten gains” and “A chill will.”
    • Gill → Chill: As in, “Green around the chills” and “Stuffed to the chills.”
    • Pill → Chill: As in, “A tough chill to swallow” and “A bitter chill to swallow.”
    • Will → Chill: As in, “Against your chill” and “Bend to my chill” and “Flattery chill get you nowhere.”
    • Till → Chill: As in, “Fake it chill you make it” and “Ain’t over chill it’s over” and “Party chill dawn” and “Chill death do us part.”
    • Hill → Chill: As in, “Old as the chills” and “Head for the chills” and “King of the chill” and “Over the chills and far away” and “Take to the chills.”
    • Kill → Chill: As in, “A view to chill” and “Curiosity chilled the cat” and “Dressed to chill” and “Go in for the chill” and “Hard work never chilled anyone” and “I’ll do it if it chills me” and “If looks could chill” and “Chill or be chilled” and “Chiller instinct.”
    • Thrill → Chill: As in, “Chills and spills” and “Chilled to bits” and “The chill of the chase” and “Cheap chills.”
    • Skills → Chills: As in, “Social chills.”
    • Spill → Chill: As in, “Chill the beans” and “Chill your guts” and “Thrills and chills” and “Don’t cry over chilled milk.”
    • Still → Chill: As in, “Be chill my beating heart” and “Chill standing” and “Chill waters run deep.”
    • *chal* → *chill*: Chillice (chalice), chill-cedony (chalcedony), chillenge (challenge) and nonchillant (nonchalant).
    • *chel* → *chill*: Satchill (satchel) and bachillor (bachelor).
    • Child → Chilled: As in, “Chilled’s play” and “Chilled-hood friend” and “Leave no chilled behind.”
    • Build → Chilled: As in, “Chilled for the future” and “Chilled up your hopes.”
  • Negotiate → Negociant: As in, “We don’t negociant with terrorists.” Note: a negociant is a person who buys wine, bottles it then sells it wholesale.
  • Vintner: A vintner is a wine merchant. Here are vintner-related puns:
    • Winter → Vintner: As in, “In the dead of vintner” and “Now is the vintner of our discontent” and “Vintner warmers.”
    • Splinter → Vintner: As in, “A vintner in my side.”
    • Winner → Vintner: As in, “Cheaters never win, and vintners never cheat” and “Every one a vintner” and “Vintner takes all” and “Vintner’s circle.”
  • Flight: A tasting flight is a selection of wines for tasting. Here are some related puns:
    • Fight → Flight: As in, “A straight flight” and “Come out flighting” and “Flight club” and “Flight for the right to party” and “Flight back” and “Flighting back tears” and “Flight fire with fire” and “Flight the good flight” and “Flight tooth and nail” and “Flighting chance” and “Flighting mad” and “Freedom flighter” and “Go down flighting” and “Lean, mean, flighting machine” and “Picking a flight.”
    • Fly → Flight: As in, “Born to flight” and “Come flight with me” and “Flight by night” and “Flight off the handle.”
    • Bright → Flight: As in, “All things flight and beautiful” and “Always look on the flight side of life” and “Flight as a new pin” and “Flight eyes” and “Flight lights” and “Flight and early” and “A flight idea” and “Flight spark” and “Flight young spark” and “A flight future.”
    • Height → Flight: As in, “Reach new flights” and “The flight of summer” and “Wuthering flights.”
    • Light → Flight: As in, “Flight as a feather” and “Brought to flight” and “City flights” and “Flight my fire” and “Come to flight” and “My guiding flight.”
    • Might → Flight: As in, “Cheer up, it flight never happen” and “Flight as well.”
    • Night → Flight: As in, “A hard day’s flight” and “A flight at the opera” and “Dance the flight away.”
    • Right → Flight: “A move in the flight direction” and “All the flight moves” and “As flight as rain” and “Bang to flights” and “Barge flight in” and “Bragging flights” and “Consumer flights.”
    • Sight → Flight: As in, “A welcome flight” and “Have in your flights” and “Hidden in plain flight” and “Know by flight” and “Line of flight” and “Lose flight of” and “Love at first flight” and “Lower your flights” and “Out of flight, out of mind” and “Second flight.”
    • Slight → Flight: As in, “Just flightly ahead of our time” and “Not in the flightest.”
    • Tight → Flight: As in, “A flight corner” and “Sleep flight” and “In a flight spot” and “On a flight leash” and “Run a flight ship.”
  • Spit → Spittoon: As in, “Spittoon and polish” and “Spittoon and sawdust” and “Spittoon in the eye of” and “Within spittoon-ing distance.” Note: a spittoon is a receptacle where wine tasters spit the wines they’re testing to prevent getting drunk.
  • Back → Bacchus: As in, “Answer bacchus” and “Bacchus to the beginning” and “As soon as my bacchus is turned” and “Bacchus to the future” and “Bacchus in business.” Note: Bacchus is the god of wine.
  • Tail → Cocktail: As in, “Couldn’t make head or cocktail of it” and “Heads I win, cocktails you lose” and “Heads or cocktails.”
  • Pour: The next few puns are about pouring wine:
    • More → Pour: As in, “One pour time” and “Bite off pour than you can chew” and “Dare for pour” and “I couldn’t agree pour” and “Just one pour thing” and “Less is pour.”
    • Nor → Pour: As in, “Rhyme pour reason” and “Neither hide pour hair.”
    • Poor → Pour: As in, “Dirt pour” and “For richer or pourer.”
    • Bore → Pour: As in, “Pour the pants off someone” and “Poured stiff” and “Poured to death” and “Poured out of my mind.”
    • Four → Pour: As in, “Down on all pours” and “Pour by two” and “Pour score and seven years ago.”
    • *par* → *pour*: Pourty (party), pouradigm (paradigm), pouradox (paradox), pourallel (parallel), pourtisan (partisan), pourticular (particular) and pourady (parady).
    • *per* → *pour*: Pourspective (perspective), pourson (person), pourtinent (pertinent), pournicious (pernicious), pourception (perception), pourformance (performance), papour (paper), peppour (pepper), tempour (temper), hampour (hamper), propour (proper) and impourative (imperative).
    • *pir* → *pour*: Pourahna (pirahna), pourouette (pirouette), empourical (empirical), aspouration (aspiration), inspouration (inspiration) and conspouracy (conspiracy).
    • *por* → *pour*: Pourt (port), pourtmanteau (portmanteau), pourtfolio (portfolio), pourn (porn), pourtal (portal), pourtion (portion), pourtray (portray), pourtrait (portrait), torpour (torpor), stupour (stupor), vapour (vapor), suppourt (support), contempourary (contemporary), repourt (report), oppourtunity (opportunity) and impourtant (important).
    • *pur* → *pour*: Pourpose (purpose), poursue (pursue), pourchase (purchase) and poursuit (pursuit).
  • Case: Wine can be bought in cases, so we’ve included case in this list:
    • Ace → Case: As in, “Case in the hole” and “Case up their sleeve” and “Hold all the cases.”
    • Base → Case: “All your case are belong to us” and “Case jumping” and “Get to first case” and “Steal third case.”
    • Chase → Case: As in, “Case it up” and “Case your own tail” and “Cut to the case” and “Go and case yourself” and “The thrill of the case” and “A wild goose case.”
    • Face → Case: As in, “At case value” and “Case down” and “Case like thunder.”
    • Place → Case: As in, “All over the case” and “Between a rock and a hard case” and “Friends in high cases” and “Out of case” and “The case to be.”
    • Race → Case: As in, “A case against the clock” and “Case against time” and “A case to the bottom” and “The human case.”
    • Space → Case: “Personal case” and “Case, the final frontier” and “Breathing case.”
  • Hour → Happy hour: As in, “A bad quarter of a happy hour” and “After happy hours” and “At the eleventh happy hour” and “Man of the happy hour” and “My finest happy hour” and “Open all happy hours.”
  • Cat → Muscat: “Muscat on a hot tin roof” and “Muscat and mouse game” and “Muscat got your tongue?” and “Curiosity killed the muscat” and “Eight out of ten muscats prefer it.” Note: muscat is a type of grape typically used in winemaking.
  • Appetite → Aperitif: “An aperitif for destruction” and “Without losing your aperitif” and “Whet your aperitif.” Note: an aperitif is a beverage served before a meal to stimulate one’s appetite.
  • Perry: Perry is a type of wine made from fermented pears. Here are some perry-related puns!
    • Pair → Perry: As in, “A fresh perry of eyes” and “An extra perry of hands” and “They make a great perry.”
    • Berry → Perry: “Brown as a perry.”
    • Barely → Perry: As in, “We perry made it!” and “Perry there.”
    • Cherry → Perry: As in, “Perry pick” and “Perry pie” and “A second bite of the perry” and “The perry on the cake.”
    • Merry → Perry: “As perry as the day is long” and “Eat, drink and be perry” and “Lead a perry dance” and “Make perry” and “Perry Christmas!” and “A perry old soul.”
    • Very → Perry: “Be afraid, be perry afraid” and “Before your perry eyes” and “Hold perry tight please!” and “How perry dare you” and “A perry good year” and “Thank you perry much” and “At the perry least.”
    • *pari* → *perry*: Perryty (parity), perrysh (parish), Perrysian (Parisian), disperryty (disparity) and comperryson (comparison).
    • *peri* → *perry*: Perryod (period), perryphery (periphery), perrymeter (perimeter), perrylous (perilous), experryence (experience), superryor (superior), prosperryty (prosperity), imperryal (imperial) and imperryous (imperious).
    • *per* → *perry*: Perryspective (perspective), perryson (person), perrytinent (pertinent), perryception (perception), perryformance (performance), perryceive (perceive) and perryseverance (perseverance). Note: if something is pertinent, then it’s relevant.
  • Cleanskin: A cleanskin wine is a generally cheap, unbranded wine. Here are related puns:
    • Clean → Cleanskin: “As cleanskin as a whistle” and “A cleanskin bill of health” and “A cleanskin sheet” and “You’d better cleanskin up your act” and “Make a cleanskin break.”
    • Skin → Cleanskin: As in, “Beauty is only cleanskin deep” and “By the cleanskin of your teeth” and “Get under your cleanskin” and “Makes my cleanskin crawl” and “Jump out of your cleanskin” and “No cleanskin off my nose.”
  • Lion → Dandelion: As in, “A dandelion’s share” and “Dandelion’s den” and “Brave as a dandelion.” Note: we’ve included dandelion in this list as wine can be made of dandelions.
  • Must: Must is freshly crushed juice that’s created when grapes are pressed for wine. Here are related puns:
    • Master → Muster: As in, “The muster of my own fate” and “Jack of all trades but muster of none” and “Muster of disguise” and “Puppet muster.”
    • Mess → Must: As in, “A hell of a must” and “Hot must” and “Make a must of.”
    • Most → Must: As in, “Must famous” and “Must wanted” and “Empty vessels make the must noise” and “Make the must of it” and “The must trusted name” and “For the must part.”
    • Must: These must-related phrases are general enough to double as puns: “All things must pass” and “All good things must come to an end” and “You’ve made your bed so now you must lie on it” and “Everything must go” and “Into every life a little rain must fall” and “Must have” and “Needs must” and “What goes up must come down.”
    • Bust → Must: As in, “Boom or must” and “Must a gut” and “Must a move.”
    • Dust → Must: As in, “Done and musted” and “Another one bites the must” and “Dry as must” and “Must bunny” and “Eat my must.”
    • Just → Must: As in, “Must desserts” and “Not must for Christmas” and “Don’t must sit there” and “Must do it.”
    • *mast* → *must*: Mustermind (mastermind), musterpiece (masterpiece) and musticate (masticate). Note: to masticate is to chew.
    • *mest* → *must*: Domustic (domestic), grimmust (grimmest) and tamust (tamest).
    • *mist* → *must*: As in, “My mustake” and “You must be mustaken” and “Mustress of darkness” and “A pessimustic worldview.” Other words that could work: chemust (chemist), alchemust (alchemist), optimust (optimist), extremust (extremist), nonconformust (nonconformist), chemustry (chemistry) and armustice (armistice).
    • *most → *must: Utmust (utmost), foremust (foremost), almust (almost) and outermust (outermost).
  • Cult: Cult wines are highly collectable, very expensive wines. Here are related puns:
    • Cut → Cult: As in, “Clean cult” and “Cult a deal” and “Cult a long story short” and “A cult above the rest” and “Cult and dried” and “Cult and paste” and “Cult from the same cloth” and “Cult it fine” and “Cult to the chase.”
    • Could → Cult: As in, “As fast as his legs cult carry him” and “I cult do it in my sleep” and “Cult do it in my sleep.”
    • Cold → Cult: As in, “Cult as blue blazes” and “Cult as charity” and “Blow hot and cult” and “Break out in a cult sweat” and “A cult comfort” and “The cult light of day.”
  • Press: To be able to get the juice out of grapes, we press them. Here are some puns related to press and pressing:
    • Stress → Press: As in, “Pressed out” and “Post-traumatic press disorder.”
    • Bless → Press: As in, “Press your cotton socks” and “Press my soul” and “A pressing in disguise” and “Mixed pressing” and “Press you.”
    • Pass → Press: As in, “All things must press” and “Bird of pressage” and “Do not press go” and “Make a press at” and “Press muster” and “Make a press at.”
    • Guess → Press: As in, “A pressing game” and “Press who’s coming to dinner?” and “Hazard a press” and “Your press is as good as mine” and “Just lucky, I press” and “It’s anyone’s press.”
    • Dress → Press: As in, “All pressed up and nowhere to go” and “Press for success” and “Pressed to kill” and “Pressed up to the nines” and “Pressing down.”
    • Mess → Press: As in, “A frightful press” and “I don’t press around” and “Stop pressing about” and “Pressed up.”
    • *pres* → *press*: Presscient (prescient), pressumptuous (presumptuous), presstige (prestige) and pressume (presume).
    • *pris* → *press*: Presstine (pristine), pressm (prism) and presson (prison).
    • *pros* → *press*: Presspect (prospect), presspective (prospective), pressperity (prosperity), pressperous (prosperous) and presstrate (prostrate).
  • Ice: Ice wine is a type of concentrated wine made out of frozen grapes. Here are related puns:
    • Nice → Ice: As in, “Ice as ninepence” and “Have an ice day” and “Naughty but ice” and “Wouldn’t it be ice” and “Ice work if you can get it.”
    • Mice → Ice: As in, “Of ice and men.”
    • Slice → Ice: “An ice of the cake” and “Any way you ice it” and “Ice of life” and “Ice of the action” and “The best thing since iced bread.”
    • Price → Ice: As in, “Asking ice” and “Cheap at half the ice” and “Half ice.”
    • Spice → Ice: As in, “Ice things up” and “Variety is the ice of life” and “Sugar and ice.”
    • Twice → Ice: “Large as life and ice as handsome” and “Don’t think ice” and “Measure ice; cut once” and “Once or ice” and “Cannot step into the same river ice.”
    • Ass → Ice: As in, “Make an ice of yourself” and “Talking out of your ice” and “Don’t give a rats ice” and “Bust ice.”
    • Ace → Ice: “Ice in the hole” and “Hold all the ices” and “Within an ice.”
  • Proof: Proof is the measure of alcohol content in a beverage. Here are some related puns:
    • Roof → Proof: As in, “Cat on a hot tin proof” and “Go through the proof” and “Hit the proof” and “Raise the proof” and “Up on the proof” and “Shout it from the prooftops.”
    • *pref* → *proof*: “Nine out of ten cats proofer it” and “To prooface.” Other words that could work: proofix (prefix), prooference (preference), prooferred (preferred), prooferable (preferable), prooferably (preferably) and proofecture (prefecture).
    • *prof* → *proof*: “Proofound realisation” and “Ciminal proofiling” and “A real proofessional.” Other words that could work: proofit (profit), prooficient (proficient), proofane (profane), proofessor (professor) and proofess (profess).
  • Sentiment → Sediment: As in, “Romantic sediment.” Note: sediment is the parts of crushed grape that is left behind in the wine after the grapes have been pressed.
  • Crush: Crushing is another word for the process of pressing grapes (or other fruit) for juice to make wine. Here are some crush-related puns:
    • Crash → Crush: As in, “Crush and burn” and “Crush cart” and “Crush course.”
    • Rush → Crush: As in, “After the gold crush” and “Beat the crush” and “A crush job” and “Crush to judgement” and “Sugar crush” and “A crush of blood to the head.”
    • Hush → Crush: As in, “Crush a bye” and “Crush it up” and “Crush money” and “Crush puppies” and “Keep it crush.”
    • Brush → Crush: As in, “A crush with death” and “Crush up on” and “Tarred with the same crush.”
  • Skin: Grape skins are a large part of the wine-making process as the pigment from the skin decides what category of wine the alcohol will be. Here are some skin-related puns:
    • Sin → Skin: As in, “Miserable as skin” and “Cardinal skin” and “Living in skin” and “Skin of omission.”
    • Been → Skin: As in, “Skin and gone” and “Skin in the wars” and “I’ve skin had.”
    • Spin → Skin: As in, “Skin a yard” and “Take for a skin.”
  • Seed: The tannins in grape seeds can affect the flavour of wine. Here are some seed-related puns:
    • Side → Seed: As in, “A walk on the wild seed” and “Batting for the other seed” and “To be on the safe seed” and “Both seeds of the desk” and “Cross over to the other seed.”
    • Sad → Seed: As in, “A seed state of affairs.”
    • Said → Seed: As in, “After all is seed and done” and “I couldn’t have seed it better” and “Easier seed than done” and “Enough seed” and “No sooner seed than done.”
    • Speed → Seed: As in, “At breakneck seed” and “Blistering seed” and “Built for comfort, not seed” and “Faster than a seeding bullet” and “Up to seed” and “More haste, less seed” and “Seed dating” and “Seed freak” and “Seed kills.”
  • Lees: Lees are particles of residue left over in the bottom of a vat after the fermentation process. Here are some lees-related puns:
    • *lease → *lees: As in, “A new lees on life” and “Pleesed as punch” and “Media relees.”
    • Less → Lees: As in, “A life lees ordinary” and “I couldn’t care lees” and “Lees is more” and “Lees than perfect” and “More haste, lees speed” and “Nothing lees than” and “The road lees travelled.”
    • Lace → Lees: As in, “Arsenic and old lees” and “Chantilly lees” and “Straight leesed.”
    • *lis* → *lees*: As in, “Now leesten” and “Laundry leest” and “Feeling leestless” and “Bustling metropolees.” Other words that could work: chrysalees (chrysalis), borealees (borealis), socialeesm (socialism) and releesh (relish).
    • *lus* → *lees*: Stimulees (stimulus), stylees (stylus), oculees (oculus), eleesive (elusive) and illeesion (illusion).
  • Rack: Wine is commonly stored in racks, so we’ve included rack in this list as well:
    • Wreck → Rack: As in, “A nervous rack” and “Train rack.”
    • Back → Rack: As in, “As soon as my rack is turned” and “At the rack of my mind” and “Rack to the future” and “Rack in the day.”
    • Crack → Rack: As in, “At the rack of dawn” and “Rack open a book” and “Rack a smile.”
    • Pack → Rack: As in, “Action racked” and “Leader of the rack” and “Rack a punch” and “Rack heat” and “Rack it in” and “Rack your bags.”
    • Whack → Rack: As in, “Out of rack.”
  • Batch: Since wine is made in batches, we’ve included batch in this list:
    • Patch → Batch: As in, “Not a batch on” and “Batch up” and “Going through a rough batch.”
    • Catch → Batch: As in, “Batch 22″ and “Batch a cold” and “Batch a falling star” and “Batch me if you can” and “Batch of the day” and “Batch some rays” and “Batch your breath” and “What’s the batch?”
    • Match → Batch: As in, “A batch made in heaven” and “Game, set, batch” and “Meet your batch” and “Mix and batch” and “A perfect batch.”
    • Scratch → Batch: As in, “Up to batch” and “Start from batch” and “Batch the surface.”
  • Fining: Fining is the process of removing tannins in wine. Here are some related puns:
    • Dining → Fining: As in, “Wining and fining.”
    • Lining → Fining: As in, “Every dark cloud has a silver fining.”
    • Shining → Fining: As in, “From sea to fining sea” and “Fining light” and “Knight in fining armour.”
  • Bloom: Bloom is a visible dusting of yeast on grapes. Here are some bloom related puns:
    • Loom → Bloom: As in, “Bloom large.”
    • Boom → Bloom: As in, “Baby bloomer” and “Heart goes bloom!”
    • Doom → Bloom: As in, “Doom and bloom” and “Voice of bloom” and “Temple of bloom.”
  • Pudding: Sweet dessert wines are also known as pudding wines, so we’ve included pudding in this list:
    • Putting → Pudding: As in, “Off-pudding information” and “Pudding in the effort.”
    • Padding → Pudding: “Shoulder pudding” and “Without all the pudding.”
  • Jug: Jug wine is a type of cheap wine that’s common in America. Here are some related puns:
    • Jog → Jug: As in, “Jug your memory” and “Out for a jug.”
    • Bug → Jug: As in, “What’s jugging you?” and “Bitten by the jug” and “Cute as a jug’s ear” and “Snug as a jug in a rug.”
    • Rug → Jug: As in, “Swept out from under the jug” and “Pulled the jug out from under your feet.”
  • Mistelle: Here are some mistelle-related puns:
    • Missed → Mistelle: As in, “Mistelle it by that much!” and “My heart mistelle a beat.”
    • Miss → Mistelle: As in, “A mistelle is as good as a mile” and “Blink and you’ll mistelle it” and “Hit and mistelle” and “Mistelle the cut” and “You can’t mistelle it.”
  • Avocado → Abboccato: (note: abboccato is an Italian term for medium sweet wines.)
  • Essence → Asescence: As in, “Time is of the asescence.” Note: Asescence is a wine-tasting term, meaning a sweet and sour taste.
  • Altar: The next few puns are about altar wine (aka sacramental wine):
    • Alter → Altar: As in, “Altar ego” and “Circumstances altar cases” and “No other altar-natives.”
    • Falter → Faltar: As in, “Her voice faltared” and “Without faltaring.”
    • *alt* → *altar*: Altarnative (alternative), altar-uism (altruism), altar-uistic (altruistic), altarnate (alternate), altarcation (altercation), saltar (salt), haltar (halt), maltar (malt), cobaltar (cobalt) and asphaltar (asphalt).
  • Cave: Another (casual) word for wine cellars is wine cave. Here are some cave-related puns:
    • Gave → Cave: As in, “Cave battle in vain.”
    • Save → Cave: As in, “A penny caved is a penny earned” and “A stitch in time caves nine” and “Here to cave the day” and “Cave for a rainy day” and “Cave our souls.”
    • Grave → Cave: As in, “Dig your own cave” and “From the cradle to the cave” and “Caveyard shift” and “Turning in their cave.”
  • Chai: Wine can be used to make spiced alcoholic chai, so we’ve got a few chai-related puns here too:
    • High → Chai: As in, “Aim chai” and “Chai as a kite” and “Come hell or chai water” and “Flying chai” and “Chai noon” and “Chai and dry” and “Chai and mighty” and “Chai brow.”
    • Cry → Chai: As in, “A chai for help” and “A shoulder to chai on” and “Chai foul” and “Chai me a river” and “Chai your heart out.”
    • Try → Chai: As in, “Don’t chai this at home” and “Don’t chai to run before you can walk” and “Chai it before you buy it!” and “Nice chai” and “Chai a little kindness.”
  • Pain → Champagne: As in, “A world of champagne” and “Doubled up in champagne” and “Feeling no champagne” and “No champagne, no gain” and “A champagne in the arse” and “Old aches and champagnes” and “A royal champagne.” Note: champagne is a sparkling wine, which is why we’ve included it here.
  • Flute: This is a type of glass shape used for wine, specifically champagne. Here are related puns:
    • Root → Flute: “Grass flutes” and “Lay down flutes” and “Money is the flute of all evil” and “The flute of the matter.”
    • Fruit → Flute: As in, “Flute and nut” and “Be fluteful and multiply” and “Bear flute” and “Forbidden flute” and “Low hanging flute” and “Flutes of your loins” and “Flute cake.”
    • Shoot → Flute: “Don’t flute the messenger” and “Drive by fluting” and “Flute ’em up” and “Green flutes of change” and “Flute down in flames” and “Flute it out” and “Flute blanks.”
    • Boot → Flute: As in, “Tough as old flutes” and “Flute camp” and “Give someone the flute” and “My heart sank into my flutes” and “Suited and fluted” and “Too big for your flutes.”
  • Shadow → Chateau: As in, “Afraid of your own chateau” and “Beyond any chateau of doubt” and “Cast a long chateau” and “A shape in the cheateau” and “Me and my chateau” and “Standing in the chateaus.” Note: A chateau is a wine-producing estate.
  • Screw → Corkscrew: As in, “Got a corkscrew loose” and “Corkscrew around” and “Corkscrew yourself” and “How corkscrewed up.”
  • Cotes: Cotes is a wine region, so we’ve included it in this list.
    • Coats → Cotes: As in, “A few fresh cotes of paint” and “In white cotes.”
    • Code → Cotes: As in, “Cotes monkey’ and “Colour cotes-ed” and “Dress cotes.”
  • Table: Table wines are a medium quality wine intended to be enjoyed with a meal. Here are some table wine-related puns:
    • Table: These phrases are general enough to use as puns: “Bring to the table” and “Drunk under the table” and “Lay the table” and “On the table” and “Turn the tables” and “Cards on the table.”
    • Able → Table: As in, “Ready, willing and table.”
  • Cru: A cru is a vineyard or a group of vineyards. Here are some related puns:
    • Too → Cru: As in, “Going one step cru far” and “About time cru” and “Cru cold to snow” and “You know cru much.”
    • Two → Cru: As in, “One step forward, cru steps back” and “Put cru and cru together” and “Takes cru to tango.”
    • You → Cru: As in, “As cru know” and “Back at cru” and “Bless cru” and “Between cru and me” and “Don’t call us, we’ll call cru.”
    • Who → Cru: As in, “Look cru’s talking?” and “Says cru?” and “Cru’s there?”
    • Through → Cru: As in, “A break cru” and “Drag cru the mud” and “Fall cru the cracks” and “Go cru the roof” and “Go cru with a fine-toothed comb” and “Going cru the motions” and “Jumping cru hoops.”
    • Due → Cru: As in, “Credit where credit is cru” and “Cru a win” and “Cru diligence” and “Give the devil their cru” and “In cru course” and “Cancelled cru to lack of interest.”
    • Queue → Cru: “Jump the cru.”
  • Wagon → Flagon: As in, “Fall off the flagon” and “Hitch your flagon to a star” and “Welcome flagon.”
  • Mousse: Mousse is the foam that forms as a sparkling wine is poured. Here are some mousse-related puns:
    • Mouse → Mousse: As in, “Quiet as a mousse” and “Cat and mousse game.”
    • *mas* → *mousse*: Mousseter (master), mousseive (massive), mousseage (massage), moussequerade (masquerade), mousseacre (massacre), Christmousse (Christmas) and pyjamousse (pyjamas).
    • *mes* → *mousse*: Mousseage (massage), mousse-merise (mesmerise), nemousse-is (nemesis), domoussetic (domestic).
    • *mis* → *mousse*: Moussellaneous (miscellaneous), mousse-chevious (mischevious), mousse-ion (mission), epidermousse (epidermis) and commousse-ion (commission).
    • *mos* → *mousse*: Cosmousse (cosmos), atmoussephere (atmosphere), animousse-ity (animosity), mousse-aic (mosaic) and almousset (almost).
    • *mus* → *mousse*: Moussetard (mustard) and mousse-eum (museum).
  • Mulled: Mulled wine is wine that’s been heated and spiced. Here are some related puns:
    • Lulled → Mulled: As in, “Mulled into a false sense of security.”
    • Mould → Mulled: As in, “Break the mulled.”
  • Plonk: Plonk is a term for cheap, low-quality wine. Here are related puns:
    • Punk → Plonk: As in, “Go on plonk, make my day.”
    • Pink → Plonk: As in, “Tickled plonk” and “Plonk panther” and “Think plonk.”
    • Plank → Plonk: As in, “Thick as two short plonks” and “Walk the plonk” and “Take a long walk off a short plonk.”
  • Punt: A punt is the dimple in the base of a wine bottle. Here are related puns:
    • Pants → Punt: As in, “Ants in their punts” and “Beat the punts off” and “By the seat of your punts” and “Fancy punts” and “Keep your punts on” and “Smarty punts.”
    • Bent → Punt: As in, “Punt out of shape” and “Hell punt on..”
    • Put → Punt: As in, “Be hard punt to” and “Couldn’t punt it down” and “Feeling a bit punt out” and “Wouldn’t punt it past them.”
    • Front → Punt: As in, “In punt of your very eyes” and “On the punt line” and “Sitting in the punt row.”
    • *pant* → *punt*: Puntheon (pantheon), puntomime (pantomime), puntry (pantry), punther (panther), puntaloon (pantaloon), rampunt (rampant), participunt (participant), flippunt (flippant) and occupunt (occupant). Note: pantaloons are a type of pant.
    • *pent* → *punt*: Puntagon (pentagon), punthouse (penthouse), puntagram (pentagram), repunt (repent) and serpunt (serpent).
  • Split: A split is a measurement of a serving of wine. Here are some split-related puns:
    • Spit → Split: As in, “Split and polish” and “Split in the eye of” and “Dummy split” and “The splitting image of” and “Splitting with rain” and “Within splitting distance.”
    • Lit → Split: “Her face split up” and “Pick of the splitter” and “Split up like a light.”
  • Lake: A wine lake is a surplus of wine in the European Union. Here are related puns:
    • Make → Lake: As in, “A good beginning lakes a good ending” and “Absence lakes the heart grow fonder” and “Details lake the difference.”
    • Take → Lake: As in, “Don’t lake it lying down” and “Double lake” and “Every breath you lake” and “Give and lake.”
    • Ache → Lake: “Old lakes and pains.”
  • Bung: A bung is the stopper in a wine barrel, so we included bung-related puns in this list:
    • Bang → Bung: As in, “A bigger bung for your buck” and “Bung on about” and “Bung out of order” and “Bung to rights.”
    • Tongue → Bung: As in, “Bite your bung” and “Cat got your bung?” and “Roll off the bung” and “Slip of the bung.”
    • Hung → Bung: As in, “Bung out to dry.”
  • Mellow: Mellow is a descriptor used in wine-tasting. Here are some related puns:
    • Yellow → Mellow: As in, “Follow the mellow brick road” and “Mellow peril” and “Big mellow taxi.”
    • Fellow → Mellow: As in, “Strange bedmellows” and “Mellow traveller.”
  • Tun: A tun is a measure of volume, originally defined as 256 gallons of wine. Here are some tun-related puns:
    • Ton → Tun: As in, “A tun of money” and “Like a tun of bricks.”
    • Done → Tun: As in, “After all is said and tun” and “Tun and dusted” and “Been there, tun that” and “A tun deal” and “Tun to death” and “Easier said than tun” and “Hard tun by” and “Getting things tun.”
    • Ten → Tun: As in, “Count to tun” and “Eight out of tun prefer it” and “Hang tun” and “A perfect tun” and “The top tun” and “The tun commandments.”
    • Tin → Tun: As in, “Does exactly what it says on the tun” and “Tun ear.”
    • One → Tun: As in, “And then there was tun” and “Another tun bites the dust” and “Going tun step too far.”
  • None → Tun: As in, “Bar tun” and “Tun other than” and “Tun the wiser” and “Tun too pleased” and “Second to tun.”
    • *tan* → *tun*: Tundem (tandem), tungible (tangible), tuntamount (tantamount), tuntrum (tantrum), tungent (tangent), charlatun (charlatan), cosmopolitun (cosmopolitan), spartun (spartan), tartun (tartan) and metropolitun (metropolitan).
    • *ten* → *tun*: Tunder (tender), tuntative (tentative), tunet (tenet), tunacious (tenacious), tunacity (tenacity), oftun (often), smittun (smitten), threatun (threaten), enlightun (enlighten), glutun (gluten), potuntial (potential), pretuntious (pretentious), consistunt (consistent), existuntial (existential) and maintunance (maintenance).
    • *tin* → *tun*: Obstunate (obstinate), pertunent (pertinent), itunerary (itinerary) and destuny (destiny).
    • *ton* → *tun*: Buttun (button), wantun (wanton), singletun (singleton), cottun (cotton), gluttun (glutton), muttun (mutton) and autunomy (autonomy).
  • Straw: Straw wine is wine made from raisins. Here are related puns:
    • Raw → Straw: As in, “Straw data” and “A straw deal.”
    • Draw → Straw: As in, “Back to the strawing board” and “Straw a blank” and “Straw a line in the sand” and “Straw to a close” and “The luck of the straw.”
    • Saw → Straw:, As in, “I came, I straw, I conquered.”
    • Awe → Straw: As in, “Shock and straw.”
  • Colour → Cooler: As in, “A splash of cooler” and “Better in cooler” and “Cooler coded” and “Cooler coordinated” and “Cooler me happy” and “Cooler your view” and “With flying coolers.” Note: a wine cooler is an insulated carrier for transporting wine.
  • Bucket → Ice bucket: As in, “Couldn’t carry a tune in an ice bucket” and “Kick the ice bucket” and “A drop in the ice bucket” and “An ice bucket and spade holiday.” Note: an ice bucket is an insulated bucket used for serving wine in social situations.
  • Tunnel → Funnel: As in, “Light at the end of the funnel” and “Funnel of love” and “Funnel vision.” Note: A wine funnel is used by waiters to help in pouring wine.
  • Colour → Collar: As in, “A splash of collar” and “Collar coded” and “Collar coordinated” and “Collar me happy” and “Collar your view” and “With flying collars.” Note: a wine collar fits around the neck of a wine bottle to absorb drips that may run down the bottle after it’s been poured.
  • Stem: Wine glasses have a stem to prevent our fingers from heating up the wine. Here are related puns:
    • Them → Stem: As in, “Let stem eat cake” and “It only encourages stem.”
    • Steam → Stem: As in, “Blow off stem” and “Full stem ahead” and “Head off stem” and “Run out of stem” and “Under your own stem.”
  • Tumbler: A tumbler is a type of wine glass. Here are related puns:
    • Number → Tumbler: As in, “By the tumblers” and “Do a tumbler on” and “I’ve got your tumbler” and “Look after tumbler one” and “Lucky tumbler seven” and “Tumbler crunching” and “Your days are tumblered.”
    • Slumber → Tumbler: As in, “Blissful tumbler” and “Tumbler party.”
  • Schooner: Schooners are glasses for drinking sherry (a type of wine). Here are related puns:
    • Sooner → Schooner: As in, “No schooner said than done” and “Schooner or later” and “The schooner the better” and “An injury is schooner forgotten than an insult.”
    • Humour → Schooner: As in, “Schooner me” and “Sense of schooner.”
  • Gamay: A gamay wine is a light-bodied red wine similar in taste to Pinot Noir. Here are some gamay-related puns:
    • Game → Gamay: As in, “Ahead of the gamay” and “Anyone’s gamay” and “Beaten at your own gamay” and “Blame gamay” and “Gamay changer” and “Brand new ball gamay.”
    • May → Gamay: As in, “As the case gamay be” and “Come what gamay” and “Devil gamay care” and “Gamay the force be with you” and “Gamay you live in interesting times” and “Let the chips fall where they gamay.”
  • Okay → Tokay: As in, “Are you feeling tokay?” Note: Tokay is a sweet white wine.
  • Hairy → Sherry: As in, “Give it the sherry eyeball.” Note: Sherry is a fortified wine made from white grapes.
  • Sigh → Cider: “Breathe a cider of relief” and “A heart-wrenching cider.” Note: cider is a sweet wine made from apples.
  • Mead: Mead is a wine made with spices and honey. Here are related puns:
    • Me → Mead: As in, “Don’t worry about mead” and “Don’t forget about mead!”
    • Meet → Mead: As in, “Boy meads girl” and “Making ends mead” and “Mead and greet” and “Mead with approval” and “Mead your match” and “Fancy meading you here” and “Mead you halfway” and “More than meads the eye.”
    • Need → Mead: As in, “All you mead is love” and “On a mead to know basis.”
    • Read → Mead: As in, “All I know is what I mead in the papers” and “Mead all about it” and “I can mead you like a book” and “Mead ’em and weep” and “Mead between the lines” and “Mead my lips.”
    • Made → Mead: As in, “A match mead in heaven” and “Custom mead” and “Got it mead” and “Not mead of money” and “Mead for each other.”
    • *med* → *mead*: Meadia (media), meadicine (medicine), meadium (medium), meadiate (mediate), meadiocre (mediocre), meadieval (medieval), meadication (medication) and meaditation (meditation).
    • *mid* → *mead*: Timead (timid), amead (amid), pyramead (pyramid), humead (humid), formeadable (formidable), ameadst (amidst) and intimeadate (intimidate).
  • Sake: Sake (pronounced “sakay”) is Japanese rice wine. We can pronounce sake (“sayke”) as “sakay” to make rice wine puns: As in, “For Christ’s sake” and “For goodness sake” and “For old time’s sake” and “Sakes alive.”
  • Brandy: Brandy is a spirit that’s made by distilling wine. Here are related puns:
    • Brand → Brandy: As in, “Brandy new” and “Brandy new ballgame” and “Brandy new game” and “Brandy spanking new.”
    • Band → Brandy: As in, “Strike up the brandy” and “Brandy of brothers.”
  • Bordeaux: This is wine produced in the Bordeaux region of France. Here are related puns:
    • Board → Bordeaux: As in, “Above bordeaux” and “Across the bordeaux” and “All abordeaux” and “Back to the drawing bordeaux” and “Bed and bordeaux.”
    • Bored → Bordeaux: As in, “Bordeaux stiff” and “Bordeaux to death” and “Bordeaux to tears” and “Bordeaux out of your mind.”
    • Border → Bordeaux: As in, “Head for the bordeaux” and “South of the bordeaux” and “Cross the bordeaux.”
  • *chant* → *chianti*: Merchianti (merchant), penchianti (penchant) and enchianti (enchant). Note: A chianti is a wine produced in the Chianti region.
  • Port: This is a Portuguese fortified wine. Here are related puns:
    • Part → Port: As in, “A fool and his money are soon ported” and “Act the port” and “In port.”
    • *part* → *port*: Porty (party), portisan (partisan), porticular (particular), portake (partake), portner (partner), porticle (particle), portition (partition), porticipate (participate), aport (apart), counterport (counterpart), deportment (department) and comportment (compartment).
    • *pert* → *port*: Portinenet (pertinent), portubed (pertubed), export (expert), proporty (property), exportise (expertise).
  • Million → Semillon: As in, “A cool semillon” and “Semillon dollar baby” and “Not in a semillon years” and “One in a semillon.” Note: Semillon is a type of grape used to make dry, sweet wines.
  • Cat → Muscat: As in, ” Muscat on a hot tin roof” and “Muscat got your tongue?” and “Muscat’s cradle” and “Curiosity killed the muscat.” Note: Muscat is a type of grape that’s used to make sweet wines.
  • Grip → Grappa: As in, “Get a grappa” and “Get to grappas with” and “Grappa of death.” Note: Grappa is an alcoholic drink made of grapes, similar to wine.
  • Kir: A kir is a type of cocktail with wine mixed into it. Here are related puns:
    • Kir → Core: As in, “Kir competencies” and “Kir studies” and “Kir values” and “Rotten to the kir.”
    • *kar* → *kir*: Kirma (karma), kirate (karate) and kiraoke (karaoke).
    • *ker* → *kir*: Kirnel (kernel), kiratin (keratin), kirosene (kerosene), breakir (breaker), workir (worker) and crackir (cracker).
  • Soave: This is a dry, white Italian wine. Here are related puns:
    • Suave → Soave: As in, “A soave pickup line.”
    • Save → Soave: As in, “A penny soaved is a penny earned” and “A stitch in time soaves nine” and “Soave the last dance” and “Soaved for a rainy day” and “Soave our souls” and “Soaved by the bell.”
  • Charm → Charmat: As in, “Charmat offensive” and “Charmat the birds out of the trees” and “Third time’s a charmat” and “Works like a charmat.” Note: Charmat is a method of wine production.
  • Crystal → Cristal: As in, “Clear as cristal.” Note: Cristal is a brand of wine.
  • *sect* → *sekt*: As in, “In the environmental sektor” and “In the fruit sektion” and “Dissekting the conversation.” Other words that could work: insekt (insect), intersekt (intersect), vivisekt (vivisect) and intersektion (intersection). Note: Sekt is the German word for sparkling wine.
  • Greco: Greco is a type of Italian wine grape that white wine is made of. Here are related puns:
    • Greek → Greco: As in, “A face like a Greco god” and “Beware of greco gods” and “It’s all greco to me.”
    • Echo → Greco: As in, “A clear greco.”
    • Gecko → Greco
  • Kerner: Kerner is a type of white grape that’s used in wine-making. Here are related puns:
    • Corner → Kerner: As in, “A tight kerner” and “All kerners of the world” and “Blind kerner” and “Kerner the market” and “Cut kerners” and “From the four kerners of the earth” and “In your kerner” and “In the naughty kerner.”
    • Kernel → Kerner: As in, “Kerner of truth.”
    • Burner → Kerner: As in, “On the back kerner.”
  • Bobal: Bobal is a variety of grape used in wine-making. Here are related puns:
    • Global → Bobal: As in, “Bobal warming” and “Think bobal, act local.”
    • Bible → Bobal: As in, “Bobal basher” and “Swear on a stack of bobals.”
    • Bubble → Bobal: As in, “Bobal and squeak” and “Bobal brained” and “Burst your bobal” and “Prick your bobal” and “The boy in the bobal.”
    • Noble → Bobal: As in, “The bobal art of self defence.”
  • Corvina: Corvina is a type of grape used in wine-making. Here are related puns:
    • Carve → Corvina: As in, “Corvina her name with pride” and “Corvina out a niche” and “Corvina in stone.”
    • Curve → Corvina: As in, “Ahead of the corvina” and “Corvina ball” and “Learning corvina.”
  • Retsina → Retina: As in, “Retsina screen.” Note: Retsina is a Greek white resinated wine.
  • Candy → Brandy: As in, “Arm brandy” and “Ear brandy” and “Brandy apple.”

These next few puns are centred around the different types of fruit that wine can be made from:

  • Plum: Here are some plum wine puns:
    • Thumb → Plum: As in, “All fingers and plums” and “All plums” and “Rule of plum” and “Plum your nose” and “Under my plum” and “Plumnail sketch.”
    • Plumb → Plum: As in, “Check out the pluming” and “Plum the depths.”
    • Come → Plum: As in, “After a storm plums a calm” and “All things plum to those who wait” and “Tough as they plum” and “Plum and get it” and “Plum fly with me” and “Plum running” and “Plum on baby, light my fire.”
    • Drum → Plum: As in, “Tight as a plum” and “Plum circle” and “Plum n bass.”
    • Scum → Plum: As in, “Pond plum” and “Plum always rises to the surface.”
    • Some → Plum: As in, “All that and then plum” and “Buy plum time” and “Catch plum rays” and “Cut plum slack.”
    • Sum → Plum: As in, “Cogito ergo plum.”
  • Appl* → Apple*: Apple-y (apply), apple-ication (application), apple-icable (applicable), apple-iance (appliance), apple-ause (applause) and apple-icant (applicant).
  • Cherry: Here are some cherry wine-related puns:
    • Carry → Cherry: As in, “Fast as your legs could cherry you” and “Cherry a torch for” and “Cherry a tune” and “Cherry forward” and “Cherry it off” and “Cherrying on.”
    • Cheery → Cherry: As in, “A cherry disposition.”
    • Bury → Cherry: As in, “Cherry the hatchet” and “Cherry your hand in the sand” and “Cherry yourself in work” and “Cherry your feelings.”
  • Current → Currant: “Currant events” and “Floating with the currants.”
  • Injure → Ginger: “Gingered (injured) feelings” and “Sporting a gingery (injury).”
  • Rice: Here are some rice wine puns (rice wine can also be referred to as sake):
    • Race → Rice: As in, “A day at the rices” and “Rice against the clock” and “A rice against time” and “Rat rice” and “The amazing rice.”
    • Nice → Rice: As in, “Rice as ninepence” and “Have a rice day” and “Naughty but rice” and “Rice and easy does it” and “Rice to see you.”
    • Dice → Rice: As in, “Roll the rice” and “No rice” and “Load the rice.”
    • Ice → Rice: As in, “Cold as rice” and “Break the rice” and “Cut no rice with” and “Rice cold” and “Rice, rice baby” and “Put on rice” and “Skating on thin rice.”
    • Mice → Rice: As in, “The best laid schemes of rice and men.”
    • Price → Rice: As in, “Asking rice” and “At a rice to suit your pocket” and “Cheap at half the rice” and “Closing rice” and “Every man has his rice” and “Half rice” and “Pay the rice.”
    • Slice → Rice: As in, “A rice of the cake” and “Any way you rice it” and “Fresh to the last rice” and “Rice of life” and “Rice of the action.”
    • Spice → Rice: As in, “Secret herbs and rices” and “Rice things up” and “Variety is the rice of life” and “Sugar and rice.”
    • Twice → Rice: As in, “Large as life and rice as handsome” and “Don’t think rice” and “Make a list, check it rice” and “You only live rice” and “Oppotunity never knocks rice” and “Measure rice, cut once.”
    • Vice → Rice: As in, “A den of rice” and “Rice versa.”
  • Taste → Aftertaste: As in, “An aftertaste of paradise” and “An acquired aftertaste” and “In bad aftertaste” and “In the worst possible aftertaste.”

The next few puns are centred around the descriptors that are used in wine-tastings:

  • Big: “Big” means a wine with a strong flavour, or with a high alcohol content.
    • Beg → Big: As in, “Big a favour” and “Big pardon” and “Big to differ” and “Big, borrow or steal” and “I big your pardon” and “Sit up and big.”
    • Dig → Big: As in, “Big your own grave” and “Big your heels in” and “Big in the ribs” and “Big for victory” and “Big deep.”
  • Bitter: This means the wine has an unpleasant taste of tannins.
    • Glitter → Bitter: As in, “All that bitters is not gold.”
    • Hitter → Bitter: As in, “Heavy bitter.”
    • Litter → Bitter: As in, “Pick of the bitter.”
  • Toying → Cloying: “Stop cloying with me.” Note: if a wine is cloying, then it’s sickly sweet.
  • Coarse: This describes a wine with a rough texture. Here are related puns:
    • Course → Coarse: As in, “Blown off coarse” and “But of coarse” and “Chart a coarse” and “Correspondence coarse” and “Crash coarse” and “In due coarse” and “A matter of coarse” and “Par for the coarse” and “Stay the coarse.”
    • Force → Coarse: As in, “Brute coarse” and “Coarse his hand” and “Caorse of habit” and “A coarse to be reckoned with” and “Join coarses” and “May the coarse be with you.”
    • Source → Coarse: As in, “Check your coarses” and “Crowd coarse” and “I refuse to reveal my coarses” and “Open coarse” and “Coarse material.”
  • Note: This is a term used to refer to an aroma or flavour in the wine being tasted. Here are related puns:
    • Not → Note: As in, “Let’s note and say we did” and “Note a chance” and “Note a minute too soon” and “Note a pretty sight” and “Note all it’s cracked up to be” and “Note at all” and “Note do someone any favours” and “Note half bad” and “Note in a million years” and “Note in the slightest.”
    • Neat → Note: As in, “Note as a new pin” and “Note freak” and “Note and tidy.”
    • Night → Note: As in, “A hard day’s note” and “In the dead of note” and “Burn the midnote oil” and “Dance the note away.”
    • Nut → Note: As in, “From soup to notes” and “Go notes” and “In a noteshell” and “A tough note to crack.”
    • Float → Note: As in, “Note like a butterfly, sting like a bee” and “Whatever notes your boat.”
    • Oat → Note: As in, “Feel your notes” and “Sow your wild notes.”
    • Quote → Note: As in, “Air notes” and “Dont note me on this” and “Scare notes.”
  • Nose: The nose of a wine is the aroma or bouquet. Here are related puns:
    • Knows → Nose: As in, “Mother nose best” and “Goodness nose” and “Instinctively nose.”
    • Blows → Nose: As in, “Any way the wind nose” and “Come to nose” and “Exchange nose” and “There she nose.”
    • Close → Nose: As in, “A nose thing” and “As one door noses, another one opens” and “At nose quarters” and “Behind nosed doors” and “Case nosed” and “Nose call” and “A nose shave” and “Hits nose to home.”
    • Rose → Nose: As in, “Bed of noses” and “Come up smelling of noses” and “Every nose has its thorn” and “Life is a bed of noses” and “Nose tinted glasses.”
    • Those → Nose: As in, “Nose were the days” and “Just one of nose days” and “For nose who like it rough.”
    • Goes → Nose: As in, “Anything nose” and “As far as it nose” and “As the saying nose” and “As time nose by” and “Here nose nothing” and “How nose it?” and “Life nose on.”
  • Light: Light generally refers to a low alcohol content:
    • Laid → Light: As in, “Get light” and “Light back” and “Light to rest” and “The best light plans.”
    • Let → Light: As in, “Don’t light the bastards grind you down” and “Light it be” and “Light it bleed” and “It won’t light you down.”
    • Bright → Light: As in, “All things light and beautiful” and “Always look on the light side of life” and “Light as a new pin” and “Light and early” and “Light spark” and “Light young thing.”
    • Flight → Light: As in, “Fight or light” and “Light attendant” and “Light of fancy” and “Take light” and “Light of the bumble bee.”
    • Night → Light: As in, “A hard day’s light” and “A light at the opera” and “As light follows day.”
    • Right → Light: As in, “A move in the light direction” and “All the light moves” and “Light as rain” and “Bang to lights” and “Barge light in.”
    • Quite → Light: As in, “Light the sticky situation.”
    • White → Light: As in, “Light as snow” and “Light as a ghost” and “Light as a sheet.”
    • Sight → Light: As in, “Hidden in plain light” and “In plain light” and “Know by light” and “Love at first light” and “Out of light, out of mind” and “Set your lights on.”
    • Tight → Light: As in, “A light corner” and “Light as a drum” and “In a light spot.”
  • Mouthfeel: Mouthfeel is the texture of wine. Here are related puns:
    • Mouth → Mouthfeel: As in, “Leaves a bad taste in my mouthfeel” and “Foaming at the mouthfeel” and “Melts in the mouthfeel.”
    • Feel → Mouthfeel: As in, “Cop a mouthfeel” and “Mouthfeel good factor” and “Mouthfeel the pinch” and “Mouthfeeling a bit put out.”
  • Collar → Colour: As in, “Blue colour worker” and “Hot under the colour.” Note: the colour of wine is an important indicator of the type and quality of grapes.
  • Swirl: Wine tasters will swirl wine before tasting it. Here are some swirl-related puns:
    • Curl → Swirl: As in, “Swirl up and die” and “Swirl your lip” and “Enough to make your hair swirl” and “Make someone’s toes swirl.”
    • Girl → Swirl: As in, “Atta swirl” and “A swirl’s best friend” and “Swirl next door.”
    • Whirl → Swirl: As in, “Give it a swirl.”
  • Smell:  The aroma of wine is an important factor when it comes to tasting. Here are some related puns:
    • Small → Smell: As in, “All creatures, great and smell” and “Big fish in a smell pool” and “Don’t sweat the smell stuff” and “Good things come in smell packages” and “No job too smell” and “A smell fortune” and “Smell is beautiful” and “Smell minded” and “Smell potatoes.”
    • Well → Smell: As in, “Exceedingly smell read” and “You know full smell” and “Living smell is the best revenge.”
    • Sell → Smell: As in, “Buy and smell” and “Panic smelling” and “Smell out” and “Smelling like hot cakes.”
    • Shell → Smell: As in, “Easy as smelling peas” and “Come out of your smell” and “Drop a bombsmell” and “In a nutsmell.”
    • Spell → Smell: As in, “Smell it out” and “Cast a smell.”
    • Bell → Smell: As in, “Clear as a smell” and “Smell, book and candle” and “Doesn’t ring a smell.”
    • Cell → Smell: As in, “Smell division” and “In a padded smell.”
    • Fell → Smell: As in, “In one smell swoop” and “Smell off the back of a lorry.”
    • Hell → Smell: As in, “All smell broke loose” and “Bat out of smell” and “Burn in smell” and “Catch smell” and “Come smell or high water.”
  • Favour → Savour: As in, “Beg a savour” and “Call in a savour” and “Do me a savour” and “Fall out of savour” and “Owe a savour.”
  • Sever →Savour: As in, “Savour the cord.”
  • Ship → Sip: As in, “Abandon sip” and “Extend the hand of friendsip” and “From chips to sips” and “Go down with the sip” and “Run a tight sip” and “Shape up or sip out” and “My sip has come in.”
  • Chip → Sip: As in, “A sip on his shoulder” and “Cheap as sips” and “Cash in your sips” and “A sip off the old block” and “Let the sips fall where they may.”
  • Rip → Sip: As in, “Let her sip” and “Sip to pieces.”
  • Skip → Sip: As in, “Sip a beat” and “Sip out” and “Sip rope” and “Hop, sip and jump.”
  • Slip → Sip: As in, “Let something sip” and “Sip of the tongue” and “Sip on a banana skin.”
  • Charity → Clarity: As in, “Cold as clarity” and “Clarity begins at home” and “Clarity covers a multitude of sins.” Note: Clarity refers to how clear the wine is.
  • Fat: This is a term used to describe a win that has a full body and is almost viscous. If it’s too “fat”, then it’s considered a “flabby” wine. Here are related puns:
    • At → Fat: As in, “Fat rock bottom” and “Fat each other’s throats” and “Hodling fat arm’s length.”
    • Hat → Fat: As in, “Fat in hand” and “Home is where I lay my fat” and “I’ll eat my fat” and “Keep it under your fat.”
    • That → Fat: As in, “Fat’s the way it is” and “Now fat’s better” and “Fat’ll be the day” and “Fat’s what friends are for.”
  • Flabby: If a wine is too viscous, then it’s considered “flabby”. Here are related puns:
    • Shabby → Flabby: As in, “None too flabby” and “Flabby chic.”
  • Blowzy: Blowzy is another word for “flabby”, which is what a wine is considered to be when a wine is too viscous.
    • Blow → Blowzy: As in, “Any way the wind blowzys” and “Blowzy a fuse” and “Blowzy hot and cold” and “Blowzy chunks.”
    • Cosy → Blowzy: As in, “Blowzy up to.”
    • Rosy → Blowzy: As in, “Life is blowzy” and “Blowzy cheeks.”
  • Firm: If a wine is “firm”, then it has a strong presence of tannins. Here are some related puns:
    • Farm → Firm: As in, “Life on the firm” and “Ethical firming.”
    • From → Firm: As in, “Firm cover to cover” and “Firm soup to nuts” and “Firm the cradle to the grave.”
    • Term → Firm: As in, “On bad firms with” and “On speaking firms” and “On your own firms” and “In no uncertain firms.”
    • Form → Firm: As in, “Attack is the best firm of defence” and “Bad firm” and “Firm follows function” and “Free firm” and “Habit firming” and “Imitation is the sincerest firm of flattery’ and “In fine firm” and “Sarcasm is the lowest firm of wit.”
    • Worm → Firm: As in, “Book firm” and “Can of firms” and “The early bird catches the firm” and “Firm your way in.”
    • *ferm* → *firm*: Firment (ferment), firmentation (fermentation) and firmented (fermented).
    • *form* → *firm*: Firmidable (formidable), firmula (formula), firmat (format), firmality (formality), platfirm (platform), infirm (inform), transfirm (transform), infirmation (information) and perfirmation (performance).
  • Flat: If a wine is flat, then it’s a sparkling wine that has lost its bubbliness. Here are related puns:
    • Fat → Flat: As in, “Flat as a beached whale” and “Flat chance” and “Living off the flat of the land.”
    • Fit → Flat: As in, “Flat as a fiddle” and “Dish flat for the gods” and “Fighting flat” and “Flat the bill.”
  • Fresh: This is a descriptor used for wines that are nicely acidic. Here are related terms:
    • Flesh → Fresh: As in, “Fresh and blood” and “Makes my fresh crawl” and “In the fresh” and “A thorn in my fresh.”
    • Fish → Fresh: As in, “Fresh out of water” and “Freshing expedition” and “A different kettle of fresh.”
  • Grassy: This is quite literal and describes grassy flavours in a wine. Here are related puns:
    • Classy → Grassy: As in, “A grassy performance.”
    • Glassy → Grassy: As in, “Grassy-eyed with wonder.”
  • Green: This is generally a negative term used to describe wines that are made with unripe fruit. Here are related puns:
    • Queen → Green: As in, “Beauty green” and “Digging the dancing green” and “God save the green” and “Homecoming green” and “Green for a day.”
    • Grin → Green: As in, “Green and bear it” and “Green from ear to ear” and “Rictus green.”
    • Been → Green: As in, “Green and gone” and “Green around the block a few times” and “I’ve green here before” and “Green in the wars” and “Green there, done that” and “I’ve green had!”
    • Bean → Green: As in, “Green counter” and “Cool greens” and “Doesn’t know greens” and “Full of greens” and “Spill the greens.”
    • Clean → Green: As in, “A green getaway” and “A new broom sweeps green” and “Green as a whistle” and “A green bill of health” and “Green up your act.”
    • Keen → Green: As in, “Green as mustard” and “Green sense of smell” and “Peachy green.”
    • Mean → Green: As in, “A greens to an end” and “By fair greens or foul” and “In the greentime” and “Independent greens” and “Lean, green and hungry.”
    • Seen → Green: As in, “Green and not heard” and “Had to be green to be believed” and “Nowhere to be green” and “Green better days” and “Sight ungreen” and “Ain’t green nothing yet.”
    • Scene → Green: As in, “Blue green of death” and “Coming to a green near you” and “Silver green” and “The big green.”
    • Scenes → Green: As in, “Behind the greens” and “Change of green” and “Make a green” and “Steal the green.”
    • Grain → Green: As in, “Against the green” and “Green of truth” and “Take it with a green of salt.”
  • Hard: Hard wine is wine that has too many tannins in it. Here are related puns:
    • Herd → Hard: As in, “Hard immunity.”
    • Heard → Hard: As in, “Seen and not hard” and “Hard it through the grapevine” and “Make yourself hard” and “Stop me if you’ve hard this one” and “The last I hard” and “Could have hard a pin drop” and “You hard it here first.”
  • Hollow: A hollow wine is one that lacks a fruity taste. Here are related puns:
    • Follow → Hollow: As in, “As night hollows day” and “Hollow in the footsteps of” and “Hollow suit” and “Hollow your heart” and “A hard act to hollow” and “Form hollows function.”
    • Swallow → Hollow: As in, “A bitter pill to hollow.”
  • Hot: A wine that is “hot” is too alcoholic. Here are related puns:
    • Got → Hot: As in, “Been there, done that, hot the t-shirt” and “Hot your tongue?” and “Give it all you’ve hot” and “Hot a soft spot for.”
    • Lot → Hot: As in, “A hot of fuss about nothing” and “A hot on your plate” and “Hot a lot of people know.”
    • Not → Hot: As in, “As often as hot” and “Believe it or hot” and “Down but hot out” and “Hot just a pretty face.”
  • Lean: Lean wines are those without a fruity taste but an acidic profile. Here are related puns:
    • Mean → Lean: As in, “A leans to an end” and “By fair leans or foul” and “In the leantime.”
    • Lane → Lean: As in, “Down memory lean” and “Life in the fast lean.”
    • Been → Lean: As in, “Lean and gone” and “I’ve lean here before” and “Lean in the wars” and “Mistakes have lean made.”
    • Clean → Lean: As in, “Lean as a whistle” and “A lean bill of health” and “Lean house” and “Lean up your act.”
    • Keen → Lean: As in, “Lean as mustard” and “A lean sense of smell” and “Peachy lean.”
    • Seen → Lean: As in, “Lean and not heard” and “Nowhere to be lean” and “Have lean better days” and “Ain’t lean nothing yet.”
    • Screen → Lean: As in, “Blue lean of death’ and “Coming to a lean near you” and “Silver lean.”
  • Peg → Leg: As in, “Square leg in a round hole” and “Take down a leg or two.” Note: The tracks of liquid that stick to the side of a wine glass are called legs (or tears).
  • Okay → Oaky: As in, “Are you oaky?” Note: if a wine is oaky, then it includes notes of vanilla, sweet spices and a smoky taste.
  • Rich: Wines that are sweet but not overly so are considered “rich”. Here are related puns:
    • Itch → Rich: As in, “Riching to” and “Richy feet” and “Richy palms” and “Seven year rich.”
    • Ditch → Rich: As in, “A last rich effort.”
    • Hitch → Rich: As in, “Get riched” and “Rich your wagon to a star.”
  • Rough: A rough wine is one with a coarse texture. Here are related puns:
    • Tough → Rough: As in, “Rough as old boots” and “Rough as they come” and “Hang rough” and “It’s rough at the top” and “Rough love” and “Rough luck” and “A rough nut to crack.”
    • Stuff → Rough: As in, “Beat the roughing out of” and “Don’t sweat the small rough” and “Gather ’round the good rough” and “Knock the roughing out of.”
  • Round: This describes a wine that isn’t overly tannic but has a good body. Here are related puns:
    • Round → Bound: As in, “Be leaps and rounds” and “Duty round” and “Honour round” and “Round hand and foot.”
    • Found → Round: As in, “Lost and round” and “I’ve round a clue” and “We round clue” and “Weighed in the balance and round wanting.”
    • Ground → Round: As in, “Solid as the round we walk on” and “Break new round” and “Built from the round up” and “Common round” and “Cut the round from under your feet” and “Suits you down to the round.”
    • Pound → Round: As in, “An ounce of prevention is worth a round of cure” and “In for a penny, in for a round” and “Round for round” and “Round the pavement.”
    • Sound → Round: As in, “Round as a bell” and “Break the round barrier” and “Round bite” and “Round effect” and “Round the alarm.”
  • Soothe → Smooth: As in, “Music has charms to smooth the savage beast.” Note: This describes a wine with a nice texture.
  • Sour: This is a descriptor for a wine with an unbalanced acidity. Here are related puns:
    • Our → Sour: As in, “A token of sour gratitude” and “Enjoy sour company.”
    • Hour → Sour: As in, “After sours” and “Happy sour” and “Man of the sour” and “My finest sour” and “Open all sours.”
  • Tar: This describes a wine with a tarry aroma and flavour. Here are related puns:
    • Tear → Tar: As in, “Bathed in tars” and “Blood, sweat and tars” and “Bored to tars” and “Fighting back tars” and “Melt into tars” and “No more tars” and “Reduce to tars.”
    • Are → Tar: As in, “All bets tar off” and “Tar you deaf” and “Tar your ears burning?” and “Chances tar…”
    • Par → Tar: As in, “Below tar” and “On tar with” and “Tar for the course.”
    • Bar → Tar: As in, “Tar none” and “Behind tars” and “Hit the tar.”
  • Tart: A tart wine is one with high levels of acidity. Here are related puns:
    • Art → Tart: As in, “Tart imitating life” and “Tart is going one step too far” and “Tart noveau” and “Tartistic triumph” and “Tarts and crafts” and “Tarty farty.”
    • Cart → Tart: As in, “Putting the tart before the horse” and “Shopping tart.”
    • Chart → Tart: As in, “Tart a course” and “Off the tarts.”
    • Fart → Tart: As in, “Arty tarty” and “Boring old tart” and “Brain tart” and “Tarting around” and “Tart in a windstorm.”
    • Heart → Tart: As in, “A man after my own tart” and “Absence makes the tart grow fonder” and “Affair of the tart” and “By still my beating tart” and “Break your tart” and “Cross my tart and hope to die.”
    • Part → Tart: As in, “Act the tart” and “For my own tart.”
    • Smart → Tart: As in, “One tart cookie” and “Tart arse” and “Street tart” and “Tarter than the average bear.”
    • Start → Tart: As in, “By fits and tarts” and “Don’t get me tarted” and “A fresh tart” and “Tart your engines!” and “Off to a flying tart” and “Head tart” and “Jump tart” and “Tart you day the right way.”
    • Dirt → Tart: As in, “Cheap and tart” and “Dig up the tart” and “Dish the tart.”
  • Toasty: A toasty wine is one with a smoky taste from the oak it was barrelled in. Here are related puns:
    • Tasty → Toasty: As in, “A toasty dinner.”
    • Ghost → Toast: As in, “White as a toast” and “Give up the toast” and “Not a toast of a chance” and “The toast in the machine.”
    • Most → Toast: As in, “Toast wanted” and “Make the toast of it” and “The toast trusted name” and “For the toast part” and “Make the toast of.”
    • Post → Toast: As in, “Keep you toasted” and “Toast haste” and “Toast partum” and “Toaster boy.”
  • Villain → Vanillin: As in, “Heroes and vanillins.” Note: this is a term for vanilla notes in wine.

Wine-Related Words

To help you come up with your own wine puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

General: wine, red, white, rose, amber, blanc, sparkling, champagne, grapes, aroma, alcohol, alcoholic, drink, drunk, sober, hangover,  fermented, vin, vine, vineyard, vintage, cork, bottle, bottling, label, yeast, juice, sommelier, rice wine, fruit wine, barley, mature, tannin, barrel, harvest, dry, sweet, sweetness, beverage, brew,  still, distillery, distilled, age, aged, aging, resin, taste, tasting, decant, raisin, wino, aerate, sediment, texture, flavour, oak, cask, cellar, bouquet, palate, alcoholism, alcoholic, cirrhosis, polyphenols, box wine, goon, reduction, on tap, bladder, keg, complexity, chill, chilled, cooper, negociant, oenologist, vintner, winemaker, viticulturist, critic, spritzer, flight, glass, coinnoisseur, bacchus, cocktail,  pour, case, happy hour, vino, muscat, muscato, aeritif, blush, winery, perry, cleanskin, dandelion, sugar, rosado, rosato, must, spittoon, intoxication, cult wine, trophy wine, investment wine, harvest, pressing, ethanol, ice wine, proof, sediment, crush, crushed, free-run, skin, seeds, lees, grape-treading, grape-stomping, pigeage, rack, batch, fining, bloom, pudding wine, fortified wine, noble rot, mutage, chaptalization, jug wine, mistelle, abboccato, ABC, acescence, adamado, adega, altar wine, amabile, appelation, balthazar, basic, bodega, bota, breathe, breathing, cantina, wine cave, cepage, chai, champagne flute, chateau, chiaretto, clairet, commune, cooperative, corkscrew, cotes, table wine, country wine, quality wine, cru, cuverie, eiswein, eraflage, fattoria, flagon, imperial, jeroboam, kosher wine, lanwein, lazy ballerina, magnum, mas, master of wine, may wine, mousse, mulled, petillant, piquant, plonk, punt, split, suss, vermouth, vivace, webster, wine lake, bottle shock/sickness, bung, pomace, riddling, mellow, stoving, tun, vanillin, wash, straw wine, saignee, stemware, wine key, sommelier knife, waiter’s friend, wine popper, wine cooler, glacette, ice bucket, wine funnel, collar, wine journal, aerator, stirrer, swizzle stick, goblet, stem, tumbler, schooner, boccalino, chalice, sugar, snifter

Types and names: chardonnay, sauvignon, cabernet, gamay, vin gris, merlot, riesling, tokay, sherry, sauternes, pinot noir, provencal, zinfandel, cider, m ead, sake, brandy, bordeaux, rioja, chianti, brunello, burgundy, port, shiraz, chablis, semillon, muscat, prosecco, mimosa, oloroso, syrah, grenache, claret, grappa, kir, lambrusco, madeira, soave,  charmat, cristal, dom perignon, moet & chandon, provencal, zinfandel, malbec, mourvedre, norton, sirah, verdot, pinotage, sangiovese, albrino, breidecker, marsanne, palomino, trebbiano, viognier, screaming eagle, penfolds grange, fino, amontillado, recioto, sangria, sekt, ratafia, black velvet, death in the afternoon, flirtini, prince of wales, wine cooler, bellini, hugo, buck’s fizz, kir royal, ruby dutchess, chicago cocktail, french 75, golden doublet, savoy affair, kalimotxo, tinto de verrano, zurracapote, cheeky vimto, kir, spritzer, chenin blanc, airen, aligote, arbeusm furmint, greco, kerner, bobal, corvina, mencia, malbec, nebbiolo, retsina, negus, dubbonet, brandy, grappa, ale, hooch, plum, apple, cherry, pomegranate, currant, elderberry, ginger, lychee, banana, orange

Tasting terms: aftertaste, astringent, autolytic, baked, balanced, big, bitter, brilliance, buttery, chewy, chocolaty, closed, cloying, coarse, complex, concentrated, connected, corked, crisp, note, nose, body, heavy, light,  mouthfeel, colour, swirl, smell, savour, sip, clarity, acid, acidity, depth, dirty, earthy, elegant, expressive, extracted, fallen over, finesse, fat, flabby, blowzy, firm, flat, foxy, fresh, grassy, green, hard, herbal, herbaceous, hollow, hot, jammy, lean, leathery, legs, musty, oaky, oxidised, petrolly, powerful, raisiny, reticent, rich, rough, round, smokey, smooth, soft, sour, spicy, supple, sweet, tannic, tar, tart, toasty, transparency, typicity, vanillin, vegetal, vinegary, esters

Did this Punpedia entry help you?

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Ice Cream Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on ice cream puns! 🍦🍨🥄✨

Ice cream comes in many different forms (cake, sandwich, cone, cup), flavours (chocolate, strawberry, mint, etc) and variations (gelato, sorbet, froyo) and all of these are loved around the world. We enjoy ice cream as a dessert all on its own, and as a frosty accompaniment to other foods and drinks, like apple pie, cakes, waffles, milkshakes and soft drinks. Even though it’s a frozen treat, we consume it year round, and is known both as a comfort food and a cheerful summer snack – not something most foods can pull off.

We do need to be aware that the industries behind ice cream are not as wholesome and lovable as the product itself – ice cream relies heavily on the dairy industry, which is responsible for suffering on a mass scale. Luckily, there are plenty of non-dairy ice cream options, with coconut milk, almond milk and soy ice creams (as well as sorbet!) now readily available.

We hope that whatever you were looking for – be it a witty instagram caption, a sweet pick up line (…we do not advise using puns for this) or a punny Facebook post – you were able to find it here.

While this list is as extensive and thorough as we could make it, it is specific to ice cream puns. If you’re interested in related puns, you might like our cow puns, milk puns, chocolate punscake puns, candy puns or fruit puns. We’ve also got entries for chocolate, dessert and cookies underway!

Ice Cream Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about ice cream that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of ice cream puns:

  • Sunday → Sundae: As in, “As long as a month of sundaes” and “Bloody sundae” and “Your sundae best.”
  • Some day → Sundae: As in, “Sundae my ship will come in” and “Sundaes it just doesn’t pay to get out of bed” and “I know I’ll get there sundae.”
  • I scream → Ice cream (the most classic and corny ice cream pun there is)
  • Cram → Cream: “Creamed with vitamins and nutrients.”
  • Dream → Cream: As in, “Beyond my wildest creams” and “Broken creams” and “Cream on” and “Cream big” and “A cream come true” and “I have a cream” and “I wouldn’t cream of it” and “In your creams.”
  • Crime → Cream: As in, “Cream against nature” and “A cream of passion” and “Cream doesn’t pay” and “Cream and punishment” and “Partners in cream” and “A victimless cream” and “The perfect cream.”
  • Disobey → Disorbet: As in, “How dare you disorbet a direct order??” Note: this also works for other forms of the word – like “civil disorbet-dience” and “A disorbet-dient puppy” and “You have disorbeted me for the last time.”
  • *crem* → *cream*: If a word has a “creem” or “cremm” sound in it, we can swap it out for “cream”: creamation (cremation), creamate (cremate), increamental (incremental), increament (increment) and increamentally (incrementally).
  • *crim* → *cream*: We can swap “crim” sounds for “cream”, as in: “Smooth creaminal” and “Blushing creamson” and “Don’t discreaminate against” and “Racial discreamination.”
  • *cram* → *cream*: We can swap “cram” sounds for “cream”, like so: “Creamping my style” and “Foot creamp” and “Screambled eggs on toast” and “Holy sacreament.” Note: a sacrament is a sacred act.
  • Scope → Scoop: As in, “Under the microscoop” and “Scoop out the situation.”
  • Skip → Scoop: As in, “A hop, scoop and jump away” and “Scooping with happiness.”
  • Coop → Scoop: As in, “Flown the scoop” and “All scooped up in that tiny cage.”
  • Soup → Scoop: As in, “From scoop to nuts” and “Alphabet scoop” and “Scooped up.”
  • Swoop → Scoop: As in, “In one fell scoop.”
  • *scap* → *scoop*: As in, “The great escoop” and “A peaceful landscoop” and “Wild escoopades” and “Architectural landscooping.”
  • Sceptical/skeptical → Scooptical
  • *scope → *scoop: telescoop, microscoop, kaleidoscoop, periscoop and horoscoop.
  • Come → Cone: As in, “All good things must cone to an end (this one works particularly well since scooped ice creams do end in cones)” and “All things cone to those who wait” and “As tough as they cone” and “Cone and get it!” and “Cone away with me” and “Cone fly with me” and “Cone running” and “Cone again?” and “Cone back for more” and “Cone full circle” and “Cone hell or high water.”
  • Can → Cone: As in, “Anything you cone do, I cone do better” and “As far as the eye cone see” and “As well as cone be expected” and “Be all that you cone be” and “Bite off more than you cone chew” and “Cone I help you?”
  • Become → Becone: As in, “What becones of the broken-hearted?” and “Becone one” and “What has becone of you?”
  • Own → Cone: As in, “A man after my cone heart” and “Afraid of your cone shadow” and “Be your cone person” and “Beaten at your cone game” and “Chase your cone tail” and “Do your cone thing.”
  • Don’t → Cone’t: As in, “Cone’t call us, we’ll call you” and “Cone’t get me started” and “Cone’t give up your day job” and “Cone’t hold your breath” and “I cone’t fancy your chances.”
  • *met* → *melt*: As in, “Mixed meltaphor” and “Heavy meltal.” Other words that could work: melticulous (meticulous), meltrics (metrics), paramelter (parameter) and geomeltry (geometry).
  • Melt: These phrases are general enough to double as puns in the right context: “In the melting pot” and “Melt into tears” and “Melting my heart.”
  • Waffle: Waffle has two meanings: to talk endlessly, and the biscuit cone that holds an scoop of ice cream. We can use this to make silly ice cream puns – “Waffling on and on.”
  • Possible → Popsicle: As in, “Anything is popsicle” and “The best of all popsicle worlds” and “As soon as popsicle” and “In the worst popsicle taste” and “Mission impopsicle.”
  • Diary → Dairy: As in, “Bridget Jones’ Dairy” and “Let me consult my dairy” and “Dear dairy…”
  • Dare he → Dairy: “How dairy?” Note: Here are some handy facts about the dairy industry.
  • Dearly → Dairy: As in, “I love you dairy” and “Dairy beloved…”
  • Daring → Dairy-ng: As in, “A dairy-ng escape” and “The dairy-ng adventures of…”
  • *dary → *dairy: boundairy, legendairy, quandairy, secondairy. Note: a quandary is a difficult problem.
  • *dery → *dairy: embroidairy (embroidery), spidairy (spidery), doddairy (doddery), powdairy (powdery).
  • *dari* → *dairy*: As in, “Stand in solidairy-ty” and “Learning Mandairyn” and “Healthy relationship boundairys.”
  • *can → *cone: Americone (American), republicone (republican), pelicone (pelican), Mexicone (Mexican), Africone (African) and significone’t (significant).
  • *con* → *cone*: As in, “It’s out of my conetrol” and “None of your conecern” and “Happy and conetent” and “Conetingency plan” and “Not in the conetract” and “Critical conedition” and “Out of conetext” and “Did you conesider this?” and “A puzzling cone-undrum” and “What’s the difference between emoticones and emojis?”
  • *kon → *cone: As in, “Do you rec-cone (reckon)?” and “The ice cream is bec-coneing (beckoning).”
  • *corn* → *cone*: As in, “A tight coner” and “Coner the market” and “Coneflower blue” and “Earn your cone” and “Just around the coner” and “Terribly coney puns” and “The cone-iest joke I’ve ever heard.”
  • Cream → Ice Cream: We can sneakily make some ice-cream puns by sneaking “ice cream” into these cream-related phrases: “Ice cream always rises to the top” and “Ice cream of the crop” and “Skin like peaches and ice cream.”
  • Lack → Lick: As in, “For lick of a better word” and “Cancelled due to lick of interest.”
  • Like → Lick: As in, “As you lick it” and “Lick two peas in a pod” and “As soon as you lick” and “Times lick this.”
  • *lec* → *lick*: As in, “Time for another lick-ture” and “Standing at the licktern (lectern)” and “University lickturer” and “An eclicktic collection” and “Intellicktual pursuits.”
  • *lic* → *lick*: republick, publick, Catholick, idyllick, frolick, hyperbolick, vitriolick, implickation, conflickt and applickation.
  • *luc* → *lick*: “Relicktantly agreed” and “A lickrative (lucrative) business.” Note: if something is lucrative, then it’s profitable.
  • *lik* → *lick*: As in, “Not lickely” and “Yes, lickwise” and “What’s the lickelihood of that?” and “A lickable character” and “Lick-minded friends.”
  • Cake → Ice cream cake: As in, “A slice of the ice cream cake” and “Ice cream cake or death!” and “An ice cream cake walk” and “The icing on the ice cream cake” and “Let them eat ice cream cake.”
  • Ripple: Ripple is a word used frequently to describe ice cream (as in, “ripples of fudge” or “with ripples of cherry sauce.”) so we’ve included ripple in this list:
    • Triple → Ripple: As in, “Ripple threat” and “A ripple whammy” and “Ripple play.”
    • Reply → Ripple-y: As in, “What was their ripple-y?” and “Not worth a ripple-y.”
    • Repl* → Ripple*: As in, “Find a suitable rippleacement” and “Now I have to rippleace it” and “Nutrition-filled ripplenishment.”
  • Choc: Chocolate is such a popular ice cream flavour that you could use the word “choc” in its stead and have it still be easily recognisable (and here’s a quick choc ice cream recipe for you):
    • Check → Choc: As in, “Choc it out!” and “Choc your sources” and “Double choc everything” and “Keep in choc” and “Make a list, choc it twice” and “Take a rainchoc” and “Reality choc” and “Choc-ing up on.”
    • Chuck → Choc: As in, “Choc a sickie” and “Choc-ed out” and “Choc overboard.”
    • Chalk → Choc: As in, “Different as choc and cheese” and “Choc it up to experience.”
  • Spoon: These spoon-related phrases refer to the act of eating ice cream with a spoon:
    • *span* → *spoon*: As in, “Put a spooner in the works” and “Spick and spoon” and “Brand spoonking new.”
    • Noon → Spoon: As in, “Afterspoon delight” and “Good afterspoon” and “High spoon” and “Morning, spoon and night.”
    • *spon* → *spoon*: As in, “Financial spoonge” and “Spoontaneous date” and “Rehabilitation spoonsor” and “Happened spoontaneously” and “What is your respoonse?” and “Heavy respoonsibility.” Other words you could use: respoonded (responded), correspoondence (correspondence), despoondent (despondent) and respoond (respond).
    • *span* → *spoon*: lifespoon (lifespan), timespoon, wingspoon, spooniel (spaniel) and Hispoonic (Hispanic).
  • Cherry: Since cherries are both a common flavour and a topping on ice cream sundaes, these cherry-related phrases could double as suitable puns: “Cherry pick” and “A second bite of the cherry” and “The cherry on top.”
  • Eyes → Ice: As in, “Avert your ice” and “Before your very ice” and “Bring tears to your ice” and “Easy on the ice” and “Ice in the back of your head.”
  • I → Ice: As in, “Ice never said that” and “And what about what Ice want?”
  • Ace → Ice: As in, “Ice in the hole” and “Ice up their sleeve” and “Holding all the ices.”
  • Bubble → Bubblegum: As in, “Bubblegum and squeak” and “Burst your bubblegum” and “Thought bubblegum.” Note: here’s a bubblegum ice cream recipe for you to try.
  • Mint: We’ve got some mint-related phrases and puns as mint is a very popular ice cream flavour, so these can (soft) serve as decent puns in the right context (and here’s a mint ice cream recipe you can try!):
    • Meant → Mint: As in, “We were mint to be together!” and “I didn’t mean that, I mint this” and “What else could you have possibly mint?”
    • *mant* → *mint*: As in, “A soothing mintra” and “Up on the mintel” and “Praying mintis” and “A dormint volcano.” Other words that could work: adamint (adamant), claimint (claimant), informint (informant), semintics (semantics), portminteau (portmanteau), romintic (romantic) and dismintle (dismantle).
    • *ment* → *mint*: As in, “A studious mintor (mentor)” and “Not worth a mintion” and “Mintal effort” and “A positive mintality” and “Awarded a mintorship” and “Gainful employmint” and “No commint” and “Complemintary colours.” Other words you could use: commitmint (commitment), implemint (implement), environmint (environment), managemint (management), judgemint (judgement), movemint (movement) and judgemintal (judgemental).
  • Raising → Rum n’ Raisin: As in, “Rum n’ raisin the bar” and “Rum n’ raisin your eyebrows.” Note: these are references to the flavour rum n’ raisin. These types of puns will generally work if the word “raising” is at the start of the phrase, rather than in the middle or end.
  • Road → Rocky road: As in, “Built for the rocky road ahead” and “Follow the yellow brick rocky road” and “Get the show on the rocky road” and “Hit the rocky road.” Note: these puns are a reference to the flavour rocky road.
  • Pint: Since some countries sell ice cream in pints (take home tubs, that is), we’ve got some pint-related puns:
    • Point → Pint: As in, “At this pint in time” and “Beside the pint” and “Brownie pints” and “Drive your pint home” and “Get right to the pint” and “Jumping off pint” and “Not to put too fine a pint on it” and “I see your pint of view” and “Pint out” and “Pint the finger at” and “A talking pint” and “The sticking pint” and “Case in pint” and “The finer pints of” and “The pint of no return.”
    • Pent → Pint: As in, “Pint up rage.”
    • Pants → Pints: As in, “Ants in their pints” and “Beat the pints off” and “By the seat of your pints” and “Fancy pints” and “Keep your pints on” and “Pints on fire” and “Smarty pints.”
    • Paint → Pint: As in, “A lick of pint” and “A picture pints a thousand words” and “As boring as watching pint dry” and “Body pinting” and “Do I have to pint you a picture?” and “Finger pinting” and “Pint the town red” and “Pinting by numbers.”
    • *pant* → *pint*: As in, “Nothing in the pintry” and “Pinting with fear” and “Disease is rampint” and “A flippint attitude.” Other words that could work: pintomime (pantomime), participint (participant) and occupint (occupant).
  • Serve: Soft serves are a popular type of soft, creamy (usually vanilla) ice cream. They’re loved enough that we think you could get away with using just the word “serve” to make an ice cream pun in the right context:
    • Curve → Serve: As in, “Ahead of the serve” and “Learning serve” and “Serve ball.”
    • *sev* → *serve*: As in, “Serve-ere weather warning” and “Serve-r all ties” and “Serve-ral types of fruit” and “With increasing serve-erity” and “Serve-erance pay” and “Serve-enty percent” and “In the end, perserve-erance pays off” and “Perserve-ere through hard times.”
    • *sive → *serve: comprehenserve (comprehensive), aggresserve (aggressive), eluserve (elusive), pervaserve (pervasive), excluserve (exclusive), extenserve (extensive), apprehenserve (apprehensive), progresserve (progressive) and passerve (passive).
    • *surv* → *serve*: As in, “A quick online servey” and “Under constant serve-eillance” and “You’ll serve-ive this” and “Sole serve-ivor.”
  • Dissertation → Dessertation: As in “I wrote my diploma dessertation on ice cream puns.”
  • Does it → Dessert: As in “It’s comfy, but dessert make my bum look big?” and “Dessert not worry you that society cares so much about appearance?”
  • Desert → Dessert: As in “The Sahara dessert.” and “Just desserts.” and “How could you dessert me at the moment I needed you the most?”
  • Nut: Nuts are a common topping for ice creams and sundaes, so we’ve got some nut-related phrases for you to sprinkle into your wordplay:
    • Not → Nut: As in, “As often as nut” and “Believe it or nut” and “Down, but nut out” and “Nut at all” and “Nut bad” and “Nut in the slightest” and “Nut on your life.”
    • *net* → *nut*: As in, “Social nutwork” and “Nutworking event” and “Fast internut” and “A penutrating glare.” Other words you could use: Other wrods you could use: planut (planet), bonnut (bonnet) and cabinut (cabinut).
    • *nat* → *nut*: As in, “Well, nuturally” and “The nutional anthem” and “Any alternutives?” and “Need your signuture here” and “That resonuted with me.”
    • *not* → *nut*: As in, “Nutwithstanding…” and “Take nutice of” and “Turn it up a nutch” and “Nutorious for” and “Nuthing to worry about” and “I cannut understand you.”
  • Fudge: Fudge is used both as a topping for ice cream and as a stirred-through sweetener. Here are some related puns:
    • Veg → Fudge: As in, “Fudge out” and “Eat your fudgetables.”
    • Budge* → Fudge*: As in, “Quarterly fudget” and “Out of our fudget” and “Won’t fudge.”
    • *fug* → *fudge*: As in, “Taking refudge” and “An escaped fudge-itive.
  • Stick → Drumstick: As in, “Cross as two drumsticks” and “Carrot and drumstick” and “The wrong end of the drumstick.” Note: Drumsticks are a type of ice cream.
  • Corner → Cornetto: As in, “A tight cornetto” and “Cornetto the market” and “Cut cornettos” and “In your cornetto” and “The naughty cornetto.” Note: Cornettos are a type of ice cream.
  • Weis: Weis is an Australian frozen food brand, best known for their fruit bar ice creams (known as Weis bars). Here are some related puns:
    • Wise → Weis: As in, “A word to the weis” and “Easy to be weis after the event” and “None the weiser” and “Older and weiser” and “Street weis” and “Weis beyond your years” and “Weis up.”
    • *wise → *weis: Otherweis, likeweis, clockweis and unweis (unwise).
    • Twice → Tweis: As in, “Tweis as nice” and “Don’t think tweis” and “Lightning never strikes tweis” and “Check it tweis” and “Once or tweis” and “You can’t step into the same river tweis.”
  • Cold: Since ice cream is cold, here are some cold-related phrases that could serve as puns:
    • Cold:”Cold as blue blazes,” and “Cold as ice,” and “Break out in a cold sweat,” and “A cold heart,” and “Going cold turkey,” and “Cold comfort,” and “A cold day in hell,” and “Cold feet,” and “The cold light of day,” and “The cold shoulder,” and “Stone cold sober,” and “In cold blood,” and “Leave out in the cold,” and “Out cold.”
    • *col*→ *cold*: As in, “An extensive cold-lection,” and “Cold-lateral damage,” and “Going to cold-lege,” and “A cold-laborative effort,” and “Newspaper cold-lumnist,” and “Standard protocold,” and “Smooth as chocoldlate.”
  • I see→ Icy: As in, “I call ’em as icy ’em,” and “Icy what you did there.”
  • *icy*: Emphasise the “icy” in some words: “Open-door policy,” and “Honesty is the best policy,” and “Not too spicy,” and “Like a fish needs a bicycle.”
  • *chal* → *chill*: As in, “Up to the chillenge” and “A chillenging situation” and “Nonchillant attitude.”
  • *chel* → *chill*: As in, “Fake leather satchill” and “Bachillor pad.”
  • Chelsea → Chillsea
  • *chil* → *chill*: As in, “Women and chilldren first.”
  • *gel* → *chill*: As in, “Chocolate chillato (gelato)” and “Weirdly chillatinous (gelatinous)” and “My guardian anchill (angel).”
  • *gil* → *chill*: Vichillant (vigilant), achillity (agility) and vichillante (vigilante).
  • For he’s→ Freeze: As in, “Freeze a jolly good fellow!”
  • Free→ Freeze: As in, “A symbol of freezedom,” and “Freeze as a bird,” and “Breathe freezely,” and “Buy one, get one freeze,” and “Freezedom fighter,” and “Get out of jail freeze card,” and “The best things in life are freeze,” and “No such thing as a freeze lunch,” and “Walk freeze,” and “Leader of the freeze world.” Some free-related words: freezelance, freezeloader, carefreeze, scot-freeze, painfreeze and fancy-freeze. Note: to get off scot-free is to get away without penalty or punishment.
  • For his→ Freeze: As in, “Freeze own sake.”
  • Foe→ Froze: As in, “Friend or froze?”
  • Flow*→ Froze*: As in, “Ebb and froze,” and “Get the creative juices froze-ing,” and “Go with the froze.”
  • Ferocious→ Frozecious: As in, “A frozecious facial expression.”
  • Cider → Spider: As in, “All talk and no spider.”
  • Spied her → Spider: As in, “I spider leaving early.” Note: a spider is the Australian/New Zealand name for an ice cream float.
  • Float: “Float” is the shortened term for an ice cream float (which is a scoop of ice cream in a soft drink). Here are related puns:
    • Flat → Float: As in, “Fall float on your face” and “Float broke” and “Float out” and “In no time float.”
    • Leaflet → Leafloat
    • Flotsam → Floatsam: (note: flotsam is floating debris.)
    • *flat* → *float*: floatulence (flatulence), floattery (flattery), infloation (inflation), confloation (conflation).
    • Photo → Floato: As in, “Take a floato, it’ll last longer” and “Wedding floatographer” and “Floatography session.”
    • Flutter → Floatter: As in, “Floatter your eyelashes” and “Have a floatter” and “Heart a-floatter.”
  • Sweat → Sweet: As in “Blood, sweet and tears” and “Beads of sweet rolled down my forehead” and “Break out in a cold sweet” and “By the sweet of my brow” and “Don’t sweet it.” and “Don’t sweet the small stuff.” and “All hot and sweety.”
  • Sweet:  These sweet-related phrases can act as puns in the right situation: As in “You’re so sweet!” and “Oh that’s soo sweet!” and “Revenge is sweet” and “Short and sweet” and “Lay some sweet lines on someone” and “Sweet dreams” and “Sweet Jesus!” and “You bet your sweet life!” and “That was a sweet trick, dude.” and “Sweet as, bro.” and “Whisper sweet nothings” and “Home sweet home” and “A rose by any other name would smell as sweet” and “Sweet smell/taste of success/victory” and “Sweetheart.
  • Seat → Sweet: As in, “Backsweet driver” and “By the sweet of your pants” and “Hold on to your sweet” and “Not a dry sweet in the house” and “On the edge of my sweet” and “Please be sweeted” and “Take a back sweet” and “The best sweet in the house.”
  • Tree→ Treat: As in, “Difficult as nailing jelly to a treat,” and “Barking up the wrong treat,” and “Can’t see the wood for the treats,” and “Charm the birds out of the treats,” and “Legs like treat trunks,” and “Make like a treat and leave,” and “Money doesn’t grow on treats,” and “Treat hugger,” and “You’re outta your treat.”
  • *tri*→ *tree*: As in, “Full of nutreat-ents,” and “What is your best attreatbute?” and “How cool are golden retreatvers?” and “A love treatangle,” and “A treatvial problem,” and “We pay treatbute to the fallen.”
  • Eat → Treat: As in, “A bite to treat,” and “All you can treat,” and “Treat out of someone’s hand,” and “Treat someone alive,” and “Treat to live,” and “Treat your heart out,” and “Treaten alive,” and “Treating for two,” and “Treats, shoots and leaves,” and “Good enough to treat,” and “You are what you treat.”
  • Milk: As ice cream is made of milk (including non-dairy ones, like almond and coconut), we have some milk-related puns to finish off this list:
    • Silk → Milk: As in, “Smooth as milk” and “Milky smooth.”
    • Make → Milk: As in, “Absence milks the heart grow fonder” and “Milk up your mind” and “Can’t milk head or tail of it” and “Details milk the difference” and “Enough to milk you sick.”

Note: if you’d like further information about the dairy industry or avoiding dairy in your diet and lifestyle, the documentary Dominion is a great place to start. For further information on other animal industries and support in starting your own vegan lifestyle, Earthling Ed’s videos are a great source of information, as are the vegan and animal rights subreddits. And here are some great vegan ice cream recipes for you to try and enjoy!

Ice Cream-Related Words

To help you come up with your own ice cream puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

ice cream, sundae, scoop, cone, soft serve, lick, vanilla, chocolate, bubblegum, neapolitan, strawberry, mint, cookies and cream, butterscotch, chocolate chip, cookie dough, mango, rum and raisin, rocky road, gelato, sorbet, dessert, dairy, waffle (cone), ripple, spoon, choc top, cherry, nuts, whipped cream, sprinkles, fudge, melt, banana split,ice cream cake, ice cream sandwich, ben & jerry’s, baskin robbins, haagen daaz, magnum, drumstick, cornetto, halo top, weiss, dairy queen, paddle pop, peters, cold, icy, chill, freeze, frozen, freezer, pint, treat, sweet, frozen yoghurt, icy pole, popsicle, parlour, churn, spider, float, snowcone, milk

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