Ice Cream Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on ice cream puns! 🍦🍨🥄✨

Ice cream comes in many different forms (cake, sandwich, cone, cup), flavours (chocolate, strawberry, mint, etc) and variations (gelato, sorbet, froyo) and all of these are loved around the world. We enjoy ice cream as a dessert all on its own, and as a frosty accompaniment to other foods and drinks, like apple pie, cakes, waffles, milkshakes and soft drinks. Even though it’s a frozen treat, we consume it year round, and is known both as a comfort food and a cheerful summer snack – not something most foods can pull off.

We do need to be aware that the industries behind ice cream are not as wholesome and lovable as the product itself – ice cream relies heavily on the dairy industry, which is responsible for suffering on a mass scale. Luckily, there are plenty of non-dairy ice cream options, with coconut milk, almond milk and soy ice creams (as well as sorbet!) now readily available.

We hope that whatever you were looking for – be it a witty instagram caption, a sweet pick up line (…we do not advise using puns for this) or a punny Facebook post – you were able to find it here.

While this list is as extensive and thorough as we could make it, it is specific to ice cream puns. If you’re interested in related puns, you might like our cow puns, milk puns, chocolate punscake puns, candy puns or fruit puns. We’ve also got entries for chocolate, dessert and cookies underway!

Ice Cream Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about ice cream that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of ice cream puns:

  • Sunday → Sundae: As in, “As long as a month of sundaes” and “Bloody sundae” and “Your sundae best.”
  • Some day → Sundae: As in, “Sundae my ship will come in” and “Sundaes it just doesn’t pay to get out of bed” and “I know I’ll get there sundae.”
  • I scream → Ice cream (the most classic and corny ice cream pun there is)
  • Cram → Cream: “Creamed with vitamins and nutrients.”
  • Dream → Cream: As in, “Beyond my wildest creams” and “Broken creams” and “Cream on” and “Cream big” and “A cream come true” and “I have a cream” and “I wouldn’t cream of it” and “In your creams.”
  • Crime → Cream: As in, “Cream against nature” and “A cream of passion” and “Cream doesn’t pay” and “Cream and punishment” and “Partners in cream” and “A victimless cream” and “The perfect cream.”
  • Disobey → Disorbet: As in, “How dare you disorbet a direct order??” Note: this also works for other forms of the word – like “civil disorbet-dience” and “A disorbet-dient puppy” and “You have disorbeted me for the last time.”
  • *crem* → *cream*: If a word has a “creem” or “cremm” sound in it, we can swap it out for “cream”: creamation (cremation), creamate (cremate), increamental (incremental), increament (increment) and increamentally (incrementally).
  • *crim* → *cream*: We can swap “crim” sounds for “cream”, as in: “Smooth creaminal” and “Blushing creamson” and “Don’t discreaminate against” and “Racial discreamination.”
  • *cram* → *cream*: We can swap “cram” sounds for “cream”, like so: “Creamping my style” and “Foot creamp” and “Screambled eggs on toast” and “Holy sacreament.” Note: a sacrament is a sacred act.
  • Scope → Scoop: As in, “Under the microscoop” and “Scoop out the situation.”
  • Skip → Scoop: As in, “A hop, scoop and jump away” and “Scooping with happiness.”
  • Coop → Scoop: As in, “Flown the scoop” and “All scooped up in that tiny cage.”
  • Soup → Scoop: As in, “From scoop to nuts” and “Alphabet scoop” and “Scooped up.”
  • Swoop → Scoop: As in, “In one fell scoop.”
  • *scap* → *scoop*: As in, “The great escoop” and “A peaceful landscoop” and “Wild escoopades” and “Architectural landscooping.”
  • Sceptical/skeptical → Scooptical
  • *scope → *scoop: telescoop, microscoop, kaleidoscoop, periscoop and horoscoop.
  • Come → Cone: As in, “All good things must cone to an end (this one works particularly well since scooped ice creams do end in cones)” and “All things cone to those who wait” and “As tough as they cone” and “Cone and get it!” and “Cone away with me” and “Cone fly with me” and “Cone running” and “Cone again?” and “Cone back for more” and “Cone full circle” and “Cone hell or high water.”
  • Can → Cone: As in, “Anything you cone do, I cone do better” and “As far as the eye cone see” and “As well as cone be expected” and “Be all that you cone be” and “Bite off more than you cone chew” and “Cone I help you?”
  • Become → Becone: As in, “What becones of the broken-hearted?” and “Becone one” and “What has becone of you?”
  • Own → Cone: As in, “A man after my cone heart” and “Afraid of your cone shadow” and “Be your cone person” and “Beaten at your cone game” and “Chase your cone tail” and “Do your cone thing.”
  • Don’t → Cone’t: As in, “Cone’t call us, we’ll call you” and “Cone’t get me started” and “Cone’t give up your day job” and “Cone’t hold your breath” and “I cone’t fancy your chances.”
  • *met* → *melt*: As in, “Mixed meltaphor” and “Heavy meltal.” Other words that could work: melticulous (meticulous), meltrics (metrics), paramelter (parameter) and geomeltry (geometry).
  • Melt: These phrases are general enough to double as puns in the right context: “In the melting pot” and “Melt into tears” and “Melting my heart.”
  • Waffle: Waffle has two meanings: to talk endlessly, and the biscuit cone that holds an scoop of ice cream. We can use this to make silly ice cream puns – “Waffling on and on.”
  • Possible → Popsicle: As in, “Anything is popsicle” and “The best of all popsicle worlds” and “As soon as popsicle” and “In the worst popsicle taste” and “Mission impopsicle.”
  • Diary → Dairy: As in, “Bridget Jones’ Dairy” and “Let me consult my dairy” and “Dear dairy…”
  • Dare he → Dairy: “How dairy?” Note: Here are some handy facts about the dairy industry.
  • Dearly → Dairy: As in, “I love you dairy” and “Dairy beloved…”
  • Daring → Dairy-ng: As in, “A dairy-ng escape” and “The dairy-ng adventures of…”
  • *dary → *dairy: boundairy, legendairy, quandairy, secondairy. Note: a quandary is a difficult problem.
  • *dery → *dairy: embroidairy (embroidery), spidairy (spidery), doddairy (doddery), powdairy (powdery).
  • *dari* → *dairy*: As in, “Stand in solidairy-ty” and “Learning Mandairyn” and “Healthy relationship boundairys.”
  • *can → *cone: Americone (American), republicone (republican), pelicone (pelican), Mexicone (Mexican), Africone (African) and significone’t (significant).
  • *con* → *cone*: As in, “It’s out of my conetrol” and “None of your conecern” and “Happy and conetent” and “Conetingency plan” and “Not in the conetract” and “Critical conedition” and “Out of conetext” and “Did you conesider this?” and “A puzzling cone-undrum” and “What’s the difference between emoticones and emojis?”
  • *kon → *cone: As in, “Do you rec-cone (reckon)?” and “The ice cream is bec-coneing (beckoning).”
  • *corn* → *cone*: As in, “A tight coner” and “Coner the market” and “Coneflower blue” and “Earn your cone” and “Just around the coner” and “Terribly coney puns” and “The cone-iest joke I’ve ever heard.”
  • Cream → Ice Cream: We can sneakily make some ice-cream puns by sneaking “ice cream” into these cream-related phrases: “Ice cream always rises to the top” and “Ice cream of the crop” and “Skin like peaches and ice cream.”
  • Lack → Lick: As in, “For lick of a better word” and “Cancelled due to lick of interest.”
  • Like → Lick: As in, “As you lick it” and “Lick two peas in a pod” and “As soon as you lick” and “Times lick this.”
  • *lec* → *lick*: As in, “Time for another lick-ture” and “Standing at the licktern (lectern)” and “University lickturer” and “An eclicktic collection” and “Intellicktual pursuits.”
  • *lic* → *lick*: republick, publick, Catholick, idyllick, frolick, hyperbolick, vitriolick, implickation, conflickt and applickation.
  • *luc* → *lick*: “Relicktantly agreed” and “A lickrative (lucrative) business.” Note: if something is lucrative, then it’s profitable.
  • *lik* → *lick*: As in, “Not lickely” and “Yes, lickwise” and “What’s the lickelihood of that?” and “A lickable character” and “Lick-minded friends.”
  • Cake → Ice cream cake: As in, “A slice of the ice cream cake” and “Ice cream cake or death!” and “An ice cream cake walk” and “The icing on the ice cream cake” and “Let them eat ice cream cake.”
  • Ripple: Ripple is a word used frequently to describe ice cream (as in, “ripples of fudge” or “with ripples of cherry sauce.”) so we’ve included ripple in this list:
    • Triple → Ripple: As in, “Ripple threat” and “A ripple whammy” and “Ripple play.”
    • Reply → Ripple-y: As in, “What was their ripple-y?” and “Not worth a ripple-y.”
    • Repl* → Ripple*: As in, “Find a suitable rippleacement” and “Now I have to rippleace it” and “Nutrition-filled ripplenishment.”
  • Choc: Chocolate is such a popular ice cream flavour that you could use the word “choc” in its stead and have it still be easily recognisable (and here’s a quick choc ice cream recipe for you):
    • Check → Choc: As in, “Choc it out!” and “Choc your sources” and “Double choc everything” and “Keep in choc” and “Make a list, choc it twice” and “Take a rainchoc” and “Reality choc” and “Choc-ing up on.”
    • Chuck → Choc: As in, “Choc a sickie” and “Choc-ed out” and “Choc overboard.”
    • Chalk → Choc: As in, “Different as choc and cheese” and “Choc it up to experience.”
  • Spoon: These spoon-related phrases refer to the act of eating ice cream with a spoon:
    • *span* → *spoon*: As in, “Put a spooner in the works” and “Spick and spoon” and “Brand spoonking new.”
    • Noon → Spoon: As in, “Afterspoon delight” and “Good afterspoon” and “High spoon” and “Morning, spoon and night.”
    • *spon* → *spoon*: As in, “Financial spoonge” and “Spoontaneous date” and “Rehabilitation spoonsor” and “Happened spoontaneously” and “What is your respoonse?” and “Heavy respoonsibility.” Other words you could use: respoonded (responded), correspoondence (correspondence), despoondent (despondent) and respoond (respond).
    • *span* → *spoon*: lifespoon (lifespan), timespoon, wingspoon, spooniel (spaniel) and Hispoonic (Hispanic).
  • Cherry: Since cherries are both a common flavour and a topping on ice cream sundaes, these cherry-related phrases could double as suitable puns: “Cherry pick” and “A second bite of the cherry” and “The cherry on top.”
  • Eyes → Ice: As in, “Avert your ice” and “Before your very ice” and “Bring tears to your ice” and “Easy on the ice” and “Ice in the back of your head.”
  • I → Ice: As in, “Ice never said that” and “And what about what Ice want?”
  • Ace → Ice: As in, “Ice in the hole” and “Ice up their sleeve” and “Holding all the ices.”
  • Bubble → Bubblegum: As in, “Bubblegum and squeak” and “Burst your bubblegum” and “Thought bubblegum.” Note: here’s a bubblegum ice cream recipe for you to try.
  • Mint: We’ve got some mint-related phrases and puns as mint is a very popular ice cream flavour, so these can (soft) serve as decent puns in the right context (and here’s a mint ice cream recipe you can try!):
    • Meant → Mint: As in, “We were mint to be together!” and “I didn’t mean that, I mint this” and “What else could you have possibly mint?”
    • *mant* → *mint*: As in, “A soothing mintra” and “Up on the mintel” and “Praying mintis” and “A dormint volcano.” Other words that could work: adamint (adamant), claimint (claimant), informint (informant), semintics (semantics), portminteau (portmanteau), romintic (romantic) and dismintle (dismantle).
    • *ment* → *mint*: As in, “A studious mintor (mentor)” and “Not worth a mintion” and “Mintal effort” and “A positive mintality” and “Awarded a mintorship” and “Gainful employmint” and “No commint” and “Complemintary colours.” Other words you could use: commitmint (commitment), implemint (implement), environmint (environment), managemint (management), judgemint (judgement), movemint (movement) and judgemintal (judgemental).
  • Raising → Rum n’ Raisin: As in, “Rum n’ raisin the bar” and “Rum n’ raisin your eyebrows.” Note: these are references to the flavour rum n’ raisin. These types of puns will generally work if the word “raising” is at the start of the phrase, rather than in the middle or end.
  • Road → Rocky road: As in, “Built for the rocky road ahead” and “Follow the yellow brick rocky road” and “Get the show on the rocky road” and “Hit the rocky road.” Note: these puns are a reference to the flavour rocky road.
  • Pint: Since some countries sell ice cream in pints (take home tubs, that is), we’ve got some pint-related puns:
    • Point → Pint: As in, “At this pint in time” and “Beside the pint” and “Brownie pints” and “Drive your pint home” and “Get right to the pint” and “Jumping off pint” and “Not to put too fine a pint on it” and “I see your pint of view” and “Pint out” and “Pint the finger at” and “A talking pint” and “The sticking pint” and “Case in pint” and “The finer pints of” and “The pint of no return.”
    • Pent → Pint: As in, “Pint up rage.”
    • Pants → Pints: As in, “Ants in their pints” and “Beat the pints off” and “By the seat of your pints” and “Fancy pints” and “Keep your pints on” and “Pints on fire” and “Smarty pints.”
    • Paint → Pint: As in, “A lick of pint” and “A picture pints a thousand words” and “As boring as watching pint dry” and “Body pinting” and “Do I have to pint you a picture?” and “Finger pinting” and “Pint the town red” and “Pinting by numbers.”
    • *pant* → *pint*: As in, “Nothing in the pintry” and “Pinting with fear” and “Disease is rampint” and “A flippint attitude.” Other words that could work: pintomime (pantomime), participint (participant) and occupint (occupant).
  • Serve: Soft serves are a popular type of soft, creamy (usually vanilla) ice cream. They’re loved enough that we think you could get away with using just the word “serve” to make an ice cream pun in the right context:
    • Curve → Serve: As in, “Ahead of the serve” and “Learning serve” and “Serve ball.”
    • *sev* → *serve*: As in, “Serve-ere weather warning” and “Serve-r all ties” and “Serve-ral types of fruit” and “With increasing serve-erity” and “Serve-erance pay” and “Serve-enty percent” and “In the end, perserve-erance pays off” and “Perserve-ere through hard times.”
    • *sive → *serve: comprehenserve (comprehensive), aggresserve (aggressive), eluserve (elusive), pervaserve (pervasive), excluserve (exclusive), extenserve (extensive), apprehenserve (apprehensive), progresserve (progressive) and passerve (passive).
    • *surv* → *serve*: As in, “A quick online servey” and “Under constant serve-eillance” and “You’ll serve-ive this” and “Sole serve-ivor.”
  • Dissertation → Dessertation: As in “I wrote my diploma dessertation on ice cream puns.”
  • Does it → Dessert: As in “It’s comfy, but dessert make my bum look big?” and “Dessert not worry you that society cares so much about appearance?”
  • Desert → Dessert: As in “The Sahara dessert.” and “Just desserts.” and “How could you dessert me at the moment I needed you the most?”
  • Nut: Nuts are a common topping for ice creams and sundaes, so we’ve got some nut-related phrases for you to sprinkle into your wordplay:
    • Not → Nut: As in, “As often as nut” and “Believe it or nut” and “Down, but nut out” and “Nut at all” and “Nut bad” and “Nut in the slightest” and “Nut on your life.”
    • *net* → *nut*: As in, “Social nutwork” and “Nutworking event” and “Fast internut” and “A penutrating glare.” Other words you could use: Other wrods you could use: planut (planet), bonnut (bonnet) and cabinut (cabinut).
    • *nat* → *nut*: As in, “Well, nuturally” and “The nutional anthem” and “Any alternutives?” and “Need your signuture here” and “That resonuted with me.”
    • *not* → *nut*: As in, “Nutwithstanding…” and “Take nutice of” and “Turn it up a nutch” and “Nutorious for” and “Nuthing to worry about” and “I cannut understand you.”
  • Fudge: Fudge is used both as a topping for ice cream and as a stirred-through sweetener. Here are some related puns:
    • Veg → Fudge: As in, “Fudge out” and “Eat your fudgetables.”
    • Budge* → Fudge*: As in, “Quarterly fudget” and “Out of our fudget” and “Won’t fudge.”
    • *fug* → *fudge*: As in, “Taking refudge” and “An escaped fudge-itive.
  • Stick → Drumstick: As in, “Cross as two drumsticks” and “Carrot and drumstick” and “The wrong end of the drumstick.” Note: Drumsticks are a type of ice cream.
  • Corner → Cornetto: As in, “A tight cornetto” and “Cornetto the market” and “Cut cornettos” and “In your cornetto” and “The naughty cornetto.” Note: Cornettos are a type of ice cream.
  • Weis: Weis is an Australian frozen food brand, best known for their fruit bar ice creams (known as Weis bars). Here are some related puns:
    • Wise → Weis: As in, “A word to the weis” and “Easy to be weis after the event” and “None the weiser” and “Older and weiser” and “Street weis” and “Weis beyond your years” and “Weis up.”
    • *wise → *weis: Otherweis, likeweis, clockweis and unweis (unwise).
    • Twice → Tweis: As in, “Tweis as nice” and “Don’t think tweis” and “Lightning never strikes tweis” and “Check it tweis” and “Once or tweis” and “You can’t step into the same river tweis.”
  • Cold: Since ice cream is cold, here are some cold-related phrases that could serve as puns:
    • Cold:”Cold as blue blazes,” and “Cold as ice,” and “Break out in a cold sweat,” and “A cold heart,” and “Going cold turkey,” and “Cold comfort,” and “A cold day in hell,” and “Cold feet,” and “The cold light of day,” and “The cold shoulder,” and “Stone cold sober,” and “In cold blood,” and “Leave out in the cold,” and “Out cold.”
    • *col*→ *cold*: As in, “An extensive cold-lection,” and “Cold-lateral damage,” and “Going to cold-lege,” and “A cold-laborative effort,” and “Newspaper cold-lumnist,” and “Standard protocold,” and “Smooth as chocoldlate.”
  • I see→ Icy: As in, “I call ’em as icy ’em,” and “Icy what you did there.”
  • *icy*: Emphasise the “icy” in some words: “Open-door policy,” and “Honesty is the best policy,” and “Not too spicy,” and “Like a fish needs a bicycle.”
  • *chal* → *chill*: As in, “Up to the chillenge” and “A chillenging situation” and “Nonchillant attitude.”
  • *chel* → *chill*: As in, “Fake leather satchill” and “Bachillor pad.”
  • Chelsea → Chillsea
  • *chil* → *chill*: As in, “Women and chilldren first.”
  • *gel* → *chill*: As in, “Chocolate chillato (gelato)” and “Weirdly chillatinous (gelatinous)” and “My guardian anchill (angel).”
  • *gil* → *chill*: Vichillant (vigilant), achillity (agility) and vichillante (vigilante).
  • For he’s→ Freeze: As in, “Freeze a jolly good fellow!”
  • Free→ Freeze: As in, “A symbol of freezedom,” and “Freeze as a bird,” and “Breathe freezely,” and “Buy one, get one freeze,” and “Freezedom fighter,” and “Get out of jail freeze card,” and “The best things in life are freeze,” and “No such thing as a freeze lunch,” and “Walk freeze,” and “Leader of the freeze world.” Some free-related words: freezelance, freezeloader, carefreeze, scot-freeze, painfreeze and fancy-freeze. Note: to get off scot-free is to get away without penalty or punishment.
  • For his→ Freeze: As in, “Freeze own sake.”
  • Foe→ Froze: As in, “Friend or froze?”
  • Flow*→ Froze*: As in, “Ebb and froze,” and “Get the creative juices froze-ing,” and “Go with the froze.”
  • Ferocious→ Frozecious: As in, “A frozecious facial expression.”
  • Cider → Spider: As in, “All talk and no spider.”
  • Spied her → Spider: As in, “I spider leaving early.” Note: a spider is the Australian/New Zealand name for an ice cream float.
  • Float: “Float” is the shortened term for an ice cream float (which is a scoop of ice cream in a soft drink). Here are related puns:
    • Flat → Float: As in, “Fall float on your face” and “Float broke” and “Float out” and “In no time float.”
    • Leaflet → Leafloat
    • Flotsam → Floatsam: (note: flotsam is floating debris.)
    • *flat* → *float*: floatulence (flatulence), floattery (flattery), infloation (inflation), confloation (conflation).
    • Photo → Floato: As in, “Take a floato, it’ll last longer” and “Wedding floatographer” and “Floatography session.”
    • Flutter → Floatter: As in, “Floatter your eyelashes” and “Have a floatter” and “Heart a-floatter.”
  • Sweat → Sweet: As in “Blood, sweet and tears” and “Beads of sweet rolled down my forehead” and “Break out in a cold sweet” and “By the sweet of my brow” and “Don’t sweet it.” and “Don’t sweet the small stuff.” and “All hot and sweety.”
  • Sweet:  These sweet-related phrases can act as puns in the right situation: As in “You’re so sweet!” and “Oh that’s soo sweet!” and “Revenge is sweet” and “Short and sweet” and “Lay some sweet lines on someone” and “Sweet dreams” and “Sweet Jesus!” and “You bet your sweet life!” and “That was a sweet trick, dude.” and “Sweet as, bro.” and “Whisper sweet nothings” and “Home sweet home” and “A rose by any other name would smell as sweet” and “Sweet smell/taste of success/victory” and “Sweetheart.
  • Seat → Sweet: As in, “Backsweet driver” and “By the sweet of your pants” and “Hold on to your sweet” and “Not a dry sweet in the house” and “On the edge of my sweet” and “Please be sweeted” and “Take a back sweet” and “The best sweet in the house.”
  • Tree→ Treat: As in, “Difficult as nailing jelly to a treat,” and “Barking up the wrong treat,” and “Can’t see the wood for the treats,” and “Charm the birds out of the treats,” and “Legs like treat trunks,” and “Make like a treat and leave,” and “Money doesn’t grow on treats,” and “Treat hugger,” and “You’re outta your treat.”
  • *tri*→ *tree*: As in, “Full of nutreat-ents,” and “What is your best attreatbute?” and “How cool are golden retreatvers?” and “A love treatangle,” and “A treatvial problem,” and “We pay treatbute to the fallen.”
  • Eat → Treat: As in, “A bite to treat,” and “All you can treat,” and “Treat out of someone’s hand,” and “Treat someone alive,” and “Treat to live,” and “Treat your heart out,” and “Treaten alive,” and “Treating for two,” and “Treats, shoots and leaves,” and “Good enough to treat,” and “You are what you treat.”
  • Milk: As ice cream is made of milk (including non-dairy ones, like almond and coconut), we have some milk-related puns to finish off this list:
    • Silk → Milk: As in, “Smooth as milk” and “Milky smooth.”
    • Make → Milk: As in, “Absence milks the heart grow fonder” and “Milk up your mind” and “Can’t milk head or tail of it” and “Details milk the difference” and “Enough to milk you sick.”

Note: if you’d like further information about the dairy industry or avoiding dairy in your diet and lifestyle, the documentary Dominion is a great place to start. For further information on other animal industries and support in starting your own vegan lifestyle, Earthling Ed’s videos are a great source of information, as are the vegan and animal rights subreddits. And here are some great vegan ice cream recipes for you to try and enjoy!

Ice Cream-Related Words

To help you come up with your own ice cream puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

ice cream, sundae, scoop, cone, soft serve, lick, vanilla, chocolate, bubblegum, neapolitan, strawberry, mint, cookies and cream, butterscotch, chocolate chip, cookie dough, mango, rum and raisin, rocky road, gelato, sorbet, dessert, dairy, waffle (cone), ripple, spoon, choc top, cherry, nuts, whipped cream, sprinkles, fudge, melt, banana split,ice cream cake, ice cream sandwich, ben & jerry’s, baskin robbins, haagen daaz, magnum, drumstick, cornetto, halo top, weiss, dairy queen, paddle pop, peters, cold, icy, chill, freeze, frozen, freezer, pint, treat, sweet, frozen yoghurt, icy pole, popsicle, parlour, churn, spider, float, snowcone, milk

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Firework Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on firework puns! 🌟 🎆 ✨🔥

Fireworks are used in many different cultural celebrations throughout the year, helping us mark the time in notable and social ways. Whether you’re ringing in the New Year, celebrating Chinese New Year, or living it up during Diwali, we hope you find the perfect pun for your social media, party invites and pun threads.

We’ve made this list as comprehensive as possible, this list is specific just to fireworks. If you’re after events where fireworks are commonly used, we’ve got entries for party puns and New Year’s puns too.

Fireworks Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about fireworks that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of firework puns:

  • Fair → Flare: As in, “All’s flare in love and war” and “By flare means or foul” and “Flare trade” and “Flare and square” and “Flare enough” and “Flare market value” and “No flare!” and “You can’t say flarer than that.”
  • Fare → Flare: As in, “Class warflare” and “Psychological warflare” and “Standard flare” and “How are you flare-ing (faring)?”
  • Flair → Flare: As in, “A flare for the dramatic.”
  • Very → Flarey: As in, “Be flarey afraid” and “Before your flarey eyes” and “How flarey dare you” and “A flarey good year” and “Thank you flarey much” and “Flarey special” and “Flarey well” and “At the flarey least” and “Eflarey (every) inch.”
  • Pang → Bang: As in, “Bangs of conscience” and “Bangs of jealousy.”
  • Pyro: The prefix “pyro” is to do with fire, and is found in words like “pyrotechnics” (which means that something is related to fireworks), so we’ve included it in this list.
    • Paro* → Pyro*:  If a word has a “paro” sound or similar, we can replace it with “pyro”, as in: “On pyrole (parole)” and “Song pyrody (parody) and “Pyroxsms (paroxysms) of laughter.” Note: A paroxysm is a sudden and random outburst.
    • *pero* → *pyro*: As in, “My pyrogative” and “Hydrogen pyroxide” and “A prospyrous venture” and “Parent chapyrone” and “Vegan Peppyroni pizza.” Note: hydrogen peroxide is a chemical compound commonly used as bleach.
    • Pirouette → Pyroette (A pirouette is a dance move where you turn a circle on the tips of your toes.)
    • *poro* → *pyro*: pyrous (porous), pyrosity (porosity),  osteopyrosis (osteoporosis), vapyrous (vaporous). Note: if something is porous, then it has lots of tiny holes that let fluids and gases through (like a sponge).
    • Sapporo → Sappyro (Sapporo is a city in Japan).
    • Payroll → Pyroll: As in, “The pyroll manager.”
    • *para* → *pyro*: As in, “A taste of pyrodise” and “Fool’s pyrodise” and “A pyrodigm shift” and “Running pyrollel” and “The pyrometers (parameters) of…” and “Honesty is pyromount to a relationship” and “Pyrogon of virtue” and “Rain on my pyrode (parade)” and “Herein lies the pyrodox” and “My love, my pyromour” and “In dispyrote locations.” Notes: a paramour is a secret or illicit lover. If things are disparate, then they are separate or apart. A paradox is a statement which contradicts itself.
    • *pera* → *pyro*: As in, “Tropical tempyrotures” and “Your co-opyrotion is appreciated” and “It’s impyrotive that…” and “Smooth opyrotor.”
    • *pira* → *pyro*: As in, “The pyrote’s (pirate’s) life for me” and “Circling like pyronhas” and “While convenient, pyrocy (piracy) is illegal” and “I aspyro (aspire) to…” and “Serve as inspyrotion (inspiration),” and “Conspyrocy theories” and “Inspyrotional pictures” and “The respyrotory system.”
    • *pare* → *pyro*: As in, “In pyronthesis” and “It’s become appyront (apparent) that…” and “Appyrontly so, but…” and “Transpyroncy in business is important.”
    • *pire → *pyro: As in, “You inspyro me” and “Running the empyro (empire)” and “As it transpyro-ed” and “Expyrory date” and “Conspyro-ring with” and “Acting umpyro” and “Vampyro movies.”
    • Singapore → Singapyro
    • *pari* → *pyro*: As in, “Gender dispyroty (disparity)” and “In compyrosin with…” and “Cast out as a pyro-ah (pariah).” Notes: disparity means inequality. A pariah is someone who has been outcast from society.
    • *peri* → *pyro*: As in, “Around the pyrometer (perimeter)” and “In my pyropheral (peripheral) vision” and “In the pyrophery of” and “Impyro-al or metric?”
    • *piri* → *pyro*: As in, “A spyrotual experience” and “An inspyro-ing speech.”
  • Fire → Fireworks: As in, “Get on like a house on fireworks” and “Come on baby, light my firework” and “Fight fire with fireworks” and “Light a firework under [someone]” and “Play with fireworks” and “Ring of fireworks” and “When you play with fireworks, you get burned.” Note: to light a fire under someone is to motivate them to move faster.
  • Sprinkler → Sparkler: As in, “A new sparkler system” and “Turn the sparklers on.” Note: a sparkler is a small hand-held firework.
  • Sparkling → Sparkler-ing: As in, “Sparkler-ing mineral water” and “Sparkler-ing repartee.” Note: if someone’s repartee is sparkling, then they’re a witty conversationalist.
  • Fire → Firecracker: As in, “Come on baby, light my firecracker” and “Come home to a real firecracker” and “Fight fire with firecracker” and “Firecracker and brimstone” and “Play with firecrackers and get burned.”
  • Gun → Gunpowder: As in, “Jump the gunpowder” and “Smoking gunpowder.” Notes: to jump the gun is to begin something too soon.
  • *star*: Pyrotechnic stars are pellets which contain powders and compounds that burn or spark a certain way and are a part of all aerial-type fireworks, so we’ve included star-related puns and phrases in this list. We’ll start off with words that you can emphasise the “star” in: “Can we start?” and “In stark relief” and “A new tech startup” and “Stop staring” and “I didn’t mean to startle you” and “This pasta is very starchy” and “A starter kit” and “You bastard!” and “Doesn’t cut the mustard.” Notes: if something doesn’t cut the mustard, then it isn’t good enough. If something is in stark relief, then it’s been made very obvious.
    • *ster* → *star*: As in, “A starn attitude” and “This area is starile” and “Turn up the stareo” and “Staroids are illegal in sports” and “Aim for the starnum” and “You monstar” and “Addiction is a cruel mastar” and “Fostar kids” and “Am I on the registar?” and “A bolstaring attitude” and “A sinistar presence” and “Mustar the courage” and “Work rostar” and “A cocky roostar” and “It’s unhealthy to judge people based on stareotypes.” Note: to bolster is to support or strengthen something.
    • Stir → Star: As in, “Cause a star” and “Shaken, not starred” and “Star the pot” and “Star up trouble” and “Star-crazy.”
    • Stir* → Star*: Starrup (stirrup) and starring (stirring).
    • *stor* → *star*: As in, “I need to go to the stare (store)” and “My favourite stary” and “A starm brewing” and “Put in starage” and “A two-starey house” and “A convoluted staryline” and “We don’t have to live like our ancestars” and “Impostar syndrome” and “Seed investars” and “Histarical fiction” and “You’re distarting the truth.”
    • Sturdy → Stardy: As in, “A stardy table.”
    • Star: These star-related phrases could serve as a pyrotechnic star or firework pun in the right context. As in, “A star is born” and “Born under a lucky star” and “Catch a falling star” and “Get a gold star” and “Guiding star” and “Written in the stars” and “Reach for the stars” and “A rising star” and “Star wars,” and “Star crossed lovers” and “Star quality” and “Starstruck” and “Stars in your eyes” and “When you wish upon a star” and “My lucky star” and “Seeing stars.”
  • Sky → Skyrocket: A skyrocket is a type of firework that’s launched into the sky. You can refer to them in your sparkling wordplay with these puns and phrases: “Lucy in the skyrocket with diamonds” and “Skyrocket high” and “The skyrocket’s the limit” and “Aim for the skyrocket.”
  • Rocket → Skyrocket: As in, “It’s not skyrocket science” and “Pocket skyrocket.”
  • Rock → Skyrocket: As in, “Hard as a skyrocket” and “Solid as a skyrocket” and “Between a skyrocket and a hard place” and “Get your skyrockets off.”
  • Shall → Shell: An aerial shell is a type of firework, so we’ve included them in this list, starting with some shell-related puns: “Ask and you shell receive” and “You shell not pass” and “When shell we meet again?” and “Speak of the devil and they shell appear” and “I shell return.”
    • Shell: These shell-related phrases can be used as firework puns in the right context: “Come out of your shell” and “Crawl back into your shell” and “Drop a bombshell” and “Hard shell” and “In a nutshell” and “Shell out.”
    • Shill → Shell: As in, “Lose a shelling, find sixpence.” Note: this means to gain something more valuable than you lost.
    • Ariel → Aerial
    • *shal* → *shell*: As in, “Shellow waters” and “Chopped shellots (shallots).”
    • *shel* → *shell*: Emphasise the “shel” in certain words by adding another “l”: “Put it on the shellf” and “Seeking shellter” and “Let’s shellve the topic for now” and “Allergic to shellfish” and “A shelltered upbringing.” Other words you could use: bushell (bushel), shellving, shellac.
    • Shoul* → Shell*: As in, “The cold shellder” and “Broad shellders” and “Chip on one’s shellder” and “A good head on one’s shellders” and “A shellder to cry on” and “You shelldn’t have” and “Zig when you shelld zag” and “You shelld try harder.”
    • *shield* → *shelld*: As in, “Shelld from the truth” and “Stop shellding them” and “Look out the windshelld.”
    • *sal* → *shell*: As in, “At your disposhell (disposal)” and “I have a proposhell for you” and “A univershell issue” and “Colosshell problems” and “Dress rehershell” and “Take with a grain of shellt (salt)” and “A shelliant (salient) point.” Other words you could use: shellamander (salamander), shellacious (salacious), shellmon (salmon), perushell (perusal), appraishell (appraisal) and reprishell (reprisal). Notes: if something is salient, then it’s relevant. To be salacious is to be lustful. A reprisal is a sort of retaliation.
    • *sel* → *shell*: As in, “A shellect few” and “Shelling like hot cakes” and “Apply yourshellf” and “Shelldom (seldom) done” and “Weashell (weasel) words” and “A shellfless act” and “Shellf-righteousness” and “Keep your own counshell.” Other words you could use: caroushell (carousel), chishell (chisel), morshell (morsel). Notes: weasel words are words that are used to make statements vague or misleading. To keep one’s counsel is to keep your own matters private.
    • *sil* → *shell*: As in, “Ask a shelly question and get a shelly answer” and “Scared shelly” and “Shellver screen” and “Tonshell hockey.” Other words you could use: reshellient (resilient), utenshell (utensil), fosshell (fossil) and shellouette (silhouette). Notes: a “silver screen” is a cinema screen. Tonsil hockey is a colloquial term for French kissing.
    • *sol* → *shell*: As in, “Pour gashelline on the fire” and “Shelld down the river” and “You’re either part of the shellution or part of the problem” and “A shellid house for shifting sands” and “Abshellute power corrupts abshellutely.” Notes: to sell someone down the river is to betray and cause extreme difficulty for them.
    • *sul* → *shell*: As in, “Unexpected reshellts (results)” and “A shelltry night.” Note: sultry means hot and humid.
    • *cel* → *shell*: As in, “A padded shell” and “Loud shellebrations” and “An expensive shellphone” and “In the shellar (cellar)” and “A-list shellebrity” and “Canshell my order” and “Part and parshell” and “A canshelled event”. Other words you could use: shellestial (celestial), shellsius (celsius), exshell (excel), exshellent and mishellaneous (miscellaneous). Note: if something is part and parcel, then it’s accepted as an integral and important part of a larger whole.
    • *cil* → *shell*: As in, “I’ll penshell it in” and “Fashellitate conversation” and “New fashellities.”
    • *tual* → *shell*: As in, “Virtshell reality” and “An intellectshell” and “Mutshell (mutual) agreement” and “A spiritshell experience” and “Be punctshell” and “Conceptshell drawings” and “It’ll happen eventshelly.” Other words you could use: ritshell (ritual), actshell (actual), virtshelly (virtually), perpetshell (perpetual) and actshelly (actually).
    • *cial* → *shell*: As in, “A crushell (crucial) point” and “Speshell treatment” and “Soshell butterfly” and “Mutually benefishell” and “Commershell use” and “Superfishell concerns” and “An offishell announcement” and “Finanshell troubles” and “Artifishell intelligence” and “Not espeshelly.” Note: if something is mutually beneficial, then it benefits all parties involved.
    • *tial* → *shell*: As in, “Hidden potenshell” and “Essenshell oils” and “Existenshell crisis” and “A substanshell portion” and “An inishell estimate” and “I’m parshell (partial) to…” and “Spashell (spatial) awareness” and “Impressive credenshells.” Note: a credential is evidence of certain privileges or status.
    • Controversial → Controvershell: As in, “A controvershell episode.”
  • Wheel → Catherine Wheel: A Catherine Wheel is a type of firework that rotates when it’s lit. We can make some silly puns about them by adding “Catherine” to wheel-related phrases: “Put the catherine wheels in motion” and “Hell on catherine wheels” and “Reinvent the catherine wheel.” Note: hell on wheels refers to a situation that is aggressively tough and wild.
  • Catherine, will → Catherine, wheel: As in, “Catherine, wheel you do it?”
  • *fuse*: Emphasise the “fuse” in certain words: refuse, diffuse, defuse, infuse, confuse, profuse, confused and profusely.
  • *fes* → *fuse*: As in, “A profuseional job” and “The writer’s manifuseto” and “Art fusetival” and “In the profusesion of…” and “A dreamlike manifusetation.” Notes: a manifesto is a public document of intentions or policies. A manifestation is the embodiment of something; a tangible thing.
  • *faz* → *fuse*: As in, “Doesn’t fuse (faze) me” and “Left unfused.”
  • *few* → *fuse*: As in, “Breaking curfuse (curfew)” and “Fuser (fewer) and fuser.”
  • *fac* → *fuse*: As in, “Fuse-ilitating conversation” and “New and updated fuse-ilities” and “A crumbling fuse-ade (facade).” Note: a facade is a “face”; or a front of something.
  • Confucius → Confusecius (Confucius was an old Chinese philosopher.)
  • Fuse: We’ve also added some fuse-related phrases that could act as explosively terrible firework puns in the right context: “Blow a fuse” and “Light their fuse” and “A short fuse.”
  • Bang: Some bang-related phrases that could substitute as puns in the right context: “A bigger bang for your buck” and “Bang goes nothing” and “Bang on about” and “Bang out of order” and “Get a bang out of [something]” and “Go out with a bang” and “A bang-up job” and “The whole shebang.” Notes: “Bang-up” means good. The “whole shebang” refers to something that included everything, almost to the top of going overboard.
  • *bing → *bang: These ones are a bit silly, but can still work as wordplay: “Mind-numbang (numbing)” and “Climbang the ladder of success” and “A throbbang headache” and “Absorbang information” and “A disturbang realisation” and “Check the plumbang.”
  • *bung* → *bang*: As in, “An abandoned bangalow (bungalow)” and “Bangled (bungled) the entire operation” and “You bangling idiot” and “Cowabanga!”
  • Bank* → Bang-k*: As in, “Safe as a bang-k” and “A bang-k you can bang-k on” and “Break the bang-k” and “Laughing all the way to the bang-k” and “Piggy bang-k” and “The bang-k of mum and dad” and “Declare bang-kruptcy.”
  • Banger: While “bang” can refer to the noise a firework makes, bangers specifically refers to a type of firework. We can joke about these with these phrases and puns: “Tofu bangers and mash” and “A real head banger.”
  • *far* → *flare*: flarewell (farewell), neflareious (nefarious), welflare (welfare), fanflare (fanfare) and airflare (airfare).
  • Ferocious → Flareocious
  • *fair* → *flare*: As in, “An afflare of the heart” and “Away with the flare-ies” and “Tooth flarey” and “Unflare-ly done” and “In all flareness” and “Flareytale wedding” and “Unflare situation.”
  • *var* → *flare*: As in, “Garden flare-iety” and “Your mileage may flarey” and “Flare-iety is the spice of life” and “Flare-ious opinions” and “Countless flare-iables.”
  • *pher* → *flare*: flare-omone (pheromone), photograflare (photographer), philosoflare (philosopher), periflare-al (peripheral), atmosflare (atmosphere), paraflare-nalia (paraphernalia) and periflarey (periphery).
  • *flir* → *flare*: As in, “A relentless flare-t (flirt)” and “A flare-tatious meeting.”
  • *flor* → *flare*: flare-ist (florist), flare-al (floral) and Flarence (Florence).
  • *flur* → *flare*: As in, “Flare-ies (flurries) of snow.”
  • Pin → Pinwheel: Pinwheels are types of firework that form a sort of spinning wheel. We can refer to them in our wordplay with these puns and phrases: “Bright as a new pinwheel” and “Neat as a new pinwheel” and “Hard to pinwheel down” and “Pinwheels and needles” and “Pull the pinwheel” and “Could have heard a pinwheel drop.”
    • Wheel → Pinwheel: As in, “Asleep at the pinwheel” and “Hell on pinwheels” and “Reinvent the pinwheel” and “A new set of pinwheels” and “Pinwheels of fate” and “Pinwheeling and dealing.” Note: hell on wheels refers to a situation which is aggressively tough and wild.
  • Rock → Rocket: As in, “Between a rocket and a hard place” and “Don’t rocket the boat” and “Rocket and roll” and “Rocket your world” and “Solid as a rocket” and “Get your rockets off” and “Have rockets in your head.”
  • Rickety → Rockety: As in, “Rockety old staircase” and “Frail, rockety legs.” Note: rickety means weak or of poor construction.
  • Racket → Rocket: As in, “Tennis rocket” and “Quit making such a loud rocket!”
  • Ache → Cake: Cakes are a type of firework which are made up of other smaller fireworks, so we’ve included them in our list: “Old cakes and pains” and “A splitting headcake” and “Old heartcake.”
    • *quake → *cake: As in, “Caking in your boots” and “It’s an earthcake!”
    • Cake: Some cake-related phrases that could serve as firework puns: “A slice of the cake” and “Piece of cake” and “You can’t have your cake and eat it too” and “The cherry on the cake” and “That takes the cake” and “Flat as a pancake” and “Baby cakes” and “Cake or death” and “A cake walk” and “Caked with mud” and “Icing on the cake” and “Let them eat cake.” Note: a cake walk is something considered to be very easy.
    • *cac* → *cake*: As in, “Spiky like a cake-tus (cactus)” and “A cake-ophony (cacophony) of noise” and “Cake-ao (cacao) powder” and “Cake-ling (cackling) to herself.” Other words you could use: efficake-cious (efficacious) and perspicake-cious (perspicacious). Notes: a cacophony is a random mess of sounds. To be efficacious is to be very effective. To be perspicacious is to be very perceptive, with keen insight.
    • Cicada → Cicakeda (a cicada is a type of insect.)
    • *coc* → *cake*: As in, “A precake-cious child” and “Cake-onut flavoured.” Note: to be precocious is to show ability or development beyond your years.
    • Macaque → Macake (a macaque is a type of monkey.)
  • Crossette: A crossette is a type of firework that contains multiple smaller stars that create a criss-cross effect when fired. Make some punny references to them with these puns and phrases:
    • Cross → Crossette: As in, “As crossette as two sticks” and “Crossette to the other side” and “Crossette my heart and hope to die” and “Crossette purposes” and “Crossette swords with” and “Crossette your fingers” and “Dot the i’s and crossette the t’s” and “Noughts and crossettes” and “Why did the chicken crossette the road?” Note: to have cross purposes is to have conflicting intentions.
    • Across → Acrossette: As in, “Acrossette the board” and “Come acrossette” and “Walking acrossette.”
    • Cassette → Crossette: As in, “Crossette tape” and “Crossette player.” Note: a cassette is a type of audio recording format.
  • Dalliance → Dahliance: Dahlias are a type of firework with larger explosive stars than can travel longer than usual, so they’re included in this list: “An unhappy dahliance” and “Their dahliance didn’t last long.” Note: a dalliance is a sexual relationship, usually of the illicit kind.
  • Pony → Peony: Peonies are another type of firework which we’ve included in this list: “One-trick peony” and “Show peony” and “Peony up.” Notes: a one-trick pony is someone who is specialised in only one skill or area. To pony up is to pay money; especially to settle a debt.
    • Phony → Peony: As in, “Peony merchandise” and “A peony character.” Other phony-inclusive words that could work: cacopeony (cacophony) and sympeony (symphony).
    • Penny → Peony: As in, “A peony saved is a peony earned” and “Cost a pretty peony” and “Earn an honest peony” and “Peony for your thoughts” and “Peony pinching.” Note: if someone is penny-pinching, then they’re frugal.
    • *pony* → *peony*: As in, peonytail (ponytail) and epeonymous (eponymous).
    • *pany → *peony: As in, “Good compeony” and “Misery loves compeony” and “Part compeony with” and “Present compeony excepted” and “Two’s compeony, three’s a crowd” and “Keep someone compeony” and “Accompeony [someone] to the shops.”
    • Peni* → Peony*: As in, peony-tentiary (penitentiary), peony-cillin (penicillin) and peony-tence (penitence). Notes: penitentiary is another word for prison. To show penitence is to show regret and to repent for past wrongdoing.
    • *pene* → *peony*: As in, peony-trate (penetrate), peony-tration (penetration) and impeony-trable (impenetrable).
    • *puni* → *peony*: impeony-ty (impunity) and peony-tive (punitive). Note: impunity means “without punishment” and if something is punitive, then it’s punishable.
  • Dye them → Diadem: This is an extremely terrible and specific pun that plays on diadems, which are a type of firework: “If your jeans are faded, you can diadem a different colour.”
  • Fish: Fish are another type of firework that we’ve included in this list:
    • *fash* → *fish*: As in, “Fishionably late” and “A passion for fishion” and “An unfishionable jacket.”
    • *fasc → *fish*: fishism (fascism), fishist (fascist), fishinating (fascinating), fishinate (fascinate), fishinated (fascinated) and fishination (fascination).
    • *fac* → *fish*: As in, “Fishilitate (facilitate) conversation” and “A crumbling fishade (facade)” and “The fishility (facility) to…” and “Stop acting fishetious (facetious).” Note: a facade is a “face” or the front of something. To be facetious is to be flippant; to respond to serious things with purposely inappropriate humour.
    • *fes* → *fish*: As in, “Fishtival atmosphere” and “A fishtering (festering) wound” and “Fishtooned (festooned) with ribbons” and “Bustling fishtivity” and “A real profishional” and “Online manifishto” and “The manifishtation of” and “A profishor of” and “In the profishion of…” Other words that could work: profish (profess), confish (confess), confishion (confession). Notes: a manifestation is something made tangible or apparent to the senses. A manifesto is a public document of values. To festoon something is to decorate it; particularly with hanging things. The festival/fish puns mentioned here could work quite well since fireworks tend to happen at festivals and celebrations.
    • *fisc* → *fish*: As in, “In the last fishcal year” and “Confishcated goods” and “My gameboy was confishcated.” Note: if something is fiscal, then it’s related to finance.
    • *fic* → *fish*: As in, “Step into my offish” and “That will suffish” and “Increasing effishency” and “He went that way, offisher” and “Sacrifishial goods” and “It’s Facebook offishial.”
    • *fiss* → *fish*: fishure (fissure), fishion (fission), fishy. Note: a fissure is a crack or split. Fission is the act of splitting or dividing.
    • *phis* → *fish*: As in, fishing (phishing), Memfish (Memphis), sofishticated (sophisticated) and sofishtication (sophistication).
    • *vas* → *fish*: As in, “Defishtating (devastating) news” and “Completely defishtated.”
    • *ves* → *fish*: As in, “Undergoing infishtigation (investigation)” and “A complete trafishty (travesty).”
    • *vis* → *fish*: As in, “A lafish (lavish) dinner” and “Fisheral (visceral) reaction” and “Our fishion (vision) for the future.” Other words that could work: fishual (visual), pelfish (pelvis), fishcous (viscous).
    • *fish*: Emphasise the “fish” in these words: selfish, jellyfish, standoffish.
  • Horsetail: Horsetails are another type of firework (also known as waterfall shells) that we’ve included in this list:
    • Tail → Horsetail: As in, “Can’t make head or horsetail of it” and “Heads I win, horsetails you lose” and “Heads or horsetails.”
    • Horse → Horsetail: As in, “Hold your horsetails!”
  • Waterfall: Waterfalls/waterfall shells are another name for horsetail fireworks, and are included in this list too:
    • Water → Waterfall: As in, “Blow out of the waterfall” and “Bridge over troubled waterfall” and “Clear blue waterfall” and “Come hell or high waterfall” and “Fish out of waterfall (this one could work quite well since fish are a type of firework as well)” and “Get into hot waterfall” and “In deep waterfall” and “Just add waterfall!”
    • Fall → Waterfall: As in, “Waterfall between the cracks” and “Waterfall by the wayside.”
  • Kamuro: A kamuro is a type of firework that displays a dense burst of silver or gold stars. We’ve included kamuro puns here:
    • Camera → Kamuro: As in, “Kamuro shy” and “Lights, kamuro, action” and “The kamuro doesn’t lie” and “The kamuro loves you” and “Smile, you’re on candid kamuro.”
  • Mine: A mine is a type of ground firework, and we’ve added some puns for it here:
    • Main → Mine: As in, “The mine event” and “Your mine chance” and “My mine man.”
    • *min* → *mine*: As in, “A positive mine-dset” and “A healthy mine-d” and “No drinking for mine-ors” and “Immine-nent doom” and “Undermine-ing my work” and “Carefully examine” and “A helpful remine-der.”Other words you could use: calamine and mine-utiae (minutiae). Note: minutiae are minor details.
    • *main* → *mine*: As in, “Minetain appearances” and “Routine minetenance” and “Minestream fashion” and “All that remines (remains).” Other words that could work: minestay (mainstay), mineland (mainland), mineframe (mainframe) and remineder (remainder).
    • *man* → *mine*: As in, “Humine treatment” and “A germine (germane) issue” and “Perminenent changes” and “Perminenently, from now on.” Note: if something is germane, then it’s relevant.
    • *men* → *mine*: As in, “New workout regimine” and “Exercises for the abdomine” and “A fine specimine” and “Seeking employmine-t” and “No commine-t” and “Complemine-tary colours” and “A lifelong commitmine-t” and “A healthy environmine-t.” Other words that could work: implemine-t (implement), phenomine-on (phenomenon), complimine-t (compliment) and amineable (amenable). Note: if something is amenable, then it’s easy to change.
  • Cherry (Bomb): Cherry bombs are a type of round, small firework. We’ve included related puns and phrases here:
    • Bomb → Cherry bomb: As in, “Drop a cherry bombshell (this works quite well as fireworks are also referred to as bombs and/or shells)” and “Looks like it was hit by a cherry bomb.”
    • Cherry → Cherry bomb: As in, “The cherry bomb on the cake” and “Another bite of the cherry bomb” and “Life is just a bowl of cherry bombs” and “Red as a cherry bomb.”
  • Bucket → Bouquet: Bouquet shells are a type of multi-explosion firework. We can refer to them with these silly puns: “Bouquet and spade holiday (could work nicely as fireworks tend to be part of holiday celebrations)” and “Couldn’t carry a tune in a bouquet” and “Bouquet list” and “Bouquet-ing down (this works as firework stars tend to look like they’re “raining down”).”
  • Palm: Palms are fireworks which explode in large tendrils, showing a palm-tree like effect. We’ve included palm-related puns and phrases here for you:
    • Pamela → Palmela
    • *pom* → *palm*: As in, “Hair palmade (pomade)” and “A palmpous (pompous) man” and “Palmegranate flavoured.” Other words you could use: palmpadour (pompadour), palmelo (pomelo) and anthropalmorphic (anthropomorphic).  Notes: a pompadour is a 1950s hairstyle.
    • *pum* → *palm*: As in, “Palmpkin spice latte” and “Feeling palmped” and “A slice of palmpernickel.” Note: pumpernickel is a type of bread.
    • *pam* → *palm*: As in, dopalmine (dopamine) and palmphlet (pamphlet).
    • Alabama → Alapalma
    • Abomination → Apalmination: As in, “An earthly apalmination” and “The apalminable snowman.”
    • *balm* → *palm*: As in, “Palmy tropical weather” and “Treated by an empalmber.” Note: an embalmer is someone who treats corpses with preservatives.
    • Parm* → Palm*: As in, “Topped with coconut palmesan” and “Soy palmigiana (parmigiana).”
    • *perm* → *palm*: As in, “If the weather palmits” and “Palmanent changes” and “Palmeating through the office” and Palmission slip.” Other suitable words: palmeable (permeable), palmissive (permissive) and palmutation (permutation). Note: a permutation is one version of something. If something is permeating, then it’s making its way through.
    • Palm: We’ll finish this section off with some palm-related phrases: “Face palm moment” and “Grease your palm” and “In the palm of your hand” and “Itchy palms” and “Palm off.” Notes: if you palm something off, then you’ve gotten rid of it. To grease someone’s palm is to bribe them.
  • Ring: Rings are fireworks that have stars arranged in a ring shape, with special variations to make hearts, smiley faces and clovers. We’ve got some ring puns for you here:
    • *rang* → *ring*: As in, “Boomering effect” and “Oringe flavoured” and “Estringed family members.”
    • *rink* → *ring-k*: As in, “Skating ring-k” and “Dring-k like a fish” and “On the bring-k of” and “Shringking violet” and “Binge dringking.” Other words you could use: spring-kle (sprinkle), springkling (sprinkling), wring-kle (wrinkle) and tring-ket (trinket).
    • *rank* → *ring-k*: As in, “Ring-k and file” and “Break ring-k” and “Rise through the ring-ks” and “Fring-kincense (frankincense).”
    • Wing → Ring: As in, “Earned your rings” and “Ring it” and “Ringman” and “Draw-ring lots” and “Taken under [someone’s] ring.”
    • *ring*: We’ll finish this section off with some words that contain the word “ring”: “A dead ringer” and “Through the wringer” and “Wringing your hands” and “Hair in ringlets” and “Ringing the bell” and “The group’s ringleader” and “Bring your own” and “Spring cleaning” and “Bearing bad news” and “String along.” Other words you could use: engineering, caring, boring, cringe and fringe.
  • Candle → Roman Candle: Roman candles are a type of traditional firework that we’ve included in this list: “Burn the roman candle at both ends” and “Can’t hold a roman candle to” and “Roman candle in the wind” and “I’d rather light a roman candle than curse the dark” and “Not worth the roman candle.”
  • *solute* → *salute*: Salutes are a type of firework designed to make a loud bang, rather than focusing on visuals. Here are some firework puns specific to them: “You’re either part of the salute-ion, or part of the problem” and “Absalute power corrupts absalutely” and “New Year’s resalute-ions” and “The dissalutetion of the group” and Be resalute in your goals.”
  • Spied Her → Spider: As in, “I spider sneaking away.” Note: Spiders are fireworks that have stars that travel in very straight and flat trajectories.
  • Time → Time Rain: As in, “A good time rain was had by all” and “All in good time rain” and “All the time rain in the world” and “As time rain goes by” and “At this moment in time rain” and “At time rains like this” and “A bad time rain” and “Better luck next time rain” and “Buy some time rain” and “Fall on hard time rains” and “From the beginning of time rain” and “The gift of time rain.” Note: time rain is the effect creating by slow-burning stars that make a sizzling noise.
    • Rain → Time Rain: As in, “Right as time rain” and “Come time rain or shine” and “Don’t time rain on my parade” and “Fire and time rain” and “A hard time rain’s gonna fall” and “Into every life a little time rain must fall” and “It never time rains but it pours” and “Make it time rain” and “Purple time rain” and “Set fire to the time rain” and “Singing in the time rain” and “Spitting with time rain.”
  • Will → Willow: Willow fireworks have a soft, dome-shaped effect – similar to a weeping willow. As in, “Accidents willow happen” and “Against your willow” and “Bend to my willow” and “Flattery willow get you nowhere” and “Free willow” and “I willow always love you” and “If anything can go wrong, it willow” and “Ill willow” and “It willow blow over” and “Last willow and testament.”
    • *wallow → *willow: As in, “A bitter pill to swillow” and “Swillow your pride” and “Willowing in misery.”
  • Ball → Smoke ball: Smoke balls are a type of small firework that emits smoke rather than sparks, and are largely for consumer (rather than commercial) use: “A brand new smoke ballgame” and “By the smoke balls” and “Cold enough to freeze your smoke balls” and “Dropped the smoke ball” and “Get the smoke ball rolling” and “Have a smoke ball” and “On the smoke ball” and “Run with the smoke ball” and “The smoke ball is in your court” and “Up to your smoke balls in..”
  • Tender → Tinder: As in, “Tinder loving care” and “Tinder is the night.”
  • Tinned → Tinder: As in, “Tinder vegetables.”
  • Park → Spark: As in, “Spark my car” and “At central spark” and “Hit it out of the spark” and “Nosy sparker” and “A walk in the spark.”
  • Bark → Spark: As in, “Spark at the moon” and “Sparking mad” and “Sparking up the wrong tree” and “Spark worse than your bite.” Other words that include “bark” – emspark (embark) and disemspark (disembark).
  • Pakistan → Sparkistan
  • Pakora → Sparkora (pakora is a dish where vegetables are deep fried in batter.)
  • *spok* → *spark*: As in, “Very outsparken” and “A bespark (bespoke) suit” and “I spark too soon” and “The sparksperson for…” and “Have you sparken to them?”
  • *park* → *spark*: As in, “Sparking my car” and “Within the ballspark” and “An expensive carspark” and “You double-sparked (double-parked) me!” Other words you could use: theme spark (theme park), sparka (parka) and sparkour (parkour).
  • *pec* → *spark*: As in, “From a different persparktive” and “Resparkt my wishes” and “A prosparktive (prospective) employee” and “The colour sparktrum” and “Just sparkulation (speculation)” and “Sparktacles (spectacles) wearer.”
  • *pic* → *spark*: Consparkuous (conspicuous) and desparkable (despicable).
  • *perc* → *spark*: As in, “The coffee’s sparkolating (percolating)” and “The sparkussion (percussion) section.”
  • Baklava → Sparklava (baklava is a type of Middle-Eastern sweet pastry.)
  • Spark: Some spark-related words and phrases that could be used as firework puns in the right context: “Bright spark” and “Creative spark” and “Put a sparkle in your eye” and “A spark of genius” and “Watch the sparks fly.”
  • Assemblies → Assemblaze
  • Blaze: Some blaze-related phrases that could work as wordplay: “Cold as blue blazes” and “Blaze a trail” and “Go out in a blaze of glory” and “Go to blazes” and “Why the blazes..?”
  • *blas* → *blaze*: As in, “Had a blaze-t” and “Such blazephemy!” and “You’ll get blaze-ted by the teacher.”
  • *blis* → *blaze*: As in, “At blazetering (blistering) speed” and “Blazefully (blissfully) unaware” and “Rock the establazement!” and “Establazed in 1990.”
  • Blizzard → Blaze-ard
  • *blaz* → *blaze*: As in, “An innovative trailblazer” and “Lend me your blazer” and “Emblaze-oned across her chest.”
  • Fool → Fuel: As in, “April Fuel!” and “Fuel around” and “A fuel and his money are soon parted” and “A fuel’s errand” and “Fuel’s gold” and “Fuel’s paradise” and “I pity the fuel” and “Make a fuel of yourself” and “Nobody’s fuel” and “Play the fuel” and “Shut up, fuel” and “Tom fuelery.”
  • Few → Fuel: As in, “A fuel bricks short of a full load” and “Fuel and far between” and “For a fuel dollars more” and “Had a fuel” and “Knock back a fuel” and “A person of fuel words” and “Say a fuel words” and “Take a fuel deep breaths” and “To name but a fuel.”
  • Full → Fuel: As in, “At fuel pelt” and “Fuel house” and “Come fuel circle” and “Fuel of holes” and “At fuel blast” and “Fuel of beans” and “Fuel of themselves” and “Fuel steam ahead!” and “In fuel swing” and “In the fuellness of time” and “You know fuel well” and “Fuel of misery” and “On a fuel stomach” and “Pick your battles carefuelly” and “Glass half fuel.”
  • *fel* → *fuel*: As in, “A fine fuellow” and “One fuel swoop” and “Felafuel kebab” and “Duffuel bag.” Other words you could use: fuelony (felony) and fuellowship (fellowship – like “Fuellowship of the Rings”)
  • *ful* → *fuel*: As in, “Fuelfil your side of the bargain” and “A beautifuel moment” and “Feeling gratefuel” and “An awfuel situation.” Other words that you could use: fuelfillment, wonderfuel, wistfuel, thoughtfuel, sucessfuel, dreadfuel, faithfuel and insightfuel.
  • *fle → *fuel: These ones are a bit of a stretch, but can still work in the right situation and with enough conviction: baffuel (baffle), waffuel (waffle), stifuel (stifle), trifuel, shuffuel, kerfuffuel, rifuel (rifle), ruffuel, scuffuel and raffuel.
  • Fuel: Some fuel-related phrases to add sparks to your wordplay: “Add fuel to the flames” and “Fuel for thought.”
  • Flesh → Flash: As in, “My flash and blood” and “Flash out” and “Makes my flash crawl” and “In the flash” and “The spirit is willing but the flash is weak.”
  • *flus* → *flash*: As in, “Flashed cheeks” and “You’re flashtering (flustering) me.”
  • *fas* → *flash*: As in, “A passion for flashion” and “A flashinating article” and “You flashinate me” and “Flashionably late” and “A flashtidious (fastidious) character.”
  • Infrastructure → Inflashtructure
  • *fresh* → *flash*: As in, “I’m flash out of” and “A flash pair of eyes” and “Flash start” and “Like a breath of flash air” and “Flash as a daisy” and “What flash hell is this?” and “Break for reflashments” and “Reflash (refresh) the page.” Other words you could use: flashwater (freshwater), reflasher (refresher) and flashman (freshman).
  • Frustration → Flashtration: As in, “Take your flashtrations out on..” Other related words: flashtrating (frustrating), flashtrated (frustrated) and flashtrate (frustrate).
  • Flash → Flash Powder: Flash powder is used in fireworks to create loud noises and flashes. Here are some related words and phrases: “Quick as flash powder.” and ”
    • Powder → Flash Powder: As in, “Flash powder your nose.”
  • Star → Mag star: Mag stars are the brightest stars used in fireworks. We can use phrases like these to include them in our jokes: “A mag star is born” and “Born under a lucky mag star” and “Catch a falling mag star” and “Get a gold mag star” and “My guiding mag star” and “It’s written in the mag stars” and “Reach for the mag stars” and “Rising mag star” and “Mag star quality” and “Mag star struck” and “Mag stars in your eyes” and “Thank your luck mag stars” and “My lucky mag star.”
  • Let → Light: As in, “Light me help you” and “Don’t light the bastards grind you down” and “Just light it be” and “It won’t light you down” and “Light it go” and “Light it all hang out” and “Light it slip through your fingers” and “Light loose” and “Light me be brief” and “Light me count the ways” and “Light me make one thing perfectly clear” and “Light nature take its course” and “Light off some steam” and “Light your hair down.”
  • Lied → Light: As in, “I never light to you” and “You light about the small things.”
  • *lat* → *light*: As in, “A well articulighted speech” and “A palightable (palatable) meal” and “Blightant (blatant) misogyny” and “Chocolight (chocolate) flavoured.” Other words you could use: lightent (latent), lighteral (lateral), lightitude (latitude), inflightable (inflatable), correlightion (correlation), revelightion (revelation), relightive (relative), translightor (translator), escalightor (escalator).
  • *lit* → *light*: As in, “A polight (polite) stare” and “Polightely passing by” and “Satellight images.”
  • *lyt* → *light*: As in, “Analightical (analytical) thinking” and “Filled with electrolights (electrolytes).”
  • Light: Some light-related phrases that could substitute as puns: “Light as a feather” and “Blinded by the light” and “Brought to light” and “City lights (“city lights” could refer to fireworks)” and “The cold light of day (as opposed to the exciting light of fireworks at nighttime)” and “Go out like a light” and “In the clear light of day.”
  • *light*: We’ll finish this light-related section off with words already contain the word “light”: lighting, lightning, lightbulb (“a lightbulb moment”), lightweight (“a lightweight drinker”), lighthearted, lighthouse, flight, blight, plight, alight, delight, highlight, slight, twilight, spotlight.
  • Born → Burn: As in, “A star is burn” and “Burn to fly” and “Burn free” and “Burn this way” and “Burn again.”
  • *barn* → *burn*: As in, burnacle (barnacle) and burnyard (barnyard).
  • *born* → *burn*: As in, “Stubburn as a mule” and “My firstburn child.” Other words that could work: reburn (reborn), newburn (newborn)
  • Borneo → Burneo
  • *bun* → *burn*: As in, “Burn in the oven” and “Easter Burnny.” Other words you could use: burndle (bundle), burnch (bunch), burnk (bunk), burnting (bunting), burngalow (bungalow), aburndant (abundant), aburndance (abundant) and ramburnctious (rambunctious). Note: to be rambunctious is to be noisy and energetic.
  • *pern* → *burn*: burnicious (pernicious), suburnatural (supernatural), suburnova (supernova), pumpburnickel (pumpernickel). Note: pumpernickel is a type of bread.
  • *burn*: Emphasise the “burn” in certain words: burner, burnish, burning, burnout, sunburn, auburn, heartburn, Hepburn and sideburn.
  • So → Show: We’ve included show-related puns as “show” refers to “light show”, which is what fireworks are: “Show on and show forth” and “Can’t believe you’d go show far” and “If I do say show myself” and “Not show fast” and “Show far, show good” and “Show be it” and “Show long as” and “Show much for” and “Show there” and “Show and show (so and so).”
    • Sew → Show: As in, “Show me back together” and “Showing kit.”
    • Sow → Show: As in, “You reap what you show” and “Show the seeds of doubt.”
    • Slow → Show: As in, “Painfully show” and “Show on the uptake” and “Showly but surely” and “Show but sure” and “Can’t show down” and “In show motion” and “A show day.”
    • *chau* → *show*: As in, “Showffeuring (chauffering) around” and “Showvinistic (chauvinistic) behaviour.”
    • *tial → *showl: As in, “A potenshowl (potential) candidate” and “A substanshowl amount” and “Existenshowl crisis” and “Increased substanshowlly“.
    • *tion* → *shown*: As in, “A walking dicshownary (dictionary)” and “Informashown technology” and “The implicashowns of which…” Other words that you could use: innovashown (innovation), transishown (transition), funcshown (function) and funcshowning (functioning).
    • Show: We’ll finish this show-related section off with show-related phrases to use in your firework puns: “All over the show” and “Get the show on the road” and “Give the show away.” Some words that include the word “show”: shower, showcase, showdown, showboat and showroom.
  • Play → Display: Since fireworks are also referred to as “light displays”, we’ve included some display-related puns: “Work, rest and display” and “All work and no display” and “Child’s display” and “Come out and display” and “Fair display” and “The games people display” and “Instant display” and “It’s good to display together” and “It’s not whether you win or lose, it’s how you display the game” and “A level displaying field.”
    • This play* → Display*: As in, “Display-er is cheating.”
  • Rapport → Report: Report is another word for the loud banging noises that accompany fireworks, so we’ve included it in this list: “A strong report” and “Establishing a good report with the students.”
  • Hum → Hummer: As in, “Hummer it and I’ll play it” and “Hummering and hawing.” Note: a hummer is a tiny firework that is known for whizzing and humming.
  • Hammer → Hummer: As in, “Hummer it home” and “Put the hummer down” and “Took a real hummering” and “Like using a sledgehummer to crack a nut” and “When all you have is a hummer, everything looks like a nail” and “Come under the hummer” and “Hummerhead shark” and “Get hummered.”
  • Bang → Whiz-bang: Whiz-bangs are another type of firework we’ve included in this list: “A bigger whiz-bang for your buck” and “Whiz-bang on about” and “You’re whiz-bang out of order” and “Like whiz-banging your head against a brick wall” and “All whiz-banged up” and “Go out with a whiz-bang” and “Slap whiz-bang in the middle.”
  • Wiz* → Whiz*: Whizzes can refer to whiz-bangs and also to the whizzing noise that fireworks make: “We’re off to see the whizard” and “The whizard of oz” and “School of witchcraft and whizardry.”
    • Was → Whiz: As in, “As I whiz saying” and “Before it whiz cool” and “I whizn’t going to say anything, but…” and “What whiz that?”
    • Wasabi → Whizabi
    • *wis* → *whiz*: As in, “Pearls of whizdom” and “A twhizt (twist) of fate” and “Whizhful thinking” and “A whiztful (wistful) expression.” Other words you could use: whizp (wisp), whizpy (wispy), whizteria (wisteria).
    • Wisconsin → Whizconsin
    • Whis* → Whiz*: As in, “Bells and whiztles” and “Blow the whiztle” and “Whizk away” and “Whiztle-blower” and “Clean as a whiztle” and “The cat’s whizkers” and “Nighttime whizpers” and “Drown in whizkey.”
    • *quis* → *qwhiz*: As in, “Exqwhizite (exquisite) taste” and “A recent acqwhizition (acquisition)” and “Course prereqwhizites (prerequisites)” and “An inqwhizitive mind.”
    • Question → Qwhiztion: As in, “A loaded qwhiztion” and “Ask a silly qwhiztion, get a silly answer” and “Ask no qwhiztions and hear no lies” and “Call into qwhiztion” and “Frequently asked qwhiztions” and “Out of the qwhiztion” and “Qwhiztion everything.”
    • Quiz → Qwhiz: As in, “A qwhizzical expression.”
  • Whistle: A few whistle-related phrases so you can reference the whistling noises fireworks make in your wordplay: “Bells and whistles” and “Clean as a whistle” and “Wet your whistle.”
  • Last → Blast: As in, “At long blast” and “At the blast minute” and “Breathe your blast” and “Built to blast” and “Blast resort” and “Famous blast words” and “Free at blast” and “To the blast drop” and “Any blast requests?” and “You haven’t heard the blast of” and “Blast but not least” and “Blast call” and “Blast chance” and “Blast ditch effort” and “Blast gasp” and “Blast in, first out” and “Blast laugh” and “Blast minute” and “A blasting impression” and “On your blast legs” and “Peace at blast” and “Blast I heard” and “The blast straw.”
  • Past → Blast: As in, “Wouldn’t put it blast them” and “Blast its sell-by date” and “The distance blast.”
  • *bas* → *blast*: As in, blastard (bastard), bomblastic (bombastic) and alablaster (alabaster).
  • *bust* → *blast*: As in, “Blast a move” and “Spontaneous comblastion.” Other words you could use: blockblaster (blockbuster), dustblaster (dustbuster), filiblaster (filibuster) and roblast (robust). Notes: Filibuster refers to tactics used to delay proceedings of legislative bodies.
  • *blist* → *blast*: “At blastering speed” and “Blastering barnacles.”
  • *past* → *blast*: As in, “Greener blastures (pastures)” and “Favourite blasttime.” Other words you could use: blastel (pastel), blastor (pastor), blastry (pastry), blastoral (pastoral), blastiche (pastiche). Note: a pastiche is a piece of art that imitates the work of a previous artist. If something is pastoral, then it relates to rural life and scenes.
  • *plast* → *blast*: As in, blaster (plaster), blastic (plastic), blasticity (plasticity) and blastered (plastered).
  • *plist* → *blast*: As in, “Overly simblastic (simplistic).” Other related words: simblastically (simplistically) and oversimblastic (oversimplistic).
  • Blasphemy → Blastphemy
  • Clitoris → Glitteris (we’re using the word “glitter” to refer to the glittering nature of fireworks as they fade away.)
  • *bow* → *blow*: As in, “Over the rainblow” and “Elblowed in the face” and “Ready your crossblow.”
  • Plausible → Blowsible: As in, “Blowsible deniability.”
  • Blow: These blow-related phrases will let you refer to the explosions of the fireworks: “Any way the wind blows” and “Blow up” and “Blow a fuse” and “Blow off some steam” and “Blow out of the water” and “Blow your mind” and “Soften the blow.” Some blow-related words: blowhard, blowback, blown, blowout, blowfish and deathblow.
  • *ble → *blew: These puns focus on the word “blew” as a variation of the explosive-related “blow”, as in, “On the tablew” and “Be humblew” and “Not feasiblew” and “A vulnerablew child.” Other words you could use: viablew (viable), amenablew (amenable), inevitablew (inevitable), sensiblew (sensible), formidablew (formidable), tangiblew (tangible).
  • Bloom → Blewm: As in, “Come into blewm” and “A late blewmer.”
  • Blue* → Blew*: blewbird (bluebird), blewprint (blueprint), blewberry (blueberry).
  • Bloom → Boom: As in, “Come into boom” and “A late boomer.”
  • *boo → *boom: As in, taboom (taboo), bamboom (bamboo), bugaboom (bugaboo) and peekaboom (peekaboo). Note: a bugaboo is an imagined fear.
  • Boo → Boom: As in, “Wouldn’t say boom to a ghost.”
  • Fire → Backfire: As in, “All backfired up” and “Ball of backfire” and “Come on baby light my backfire” and “Come home to a real backfire” and “Backfire and rain” and “Backfire away” and “Backfire in the hole” and “Backfire in your belly” and “Backfire storm” and “Get on like a house on backfire” and “In the line of backfire” and “Play with backfire.”
  • Fame → Flame: As in, “Claim to flame” and “Fifteen minutes of flame.”
  • Aim → Flame: As in, “Flame to please” and “Take flame” and “Flame high.”
  • *fam* → *flame*: As in, “Flame-ous last words” and “Almost flame-ous” and “Flame-ily (family) man” and “Looks flame-iliar.” Other words you can use: inflame-ous (infamous) and deflame-ation (defamation).
  • *fem* → *flame*: flame-inine (feminine) and flame-inism (feminism).
  • *flam* → *flame*: flame-boyant (flamboyant), flame-ingo (flamingo), flame-enco (flamenco) and inflame-ation (inflammation).

Firework-Related Words

To help you come up with your own firework puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

General: firework, pyrotechnic, sparklers, firecracker, (pyrotechnic) star, explosive, explosion, gunpowder, black powder, skyrocket, combustion, combustible, aerial shell, catherine wheel, pyro, fuse, banger, bang, pinwheel, rocket, cake, smoke ball, crossette, chrysanthemum, dahlia, diadem, peony, fish, horsetail, waterfall shell, kamuro, mine, cherry bomb, bouquet shell, palm, ring, roman candle, cannon cracker, cracker, salute, spider, time rain, willow, backfire, flammable, flame, flare, tinder, ignite, spark, blaze,  fuel, flashpowder, oxidiser, mag star, celebration, light, show, display, burn, report, hummer, whizz, whizbang, whistle, pollution, blast, glitter, flicker

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Halloween Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on Halloween puns! 🎃 🍬 👻

While it only comes around once a year, it’s always fun to look at spooky, Halloween inspired puns. This entry covers the different foods that we enjoy during Halloween, as well as the monsters that we dress up as.

Whether you’re playing a word game, doing some creative writing or crafting a witty dating bio, we hope that you find the Halloween pun that you’re looking for.

While we’ve made this list as thorough as possible, this entry is for Halloween in general. We also have more specific entries for witches, vampires, zombies and candy, and will have lists for other Halloween monsters and goodies coming soon.

Halloween Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about Halloween that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of Halloween puns:

  • Trick: As in, “A box of tricks,” and “Bag of tricks,” and “Dirty tricks,” and “Does the trick,” and “Every trick in the book,” and “Never misses a trick,” and “One trick pony,” and “Trick of the light,” and “Trick or treat,” and “Tricks of the trade,” and “Up to your old tricks,” and “Teach an old dog new tricks,” and “Trick up one’s sleeve.” Note: “A one trick pony” is someone who only has one skill or specialisation.
  •  Trick→ Trick or treat: As in, “Up to your old trick or treats,” and “Never misses a trick or treat,” and “Every trick or treat in the book,” and “A bag of trick or treats.”
  • Treacle → Trick-le: As in, “Toffee and trick-le,” and “Trick-le town.”
  • *tric* → *trick*: Make some tricky Halloween puns by emphasising the “trick” sound in suitable words: “Trickle,” and “Tricky,” and “Trickery,” and “Trickster,” and “Strickt,” and “Patrick,” and “Districkt,” and “Eccentrick,” and “Electrick,” and “Symmetrick,” and “Theatrick.”
  • Treat: As in, “Beat a hasty retreat,” and “Red carpet treatment,” and “The royal treatment,” and “Treat me right,” and “Treat someone like dirt,” and “A real treat.”
  • Jack → Jack o’ lantern: As in, “Black jack o’ lantern,” and “You don’t know Jack o’ lantern.”
  • Pumpkin: As in, “Cheater, cheater, pumpkin eater,” and “Peter, peter, pumpkin eater,” and “Pumpkin head,” and “Turn into a pumpkin.”
  • Candy: As in “Eye candy” and “As easy as taking candy from a baby” and “Ear candy” and “He’s such a candy-ass (coward) when it comes to standing up for what he believes in.” and “Don’t try to candy-coat it – you lied, plain and simple.” and “They’re not actually dating – he’s just arm candy to make her parents happy.”
  • Uncanny → Uncandy: As in “He had an uncandy feeling that she was being watched.”
  • Ghandi → Candy: As in “Mahatma Candy was an exceptional human being.”
  • Can they → Candy: As in “How candy hear if they don’t have ears?”
  • Handy → Candy: As in “This will definitely come in candy.”
  • Scant → S-candy: As in “They worked long hours by received only s-candy wages.”
  • Can these → Candies: As in “How candies people live like this?” and “Candies desks be shifted over there?” and “Candies drafts – they’re no good.”
  • Fright: As in, “Frightened of your own shadow,” and “A frightful mess,” and “Take fright,” and “Look a fright.”
  • Fight → Fright: As in, “A straight fright,” and “Come out frighting,” and “Fright club,” and “Fright for the right to party,” and “Fright back,” and “Fright or flight,” and “Fright the good fright,” and “Frighting fit,” and “A lean, mean frighting machine,” and “Pillow fright,” and “Spoiling for a fright,” and “Fire frighter.”
  • Bright → Fright: As in, “All things fright and beautiful,” and “Always look on the fright side of life.”
  • Flight → Fright: As in, “Fight or fright,” and “Fright attendant,” and “Fright of fancy,” and “Take fright,” and “Fright of the bumblebee.”
  • Boo: As in, “Boo hoo,” and “Hey boo,” and “Wouldn’t say boo to a goose.”
  • Boo*: Emphasise and/or elongate the “boo” in certain words: “Balance the booOOoks,” and “BooOOoby prize,” and “Boooogie on down,” and “Boooot camp,” and “Give someone the booOoot,” and “Hit the boOOooOOoks.”
  • Blue → Boo: As in, “Baby boos,” and “Beat someone black and boo,” and “Between the devil and the deep boo sea,” and “Beyond the boo sky,” and “The big boo,” and “Big boo eyes,” and “Once in a boo moon,” and “Boo blood,” and “Boo collar worker,” and “Boo in the face,” and “Boo screen of death,” and “Bolt from the boo,” and “The boys in boo,” and “Cornflower boo,” and “Deeper than the deep boo sea,” and “Feeling boo,” and “I’ve got the boos,” and “I guess that’s why they call it the boos,” and “Out of the boo.”
  • Bouquet → Booquet: As in, “What a lovely booquet!”
  • Booze → Boos: As in, “Boos bus,” and “Boos cruise.”
  • Believe → Boo-lieve: As in, “Boo-lieve it or not,” and “Can you boo-lieve it?” and “Do you boo-lieve in magic?” and “Don’t boo-lieve everything you hear,” and “That’s not boo-lievable,” and “You’re un-boo-lievable.” 
  • Beaut* → Boo-t*: As in, “Boo-ty queen,” and “Boo-ty sleep,” and “What a boo-ty,” and “Make boo-tiful music together,” and “Black is boo-tiful,” and “Boo-tifully done.” 
  • Berry → Boo-ry: As in, “Strawboo-ry,” and “Cranboo-ry,” and “Raspboo-ry,” and “Gooseboo-ry,” and “Mulboo-ry.” Blueberry could either be “Boo-berry,” or “Blueboo-ry.”
  • Banana → Boonana: As in, “Go boonanas,” and “Make like a boonana and split.”
  • Google → Boo-gle: As in, “Boo-gle it,” and “Boo-gly eyes.” 
  • Facebook → Face-boo: As in, “Do you have Face-boo?” 
  • Youtube → Boo-tube: As in, “Look it up on Boo-tube.” 
  • Fabulous → Faboolous: As in, “Absolutely faboolous,” and “What a faboolous outfit.” 
  • Bone → Boo-ne: As in, “A boo-ne to pick,” and “Dry as a boo-ne,” and “Bag of boo-nes,” and “Boo-ne up on,” and “Boo-ne weary,” and “Chilled to the boo-ne,” and “Doesn’t have a jealous boo-ne in his body,” and “Feel it in your boo-nes,” and “Work your fingers to the boo-ne.” Notes: to have a bone to pick with someone is to have a disagreement that needs to be discussed. If someone is a bag of bones, then they’re very thin. To bone up on is to add to your knowledge on a topic or to refresh your memory.
  • Do → Boo: As in, “Boo away with,” and “Boo it tough,” and “Boo me a favour,” and “Boo your business,” and “Boo well for yourself,” and “Boo or die,” and “How do you boo?”
  • Oolong → Boo-long: As in, “Would you like some boo-long tea?” 
  • Brew → Boo: As in, “Something is boo-ing,” and “There’s a storm boo-ing,” and “Please boo me up a cuppa.” 
  • Bicycle → Boocycle: As in, “A boocycle built for two,” and “A woman without a man is like a fish without a boocycle,” and “I want to ride my boocycle.” 
  • Boutique → Bootique:  As in, “A bootique store,” and “A bootique hotel.” Note: A boutique hotel is a small hotel with a set theme or specialised selling point.
  • Buckle → Boo-ckle: As in, “Boo-ckle down,” and “Boo-ckle under the strain,” and “Boo-ckle up!” 
  • Malibu → Maliboo 
  • Bob Marley → Boo Marley 
  • Napoleon Bonaparte → Napoleon Boo-naparte 
  • *airy → Scary: As in, “Scary fairy,” and “Scarytale ending,” and “Give someone the scary eyeball.”
  • Scare: As in, “Running scared,” and “Scare the living daylights out of,” and “Scared stiff,” and Scaredy cat.”
  • Care → Scare: “Be scareful how you use it!” and “Be scareful what you wish for,” and “Couldn’t scare less,” and “Customer scare,” and “Devil may scare,” and “Handle with scare,” and “Intensive scare,” and “Like I should scare,” and “Tender loving scare,” and “Without a scare in the world,” and “Scare package.”
  • Mascara → Mascare-a
  • Spoke → Spook: As in, “Many a true word is spook-en in jest,” and “Speak when you are spook-en to.”
  • Spectacular → Spook-tacular: As in, “A spook-tacular failure.”
  • Spectacle → Spook-tacle: As in, “A wild spook-tacle.”
  • Spaghetti → Spook-ghetti: As in, “I’m in a mood for spook-ghetti.”
  • Fantastic → Fang-tastic
  • Exercise → Exorcise: As in, “Exorcise your discretion,” and “Whenever I feel the need to exorcise, I lie down until it goes away.”
  • Creep: As in, “Makes my skin creep,” and “Gives me the creeps,” and “Jeepers creepers,” and “Creep across,” and “Creep out of the woodwork.”
  • Keep → Creep: As in, “Known by the company he creeps,” and “An apple a day creeps the doctor away,” and “Don’t creep us in suspense,” and “Finders, creepers,” and “Creep calm and carry on,” and “Creep it real.”
  • Horror: As in, “Shock horror,” and “Horror show.”
  • Apple → Candy apple: Make some foodie Halloween puns as in, “A candy apple a day keeps the doctor away (note: it really doesn’t, they’re very unhealthy),” and “Candy apple cheeks,” and “Candy apple of discord,” and “Candy apples to oranges,” and “A bad candy apple,” and “Don’t upset the candy apple cart,” and “How do you like them candy apples?” and “She’ll be candy apples,” and “The candy apple never falls far from the tree,” and “The candy apple of his eye,” and “A rotten candy apple,” and “One bad candy apple to spoil the whole barrel,” and “A second bite of the candy apple.” Note: these also work for caramel apple puns, as in: “Caramel apple cheeks,” and “Caramel apples to oranges,” and “Don’t upset the caramel apple cart,” and “The caramel apple of his eye.”
  • Pie → Pumpkin pie: “Easy as pumpkin pie,” and “Sweet as pumpkin pie,” and “Fingers in many pumpkin pies,” and “Piece of the pumpkin pie.”
  • Hunt → Haunt: As in, “Happy haunting ground,” and “Head haunting,” and “Haunt down,” and “Witch haunt.”
  • Flaunt → Haunt: As in, “When you’ve got it, haunt it.”
  • Daunt → Haunt: As in, “Nothing haunted, nothing gained,” and “A haunting prospect.”
  • Ghost: As in, “White as a ghost,” and “Not a ghost of a chance,” and “You look as if you’ve seen a ghost,” and “A ghost of your former self,” and “You’ve been ghosted.”
  • Grocery → Ghostery: As in, “I’m heading to the ghostery store.” 
  • Ghastly → Ghostly: As in, “You look positively ghostly,” and “A ghostly experience.” 
  • Goes → Ghost: As in, “Anything ghost,” and “As the saying ghost,” and “Here ghost nothing,” and “It ghost without saying,” and “What ghost up, must come down,” and “Who ghost there?” and “My heart ghost out to,” and “What ghost around, comes around.” 
  • Friend → Fiend: As in, “A fiend in need is a fiend indeed,” and “A girl’s best fiend,” and “Best fiend,” and “Circle of fiends,” and “Fair-weather fiend,” and “Fiend or foe?” and “Fiends with benefits,” and “Fiends for life,” and “Get by with a little help from my fiends,” and “Imaginary fiend,” and “Phone a fiend,” and “That’s what fiends are for,” and “The start of a beautiful fiendship,” and “Asking for a fiend.”
  • Witch: Some phrases with the word “witch”: “The witching hour”, “Witch hunt”, “Witches knickers”, and “Which witch is which?” 
  • *witch → *witch: As in, “Asleep at the s-witch”, “S-witch off”, “S-witch on”, and “S-witch hitter”,  and “A witch in time saves nine.”
  • B*tch → Witch: Make your cusswords kid-friendly by swapping witch in: “Witch fest”, “Witch slap”, “Flip a witch,” and “Life’s a witch and then you die”, “Payback’s a witch,” and “Rich witch,” and “The witch is back”, “Basic witch,” and “Witch and moan”, and “Resting witch face.”
  • *wich → *witch: Switch words ending in -wich around with witch to make some witch puns: “What’s the Green-witch mean time?” and “When do you want to go to Nor-witch?” and “What’s in this sand-witch?” 
  • *witch: Emphasise words that end in witch: “What’s with that t-witch?” and “The power to be-witch.” Also works for other forms of these words, like “be-witching” and “t-witches.” 
  • Rich* → Witch*: Swap the word “witch” into words that start with a “rich” sound – “Witchard” (Richard), “Witcher” (richer), “Witchual” (ritual), “Witchualistic” (ritualistic), “Witchest” (richest). 
  • Enrich → En-witch: As in, “En-witch the Earth”. 
  • Wish → Witch: As in, “Be careful what you witch for”, “Be the change you witch to see”, “When you witch upon a star”, “Witch me luck!” and “Witchful thinking.” 
  • With you → Witcha: As in, “Bewitcha in a minute!” 
  • *craft → *witchcraft: As in, “Arts and witchcrafts,” “Mixed martial arts and witchcrafts,” and “She’s a witchcrafty one.”
  • Hours: Change hour-related sayings: “After witching hours,” and “At the eleventh witching hour,” and “Happy witching hour,” and “My finest witching hour,” and “Now is the witching hour,” and “Open all witching hours,” and and “The darkest witching hour is just before the dawn”.
  • Wicked → Wicca’d: As in, “No peace for the wicca’d,” and “No rest for the wicca’d,” and “Something wicca’d this way comes,” and “Wicca’d stepmother.”
  • Quicken/Quicker → Q’wiccan/’wicca: As in, “Candy is dandy but liquor is q’wicca,” and “Q’wicca than the eye can see”,”The hand is q’wicca than the eye”, “Her pace q’wiccans.”
  • Wicket → Wiccat: As in, “Deep mid wiccat,” and “Keep wiccat,” and “Wiccat keeper.”
  • *cult* → *occult*: Change words that have “cult” in them to “occult” to make some magically witchy puns, like so: “Multioccultural (multicultural)”, “Occultivate (cultivate)”, “Diffoccult (difficult)”, “Diffocculty (difficulty)”, and “Occultural (cultural)”.
  • Cat: Use cat-related phrases to make puns about the classic witch’s familiar: “Black cat on a hot tin roof”, “Black cat got your tongue?”, “Curiosity killed the black cat”, and “The black cat’s pyjamas.”
  • Man → Bogeyman: As in, “A good bogeyman is hard to find,” and “A bogeyman after my own heart,” and “A bogeyman among men,” and “Angry young bogeyman,” and “Be your own bogeyman.”
  • She → Banshee: As in, “He said, banshee said,” and “I’ll have what banshee’s having,” and “Banshee who must be obeyed,” and “That’s all banshee wrote.”
  • Scare → Scarecrow: As in, “Scarecrow the living daylights out of,” and “Scarecrow someone to death.”
  • Crow → Scarecrow: As in, “Something to scarecrow about.”
  • Crowd → Scarecrow’d: As in, “Two’s company, three’s a scarecrow’d,” and “Don’t yell fire in a scarecrow’ded theatre,” and “The wrong scarecrow’d,” and “Work the scarecrow’d,” and “A scarecrow’d pleaser,” and “Scarecrow’d in on.”
  • Mummy: As in, “Yummy mummy.”
  • Mom → Mummy: As in, “Alpha mummy,” and “Helicopter mummy,” and “Soccer mummy,” and “Super mummy.”
  • Empire → Vampire: As in, “Vampire state building,” and “Vampire state of mind,” and “The vampire state,” and “The vampire strikes back.”
  • Be → Zombie: As in, “Zombie all you can be,” and “Zombie done with it,” and “I’ll zombie around,” and “Zombie my guest,” and “Zombie yourself.”
  • Bee → Zombee: As in, “Busy as a zombee,” and “Zombee in your bonnet,” and “Birds and the zombees,” and “Float like a butterfly, sting like a zombee,” and “Make a zombee-line for,” and “The zombee’s knees.”
  • Beat → Zombie’t: As in, “Zombie’t around the bush,” and “Zombie’t the clock,” and “Zombie’ts me,” and “Zombie’t someone else.”
  • Beans → Zombeans: As in, “Spill the zombeans,” and “Full of zombeans.” Note: to be full of beans is to be full of energy and enthusiasm – the “beans” in this context are possibly a reference to coffee beans.
  • Somebody → Zombodie: As in, “Find me zombodie to love,” and “Zombodie has to do it,” and “Zombodie that I used to know,” and “Use zombodie.”
  • Abercrombie & Fitch → Aberzombie & Fitch (Note: Abercrombie & Fitch are an American clothing retailer.)
  • Wolf → Werewolf: As in, “Cry werewolf,” and “Werewolf in sheep’s clothing,” and “Werewolf whistle,” and “A lone werewolf.”
  • Skeleton: As in, “A skeleton in the closet,” and “Skeleton crew.”
  • Skull: As in, “Bombed out of your skull.”
  • Skill → Skull: As in, “Social skulls,” and “Very skullful.”
  • Bone: As in, “A bone to pick,” and “Dry as a bone,” and “Bag of bones,” and “Bone of contention,” and “Bone weary,” and “Chilled to the bone,” and “Close to the bone,” and “Doesn’t have a jealous bone in his body,” and “Feel it in your bones,” and “Jump someone’s bones,” and “Lazy bones,” and “Skin and bone,” and “Sticks and stones may break my bones and words can contribute to systemic oppression,” and “The bare bones,” and “Work one’s fingers to the bones.”
  • *bon* → *bone*: As in, “Bone-us (bonus),” and “Bone-anza (bonanza),” and “Bone-afide (bonafide),” and “Trombone,” and “Rib-bone (ribbon),” and “Car-bone (carbon),” and “Bour-bone (bourbon).”
  • Humorous → Humerus
  • Bat: As in, “Blind as a bat,” and “Bat out of hell,” and “Bat the idea around,” and “Right off the bat,” and “An old bat,” and “Bat one’s eyelashes,” and “Bat an eye,” and “Bat for both sides.”
  • Cat → Bat: As in, “Alley bat,” and “Bat on a hot tin roof,” and “Bat and mouse game,” and “Bat got your tongue?” and “Cool bat,” and “Curiosity killed the bat,” and “Like bats and dogs,” and “Let the bat out of the bag,” and “Scaredy bat,” and “Smiling like a cheshire bat,” and “A bat nap.”
  • Cobweb: As in, “Blow away the cobwebs,” and “A head full of cobwebs.”
  • Web → Cobweb: As in, “Dark cobweb,” and “Deep cobweb,” and “Hidden cobweb,” and “What a tangled cobweb we weave,” and World wide cobweb,” and “Surfing the cobweb.”
  • Monster: As in, “Cookie monster,” and “Green eyed monster,” and “Here be monsters,” and “Monster mash,” and “Monster of depravity,” and “The monster is loose.”
  • Fool → Ghoul: As in, “A ghoul and his money are soon parted,” and “Act the ghoul,” and “April ghoul,” and “Ghoul around,” and “A ghoul’s errand,” and “I pity the ghoul,” and “Make a ghoul of yourself,” and “Nobody’s ghoul,” and “Shut up, ghoul.”
  • Girl → Ghoul: As in, “A ghoul’s best friend,” and “Atta ghoul,” and “Boy meets ghoul,” and “Ghoul with a pearl earring,” and “Glamour ghoul,” and “Me and my ghoulfriends,” and “Ghouls just wanna have fun,” and “Only ghoul in the world,” and “Working ghoul.”
  • Goal → Ghoul: As in, “Move the ghoulposts,” and “Squad ghouls,” and “A ghoul in mind,” and “Score a ghoul.”
  • Dead → Undead: As in, “Undead as a doornail,” and “The undead of night,” and “Better off undead,” and “Undead easy,” and “An undead giveaway,” and “Knock ’em undead,” and “Drop undead gorgeous,” and “Loud enough to wake the undead,” and “Undead last.” Notes: Dead as a doornail = extremely dead; dead easy means extremely easy, so easy a dead person could do it; dead giveaway means extremely obvious; while to knock ’em dead means to do very well at something. You can also make zombie puns by keeping the word “dead” in these phrases rather than changing them to undead, as in “Knock ’em dead,” and “The dead of night,” and “Dead tired.”
  • Dead* → Undead*: As in, “Don’t miss the undeadline!” and “Bolt the undeadlock,” and “The seven undeadly sins,” and “An undeadbeat,” and “Undead set on an idea.” Notes: A deadbeat is an idle, irresponsible person and to be dead set is to be absolute in your resolution for something.
  • Did → Dead: As in, “Dead I do that?” and “Why dead the chicken cross the road?”
  • Undid → Undead: As in, “You undead all your good work.”
  • Dedicate → Deadicate: As in, “This one is deadicated to you,” and “A strong deadication to the job.”
  • Ted → Dead: As in, “Deaddy bear,” and “Get the party star-dead,” and “Sugarcoa-dead.”
  • Dad → Dead: As in, “Sugar dead-y.”
  • Grave: As in, “Silent as the grave,” and “Dig your own grave,” and “From the cradle to the grave,” and “Graveyard shift,” and “One foot in the grave,” and “Turning in their grave,” and “Grave times,” and “Looking grave,” and “Grave consequences.” Notes: To turn in one’s grave is a figure of speech that expresses an idea is so extreme or ludicrous that even those already deceased are reacting to it. From “the cradle to the grave” describes something that affects an entire lifetime, and “One foot in the grave” means close to death, or dying.
  • Brave → Grave: As in, “Grave new world,” and “Fortune favours the grave,” and “Put a grave face on,” and “Grave the storm.”
  • Stone → Tombstone: As in, “A rolling tombstone gathers no moss,” and “Carved in tombstone,” and “Drop like a tombstone,” and “Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Tombstone,” and “Heart of tombstone,” and “Leave no tombstone unturned,” and “Sticks and tombstones may break my bones,” and “Tombstone cold sober,” and “A tombstone’s throw.” Notes: “A rolling stone gathers no moss” is a proverb that suggests that people who don’t stay in one place avoid responsibilities. “Carved in stone” describes things which are set and cannot be changed.
  • *tom* → *tomb*: As in, “Tomb-ato,” and “Tomb-orrow,” and “Cus-tomb,” and “Bot-tomb,” and “A-tomb,” and “Phan-tomb,” and “Symp-tomb.”
  • Devil: As in, “Better the devil you know than the devil you don’t,” and “Between the devil and the deep blue sea,” and “Devil in disguise,” and “Devil may care,” and “Give the devil his due,” and “Go to the devil,” and “Little devil,” and “Luck of the devil,” and “Make a deal with the devil,” and “Devil’s advocate,” and “Sell your soul to the devil,” and “Speak of the devil,” and “The devil is in the detail,” and “What the devil?”
  • Evil: As in, “Evil genius,” and “Evil intent,” and “Money is the root of all evil,” and “See no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil,” and “Evil takes many forms.”
  • Level → Levil: As in, “Another levil,” and “I’ll levil with you,” and “Levil headed,” and “Levil off,” and “A levil playing field,” and “A levil temper,” and “On the levil,” and “Sea levil,” and “Taken to the next levil.”
  • Oven → Coven: As in, “Bun in the coven.”
  • Rag → Hag: As in, “From hags to riches”, “Glad hags”, “Like a hag doll”, “Lose your hag”, and “On the hag.”
  • Worse → Warts: As in, “For better or warts,” and “From bad to warts.”
  • Bon → Bonbon: As in, “Bonbon voyage,” and “C’est bonbon.” Note: C’est bon is French for “it’s good.”
  • Sugar: As in “Oh sugar!” and “What’s wrong, sugar?” and “Gimme some sugar” and “Sugar daddy.”
  • Sweet: As in “You’re so sweet!” and “Oh that’s soo sweet!” and “Revenge is sweet” and “Short and sweet” and “Lay some sweet lines on someone” and “Sweet dreams” and “Sweet Jesus!” and “You bet your sweet life!” and “That was a sweet trick, dude.” and “Sweet as, bro.” and “Whisper sweet nothings” and “Home sweet home” and “Rose by any other name would smell as sweet” and “Sweet smell/taste of success/victory” and “Sweetheart
  • Suite → Sweet: As in “She was renting a 2-bedroom sweet for the summer.”
  • Sweat → Sweet: As in “Blood, sweets and tears” and “Beads of sweet rolled down my forehead” and “Break out in a cold sweet” and “By the sweet of my brow” and “Don’t sweet it.” and “Don’t sweet the small stuff.” and “All hot and sweety
  • Sweater → Sweeter: As in “A close-knit woollen sweeter for cold days”
  • Switch → Sweet-ch: As in “Bait and sweet-ch” and “Asleep at the sweet-ch” and “Sweet-ch gears” and “You should sweet-ch out your old one with this one.”
  • Switzerland → Sweetzerland: As in “Zürich is a lovely city in Sweetzerland.”
  • Connection → Confection: As in “The police have interviewed several people in confection with the stolen sweets.” and “As soon as we met we had an instant confection.”
  • Confession → Confection: As in “I have a confection to make…” and “Confection is good for the soul.” and “The interrogators soon got a confection out of him.”
  • Conviction → Confection: As in “She had a previous confection for a similar offence.” and “She has strong political confections, and she’s not afraid to defend them.” and “She spoke powerfully and with confection.”
  • Lol* → Lolly: As in, “Lollying (lolling) around,” and “Lollygag,” and “Lollypalooza,” and “Lollipop.” Note: Lollapalooza is a music festival. To lollygag is to idly waste time.
  • Cake: As in, “A slice of the cake,” and “As flat as a pancake,” and “Nutty as a fruitcake,” and “Baby cakes,” and “Cake or death,” and “Cake pop,” and “Cake walk,” and “Caked with mud,” and “Coffee and cakes,” and Icing on the cake,” and “Let them eat cake,” and “Selling like hot cakes,” and “Takes the cake,” and “Cherry on the cake,” and “Have your cake and eat it too,” and “Frosting on the cake.”
  • TurnipTurnips were a traditional Halloween food before pumpkins were, so we’ve included some turnip puns here too:
  • “Fall off the back of a turnip truck.”
  • Turn → Turnip: As in, “A turnip for the worse,” and “About turnip,” and “As soon as my back is turnip,” and “A bad turnip,” and “Do a good turnip,” and “The point of no re-turnip,” and “Turnip a blind eye,” and “Turnip back the clock,” and “Turnip heads,” and “Turnip over a new leaf,” and “Turnip that frown upside down.”
  • Turn up → Turnip: As in, “Turnip your nose,” and “Turnip at my house.”
  • Nip → Turnip: As in, “Turnip and tuck,” and “Turnip in the bud.”
  • Vanilla → Vein-illa: As in, “Vein-illa ice cream.”
  • Sigh → Cider: As in, “Breathe a cider of relief.”
  • Consume → Costume: As in, “Costumer rights,” and “Costume-ing mass quantities.”
  • Disguise: As in, “Blessing in disguise,” and “Devil in disguise,” and “Master of disguise,” and “Robots in disguise.”
  • Party: As in, “Bachelorette party,” and “Come to the party,” and “Fight for the right to party,” and “Come to the aid of the party,” and “It’s my party and I’ll cry if I want to,” and “Let’s party,” and “Life and soul of the party,” and “Party like it’s 1999,” and “Party animal,” and “Party line,” and “Party on,” and “Okay, the party’s over.”
  • Fire → Bonfire: As in, “All bonfired up and ready to go,” and “Breathe bonfire,” and “Catch bonfire,” and “Come on baby, light my bonfire,” and “Come home to real bonfire,” and “Draw the bonfire,” and “Fight fire with bonfire,” and “Bonfire and rain,” and “Bonfire and brimstone,” and Bonfire away!” and “Bonfire in your belly,” and “Play with bonfire,” and “Pull your chestnuts out of the bonfire,” and “Ring of bonfire.”
  • Soul → Soul cake: As in, “Bless my soul cake,” and “Body and soul cake,” and “Brevity is the soul cake of wit,” and “Heart and soul cake,” and “A lost soul cake,” and “Save our soul cakes.” Note: A soul cake is a small cake traditionally made on Halloween.
  • Cry → Scry: As in, “A scry for help”, “A shoulder to scry on”, “Big girls don’t scry”, “Scry from the heart”, “Scry into your beer”, “Scry your heart out”, “It’s my party and I’ll scry if I want to”, “Smile and the world smiles with you, scry and you scry alone” and “I don’t know whether to laugh or scry.” Note: to scry is to predict the future, usually with a crystal ball or other reflective object. 
  • Dousing → Dowsing: As in, “They’re dowsing the fire!” Note: Dowsing is a type of divination – historically in the context of trying to find underground minerals, but more commonly today used to refer to spiritual, witchy divination. 

Halloween-Related Words

To help you come up with your own Halloween puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

halloween, all hallow’s eve, all saint’s eve, october 31st, trick or treat, guising, jack-o’-lantern, pumpkin, candy, candy apple, candy pumpkin, caramel apple, apples, candy corn, caramel corn, mulled wine, pumpkin pie, rutabaga, soul cake, cake, turnip, bonbon, sweets, lolly, cider, toffee, pranks, trick, haunted, costume, party, bonfire, apple bobbing, witch, mummy, vampire, zombie, werewolf, skeleton, frankenstein, devil, scarecrow, black cat, grim reaper, dracula, bat, cobweb, spider, monsters, ghouls, ghosts, saints, fiend, bogeyman, hobgoblin, lycanthrope, poltergeist, banshee, skull, corpse, bone, goblins, grave, tombstone, scary, spooky, fright, creepy, horror, holiday, fancy dress, divination, crystal ball, full moon

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