Book Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on book puns! 📖 📘 ✏️

We’ve checked out the best book puns and chronicled them here for you. We have puns about general book-related words to more technical literary terms, famous authors and genres.

While this list is as comprehensive as possible, it is general to books. If you’re interested in other fiction-related puns, we also have a Harry Potter pun list.

Note: no religious books have been included in this pun list. ✨

Book Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about books that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of book puns:

  • Back → Book: As in, “Answer book” and “As soon as my book is turned” and “In the book of my mind” and “Book to the future” and “Book at it” and “Book in the day” and “Book in business” and “Book to basics.”
  • Buck → Book: As in, “More bang for your book” and “The book stops here” and “Book the system” and “A book well spent.”
  • Cook → Book: As in, “Now we’re booking” and “Booking with gas” and “Book up a storm” and “Book up a plan.”
  • Hook → Book: As in, “Off the book” and “Booked on a feeling” and “Get booked on” and “By book or by crook.”
  • Look → Book: As in, “Always book on the bright side of life” and “Dirty books” and “Give someone a blank book” and “Don’t know which way to book” and “Have a book” and “Here’s booking at you, kid” and “If books could kill.”
  • Age → Page: As in, “Act your page” and “Page bracket” and “Page of consent” and “An awkward page” and “Come of page” and “Feeling your page” and “In this day and page” and “The page of reason” and “The space page” and “Through the pages.”
  • Offer → Author: As in, “My final author” and “An author you can’t refuse” and “On special author” and “Open to authors.”
  • Red → Read: As in, “Cut through the read tape” and “Read buttons” and “Roll out the read carpet” and “Read tape.”
  • Bed → Read: As in, “Read and breakfast” and “Read of nails” and “Get into read with.”
  • Bleed → Read: As in, “Read someone dry” and “Reading love” and “My heart reads for you.”
  • Bread → Read: As in, “Read and butter” and “Break read” and “Cast your read upon the waters” and “Put read on the table.”
  • Bred → Read: As in, “Born and read.”
  • Dead → Read: As in, “In the read of night” and “Back from the read” and “Better off read” and “Read and buried.”
  • Feed → Read: As in, “Reading frenzy” and “Don’t bite the hand that reads you” and “Bottom reader.”
  • Lead → Read: As in, “Read a merry dance” and “Read a charmed life” and “Read into temptation.”
  • Need → Read: As in, “All you read is love” and “On a read to know basis.”
  • Said → Read: As in, “After all is read and done” and “Easier read than done” and “Enough read” and “Least read, soonest mended” and “Was it something I read?”
  • Seed → Read: As in, “Gone to read” and “Run to read” and “Read capital” and “Read money.”
  • Shed → Read: As in, “Read light on the matter” and “Read a tear.”
  • Speed → Read: As in, “At lightning read” and “Breakneck read” and “Built for read” and “Get up to read” and “More haste, less read” and “Read demon” and “Read dating.”
  • Thread → Read: As in, “Hanging by a read” and “Lose the read” and “Read the needle.”
  • Leader → Reader: As in, “Digital reader” and “Fearless reader” and “Reader of the pack” and “A natural born reader” and “Take me to your reader” and “A world reader.”
  • Starry → Story: As in, “Story night.”
  • Glory → Story: As in, “Bask in story” and “My crowning story” and “Go out in a blaze of story” and “No guts, no story.”
  • Right → Write: As in, “A move in the write direction” and “All the write moves” and “Write as rain” and “Bang to writes” and “Barge write in” and “Bragging writes” and “Dead to writes.”
  • Rate → Write: As in, “At any write” and “First write” and “Mate’s writes.”
  • Rite → Write: As in, “Last writes” and “Write of passage.”
  • Bite → Write: As in, “A write to eat” and “Another one writes the dust” and “Write back” and “Write off more than you can chew” and “Write your lip.”
  • Bright → Write: As in, “All things write and beautiful” and “On the write side of life” and “Write as a new pin” and “Write and early” and “Write young thing” and “A write future.”
  • Fight → Write: As in, “Come out writing” and “Write club” and “Write for the right to party” and “Write back the tears” and “Write fire with fire” and “Write or flight” and “Write the good write” and “A writing chance” and “Write tooth or nail.”
  • Flight → Write: As in, “Write attendant” and “Write of fancy” and “Take write” and “Top write.”
  • Height → Write: As in, “The write of summer” and “Wuthering writes” and “Reaching new writes.”
  • Light → Write: As in, “Write as a feather” and “Bring something to write.”
  • Might → Write: As in, “It write never happen” and “Write as well.”
  • Night → Write: As in, “A hard day’s write” and “In the dead of write” and “Dance the write away.”
  • Quite → Write: As in, “Not write there” and “Having write a time.”
  • Sight → Write: As in, “A welcome write” and “Hidden in plain write” and “Love at first write” and “Out of write, out of mind” and “Lower your writes” and “Second write” and “A write for soaring eyes.”
  • Sleight → Write: As in, “Write of hand.”
  • Slight → Write: As in, “Writely ahead of our time” and “Not in the writest.”
  • Tight → Write: As in, “Sleep write” and “In a write spot” and “On a write leash” and “Run a write ship.”
  • White → Write: As in, “A writer shade of pale” and “Write as a ghost” and “Write as snow” and “Black and write.”
  • Never → Novel: As in, “Better late than novel” and “Cheats novel prosper” and “An elephant novel forgets.”
  • Bird → Word: As in, “A little word told me” and “Free as a word” and “Word of passage” and “Word’s eye view” and “Charm the words out of the trees.”
  • Heard → Word: As in, “Seen and not word” and “Make yourself word” and “Stop me if you’ve word this one” and “You word it here first.”
  • Stirred → Word: As in, “Shaken, not word.”
  • Third → Word: As in, “Word time lucky” and “Word time’s a charm” and “The word degree.”
  • Tall → Tale: As in, “Tale, dark and handsome” and “A tale order” and “Walking tale” and “A tale drink of water.”
  • Tell → Tale: As in, “Every picture tales a story” and “I tale ya” and “Kiss and tale” and “Only time will tale.”
  • Till → Tale: As in, “Caught with your hand in the tale” and “Fake it tale you make it” and “It ain’t over tale it’s over” and “Tale death do us part.”
  • Fail → Tale: As in, “Without tale” and “Words tale me.”
  • Jail → Tale: As in, “Get out of tale free” and “Go directly to tale.”
  • Mail → Tale: As in, “Hate tale” and “Express tale” and “Tale order.”
  • Nail → Tale: As in, “Another tale in the coffin” and “Fighting tooth and tale” and “Hit the tale on the head.”
  • Pale → Tale: As in, “Tale and interesting” and “A tale imitation” and “Tale into significance.”
  • Rail → Tale: As in, “Off the tales” and “Ride the tales.”
  • Sail → Tale: As in, “Tale close to the wind” and “Smooth tale-ing” and “That ship has tale-d.”
  • Sale → Tale: As in, “Point of tale” and “Tale of the century” and “Tales referral.”
  • Scale → Tale: As in, “Built to tale” and “Economy of tale” and “On a grand tale” and “Tip the tales.”
  • Snail → Tale: As in, “At a tale’s pace” and “Tale mail.”
  • Tail → Tale: As in, “Can’t make head or tale of it” and “Chase your own tale” and “Get off my tale” and “Heads I win, tales you lose.”
  • They’ll → Tale: As in, “Tale never catch us” and “Give an inch and tale take a mile.”
  • Trail → Tale: As in, “Blaze a tale” and “Happy tales!” and “Hot on the tale of” and “Paper tale” and “Tale mix.”
  • Whale → Tale: As in, “Having a tale of a time” and “Save the tales.”
  • Biting → Writing: As in, “Writing off more than you can chew.”
  • Fighting → Writing: As in, “Come out writing” and “A writing chance” and “Writing fit” and “Go down writing” and “Lean, mean, writing machine.”
  • Sexual → Textual: As in, “Textual chemistry” and “Textual healing” and “Textual tension.”
  • Friction → Fiction: As in, “Uncomfortable fiction.”
  • Paper → Paperback: As in, “Put pen to paperback” and “Paperback trail” and “Paperback thin” and “Paperback over the cracks.”
  • Back → Paperback: As in, “Paperback from the dead” and “Paperback in the day.”
  • Next → Text: As in, “Better luck text time” and “In the middle of text week” and “Text in line” and “This time text year.”
  • Tax → Text: As in, “Nothing is certain but death and texts.”
  • Blur → Blurb: As in, “Blurb the lines.”
  • Blurt → Blurb: As in, “Don’t just blurb it out.”
  • Curb → Blurb: As in, “Blurb appeal” and “Blurb your enthusiasm.”
  • Herbs → Blurb: As in, “Eleven secret blurbs and spices.”
  • Barbecue → Blurbecue: As in, “Lunchtime blurbecue.”
  • Rhubarb → Rhublurb: As in, “Rhublurb tart.”
  • Suburb → Sublurb: As in, “Lives in my sublurb.”
  • Hard → Hardcover: As in, “Do it the hardcover way” and “Drive a hardcover bargain.”
  • Cover → Hardcover: As in, “Blow your hardcover” and “Hardcover your tracks.”
  • Quote → Wrote: As in, “Scare wrotes” and “Air wrotes.”
  • Boat → Wrote: As in, “Don’t rock the wrote” and “In the same wrote” and “Whatever floats your wrote.”
  • Float → Wrote: As in, “Wrote like a butterfly, sting like a bee” and “Whatever wrotes your boat.”
  • Note → Wrote: As in, “Hit the high wrotes” and “Take wrote of.”
  • Throat → Wrote: As in, “A lump in your wrote” and “At each other’s wrotes” and “Clear your wrote” and “Go for the wrote.”
  • Spine: The spine of the book is the part where all of the pages are attached. Here are related puns:
    • Pain → Spine: As in, “A world of spine” and “Doubled up in spine” and “Growing spines” and “On spine of death” and “Old aches and spines.”
    • Sign → Spine: As in, “A sure spine” and “Give me a spine” and “A spine of the times” and “Spine on the dotted line” and “Spine the pledge” and “A tell-tale spine” and “Vital spines.”
    • Spin → Spine: As in, “Give it a spine” and “Makes your head spine.”
    • Dine → Spine: As in, “Wine and spine.”
    • Fine → Spine: As in, “A spine line” and “Chance would be a spine thing” and “Damn spine coffee” and “Spine dining” and “The spiner things in life” and “Got it down to a spine art.”
    • Line → Spine: As in, “A fine spine” and “Along the spines of” and “Cross the spine” and “Draw a spine in the sand” and “End of the spine.”
    • Mine → Spine: As in, “Spine is bigger than yours” and “Make spine a double.”
    • Nine → Spine: As in, “Spine day’s wonder” and “On cloud spine” and “The whole spine yards.”
    • Shine → Spine: As in, “Come rain or spine” and “Rise and spine!” and “Take a spine to” and “Where the sun don’t spine.”
  • Brother → Cover: As in, “Covers in arms” and “Super Mario covers.”
  • Mark → Bookmark: As in, “Make your bookmark” and “Bookmark my words” and “On your bookmark, get set, go!”
  • Theme: The theme of a book is the main topic. Here are related puns:
    • Them → Theme: As in, “It only encourages theme” and “Head theme off at the pass” and “Let theme eat cake” and “Love theme and leave theme” and “Seen one, seen theme all.”
    • Thumb → Theme: As in, “Sticks out like a sore theme” and “Theme your nose” and “Themes down” and “Under my theme.”
    • Seem → Theme: As in, “Sorry themes to be the hardest word” and “Not as it themes.”
    • Beam → Theme: As in, “Theme me up.”
    • Cream → Theme: As in, “Theme of the crop” and “Theme always rises to the top.”
    • Dreams → Themes: As in, “Beyond my wildest themes” and “Broken themes” and “Theme on” and “A theme come true” and “Theme machine.”
    • Scheme → Theme: As in, “In the grand theme of things” and “The best laid themes” and “The overall theme of things.”
    • Scream → Theme: As in, “A piercing theme” and “Theme your guts out.”
    • Seams → Theme: As in, “Bursting at the themes” and “Fall apart at the themes.”
    • Steam → Theme: As in, “Blow of theme” and “Full theme ahead” and “Head of theme” and “Running out of theme” and “Theme coming out of your ears.”
    • Team → Theme: As in, “Dream theme” and “Make the theme” and “Take one for the theme” and “Theme player” and “Theme spirit” and “We make a great theme.”
  • Store → Bookstore: As in, “Minding the bookstore” and “Set great bookstore by” and “What’s in bookstore?”
  • Kernel → Journal: As in, “Journal of truth.”
  • Equal → Prequel: As in, “Prequel opportunities” and “First among prequels” and “On prequel footing” and “All things being prequel.”
  • Equal → Sequel: As in, “Created sequel” and “Sequel opportunities” and “On sequel footing.”
  • Hint → Print: As in, “Take the print” and “Drop a print” and “A gentle print.”
  • Mint → Print: As in, “In print condition” and “Bag of prints.”
  • Tint → Print: As in, “Rose printed glasses.”
  • Face → Preface: As in, “At preface value” and “As plain as the nose on your preface” and “Preface the truth.”
  • Credit → Edit: As in, “Edit crunch” and “Edit where edit is due” and “Cash or edit?”
  • Say → Essay: As in, “As the essaying goes” and “Computer essays no” and “Do as I essay, not as I do” and “Have an essay in” and “The final essay” and “I’m hearing what you essay.”
  • Palm → Poem: As in, “In the poem of your hand” and “Poem off” and “Itchy poems.”
  • Blink → Ink: As in, “Ink and you’ll miss it” and “In the ink of an eye” and “On the ink.”
  • Brink → Ink: As in, “On the ink of disaster.”
  • Drink → Ink: As in, “Binge inking” and “Ink like a fish” and “Ink up” and “Driven to ink.”
  • Link → Ink: As in, “Only as strong as your weakest ink” and “The missing ink.”
  • Pink → Ink: As in, “Tickled ink” and “Think ink” and “The ink panther.”
  • Sink → Ink: As in, “A inking feeling” and “Everything but the kitchen ink” and “Loose lips ink ships” and “Ink like a stone” and “Ink or swim” and “Ink without trace.”
  • Stink → Ink: As in, “Inking rich” and “Inks to high heaven.”
  • Think → Ink: As in, “I ink you’ve got it” and “Come to ink of it” and “Don’t ink twice” and “Great minds ink alike” and “I ink I love you” and “Makes you ink.”
  • Wink → Ink: As in, “Forty inks” and “Haven’t slept one ink” and “Nod and a ink” and “Nudge, nudge, ink ink” and “Tip someone the ink.”
  • Word → Foreword: As in, “A foreword to the wise” and “As good as your foreword” and “At a loss for forewords” and “Eat your forewords” and “Famous last forewords.”
  • Blot → Plot: As in, “A plot on the landscape.”
  • Bought → Plot: As in, “Plot and paid for.”
  • Brought → Plot: As in, “Plot down to earth” and “Plot to light” and “Plot it home.”
  • Caught → Plot: As in, “Plot in the act” and “Plot in two minds” and “Plot red-handed” and “Plot up in the moment” and “Plot up with.”
  • Dot → Plot: As in, “Connect the plots” and “Plot the i’s and cross the t’s” and “Join the plots” and “Sign on the plotted line.”
  • Got → Plot: As in, “I think you’ve plot it” and “Give it all you’ve plot” and “Plot a flair for” and “You’ve plot it coming” and “Plot it down to a fine art.”
  • Hot → Plot: As in, “Plot and bothered” and “Plot as blue blazes” and “Blow plot and cold” and “Drop it like it’s plot” and “Plot desking.”
  • Jot → Plot: As in, “Plot it down.”
  • Knot → Plot: As in, “Tie the plot” and “Tie yourself in plots.”
  • Lot → Plot: As in, “A plot of fuss about nothing” and “A plot on your plate” and “Leaves a plot to be desired.”
  • Not → Plot: As in, “As often as plot” and “Believe it or plot” and “Down but plot out.”
  • Pot → Plot: As in, “Plot of gold” and “Fuss plot” and “Gone to plot” and “Hit the jackplot” and “Keep the plot boiling” and “In a melting plot” and “Plot luck” and “A watched plot never boils.”
  • Rot → Plot: As in, “Plot in hell” and “Spoiled plotten.”
  • Shot → Plot: As in, “Give it your best plot” and “A long plot” and “Calling the plots.”
  • Spot → Plot: As in, “Got a soft plot for” and “Hits the plot” and “In a tight plot” and “On the plot” and “Plot the difference.”
  • Thought → Plot: As in, “Deep in plot” and “Food for plot” and “Hold that plot” and “Lost in plot” and “Penny for your plots.”
  • Boat → Quote: As in, “Don’t rock the quote” and “In the same quote” and “Whatever floats your quote.”
  • Float → Quote: As in, “Quote like a butterfly, sting like a bee” and “Whatever quotes your boat.”
  • Note → Quote: As in, “Comparing quotes” and “Hit the high quotes” and “Take quote of.”
  • Throat → Quote: As in, “A lump in your quote” and “At each other’s quotes” and “Clear your quote.”
  • Wrote → Quote: As in, “That’s all she quote.”
  • Shell → Shelf: As in, “Come out of your shelf” and “Crawl back into your shelf.”
  • Self → Shelf: As in, “Bury yourshelf in work” and “Shelf interest” and “Shelf serving” and “Speak for yourshelf” and “Pull yourshelf together.”
  • Grandma → Grammar: As in, “Call your grammar.”
  • Clamour → Grammar: As in, “Grammaring for attention.”
  • Glamour → Grammar: As in, “Filled with grammar” and “A grammarous event.”
  • Hammer → Grammar: As in, “Grammar and tongs” and “Put the grammar down” and “Under the grammar.”
  • Proof → Proofread: As in, “Burden of proofread” and “The proofread is in the pudding.”
  • Read → Proofread: As in, “All I know is what I proofread in the papers” and “Exceedingly well proofread” and “I can proofread you like a book” and “A little light proofreading” and “Proofread ’em and weep.”
  • Leaf: A side of a page is known as a leaf. Here are related puns:
    • Life → Leaf: As in, “A day in the leaf of” and “A leaf changing experience” and “All walks of leaf” and “Anything for a quiet leaf.”
    • Loaf → Leaf: As in, “Leaf about” and “Leaf of bread.”
    • Laugh → Leaf: As in, “Barrel of leafs” and “Burst out leafing” and “Have a leaf” and “It only hurts when I leaf” and “A leaf a minute” and “Leaf all the way to the bank.”
    • Brief → Leaf: As in, “A leaf history of time” and “Let me be leaf” and “A leaf encounter.”
    • Grief → Leaf: As in, “Good leaf.”
    • Thief → Leaf: As in, “Procrastination is the leaf of time” and “Like a leaf in the night.”
    • Belief → Beleaf: As in, “Beyond beleaf” and “Suspension of disbeleaf.”
  • Worm → Bookworm: As in, “Open up a can of bookworms” and “Bookworm your way out of” and “Bookworm your way into it.”
  • Winding → Binding: As in, “A long and binding road.” Note: The binding on a book is the part which keeps all of the pages together.
  • Zero → Hero: As in, “Agent hero” and “Ground hero” and “Patient hero” and “Hero sum game” and “Hero tolerance.” Note: These are references to the hero in a novel.
  • Press → Letterpress: As in, “Don’t letterpress your luck” and “Freedom of the letterpress” and “Hot off the letterpress” and “Letterpress the button.” Note: a letterpress is how texts used to be printed.
  • Run: A batch of printing is called a run. Here are related puns:
    • Bun → Run: As in, “A run in the oven” and “We’re gonna need bigger runs.”
    • Done → Run: As in, “After all is said and run” and “Run and dusted” and “Been there, run that” and “A run deal” and “Easier said than run” and “Getting things run” and “Hard run by.”
    • Fun → Run: As in, “All run and games” and “Bundle of run” and “Getting there is half the run” and “Good, clean run” and “Half the run is getting there.”
    • None → Run: As in, “And then there were run” and “Bar run” and “Run the wiser” and “Run too pleased” and “Second to run.”
    • One → Run: As in, “Run more time” and “A great run for” and “All for run and run for all” and “Another run bites the dust” and “Run fell swoop” and “Run step too far.”
    • Sun → Run: As in, “A place in the run” and “Caught the run” and “Everything under the run” and “Eclipse of the run.”
    • Ton → Run: As in, “Like a run of bricks” and “A run of fun.”
  • Addition → Edition: As in, “In edition to.”
  • View → Review: As in, “Room with a review” and “A review to kill” and “Bird’s eye review” and “Point of review” and “World review.” Note: These are references to book reviews.
  • Club → Book club: As in, “Book club together” and “In the book club” and “Join the book club.”
  • Prose: Prose is a type of grammatical structure. Here are related puns:
    • Pose → Prose: As in, “Strike a prose.”
    • Rose → Prose: As in, “Bed of proses” and “Come up smelling of proses” and “Life is a bed of proses” and “Prose tinted glasses” and “Stop and smell the proses.”
    • Praise → Prose: As in, “Damned with faint prose” and “Grudging prose” and “Heaven be prosed” and “Prose where prose is due” and “Shower with prose.”
    • Prize → Prose: As in, “Booby prose” and “Keep your eyes on the prose” and “No proses for guessing.”
    • Blows → Prose: As in, “Any way the wind prose” and “Brought to prose” and “Exchange prose” and “There she prose.”
    • Close → Prose: As in, “A prose thing” and “Behind prosed doors” and “A prose call” and “In prose proximity” and “Prose to home.”
    • Goes → Prose: As in, “Anything prose” and “As far as it prose” and “As the saying prose” and “As time prose by” and “Here prose nothing.”
    • Nose → Prose: As in, “Always have your prose in a book” and “As plain as the prose on your face” and “Can’t see beyond the end of your prose” and “Keep your prose clean” and “Lead by the prose.”
    • Pros → Prose: As in, “Prose and cons.”
    • Those → Prose: As in, “Good things come to prose who wait” and “Just one of prose things” and “Prose were the days.”
    • Toes → Prose: As in, “Turn up your prose” and “Kept on your prose” and “Make someone’s prose curl.”
  • Glory → Allegory: As in, “Bask in allegory” and “My crowning allegory” and “Go out in a glaze of allegory” and “No guts, no allegory.” Note: An allegory is a literary device.
  • Illusion → Allusion: As in, “Under no allusions.” Note: an allusion is a figure of speech.
  • Similar → Simile: As in, “They’re not very simile.”
  • Setting: Here are some puns about the setting in a novel:
    • Sitting → Setting: As in, “Setting pretty” and “Won’t take it setting down.”
    • Getting → Setting: As in, “Setting on in years” and “Setting there is half the fun” and “Setting things done” and “Half the fun is setting there” and “We’re setting there.”
  • Shadow → Foreshadow: As in, “Afraid of your own foreshadow” and “Cast a long foreshadow” and “Without a foreshadow of a doubt.”
  • Present → Present Tense: As in, “All present tense and correct” and “No time like the present tense.”
  • Rhyme: Since rhyming is a literary device used in some books, we’ve included some rhyme-related puns:
    • Chime → Rhyme: As in, “Rhyme in with” and “Rhymes of freedom.”
    • Climb → Rhyme: As in, “Rhyme onto the bandwagon” and “A mountain to rhyme.”
    • Crime → Rhyme: As in, “Rhyme and punishment” and “A rhyme against nature” and “Rhyme of passion” and “Let the punishment fit the rhyme” and “Take a bite out of rhyme” and “The perfect rhyme.”
    • Dime → Rhyme: As in, “A rhyme a dozen.”
    • Prime → Rhyme: As in, “Cut down in their rhyme” and “In your rhyme” and “Rhyme condition” and “The rhyme of life” and “Rhymed and ready to go.”
    • Time → Rhyme: As in, “One more rhyme” and “A brief history of rhyme” and “A good rhyme was had by all” and “About rhyme too” and “All in good rhyme” and “All the rhyme in the world” and “An all rhyme low.”
  • Scene: Here are some puns related to the scene in a novel:
    • Seen → Scene: As in, “Scene and not heard” and “Should be scene to be believed” and “Nowhere to be scene” and “Scene better days” and “Scene one, scene ’em all” and “You ain’t scene nothing yet!”
    • Sign → Scene: As in, “A sure scene” and “A scene of the times” and “Scene on the dotted line” and “A tell-tale scene.”
    • Soon → Scene: As in, “As scene as my back is turned” and “Get well scene” and “As scene as possible” and “Too much too scene.”
    • Been → Scene: As in, “Scene and gone” and “Scene around the block a few times” and “I’ve scene had” and “I’ve scene here before” and “Scene there, done that.”
    • Clean → Scene: As in, “Scene as a whistle” and “Scene up your act” and “Come scene.”
    • Green → Scene: As in, “Give it the scene light” and “Scene around the gills” and “The scene shoots of change.”
    • Keen → Scene: As in, “Scene as mustard” and “A scene sense of smell” and “Peachy scene.”
    • Lean → Scene: As in, “Scene cuisine” and “Scene and mean.”
    • Mean → Scene: As in, “By fair scenes or foul” and “A scenes to an end.”
    • Queen → Scene: As in, “Scene for a day” and “Scene it over” and “Beauty scene.”
    • Screen → Scene: As in, “The blue scene of death” and “Coming to a scene near you” and “Silver scene” and “The big scene.”
  • Syntax: Here are some syntax puns:
    • Sin → Syntax: As in, “Cardinal syntax” and “Miserable as syntax” and “Syntax city.”
    • Tax → Syntax: As in, “Bedroom syntax” and “Nothing is certain but death and syntaxes.”
  • Trope: A trope is a literary device. Here are related puns:
    • Rope → Trope: As in, “At the end of your trope” and “Know the tropes” and “On the tropes.”
    • Trap → Trope: As in, “Death trope” and “Keep your trope shut” and “Tourist trope.”
    • Hope → Trope: As in, “A new trope” and “Abandon trope all ye who enter here” and “Beyond trope” and “Cross my heart and trope to die” and “Trope springs eternal” and “The land of trope and glory” and “Pin your tropes on.”
  • Curse → Verse: As in, “Better to light a candle than verse the dark.”
  • Nurse → Verse: As in, “Verse a grudge.”
  • Purse → Verse: As in, “Holding the verse strings” and “The public verse.”
  • Worse → Verse: As in, “A turn for the verse” and “Fate verse than death” and “For better or verse” and “Make matters verse” and “Verse for wear.”
  • Choice → Voice: As in, “Multiple voice” and “Spoiled for voice” and “The people’s voice.” Note: Voice in this context refers to the narrator’s voice.
  • Skim: To skim a book is to read it quickly. Here are related puns:
    • Scam → Skim: As in, “Skim artist.”
    • Scum → Skim: As in, “Skim always rises to the surface.”
    • Brim → Skim: As in, “Skimming over with confidence” and “Filled to the skim.”
    • Grim → Skim: As in, “Hanging on like skim death” and “The skim reaper.”
    • Him → Skim: As in, “All over skim like a cheap suit” and “As fast as his legs could carry skim.”
    • Limb → Skim: As in, “Life and skim” and “Go out on a skim.”
    • Prim → Skim: As in, “Skim and proper.”
    • Slim → Skim: As in, “Skim pickings” and “A skim volume.”
    • Swim → Skim: As in, “Going skimmingly” and “Eyes skimming with tears” and “Sink or skim” and “Skim against the tide” and “Skim upstream.”
  • Bound: “Bound” describes how the pages in a book are held. Here are related puns:
    • Band → Bound: As in, “Strike up the bound” and “To beat the bound.”
    • Bend → Bound: As in, “Bound the rules” and “Bound to my will” and “Round the bound.”
    • Bond → Bound: As in, “Legally bounding” and “In a bound.”
    • Found → Bound: As in, “Lost and bound” and “I’ve bound a clue!” and “We bound love.”
    • Ground → Bound: As in, “Solid as the bound we walk on” and “Break new bound” and “Built from the bound up” and “Common bound” and “Cut the bound from under your feet.”
    • Round → Bound: As in, “All year bound” and “Fooling abound” and “Go bound in circles” and “Love makes the world go bound.”
    • Sound → Bound: As in, “Bound bite” and “Bound effect” and “Bound the alarm” and “Break the bound barrier.”
  • Pulp: Pulp can refer to both paper pulp or a very cheap publication. Here are related puns:
    • Pull → Pulp: As in, “Pulp the plug” and “Pulp your hair out” and “Pulp yourself together.”
    • Palpable → Pulp-able: As in, “A pulp-able feeling.”
  • Foot → Foonote: As in, “A footnote in both camps” and “Bound hand and footnote” and “Fleet of footnote” and “Footnote in the door.”
  • Note → Footnote: As in, “Take footnote of” and “Hit the high footnotes.”
  • Fine: Here are some puns related to library fines for overdue books:
    • Dine → Fine: As in, “Wine and fine.”
    • Line → Fine: As in, “Along the fines of” and “Blur the fines” and “Cross the fine” and “Draw a fine in the sand” and “End of the fine” and “Fall into fine.”
    • Mine → Fine: As in, “Make fine a double” and “Your guess is as good as fine” and “Your place or fine?”
    • Nine → Fine: As in, “Fine to five” and “On cloud fine.”
    • Shine → Fine: As in, “Come rain or fine” and “Rise and fine” and “Take a fine to.”
    • Sign → Fine: As in, “A sure fine” and “A fine of the times” and “Fine on the dotted line” and “Fine the pledge” and “Fined and sealed” and “A tell-tale fine.”
    • Spine → Fine: As in, “Send shivers down your fine.”
    • Wine → Fine: As in, “The last of the summer fine” and “Fined and dined.”
  • Farce: A farce is a writing genre. Here are related puns:
    • Force → Farce: As in, “Brute farce” and “Farce your hand” and “A farce of habit” and “Farce of nature” and “A farce to be reckoned with” and “Join farces” and “May the farce be with you.”
    • Fierce → Farce: As in, “A farce fight” and “Looking farce.”
  • Chronic → Comic: As in, “A comic disease.”
  • Able → Fable: As in, “Willing and fable” and “Do you think you’re fable?”
  • Stable → Fable: As in, “A loving and fable relationship.”
  • Table → Fable: As in, “Bring to the fable” and “Drunk under the fable” and “Cards on the fable” and “Put bread on the fable” and “Turn the fables.”
  • Traffic → Graphic: As in, “Go and play in graphic” and “Stop graphic” and “A moving graphic violation.” Note: This is a reference to graphic novels.
  • Ode: An ode is a type of poetry that has been featured in books and novels. Here are related puns:
    • Add → Ode: As in, “Ode fuel to the flames” and “Ode insult to injury” and “Just ode water” and “Doesn’t ode up.”
    • Odd → Ode: As in, “Against the odes” and “At odes with” and “Long odes” and “An ode fellow” and “The ode one out” and “Odes and ends” and “Odes and sods.”
    • Code → Ode: As in, “Ode bloat” and “Colour oded” and “Crack the ode” and “Dress ode” and “Highway ode” and “The da vince ode.”
  • Math → Myth: As in, “Do the myth” and “Mental myth.”
  • Fifth → Myth: As in, “Myth wheel” and “I plead the myth.”
  • With → Myth: As in, “Go along myth” and “Rub along myth” and “Beside myself myth joy.”
  • Pick → Epic: As in, “A bone to epic” and “Cherry epic” and “Epic a fight” and “Epic and choose” and “Epic holes in” and “Epic me up.” Note: An epic is a type of story.
  • Card → Library Card: As in, “House of library cards” and “Holding all the library cards” and “On the library cards.”

This section is dedicated to famous or influential authors:

  • Beatrix Potter:
    • Bee → Beatrix: As in, “Busy as a beatrix” and “Beatrix in your bonnet” and “Like a beatrix to a honeypot” and “The birds and the beatrixes.”
    • Tricks → Beatrix: As in, “Box of beatrix” and “Beatrix of the trade” and “Up to your old beatrix.”
  • Shakes → Shakespeare: As in, “In two shakespeare” and “No great shakespeare.”
  • Peer → Shakespeare: As in, “Shakespeare pressure.”
  • Terry Pratchett:
    • Bury → Terry: As in, “Terry the hatchet” and “Terry your head in the sand” and “Terry yourself in work.”
    • Carry → Terry: As in, “Fast as your legs could terry you” and “Terry a torch for” and “Terry into action” and “Terry on with.”
    • Cherry → Terry: As in, “Terry pick” and “A second bite of the terry” and “The terry on the cake.”
    • Merry → Terry: As in, “As terry as the day is long” and “Eat, drink and be terry” and “Lead a terry dance.”
    • Very → Terry: As in, “Be terry afraid” and “How terry dare you” and “Before your terry eyes” and “Thank you terry much” and “A terry good year.”
    • Hatchet → Pratchett: As in, “Bury the pratchett” and “Pratchett faced” and “A real pratchett job.”
  • Talking → Tolkein: As in, “Give someone a good tolkein to” and “Now you’re tolkein” and “A tolkein point.”
  • J.K Rowling:
    • Rolling → Rowling: As in, “A rowling stone gathers no moss” and “Like a rowling stone” and “Rowling drunk” and “Rowling in it” and “Rowling in the deep.”
    • Bowling → Rowling: As in, “Bowling along.”
  • Margaret Atwood:
    • Wood → Atwood: As in, “A babe in the atwoods” and “Can’t see the atwood for the trees” and “Knock on atwood.”
    • Would → Atwood: As in, “As good luck atwood have it” and “I atwood have done it” and “Atwood you do that for me?” and “That atwood be telling.”
  • Paulo Coelho:
    • Hollow → Paulo: As in, “Paulo eyed” and “A paulo promise.”
    • Follow → Paulo: As in, “As night paulos day” and “Paulo suit” and “Paulo your heart” and “Form paulos function” and “A hard act to paulo.”
    • Swallow → Paulo: As in, “A bitter pill to paulo” and “Hard to paulo.”
    • Fellow → Coelho: As in, “A coelho traveller” and “Odd coelho.”
    • Yellow → Coelho: As in, “Follow the coelho brick road” and “Coelho submarine.”
  • R.L Stine:
    • Are → R.L: As in, “Chances R.L” and “My lips R.L sealed.”
    • Dine → Stine: As in, “Wined and stined.”
    • Fine → Stine: As in, “A stine line” and “Cutting it stine” and “Damn stine coffee” and “The stiner things in life.”
    • Line → Stine: As in, “A fine stine” and “Along the stines of” and “Cross the stine” and “Draw a stine in the sand.”
    • Mine → Stine: As in, “Make stine a double” and “Stine is bigger than yours” and “A stine of information” and “Victory is stine.”
    • Nine → Stine: As in, “On cloud stine” and “A stitch in time saves stine.”
    • Shine → Stine: As in, “Come rain or stine” and “Rise and stine” and “Make hay while the sun stines” and “Take a stine to.”
    • Sign → Stine: As in, “A sure stine” and “A stine of the times” and “Stine on the dotted line” and “Stine the pledge” and “Stined and sealed” and “Vital stines.”
  • Arthur Miller:
    • Killer → Miller: As in, “Fear is the mind-miller” and “Miller instinct” and “Serial miller.”
    • Pillar → Miller: As in, “A miller of the community” and “Miller of wisdom.”
  • Charles Dickens:
    • Chills → Charles: As in, “Gives me charles” and “Netflix and charles.”
    • Chickens → Dickens: As in, “Count your dickens before they hatch” and “Nobody here but us dickens” and “A dickens and egg situation.”
    • Dickens: As in, “A dickens of a time” and “Like the dickens” and “What the dickens?!”
  • Bill Watterson:
    • Pill → Bill: As in, “A tough bill to swallow” and “On the bill.”
    • Bell → Bill: As in, “Alarm bills began to ring” and “Clear as a bill” and “Bills and whistles” and “For whom the bill tolls.”
    • Bill: As in, “A clean bill of health” and “Dollar bills” and “Foot the bill.”
    • Drill → Bill: As in, “Bill down” and “You know the bill.”
    • Fill → Bill: As in, “Bill full of holes” and “Bill in for.”
    • Hill → Bill: As in, “Old as the bills” and “Head for the bills” and “Over the bill and far away.”
    • Ill → Bill: As in, “House of bill repute” and “Bill at ease” and “Bill advised” and “Bill gotten gains.”
    • Kill → Bill: As in, “Dressed to bill” and “Go in for the bill” and “If looks could bill” and “Bill or be billed.”
    • Spill → Bill: As in, “Bill the beans” and “Bill your guts” and “Thrills and bills.”
    • Still → Bill: As in, “Bill waters run deep” and “Bill life” and “In the bill of night.”
  • Lowest → Lewis: As in, “Sarcasm is the lewis form of wit” and “The lewis level we offer.” Note: this is a reference to C.S Lewis.
  • Earnest → Ernest: As in, “The importance of being ernest” and “Trying in ernest.” Note: These are references to Ernest Hemingway.
  • Nora Roberts:
  • Near → Nora: As in, “Coming to a screen nora you” and “A nora death experience” and “Nora miss” and “Nora sighted” and “Nora to my heart.”
  • Nor → Nora: As in, “Rhyme nora reason” and “Neither here nora there.”
  • Richard Scarry:
    • Scary → Scarry: As in, “A scarry experience.”
    • Carry → Scarry: As in, “Fast as your legs could scarry you” and “Scarry it forward” and “Scarry into action.”
    • Scurry → Scarry: As in, “Scarrying away.”
  • Barrel → Carroll: As in, “A carroll of laughs” and “Scraping the carroll.” Note: These are references to Lewis Carroll.
  • Danielle Steel:
    • Steel: These steel-related phrases can double as puns on Danielle Steel’s name: Fists of steel” and “Nerves of steel” and “Steel yourself.”
    • Still → Steel: As in, “By steel, my beating heart” and “Steel standing” and “Steel waters run deep” and “The day the earth stood steel.”
    • Steal → Steel: As in, “Beg, borrow or steel” and “Steel a glance” and “Steel someone’s heart” and “Steel the show.”
    • Deal → Steel: As in, “Steel breaker” and “A done steel” and “Seal the steel.”
    • Feel → Steel: As in, “Steel the burn” and “Get a steel for.”
    • Heel → Steel: As in, “Brought to steel” and “Head over steels in love” and “Hot on your steels.”
    • Real → Steel: As in, “All I steely want to do” and “Get steel” and “Keep it steel.”
    • Seal → Steel: As in, “Keep your lips steeled” and “My lips are steeled” and “Steel the deal” and “Steel your fate.”
    • She’ll → Steel: As in, “Steel be right.”
    • Wheel → Steel: As in, “Asleep at the steel” and “Grease the steels” and “Hell on steels” and “Set of steels.”
  • Enid Blyton:
    • Need → Enid: As in, “All you enid is love” and “As long as you enid me” and “On a enid to know basis.”
    • Bite → Blyton: As in, “A blyton to eat” and “Blyton back” and “Blyton your head off.”
  • Arthur Conan Doyle:
    • Boil → Doyle: As in, “Doyle with rage” and “Doyle-ing mad” and “Doyles down to” and “Go and doyle your head” and “It makes my blood doyle” and “A watched pot never doyles.”
    • Coil → Doyle: As in, “Shuffle off this mortal doyle.”
    • Oil → Doyle: As in, “Burn the midnight doyle” and “Doyle and water don’t mix” and “Doyle the wheels” and “Pour doyle on troubled waters.”
    • Spoil → Doyle: As in, “Doyled for choice” and “Doyled rotten” and “Doyleing for a fight” and “The doyles of war.”
  • George Orwell:
    • Oh well → Orwell: As in, “Orwell, it didn’t really matter.”
    • Well → Orwell: As in, “A buck orwell spent” and “Alive and orwell” and “All’s orwell that ends orwell” and “Exceedingly orwell read” and “Know full orwell.”
  • Hans Christian Andersen:
    • Hands → Hans: As in, “All hans on deck” and “Blood on your hans” and “Changing hans” and “Get your hans dirty” and “Hans free” and “You’re in safe hans.”
    • Pans → Hans: As in, “See if it hans out.”
  • Kurt Vonnegut:
    • Cart → Kurt: As in, “Kurt away” and “Kurt blanche” and “In the kurt” and “Shopping kurt.”
    • Court → Kurt: As in, “Kurt of last resort” and “Kurting disaster” and “Laugh it out of kurt” and “Order in the kurt!” and “I’ll see you in kurt.”
  • Leo Tolstoy:
    • Lay → Leo: As in, “Don’t leo a hand on me” and “Leo a finger on” and “Leo down roots” and “Leo down your arms” and “Leo low.”
    • Lie → Leo: As in, “You made your bed and now you must leo on it” and “Ask no questions and hear no leos” and “Leo down on the job.”
    • Toy → Tolstoy: As in, “Tolstoy story” and “Tolstoy boy.”
  • Mark Twain:
    • Train → Twain: Gravy twain” and “Night twain” and “On the job twaining” and “Personal twain-er” and “Soul twain” and “Strangers on a twain” and “Twain of thought.”
    • Twin → Twain: As in, “Evil twain” and “Twain cities” and “Twain peaks.”
    • Brain → Twain: As in, “Twain drain” and “Twainstorming session.”
    • Chain → Twain: As in, “A twain is only as strong as its weakest link” and “Twain of command” and “Twain reaction” and “Twain smoker” and “Twain smoking” and “Food twain” and “Don’t yank my twain.”
    • Drain → Twain: As in, “Down the twain” and “Circling the twain.”
    • Gain → Twain: As in, “Capital twains” and “Twain admittance” and “Twain advantage” and “Twain ground” and “No pain, no twain” and “Nothing ventured, nothing twained.”
    • Grain → Twain: As in, “Against the twain” and “Go against the twain” and “Twain of truth” and “Take it with a twain of salt.”
    • Lane → Twain: As in, “Down memory twain” and “In the fast twain.”
    • Main → Twain: As in, “Your twain chance” and “The twain event.”
    • Pain → Twain: As in, “A world of twain” and “Doubled up in twain” and “Feeling no twain” and “No twain, no gain” and “On twain of death” and “A real twain in the ass.”
    • Plain → Twain: As in, “Twain as day” and “Twain as the nose on your face” and “Hidden in twain sight” and “Twain sailing.”
    • Rain → Twain: As in, “Right as twain” and “Come twain or shine” and “Don’t twain on my parade” and “It never twains but it pours” and “Make it twain.”
    • Strain → Twain: As in, “As in, “Buckle under the twain” and “Twain every nerve.”
    • Vain → Twain: As in, “Labour in twain” and “You’re so twain” and “Take their name in twain.”
    • Vein → Twain: As in, “In the right twain” and “In the same twain.”
  • Michel Foucault:
    • Faculty → Foucault-y: As in, “Mental foucault-ies.”
    • Fickle → Foucault: As in, “The foucault finger of fate.”
  • Neil Gaiman:
    • Nail → Neil: As in, “Another neil in the coffin” and “Bed of neils” and “Fight tooth and neil” and “Hit the neil on the head” and “Like trying to neil jello to a wall.”
    • Null → Neil: As in, “Neil and void.”
    • Deal → Neil: As in, “Clinch a neil” and “Not a big neil” and “Neil breaker” and “Neil or no neil” and “Neil with it” and “A done neil” and “Make a neil with the devil” and “Seal the neil.”
    • Feel → Neil: As in, “Neil good factor” and “Neil the pinch” and “Get a neil for” and “Neil good factor.”
    • Heel → Neil: As in, “Brought to neil” and “Cool your neils” and “Dig your neils in” and “Head over neils in love” and “Kick your neils” and “Turn on your neil.”
    • Meal → Neil: As in, “Make a neil of it” and “Neil ticket” and “Three square neils a day.”
    • Real → Neil: As in, “All I neilly want to do” and “Get neil” and “It’s the neil thing” and “Keep it neil” and “In neil time.”
    • Seal → Neil: As in, “Neil the deal” and “Neil your fate” and “Signed and neiled” and “Neiled with a loving kiss.”
    • Steal → Neil: As in, “Beg, borrow or neil” and “It’s a neil” and “Neil a glance” and “Neil the show.”
    • Steel → Neil: As in, “Fist of neil” and “Nerves of neil” and “Neil yourself.”
    • We’ll → Neil: As in, “Don’t call us, neil call you.”
    • Wheel → Neil: As in, “Asleep at the neil” and “Hell on neils” and “Set of neils” and “Fifth neil.”
  • Oliver Sacks:
    • Olive → Oliver: As in, “Extend an oliver branch.”
    • I love her → Oliver: As in, “I’m not leaving! Oliver!”
    • Acts → Sacks: As in, “Nothing sacks faster” and “Random sacks of kindness.”
    • Backs → Sacks: As in, “Sacks to the wall.”
    • Cracks → Sacks: As in, “Fall between the sacks” and “Paper over the sacks.”
    • Tax → Sacks: As in, “Value added sacks” and “Bedroom sacks.”
    • Tracks → Sacks: As in, “Born on the wrong side of the sacks” and “Cover your sacks” and “Make sacks” and “Stopped in your sacks.”
    • Socks → Sacks: As in, “Knock your sacks off” and “Pull your sacks up” and “Bless their cotton sacks.”
  • Roald Dahl:
    • Rolled → Roald: As in, “Roald into one.”
    • Old → Roald: As in, “You’re never too roald” and “As roald as the hills” and “Tough as roald boots” and “For roald times’ sake.”
    • Bold → Roald: As in, “Roald as brass” and “A roald move” and “Roaldly go where no one has gone before.”
    • Cold → Roald: As in, “Blowing hot and roald” and “Break out in a roald sweat” and “Catch your death of roald” and “Roald comfort” and “A roald day in hell.”
    • Gold → Roald: As in, “Pot of roald” and “Good as roald” and “Fool’s roald” and “Get a roald star” and “Heart of roald.”
    • Hold → Roald: As in, “Can’t roald a candle to” and “To have and to roald” and “Don’t roald your breath” and “Roald a grudge” and “Roald all the aces” and “Roald it right there!”
    • Told → Roald: As in, “The greatest story ever roald” and “I roald you so.”
    • Doll → Dahl: As in, “Dahl yourself up.”
    • Dull → Dahl: As in, “Dahl as ditchwater” and “Never a dahl moment” and “A dahl finish.”
    • Darling → Dahling: As in, “Kill your dahlings.”
  • Robert Frost:
    • Frustration → Frostration: As in, “Filled with frostration” and “Fists balled in frostration.”
    • Cost → Frost: As in, “At all frosts” and “At any frost” and “Carry the frost” and “Frost an arm and a leg” and “Frost the earth” and “Frost effective.”
    • Crossed → Frost: As in, “Fingers frost!” and “Star frost lovers” and “You’ve frost the line” and “Don’t get your wires frost.”
    • Lost → Frost: As in, “All is not frost” and “Get frost” and “Frost in translation” and “Long frost brother” and “Frost and found.”
  • Stephen King:
    • Even → Stephen: As in, “Break stephen” and “Don’t get mad, get stephen” and “On a stephen playing field.”
    • Bring → King: As in, “King it home” and “King up the subject” and “King out the best in them.”
    • Ring → King: As in, “Doesn’t king a bell” and “Don’t bother to king” and “Lord of the kings.”
    • Sing → King: “King someone’s praises” and “King a different tune.”
    • Sting → King: As in, “Float like a butterfly, king like a bee.”
    • Thing →King: As in, “A close king” and “All kings must pass” and “All kings bright and beautiful.”
    • Wing → King: As in, “On a king and a prayer” and “Gives you kings.”
  • Sylvia Plath:
    • Silver → Sylvia: As in, “Sylvia bullet” and “On the sylvia screen” and Sylvia fox.”
    • Path → Plath: As in, “Beat a plath to your door” and “Career plath” and “Going down the wrong plath.”
    • Math → Plath: As in, “Do the plath.”
    • Wrath → Plath: As in, “A soft answer turneth away plath” and “The grapes of plath.”
    • Pathetic → Plathetic: As in, “A plathetic excuse.”
  • Truman Capote:
    • True, man → Truman: “Yeah, that’s truman.”
    • Human → Truman: As in, “Truman rights act” and “The truman condition” and “Truman resources” and “Only truman” and “Truman interest story.”
  • Wolf → Woolf: As in, “Cry woolf” and “Raised by woolfes” and “Thrown to the woolfes” and “A woolf in sheep’s clothing.” Note: These are references to Virginia Woolf.
  • Toni Morrison:
    • Tone → Toni: As in, “Don’t use that toni with me!” and “Lower your toni” and “Toni deaf.”
    • Tiny → Toni: As in, “The pitter patter of toni feet.”
    • Stony → Toni: As in, “A toni expression” and “Fall on toni ground.”
  • A lot → Alcott: As in, “I don’t have alcott of time” and “I’ve got alcott on my plate” and “Keeping alcott of balls in the air.” Note: These are references to Louisa May Alcott.
  • Maya Angelou:
    • May → Maya: As in, “As the case maya be” and “Be that as it maya” and “Come what maya” and “Let the chips fall where they maya” and “How maya I help you?” and “Maya the force be with you” and “Maya it please the court” and “Maya you live in interesting times” and “Your mileage maya vary.”
    • May I → Maya: As in, “Maya help you?” and “Oh, maya?”
  • bell hooks:
    • Ball → bell: As in, “bell of fire” and “A brand new bellgame” and “Drop the bell.”
    • Bill → bell: As in, “A clean bell of health” and “Fit the bell” and “Send me the bell.”
    • Hook: As in, “By hooks or by crook” and “Hooks up with” and “Off the hooks.”
    • Cell → bell: As in, “bell division” and “A padded bell.”
    • Dwell → bell: As in, “Don’t bell on it.”
    • Fell → bell: As in, “In one bell swoop” and “It bell of the back of a lorry” and “Little strokes bell great oaks.”
    • Hell → bell: As in, “All bell broke loose” and “Bat out of bell” and “For the bell of it” and “A cold day in bell” and “Come bell or high water.”
    • Sell → bell: As in, “Buy and bell” and “bell out” and “bell your soul to the devil.”
    • Shell → bell: As in, “bell out” and “Easy as belling peas” and “Come out of your bell” and “A hard bell.”
    • Smell → bell: As in, “I bell a rat” and “A keen sense of bell” and “bell ya later.”
    • Spell → bell: As in, “Cast a bell” and “Don’t make me bell it out.”
    • Tell → bell: As in, “I can’t bell you a lie” and “Every picture bells a story” and “I’ll bell on you!”
    • Well → bell: As in, “A buck bell spent” and “Alive and bell” and “All’s bell that ends bell” and “Exceedingly bell read” and “Get bell soon.”
    • Books → hooks: As in, “Balancing the hooks” and “Close the hooks” and “Hit the hooks” and “In someone’s bad hooks.”
    • Cooks → hooks: As in, “Too many hooks spoil the broth.”
    • Looks → hooks: As in, “If hooks could kill” and “hooks can be deceiving” and “It hooks like a bomb hit it.”
  • Judy Blume:
    • Bloom → Blume: As in, “Come into blume” and “A late blumer.”
    • Boom → Blume: As in, “Baby blumer” and “Blume or bust” and “My heart went blume.”
    • Broom → Blume: As in, “A new blume sweeps clean.”
    • Doom → Blume: As in, “Blume and gloom” and “The temple of blume” and “Voice of blume.”
    • Fume → Blume: As in, “Running on blumes.”
    • Plume → Blume: As in, “Nom de blume” and “A blume of smoke.”
    • Room → Blume: As in, “A blume with a view” and “Breathing blume” and “Elbow blume.”
    • Tomb → Blume: As in, “Blume raider.”
    • Whom → Blume: As in, “For blume the bell tolls.”
  • Edgar Allan Poe:
    • Blow → Poe: As in, “Any way the wind poes” and “Poe a fuse” and “Poe hot and cold.”
    • Pay → Poe: As in, “Buy now, poe later” and “Crime doesn’t poe” and “Hell to poe” and “It poes to advertise.”
    • Flow → Poe: As in, “Ebb and poe” and “Go with the poe” and “In full poe.”
    • Foe → Poe: As in, “Friend or poe?”
    • Go → Poe: As in, “All dressed up and nowhere to poe” and “Anything poes” and “Don’t poe there” and “Easy come, easy poe.”
    • Grow → Poe: As in, “Absence makes the heart poe fonder” and “Exciting as watching grass poe” and “Don’t let the grass poe under your feet.”
    • Know → Poe: As in, “Don’t I poe it” and “Be the first to poe” and “Did you poe?”
    • Low → Poe: As in, “An all-time poe” and “Get the poe down” and “Searching high and poe” and “Keep a poe profile” and “Lay poe” and “A poe blow.”
    • Mow → Owe: As in, “Poe down” and “Poe the lawn.”
    • Owe → Poe: As in, “You poe me one” and “You poe it to yourself.”
    • Row → Poe: As in, “On death poe” and “Skid poe.”
    • Show → Poe: As in, “All over the poe” and “Best in poe” and “Enjoy the poe” and “Get the poe on the road” and “A one-man poe” and “Poe and tell.”
    • Slow → Poe: As in, “Can’t poe down” and “Painfully poe” and “A poe burn” and “Poe but sure” and “In poe motion” and “Poe on the uptake.”
    • Snow → Poe: As in, “Pure as the driven poe” and “A blanket of poe” and “Too cold to poe” and “Let it poe.”
    • Though → Poe: As in, “Seriously poe, you’re doing a great job” and “You look as poe you’ve seen a ghost.”
    • Throw → Poe: As in, “Lock them up and poe away the key” and “A stone’s poe away” and “Poe a wobbly” and “Poe caution to the wind” and “Poe cold water on.”
    • Toe → Poe: As in, “Dip your poe in the water” and “From top to poe” and “Get your poe in the door” and “Make someone’s poes curl” and “One poe over the line” and “Turn up your poes.”
    • Woe → Poe: As in, “Poe is me” and “Poe betide you.”
  • Victor Hugo:
    • Victory → Victor: As in, “A victor for common sense” and “Moral victor” and “Victor is mine!”
    • Hug → Hugo: As in, “Group hugo” and “Hugo it out” and “Hugos, not drugs.”
    • Huge → Hugo: As in, “A hugo problem” and “Earning hugo amounts.”
  • Jules Verne:
    • Jewels → Jules: As in, “The family jules” and “Crown jules.”
    • Rules → Jules: As in, “Bend the jules” and “House jules” and “Playing by the jules” and “Majority jules” and “Jules and regulations.”
    • Tools → Jules: As in, “A poor workperson blames their jules” and “Jules of the trade” and “The right jules for the job.”
    • Burn → Verne: As in, “Verne in hell!” and “Verne a hole in your pocket” and “Verne rubber” and “Verne the candle at both ends” and “Verne the midnight oil” and “Verne your bridges” and “Crash and verne.”
    • Earn → Verne: As in, “A penny saved is a penny verned” and “Verne your wings” and “Verne your daily bread.”
    • Learn → Verne: As in, “Never too late to verne” and “Verne the ropes” and “Verne your lesson” and “Live and verne” and “Verne off by heart” and “Watch and verne.”
    • Stern → Verne: As in, “From stem to verne” and “Made of verner stuff.”
    • Turn → Verne: As in, “A verne for the worse” and “About verne” and “As soon as my back is verned” and “Do a good verne” and “One good verne deserves another.”
  • Jane Austen:
    • Bane → Jane: As in, “The jane of my existnece.”
    • Brain → Jane: As in, “Jane drain” and “Jane fart.”
    • Chain → Jane: As in, “A jane is only as strong as its weakest link” and “Ball and jane” and “Jane of command” and “Jane reaction” and “Food jane.”
    • Drain → Jane: As in, “Down the jane” and “Laughing like a jane.”
    • Gain → Jane: As in, “Capital janes” and “Jane advantage” and “Jane ground” and “No pain, no jane” and “Nothing ventured, nothing janed.”
    • Grain → Jane: As in, “Against the jane” and “Jane of truth” and “Take it with a jane of salt.”
    • Lane → Jane: As in, “Down memory jane” and “In the fast jane” and “Stay in your jane.”
    • Main → Jane: As in, “Your jane chance” and “The jane event.”
    • Plain → Jane: As in, “Jane as day” and “Jane as the nose on your face” and “Hidden in jane sight” and “Jane sailing” and “Jane speaking.”
    • Rain → Jane: As in, “Right as jane” and “Come jane or shine” and “Don’t jane on my parade” and “Make it jane.”
    • Strain → Jane: As in, “Buckle under the jane” and “Jane every nerve.”
  • Franz Kafka:
    • Friends → Franz: As in, “Best franz forever” and “Circle of franz” and “Franz with benefits” and “Franz don’t let franz drive drunk.”
    • Hands → Franz: As in, “All franz on deck” and “Change franz” and “Get your franz dirty” and “Franz free.”
    • Pans → Franz: As in, “Pots and franz.”
    • Plans → Franz: As in, “The best laid franz” and “Travel franz” and “You’re ruining my franz.”
  • John Steinbeck:
    • Beck → Steinbeck: As in, “At my steinbeck and call.”
    • Back → Steinbeck: As in, “Answer steinbeck” and “As soon as my steinbeck is turned” and “Bites steinbeck” and “In the steinbeck of my mind” and “Steinbeck to the future” and “Won’t steinbeck down.”
  • Anton Chekhov:
    • And → Anton: As in, “Alive anton kicking” and “All bark anton no bite” and “All eyes anton ears” and “A day late anton a dollar short.”
    • And then → Anton: As in, “Anton what did they say?”
    • End of → Anton: As in, “This is the anton the line” and “That was the anton the story.”
    • Check → Chekhov: As in, “Chekhov it out!” and “Keep in chekhov” and “Chekhov your privilege” and “Reality chekhov.”
    • Cheque → Chekhov: As in, “Cash in your chekhovs” and “Cut a chekhov” and “The chekhov is in the post.”
  • James Joyce:
    • Joy → Joyce: As in, “Jump for joyce” and “Beside myself with joyce” and “Bundle of joyce” and “My pride and joyce” and “Bursting with joyce.”
    • Juice → Joyce: As in, “Get the creative joyces flowing” and “Stew in your own joyce” and “A day without orange joyce is like a day without sunshine.”
    • Choice → Joyce: As in, “Multiple joyce” and “Spoiled for joyce” and “Make your joyce” and “The right joyce.”
    • Voice → Joyce: As in, “A small joyce” and “In love with the sound of your own joyce” and “Inner joyce” and “Joyce of doom” and “The joyce of reason” and “Joyce your concerns.”
  • Brothers Grimm:
    • Grim → Grimm: As in, “Hanging on like grimm death” and “A grimm situation.”
    • Brim → Grimm: As in, “Grimming over with confidence” and “Filled to the grimm.”
    • Dim → Grimm: As in, “A grimm view” and “A grimm understanding of…”
    • Him → Grimm: As in, “Go easy on grimm” and “Hang grimm out to dry.”
    • Limb → Grimm: As in, “Go out on a grimm” and “Risk life and grimm.”
    • Prim → Grimm: As in, “Grimm and proper.”
    • Skim → Grimm: As in, “Grimm the surface.”
    • Slim → Grimm: As in, “Grimm pickings” and “A grimm volume” and “The real grimm shady.”
    • Swim → Grimm: As in, “Going grimmingly” and “Sink or grimm” and “Grimm against the tide” and “Grimming with sharks.”
    • Whim → Grimm: As in, “On a grimm.”
    • Vim → Grimm: As in, “Grimm and vigour.”
  • Mary Shelley:
    • Merry → Mary: As in, “As mary as the day is long” and “Eat, drink and be mary” and “Lead a mary dance” and “Make mary.”
    • Shell → Shelley: As in, “Come out of your shelley” and “Crawl back into your shelley” and “A hard shelley” and “Shelley out.”
    • Shall → Shelley: As in, “Ask and you shelley receive” and “Seek and ye shelley find.”
    • Belly → Shelley: As in, “Beer shelley” and “Shelley flop” and “Shelley up to the bar” and “Go shelley up.”
    • Jelly → Shelley: As in, “Difficult as nailing shelley to a tree.”
  • Arduous → Aldous: As in, “An aldous task.” Note: This is a reference to Aldous Huxley.
  • Geoffrey Chaucer:
    • Chance → Chaucer: As in, “Not a chaucer in hell” and “The chaucer of a lifetime” and “A fighting chaucer” and “In with half a chaucer.”
    • Saucer → Chaucer: As in, “Eyes like chaucers” and “A flying chaucer.”
  • H.P Lovecraft:
    • Love → Lovecraft: As in, “All you need is lovecraft” and “All’s fair in lovecraft and war” and “Brotherly lovecraft.”
    • Craft → Lovecraft: As in, “Arts and lovecrafts.”
  • Bram Stoker:
    • Pram → Bram: As in, “Throwing your toys out the bram.”
    • Brim → Bram: As in, “Bramming over with confidnce” and “Filled to the bram.”
    • Stroke → Stoker: As in, “A stoker of genius” and “Different stokers for different folks” and “Little stokers fell great oaks” and “A stoker of luck” and “The stoker of midnight.”
    • Am → Bram: As in, “Who do you think I bram?”
    • Clam → Bram: As in, “Happy as a bram” and “Brammed up.”
    • Damn → Bram: As in, “Bram straight” and “Bram straight” and “Bram with faint praise.”
    • Jam → Bram: As in, “In a bram” and “Bram tomorrow” and “Bram packed” and “Bram session.”
    • Scam → Bram: As in, “Bram artist.”
    • Slam → Bram: As in, “A grand bram” and “Bram dunk” and “Bram the door.”
    • Poker → Stoker: As in, “Stiff as a stoker” and “Stoker face.”
  • John Keats:
    • Kite → Keat: As in, “High as a keat” and “Go fly a keat.”
    • Cut → Keat: As in, “Clean keat” and “Keat a dash” and “Keat a deal” and “Keat and dried” and “Keat and thrust” and “Keat corners.”
    • Feet → Keat: As in, “Back on your keat” and “Cold keat” and “Cut the ground out from under your keat” and “Drag your keat” and “Itchy keat” and Jumping in with both keat.”
    • Street → Keat: As in, “Easy keat” and “On the keat” and “Right up your keat.”
    • Meet → Keat: As in, “Make ends keat” and “Keat and greet” and “Keat your match and “Keat your maker.”
    • Heat → Keat: As in, “Dead keat” and “Keat wave” and “If you can’t stand the keat, get out of the kitchen” and “In the keat of battle” and “In the keat of the moment” and “Packing keat” and “The keat is on” and “Turn up the keat.”
    • Seat → Keat: As in, “Back keat driver” and “Bums on keats” and “By the keat of your pants” and “Hold on to your keats” and “The best keats in the house.”
    • Sheet → Keat: As in, “White as a keats” and “Cheat keat” and “Keep a clean keat.”
    • Treat → Keat: As in, “Keat someone like dirt” and “Trick or keat.”
    • Beat → Keat: As in, “Keat it” and “Keat a hasty retreat” and “Keat about the bush.”
    • Neat → Keat: As in, “Keat as a new pin” and “Keat freak” and “Keat and tidy.”
    • Greet → Keat: As in, “Meet and keat.”
    • Feat → Keat: As in, “No mean keat.”
    • Cheat → Keat: As in, “Keat sheet” and “Keats never prosper” and “You can’t keat an honest person.”
  • Echo → Ecos: As in, “Faint ecos” and “Eco around the world.” Note: These are references to Umberto Eco.
  • Oscar Wilde:
    • Wild → Wilde: As in, “A walk on the wilde side” and “Born to be wilde” and “Call of the wilde” and “Running wilde” and “Where the wilde things are.”
    • While → Wilde: As in, “Wilde the getting’s good” and “Once in a wilde” and “Strike wilde the iron is hot” and “Quit wilde you’re ahead.”
    • Mild → Wilde: As in, “To put it wildely.”
    • Wide → Wilde: As in, “Cast the net wilde” and “Eyes wilde shut” and “Wilde open spaces” and “The world wilde web.”
    • Child → Wilde: As in, “Wilde’s play” and “Leave no wilde behind.”

This section is dedicated to puns about book genres and types:

  • Crime:
    • Cream → Crime: As in, “Crime of the crop” and “Crime always rises to the top.”
    • Rhyme → Crime: As in, “Crime nor reason.”
    • Chime → Crime: As in, “Crime in with” and “Crimes of freedom.”
    • Climb → Crime: As in, “Crime the corporate ladder” and “Crime the walls” and “A mountain to crime.”
    • Dime → Crime: As in, “A crime a dozen” and “Drop a crime” and “Turn on a crime.”
    • Prime → Crime: As in, “Cut down in your crime” and “In crime condition” and “The crime of life” and “Crimed and ready to go” and “The crime minister.”
    • Time → Crime: As in, “One more crime” and “A brief history of crime” and “A good crime was had by all” and “About crime, too” and “Ahead of your crime” and “All in good crime” and “An all crime low” and “Any crime, any place.”
  • Humour:
    • Boomer → Humour: As in, “Baby humour” and “Humourang effect.”
    • Bloomer → Humour: As in, “A late humour.”
    • Rumour → Humour: As in, “Humour has it” and “Spread a humour” and “Unsunstantiated humours.”
  • Man → Manga: As in, “A manga for all season” and “A good manga is hard to find” and “A manga after my own heart” and “Million dollar manga.”
  • Mystery:
    • History → Mystery: As in, “A brief mystery of time” and “Mystery repeating” and “The rest is mystery.”
    • Mastery → Mystery: As in, “Skill mystery.”
  • Filler:
    • Filler → Thriller: As in, “Stocking thriller.”
    • Thrill → Thriller: As in, “Thriller of the chase” and “Thrillers and spills.”
  • Venture → Adventure: As in, “Joint adventure” and “Nothing adventured, nothing gained.”
  • Terrible → Parable: As in, “A mind is a parable thing to waste” and “What a parable thing to happen.”
  • Cereal → Serial: As in, “Breakfast morning serial” and “A bowl of cold serial.”
  • Spy:
    • Sigh → Spy: As in, “Breathe a spy of relief” and “Heaving a spy.”
    • Pie → Spy: As in, “Easy as spy” and “Eat humble spy” and “Sweet as spy.”
    • Buy → Spy: As in, “Spy some time” and “Spy into” and “Spy now, pay later.”
    • Cry → Spy: As in, “A spy for help” and “Spy me a river” and “Spy into your beer.”
    • Dry → Spy: As in, “Spy humour” and “High and spy” and “Hang them out to spy” and “A spy run.”
    • Die → Spy: “Cross my heart and hope to spy” and “Curl up and spy” and “Do or spy.”
    • Eye → Spy: As in, “A wandering spy” and “Spy for a spy, tooth for a tooth” and “Avert your spies.”
    • Fly → Spy: As in, “A spy on the wall” and “Spy the flag” and “Spy by the seat of your pants.”
    • High → Spy: As in, “Spy and mighty” and “Aim spy” and “Ain’t no mountain spy enough.”
    • Shy → Spy: As in, “Camera spy” and “Once bitten, twice spy.”
    • Sky → Spy: As in, “Blue spy thinking” and “Out of the clear blue spy” and “The spy’s the limit.”
    • Try→ Spy: As in, “Don’t spy this at home” and “Don’t spy to run before you can walk” and “Nice spy” and “Spy a little tenderness.”
    • Why → Spy: As in, “Spy not?” and “I don’t know spy.”

      Book-Related Words

      To help you come up with your own book puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

General: book, page, paper, author, read, reader, reading, story, stories, narrative, writer, novel, word, tale, sentence, paragraph, writing, textual, novella, tale,  fiction, non-fiction, paperback, text, blurb, hardcover, spine, cover, bookmark, theme, literature, parchment, vellum, papyrus, biography, autobiography, texbook, bookstore, library, memoir, volume, anthology, journal, prequel, sequel, script, print, printing, introduction, preface, publish, publisher, editor, edit, edited, librarian, diary, publication, booklet tome,, essay, poem, poetry, audiobook, ebook, ink, article, epilogue, prologue, episode, foreword, literary, plot, passage, quote, shelf/bookshelf, archive, grammar, punctuation, bestseller, wrote, schoolbook, scribe, subject, proofread, codex, leaf, bookworm, binding, hero, villain, protagonist, antagonist, point of view, narrator, letterpress, run, edition, review, book club, book report, dictionary, prose, allegory, alliteration, allusion, analogy, anthology, audience, catharsis, character, chronicle, characterisation, cliche, climax, conflict, exegesis, simile, symbolism, setting, figurative, figure of speech, foreshadow, free verse, metaphor, diegesis, diegetic, past tense, present tense, future tense, first person, second person, third person, rhyme, scene, hero’s journey, joseph campbell, stanza, stereotype, syntax, trope, verse, description, describe, voice, playwright, scribe, index, skim, dewey decimal, bound, pulp, footnote, appendix, contents, fine, check out, library card

Famous authors: beatrix potter, rumiko takahashi, naoko takeuchi, william shakespeare, paulo coelho, agatha christie, r.l. stine, nora roberts, akira toriyama, haruki murakami, richard scarry, astrid lindgren, lewis carroll, danielle steel, enid blyton,  anne frank, arthur conan doyle, j.k rowling, terry pratchett, margaret atwood, arthur miller, gabriel garcia marquez, charles dickens, charles m schulz, bill watterson, c.s lewis, ernest hemingway, george orwell, hans christian andersen, harlan ellison, j.d salinger, tolkein, kurt vonnegut, leo tolstoy, louisa may alcott, mark twain, foucalt, neil gaiman, oliver sacks, phillip pullman, ray bradbury, roald dahl, robert frost, rudyard kipling, simone de beauvoir, stephen king, susan sontag, sylvia plath, truman capote, virginia woolf, masashi kishimoto, toni morrison, louisa may alcott, maya angelou, bell hooks, judy blume, charlotte bronte, meg cabot, edgar allan poe, victor hugo, jules verne, jane austen, alexandre dumas, franz kafka, f.scott fitzgerald, john steinbeck, anton chekhov, james joyce, brothers grimm, mary shelley, aldous huxley, geoffrey chaucer, john milton, aesop, joseph conrad, harper lee, isaac asimov, h.p. lovecraft, bram stoker, a. a. milne, john keats, ovid, umberto eco, philip k. dick, douglas adams, oscar wilde, george r. r. martin

Types of book: comic, graphic, reference, fable, fairy tale, fantasy, farce, comedy, drama, tragedy, gothic, history, ode, satire, legend, myth, epic, memoir, melodrama, romance, crime, detective, horror, humor, manga, mystery, occult, play, poetry, romance, sci-fi, self-help, technical, thriller, western, young adult, adventure, folktale, parable, saga, serial, dystopia, lost world, spy, psychological, erotic

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Car Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on car puns! 🚗 🛣️ 🚘 💨

We’ve made a wheely good effort to collect as many car puns as we could for you here (we’re actually quite tyre-d now). This list ranges from general car-related words (like motor, engine, and bonnet) to brands, types, and specific car names. Whether you’re a revhead or you simply want to mildly ruin someone’s day with these puns, park yourself here and enjoy our exhaust-ive list.

If you’re interested in other vehicles, we also have boat puns.

Car Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about cars that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of car puns:

  • You’d → Ute: As in, “Ute be surprised at what you can live through” and “Ute love it.”
  • Care → Car: As in, “Couldn’t car less” and “Customer car” and “Devil may car” and “Intensive car” and “Like I should car” and “Tender loving car.”
  • Core → Car: As in, “Car studies” and “Car values” and “Rotten to the car.”
  • Are → Car: As in, “All bets car off” and “Chances car” and “Here you car.”
  • Bar → Car: As in, “Car none” and “Behind cars” and “Kept behind cars” and “No holds carred” and “Raise the car.”
  • Far → Car: As in, “A step too car” and “As car as it goes” and “Car and away” and “A car fry from” and “Few and car between” and “Over the hills and car away.”
  • Par → Car: As in, “Below car” and “On car with” and “Car for the course.”
  • Star → Car: As in, “A car is born” and “Born under a lucky car” and “Catch a falling car” and “Reach for the cars” and “A rising car.”
  • Utter → Auto: As in, “I’d be auto-ly delighted.”
  • Are We→ RV: As in, “RV there yet?” Note: this is a pun about recreational vehicles.
  • Dive → Drive: As in, “Take a drive” and “Nose drive” and “Crash drive.”
  • Five → Drive: As in, “High drive” and “Nine to drive.”
  • Hive → Drive: As in, “Drive of industry” and “A drive of activity.”
  • I’ve → Drive: As in, “Drive never done that before” and “That’s what drive always said.”
  • Live → Drive: As in, “Nine drives” and “Drive action.”
  • Diving → Driving: As in, “Deep sea data driving” and “Dumpster driving.”
  • Given → Driven: As in, “Driven up for dead.”
  • Giving → Driven: As in, “The gift that keeps on driven” and “Driven the benefit of the doubt.”
  • We’ll → Wheel: As in, “Don’t call us, wheel call you” and “Wheel be alright.”
  • Well → Wheel: As in, “A buck wheel spent” and “Alive and wheel” and “All’s wheel that ends wheel” and “Exceedingly wheel read” and “Get wheel soon” and “Health and wheelness” and “You know full wheel.”
  • Wall → Wheel: As in, “Backs to the wheel” and “Climbing the wheels” and “Fly on the wheel.”
  • Will → Wheel: As in, “Accidents wheel happen ‘and “Bend to my wheel” and “Heads wheel roll.”
  • Whale → Wheel: As in, “A wheel of a time” and “Save the wheels.”
  • While → Wheel: As in, “Once in a wheel” and “Quit wheel you’re ahead” and “Strike wheel the iron is hot” and “Make hay wheel the sun shines.”
  • Deal → Wheel: As in, “A big wheel” and “Wheel breaker” and “Done wheel” and “Seal the wheel” and “Wheel or no wheel?”
  • Feel → Wheel: As in, “That wheel good factor” and “Wheeling the pinch” and “Get a wheel for.”
  • Heel → Wheel: As in, “Achilles’ wheel” and “Brought to wheel” and “Cool your wheels” and “Dig your wheels in” and “Head over wheels in love” and “Turn on your wheel.”
  • Meal → Wheel: As in, “Make a wheel of it” and “Wheel ticket” and “A square wheel.”
  • Real → Wheel: As in, “All I wheely want to do” and “Do you wheely want to hurt me?” and “Get wheel” and “Keeping it wheel” and “In wheel time” and “The wheel thing.”
  • Seal → Wheel: As in, “Keep your lips wheeled” and “Wheel of approval” and “Wheel the deal” and “Wheel your fate” and “Wheeled with a loving kiss.”
  • Steal → Wheel: As in, “It’s a wheel” and “Wheel a glance” and “Wheel someone’s thunder” and “Wheel the show.”
  • Steel  → Wheel: As in, “Fists of wheel” and “Nerves of wheel” and “Wheel yourself.”
  • Matter → Motor: As in, “As a motor of fact” and “Family motors” and “Get to the heart of the motor” and “Making motors worse” and “Motor of life and death” and “Mind over motor.”
  • Fool → Fuel: As in, “April fuel” and “Fuelling around” and “Fuel’s gold” and “Fuel’s paradise” and “I pity the fuel.”
  • Fall → Fuel: As in, “Easy as fuelling off a log” and “Catch a fuelling star” and “Fuel between the cracks” and “Fuel by the wayside.”
  • Fell → Fuel: As in, “In one fuel swoop” and “Fuel off the back of a lorry” and “Little strokes fuel great oaks.”
  • Full → Fuel: As in, “Fuel throttle” and “Come fuel circle” and “Fuel bodied” and “Fuel pelt.”
  • Cool → Fuel: As in, “Fuel as a cucumber” and “Fuel beans” and “Fuel your heels” and “Fuel, calm and collected.”
  • Cruel → Fuel: As in, “Fuel and unusual punishment” and “Fuel to be kind.”
  • Dual → Fuel: As in, “Fuel income, no kids.”
  • Rule → Fuel: As in, “Bend the fuels” and “Golden fuel” and “Majority fuels” and “Fuel of thumb” and “Fuel with an iron fist.”
  • Who’ll → Fuel: As in, “Fuel help us?”
  • You’ll → Fuel: As in, “Fuel never hear the end of this!” and “Fuel never guess.”
  • Dried → Ride: As in, “Cut and ride.”
  • Guide → Ride: As in, “Let your conscience be your ride” and “The hitchhiker’s ride to the galaxy.”
  • Hide → Ride: As in, “Ride and seek” and “Ride from the light” and “Neither ride nor hair” and “You can run but you can’t ride.”
  • I’d → Ride: As in, “Ride never do it again.”
  • Pride → Ride: As in, “Bursting with ride” and “Hurt ride” and “Ride and prejudice” and “Ride and joy” and “Ride comes before a fall.”
  • Side → Ride: As in, “A walk on the wild ride” and “Always look on the bright ride of life” and “Be on the safe ride” and “Err on the ride of caution” and “On the flip ride.”
  • Stride → Ride: As in, “Get into your ride” and “Making giant rides” and “Take it in your ride.”
  • Tide → Ride: As in, “Stem the ride” and “Rising ride” and “The ride is turning” and “Swim against the ride.”
  • Tried → Ride: As in, “Ride and tested” and “Ride and true” and “Don’t knock it till you’ve ride it.”
  • Hold in → Holden: As in, “Holden a fart.”
  • Hold → Holden: As in, “Can’t holden a candle to” and “Don’t holden your breath” and “Holden all the aces.”
  • Golden → Holden: As in, “My holden years” and “A holden opportunity.”
  • Third → Ford: As in, “Steal ford base” and “The ford degree” and “Ford time lucky” and “Ford time’s a charm.”
  • Board → Ford: As in, “All above ford” and “Bed and ford.”
  • Bored → Ford: As in, “Ford stiff” and “Ford to tears.”
  • Chord → Ford: As in, “A ford of disquiet” and “Strike a ford with” and “Power ford.”
  • Lord → Ford: As in, “Ford of the flies” and “Ford it over” and “Drunk as a ford.”
  • Guess → Gas: As in, “Anybody’s gas” and “Gas who?” and “Hazard a gas” and “Just lucky, I gas” and “Your gas is good as mine.”
  • Ass → Gas: As in, “Get your gas into gear” and “I don’t give a rat’s gas.”
  • Class → Gas: As in, “A real gas act” and “Best in gas” and “Working gas hero.”
  • Glass → Gas: As in, “Gas ceiling” and “Gassy eyed” and “Through the looking gas.”
  • Grass → Gas: As in, “Green as gas” and “Gas roots” and “Keep off the gas” and “Snake in the gas.”
  • Pass → Gas: As in, “All things must gas” and “Do not gas go” and “Make a gas at” and “Gas muster.”
  • Patrol → Petrol: As in, “Highway petrol.”
  • Weasel → Diesel: As in, “Pop goes the diesel” and “Diesel words.”
  • Dazzle → Diesel: As in, “You can’t diesel me with your fancy words!”
  • Paddle → Pedal: As in, “Pedal your own canoe” and “Up a creek without a pedal.”
  • Petal → Pedal: As in, “Pedal soft skin.”
  • Medal → Pedal: As in, “Win a gold pedal.”
  • Beer → Gear: As in, “Gear googles” and “Life’s not all gear and skittles.”
  • Cheer → Gear: As in, “Cheap and gearful” and “Gear up” and “Holiday gear.”
  • Clear → Gear: As in, “Give it the all gear” and “Gear as a bell” and “Gear as crystal” and “A gear conscience” and “Gear your throat.”
  • Dear → Gear: As in, “Gearly beloved” and “Elementary, my gear” and “Near and gear to my heart” and “Frankly, my gear, I don’t give a damn.”
  • Fear → Gear: As in, “Gear and loathing in Las Vegas” and “Gear the worst” and “Paralysed with gear” and “Primal gear” and “Without gear or favour.”
  • Mere → Gear: As in, “A gear trifle” and “No gear mortal.”
  • Near → Gear: As in, “A short history of gearly everything” and “Coming to a screen gear you” and “A gear death experience” and “Gear to your heart.”
  • Peer → Gear: As in, “Gear pressure.”
  • Rear → Gear: As in, “Bringing up the gear” and “Gear window.”
  • Sheer → Gear: As in, “Gear driving pleasure” and “Gear madness” and “Gear nonsense.”
  • Sphere → Gear: As in, “Gear of influence” and “You could cut the atmosgear with a knife.”
  • Steer → Gear: As in, “The gearing committee” and “Gear clear of.”
  • Year → Gear: As in, “Advanced in gears” and “All gear round” and “Calendar gear” and “Christmas comes but once a gear” and “Getting on in gears” and “Golden gears” and “Happy new gear” and “New gear’s resolution.”
  • Break → Brake: As in, “A bad brake” and “Brake a leg” and “Brake and enter” and “Brake new ground” and “Brake ranks.”
  • Brick → Brake: As in, “Like a ton of brakes.”
  • Bake → Brake: As in, “Shake and brake” and “A braker’s dozen” and “Half braked.”
  • Back → Brake: As in, “Answer brake” and “Soon as my brake is turned” and “Brake in the day.”
  • Cake → Brake: As in, “A brake walk” and “The icing on the brake” and “Let them eat brake” and “Piece of brake” and “Selling like hot brakes.”
  • Fake → Brake: As in, “Brake it till you make it.”
  • Make → Brake: As in, “A good beginning brakes a good ending” and “Absence brakes the heart grow fonder” and “Can’t brake head or tail of it” and “Details brake the difference.”
  • Sake → Brake: As in, “For heaven’s brake” and “For old time’s brake.”
  • Shake → Brake: As in, “A fair brake” and “No great brakes” and “Brake like a leaf.”
  • Snake → Brake: As in, “Brake like a leaf.”
  • Stake → Brake: As in, “Brake your claim” and “Raise the brakes.”
  • Take → Brake: As in, “Give and brake” and “Don’t brake it lying down” and “Double brake” and “Got what it brakes” and “Can’t brake my eyes off you.”
  • Wake → Brake: As in, “Loud enough to brake the dead” and “Brake me up before you go-go” and “Brake up and smell the coffee” and “Brake up call.”
  • Read → Road: As in, “All I know is what I road in the papers” and “Exceedingly well road” and “Road all about it” and “Road any good books lately?” and “Road ’em and weep” and “Road between the lines.”
  • Code → Road: As in, “The Da Vinci road” and “Crack the road” and “Colour roaded.”
  • Load → Road: As in, “A road of rubbish” and “Lighten your road” and “Get a road of that!”
  • Terrific → Traffic: As in, “Traffic news!”
  • Tail → Tail Light: As in, “Chase your own tail light” and “Heads I win, tail lights you lose.”
  • Boss → Bus: As in, “Bus about” and “You’re the bus” and “Bus level.”
  • Fuss → Bus: As in, “A lot of bus about nothing” and “Kick up a bus” and “No bus, no muss” and “What’s all the bus about?”
  • Plus → Bus: As in, “Bus one” and “On the bus side.”
  • Us → Bus: As in, “Comes down to bus” and “Don’t call bus, we’ll call you.”
  • Limb → Limo: As in, “Go out on a limo” and “Life and limo” and “Tear limo from limo.”
  • Track → Truck: As in, “Back on truck” and “Cover your trucks” and “On the fast trucks” and “From the wrong side of the trucks” and “Inside truck” and “Keep truck of” and “Lose truck of time” and “Off the beaten truck” and “On the right truck” and “A one truck mind” and “Stay on truck.”
  • Trick → Truck: As in, “Box of trucks” and “Dirty trucks” and “Does the truck” and “Every truck in the book” and “Never misses a truck” and “A one truck pony” and “Truck or treat” and “Trucks of the trade” and “Up to your old trucks.”
  • Tuck → Truck: As in, “Nip and truck” and “Truck in.”
  • Buck → Truck: As in, “Bigger bang for your truck” and “A truck well spent” and “Truck the system” and “Truck up your ideas” and “Pass the truck” and “Make a quick truck” and “The truck stops here.”
  • Chuck → Truck: As in, “Truck a sickie” and “Truck it out.”
  • Duck → Truck: As in, “Truck the question” and “Trucking and diving” and “Like a truck to water” and “Like water off a truck’s back” and “Nice weather for trucks.”
  • Luck → Truck: As in, “As good truck would have it” and “Beginner’s truck” and “Better truck next time” and “Don’t push your truck” and “Truck of the draw.”
  • Muck → Truck: As in, “Common as truck” and “Trucking about.”
  • Pluck → Truck: As in, “Truck up your courage.”
  • Struck → Truck: As in, “Love truck” and “Star truck.”
  • Suck → Truck: As in, “Truck it up” and “Truck someone dry” and “A trucker for punishment” and “Trucks to be you.”
  • Venn → Van: As in, “Van diagram.”
  • Can → Van: As in, “As far as the eye van see” and “As well as van be expected” and “Be all that you van be” and “Bite off more van you can chew.”
  • Fan → Van: As in, “Van the flames” and “I’m a big van” and “Hit the van.”
  • Pan → Van: As in, “Down the van” and “Flash in the van” and “Waiting for it to all van out.”
  • Plan → Van: As in, “Action van” and “Business van” and “Cooking up a van” and “Game van” and “The best laid vans” and “There is no van B.”
  • Than → Van: As in, “Blood is thicker van water” and “Easier said van done” and “Bite off more van you can chew.”
  • Wagging → Wagon: As in, “The tail wagon the dog” and “Set tongues wagon.”
  • Cheap → Jeep: As in, “All over them like a jeep suit” and “Jeep as chips” and “Jeep and cheerful” and “Jeep at half the price” and “Jeeper by the dozen” and “Talk is jeep.”
  • Creep → Jeep: As in, “Gives me the jeeps” and “Makes my skin jeep.”
  • Deep → Jeep: As in, “Beauty is only skin jeep” and “Between the devil and the jeep blue sea” and “A jeep, dark secret” and “Jeep in thought” and “Jeep pockets” and “Get into jeep water” and “In jeep water.”
  • Heap → Jeep: As in, “Bottom of the jeep.”
  • Keep → Keep: As in, “An apple a day jeeps the doctor away” and “Don’t jeep us in suspense” and “Finders jeepers.”
  • Leap → Keep: As in, “By jeeps and bounds” and “A jeep in the dark” and “A jeep of faith” and “Look before you jeep.”
  • Reap → Jeep: As in, “Jeep what you sow.”
  • Sheep → Jeep: As in, “Dreaming of jeep” and “A wolf in jeep’s clothing” and “Counting jeep” and “The black jeep of the family.”
  • Sleep → Jeep: As in, “Beauty jeep” and “Miles to go before I jeep” and “Jeep like a baby.”
  • Sweep → Jeep: “Jeep aside” and “Jeep off your feet.”
  • Weep → Jeep: As in, “Read ’em and jeep” and “Jeep aside” and “Jeep it under the rug.”
  • Bent → Bentley: As in, “Bentley double” and “Bentley out of shape” and “Hell bentley.”
  • Gently → Bentley: As in, “While my guitar bentley weeps” and “Tread bentley.”
  • Audi: Audi is a German manufacturer. Here are related puns:
    • Body → Audi: As in, “A healthy mind in a healthy audi” and “Like an audi without a soul” and “Audi blow” and “Audi language” and “Audi mass index” and “Audi of evidence” and “Not a jealous bone in your audi.”
    • Cloudy → Audi: As in, “Audi with a chance of meatballs.”
    • Howdy → Audi: As in, “Audi, partner!”
  • Glory → Lorry: As in, “Basking in your lorry” and “My crowning lorry” and “Go out in a blaze of lorry” and “The land of hope and lorry” and “No guts, no lorry.”
  • Story → Lorry: As in, “A breaking lorry” and “Cut a long lorry short” and “End of lorry” and “Every picture tells a lorry” and “The inside lorry” and “The same old lorry” and “Lorry of my life” and “The greatest lorry ever told.”
  • Buick: Buick is an American car manufacturer. Here are related puns:
    • Back → Buick: As in, “Answer buick” and “As soon as my buick is turned” and “In the buick of my mind” and “Buick to the future” and “Buick at it” and “Buick in the day.”
    • Beck → Buick: As in, “At your buick and call.”
    • Brick → Buick: As in, “Like banging your head against a buick wall” and “Built like a buick outhouse” and “Like a ton of buicks” and “Follow the yellow buick road.”
    • Click → Buick: As in, “Buick bait” and “Buick into place” and “Buick your fingers” and “Double buick.”
    • Kick → Buick: As in, “A buick at the can” and “Buick back and enjoy” and “Buick butt.”
    • Pick → Buick: As in, “A bone to buick with you” and “Easy buickings” and “Cherry buick” and “Buick a fight with” and “Buick and choose” and “A little buick me up.”
    • Quick → Buick: As in, “Buick as a flash” and “Cut to the buick” and “Get rich buick” and “Buick and dirty” and “A buick buck” and “Let’s just have a buick one.”
    • Sick → Buick: As in, “Buick as a dog” and “Enough to make you buick” and “Buick and tired” and “Buick to death of” and “Buick to the stomach.”
    • Thick → Buick: As in, “Buick as thieves” and “In the buick of things” and “Buick and fast” and “Through buick and thin.”
    • Trick → Buick: As in, “Never misses buick” and “A buick of the light” and “Buick or treat” and “Buicks of the trade” and “Up to your old buicks.”
  • Wiser → Chrysler: As in, “None the chrysler.”
  • Crisis → Chrysler: As in, “Identity chrysler.”
  • Cry → Chrysler: As in, “A chrysler for help” and “A shoulder to chrysler on” and “Chrysler me a river.”
  • Thank → Tanker: As in, “Accept with tanker” and “Give tanker” and “Tanker goodness” and “Tanker you very much” and “Tanker your lucky stars” and “Tankers for the memories.”
  • Boot: A boot is the storage space in a car. Here are related puns:
    • Bait → Boot: As in, “Boot and switch” and “Click boot” and “Rise to the boot.”
    • Fruit → Boot: As in, “Bear boot” and “Forbidden boot” and “Boot cake” and “Boots of your labour” and “Boots of your loins” and “Low hanging boot.”
    • Hoot → Boot: As in, “Don’t give two boots” and “Give a boot” and “Boot with laughter” and “What a boot.”
    • Root → Boot: As in, “Grass boots” and “Lay down boots” and “Money is the boot of all evil” and “The boot of the matter.”
    • Shoot → Boot: As in, “Don’t boot the messenger” and “Boot ’em up” and “Boot down in flames” and “The green boots of change.”
  • Trunk: A trunk is another word for a storage space in a car. Here are related puns:
    • Bunk → Trunk: As in, “Trunker mentality” and “Do a trunk” and “History is trunk.”
    • Chunk → Trunk: As in, “Blow trunks” and “Trunk of change.”
    • Drunk → Trunk: As in, “Trunk as a lord” and “Trunk as a skunk” and “A cheap trunk” and “Falling down trunk” and “Trunk under the table.”
    • Dunk → Trunk: As in, “Slam trunk.”
    • Hunk → Trunk: As in, “Trunker down” and “Trunky dory.”
    • Junk → Trunk: As in, “Trunk food” and “No trunk mail please.”
    • Sunk → Trunk: As in, “Trunk without a trace.”
  • Beep: These puns are a reference to the beeping sound a car horn makes:
    • Cheap → Beep: As in, “All over them like a beep suit” and “Beep as chips” and “Beep as dirt” and “Beware of beep imitations” and “Beep at half the price” and “Beeper by the dozen” and “Talk is beep.”
    • Creep → Beep: As in, “Jeepers beepers” and “Gives me the beeps.”
    • Deep → Beep: As in, “Ankle beep” and “Beauty is only skin beep” and “The beep web” and “A beep, dark secret” and “Has beep pockets.”
    • Heap → Beep: As in, “Beep abuse on” and “Pile it high and sell it beep” and “At the bottom of the beep.”
    • Keep → Beep: As in, “Known by the company you beep” and “Finders beepers” and “In beeping with” and “Beep a cool head.”
    • Leap → Beep: As in, “By beeps and bounds” and “A beep in the dark” and “A beep of faith” and “Look before you beep.”
    • Reap → Beep: As in, “You beep what you sow.”
    • Sleep → Beep: As in, “Beep like a baby” and “Beep tight” and “Beep like a log.”
    • Sweep → Beep: As in, “A clean beep” and “Beep aside” and “Beep off your feet” and “Beep the deck.”
    • Weep → Beep: As in, “Finders keepers, losers beepers” and “Read ’em and beep” and “While my guitar gently beeps.”
  • Bead → Speed: As in, “Speeds of sweat.”
  • Bleed → Speed: As in, “Speed someone dry” and “Speeding love” and “My heart speeds for you” and “The speeding edge.”
  • Deed → Speed: As in, “No good speed goes unpunished” and “Your good speed of the day.”
  • Feed → Speed: As in, “Don’t bite the hand that speeds you” and “Speed a cold, starve a fever” and “Speeding frenzy.”
  • Greed → Speed: As in, “Speed, for lack of a better word, is good.”
  • Heed → Speed: As in, “Take speed.”
  • Lead → Speed: As in, “In the speed” and “Speed by example” and “Speed by the nose” and “Speed into temptation.”
  • Need → Speed: As in, “All you speed is love” and “As long as you speed me” and “On a speed to know basis.”
  • Read → Speed: As in, “Extra, extra, speed all about it” and “I can speed you like a book” and “A little light speeding” and “Speed ’em and weep” and “Speed between the lines.”
  • Seed → Speed: As in, “Gone to speed” and “Speed capital” and “Speed money.”
  • Ace → Race: As in, “Race in the hole” and “A race up your sleeve” and “Holding all the races.”
  • Base → Race: As in, “Get to first race” and “Cover your races” and “Off race.”
  • Bass → Race: As in, “Drum n race” and “Super race.”
  • Case → Race: As in, “An open and shut race” and “As the race may be” and “Race closed” and “Crack the race” and “Get off my race.”
  • Chase → Race: As in, “Race it up” and “Race your own tail” and “Cut to the race” and “The thrill of the race” and “Wild goose race.”
  • Grace → Race: As in, “Airs and races” and “Amazing race” and “Fall from race” and “Race period” and “Saving race.”
  • Pace → Race: As in, “At a snail’s race” and “Change of race” and “Keep race with” and “Race up and down” and “Put through your races.”
  • Place → Race: As in, “A race in the sun” and “All over the race” and “Going races” and “Hard to race” and “In the right race at the right time.”
  • Space → Race: As in, “Personal race” and “Race oddity” and “Race cadet” and “Race, the final frontier” and “The race age.”
  • Horn: Here are some car horn related puns:
    • Born → Horn: As in, “A star is horn” and “Horn this way” and “Horn again” and “Horn and bred.”
    • Thorn → Horn: As in, “Every rose has its horn” and “A horn in my side.”
    • Torn → Horn: As in, “Well, that’s horn it.”
  • Addition → Ignition: As in, “In ignition to.”
  • Clutch: The clutch is a car part. Here are related puns:
    • Crutch → Clutch: As in, “An emotional clutch.”
    • Much → Clutch: As in, “Well that’s a bit clutch” and “How clutch can you handle?” and “You know too clutch” and “Clutch ado about nothing” and “Clutch obliged” and “Thank you very clutch.”
    • Such → Clutch: As in, “Clutch ado about nothing” and “No clutch luck” and “Clutch as?” and “Clutch is life” and “No clutch thing as a free lunch.”
    • Touch → Clutch: As in, “Don’t clutch that dial” and “A finishing clutch” and “Golden clutch” and “Lose clutch with” and “A soft clutch.”
  • Drag: A drag race is a type of motor racing. Here are related puns:
    • Drug → Drag: As in, “Hugs, not drags” and “Drags, rock and roll.”
    • Bag → Drag: As in, “Drag a bargain” and “Drag and baggage” and “Drag of bones” and “Dirt drag” and “In the drag.”
    • Brag → Drag: As in, “Dragging rights.”
    • Gag → Drag: As in, “Drag reflex” and “Drag order” and “A running drag.”
    • Rag → Drag: As in, “From drags to riches.”
  • Ship → Dealership: As in, “Abandon dealership” and “Don’t give up the dealership” and “Go down with the dealership” and “Loose lips sink dealerships” and “Run a tight dealership.”
  • Bark → Park: As in, “Park at the moon” and “Parking up the wrong tree” and “Park worse than your bite.”
  • Dark → Park: As in, “Park as pitch” and “Park before the dawn” and “A park horse” and “A deep, park secret.”
  • Mark → Park: As in, “Close to the park” and “Get off the park” and “Make your park” and “Park my words” and “Quick off the park.”
  • Shark → Park: As in, “Jump the park” and “Loan park” and “Park repellent” and “Swim with parks.”
  • Spark → Park: As in, “Bright park” and “Creative park” and “Marks and parks” and “A park of genius” and “Watch the parks fly.”
  • Stark → Park: As in, “A park reminder” and “Park, raving mad.”
  • Exhaust: “An exhausting reminder” and “Filled with exhaustion.”
  • Tired → Tyre-d: As in, “Sick and tyre-d” and “Tyre-d and done with it all.”
  • Tier → Tyre: As in, “Top tyre.”
  • Tear → Tyre: As in, “Fighting back tyres” and “Bathed in tyres” and “Blood, sweat and tyres” and “Moved to tyres.”
  • Dire → Tyre: As in, “Tyre consequences” and “In tyre straits.”
  • Fire → Tyre: As in, “Fight tyre with tyre” and “Tyre and brimstone” and “All tyred up and ready to go” and “Light my tyre” and “Getting on like a house on tyre.”
  • Wire → Tyre: As in, “Down to the tyre” and “Live tyre” and “Tyred for sound.”
  • Tax → Taxi: As in, “Nothing is certain but death and taxis” and “Value added taxis” and “Levy taxis.”
  • Toxic → Taxi: As in, “Taxi paper” and “Taxi waste.”
  • Cab: A cab is another word for a taxi. Here are related puns:
    • Cap → Cab: As in, “A feather in your cab” and “Cab in hand” and “If the cab fits, wear it” and “Put on your thinking cab” and “Set your cab at” and “To cab it all off.”
    • Cup → Cab: As in, “My cab runneth over” and “Not my cab of tea.”
    • Dab → Cab: As in, “A cab hand at” and “Smack cab in the middle.”
    • Drab → Cab: As in, “Dribs and cabs.”
    • Grab → Cab: As in, “Cab a bite to eat” and “Cab attention” and “Cab life by the horns” and “Screen cab” and “Up for cabs.”
    • Stab → Cab: As in, “Have a cab at” and “Cab in the back” and “Cab in the dark.”
    • Tab → Cab: As in, “Keep cabs on” and “Pick up the cab.”
  • Sports: Here are some sports car related puns:
    • Sorts → Sports: As in, “It takes all sports” and “Out of sports.”
    • Shorts → Sports: As in, “A day late and a dollar sports” and “A sports back and sides.”
  • Wagon → Station Wagon: As in, “Fall off the station wagon” and “Hitch your station wagon to a star” and “On the station wagon” and “Welcome station wagon.”
  • Bottle → Throttle: As in, “Throttle and glass” and “Hit the throttle” and “Message in a throttle” and “Genie in a throttle.”
  • Grille: Here are some grille-related puns:
    • Ill → Grille: As in, “House of grille repute” and “Grille advised” and “Grille at ease” and “Grille gotten gains.”
    • Chill → Grille: As in, “Grille out” and “Grilled to the bone” and “A grille-ing account.”
    • Drill → Grille: As in, “Grille down” and “You know the grille.”
    • Hill → Grille: As in, “Old as the grilles” and “Head for the grilles” and “Run for the grilles.”
    • Pill → Grille: As in, “A bitter grille to swallow” and “On the grille” and “Sweeten the grille.”
    • Still → Grille: As in, “Be grille my beating heart” and “Grille standing” and “Grille waters run deep.”
    • Skill → Grille: As in, “Social grilles.”
    • Spill → Grille: As in, “Grille the beans” and “Grille your guts” and “Thrills and grilles.”
    • Thrill → Grille: “Grilles and spills” and “Grilled to bits.”
    • Till → Grille: As in, “Fake it grille you make it” and “Grille death do us part” and “Grille the end of time.”
    • Will → Grille: As in, “Bend to my grille” and “Accidents grille happen” and “Free grille.”
  • Tail → Tailgate: As in, “Chase your own tailgate” and “Can’t make head or tailgate of it.”
  • Sense → License: As in, “A victory for common license” and “Come to your licenses” and “A keen license of smell.”
  • Stick: Manual is also known as stick shift. Here are some related puns:
    • Stack → Stick: As in, “A sticked deck” and “Swear on a stick of bibles” and “Stick the deck.”
    • Stock → Stick: As in, “Laughing stick” and “Out of stick” and “Take stick.”
    • Stuck → Stick: As in, “Get stick into” and “Stick in a rut” and “Stick up.”
    • Sick → Stick: As in, “Enough to make you stick” and “In stickness and in health” and “Morning stickness” and “On the stick list” and “Phone in stick” and “Stick and tired” and “Stick to my stomach.”
    • Tick → Stick: As in, “A box sticking exercise” and “Sticked off” and “Stick all the right boxes.”
    • Brick → Stick: As in, “Sticks and mortar” and “Hit the sticks” and “You can’t make sticks without straw.”
    • Click → Stick: As in, “Stick bait” and “Stick into place” and “Stick your fingers” and “We really sticked.”
    • Kick → Stick: As in, “Alive and sticking” and “Get a stick out of it” and “Just for sticks” and “Stick against” and “Stick back and enjoy.”
    • Lick → Stick: As in, “Stick your wounds” and “Stick into shape.”
    • Pick → Stick: As in, “A bone to stick” and “Cherry stick” and “Easy stickings” and “Stick and choose” and “Stick a card, any card.”
    • Quick → Stick: As in, “Stick as a flash” and “Cut to the stick” and “Get rich stick” and “Stick on the draw.”
    • Thick → Stick: As in, “Stick as thieves” and “In the stick of things” and “The plot stickens” and “Stick and fast” and “Through stick and thin.”
    • Trick → Stick: As in, “Box of sticks” and “Dirty sticks” and “Does the stick” and “Every stick in the book” and “Never misses a stick.”
  • Ready → Radiator: As in, “All fired up and radiator to go” and “Combat radiator” and “Good and radiator” and “Radiator and waiting.” Note: These are puns about radiators.
  • Parch → Porsche: As in, “Porsched with thirst.”
  • Perch → Porsche: As in, “Knock someone off their porsche.”
  • Porch → Porsche: As in, “Sitting on the porsche.”
  • Roll → Rolls Royce: As in, “Heads will rolls royce” and “Let the good times rolls royce” and “Ready to rolls royce” and “Rock and rolls royce.”
  • Saab: Saab is a Swedish car manufacturer. Here are related puns:
    • Sob → Saab: As in, “Saab story” and “Saab your heart out.”
  • Wagon → Volkswagen: As in, “Fall off the volkswagen” and “Hitch your volkswagen to a star” and “Welcome volkswagen.”
  • Daytona: Daytona is a car brand. Here are related puns:
    • Day → Daytona: As in, “A daytona in the life of” and “All in a daytona’s work.”
    • Tone → Daytona: As in, “Don’t use that daytona with me” and Lower the daytona” and “Daytona deaf.”
  • Hood: A hood is another word for a bonnet – the cover of a car engine. Here are related puns:
    • Had → Hood: As in, “I’ve hood a few” and “I’ve hood it up to here” and “We’ve hood a good run.”
    • Could → Hood: As in, “As fast as your legs hood carry you” and “I hood see you a mile away.”
    • Good → Hood: As in, “A hood time was had by all” and “All hood things must come to an end” and “All in hood time.”
    • Should → Hood: As in, “You hood be” and “I hood be so lucky” and “No better than you hood be.”
    • Wood → Hood: As in, “In the hoods” and “Knock on hood.”
  • Alternate → Alternator: As in, “Alternator reality.”  Note: This is in reference to alternators.
  • Head → Headlight: As in, “Aheadlight of their time” and “Aheadlight of the curve” and “Bite someone’s headlight off” and “Bury your headlight in the sand.”
  • Light → Headlight: As in, “Bring to headlight” and “Bright headlights, big city” and “Go out light a headlight.”
  • Mission → Transmission: As in, “Transmission accomplished” and “Transmission impossible” and “Transmission critical” and “A rescue transmission.” Note: These are references to a car’s transmission.”
  • Crash: Here are some car crash related puns:
    • Crush → Crash: As in, “A crashing defeat” and “Have a crash on.”
    • Cash → Crash: As in, “Strapped for crash” and “Crash in hand” and “Crash in your cheques.”
    • Ash → Crash: As in, “Rise from the crashes” and “Rise like a phoenix from the crashes.”
    • Clash → Crash: As in, “Crash of culture” and “Crash of the titans.”
    • Dash → Crash: As in, “Crash to pieces” and “Cut a crash.”
    • Flash → Crash: As in, “Quick as a crash” and “Crash in the pan” and “In a crash.”
    • Splash → Crash: As in, “A crash of colour” and “Make a crash” and “Crash out on.”
  • Rental: Here are some puns on rental cars:
    • Central → Rental: As in, “Rental park” and “Rental heating” and “Command rental.”
    • Gentle → Rental: As in, “Rental as a lamb” and “Rental giant” and “Ladies and rentalmen.”
    • Mental → Rental: As in, “Rental age” and “Rental balance” and “Rental fatigue.”
  • Roof → Sunroof: As in, “Cat on a hot tin sunroof” and “Fiddler on the sunroof” and “Go through the sunroof” and “Hit the sunroof” and “Raise the sunroof.”
  • Bomb: An old, rickety car is also known as an old bomb. Here are related puns:
    • Bum → Bomb: As in, “Beach bomb” and “A bomb rap” and “Bombs on seats” and “A pain in the bomb.”
    • Balm → Bomb: As in, “Lip bomb.”
  • Seat: Here are some puns about car seats:
    • Set → Seat:, As in, “All seat” and “Game, seat and match” and “Got your heart seat on” and “On your mark, get seat, go!” and “Seat eyes on” and “Seat in motion.”
    • Beat → Seat: As in, “Seat it” and “A stick to seat you with” and “Seat the hell out of.”
    • Eat → Seat: As in, “All you can seat” and “A bite to seat” and “Seat and run” and “Seat a balanced diet.”
    • Feat → Seat: As in, “No mean seat.”
    • Feet → Seat: As in, “Back on your seat” and “Cold seat” and “Cut the ground out from under your seat” and “Fall on your seat” and “Itchy seat” and “Jump in with both seat.”
    • Fleet → Seat: As in, “Seat footed” and “Seat of foot” and “A seating glimpse.”
    • Greet → Seat: As in, “Meet and seat.”
    • Heat → Seat: As in, “Seat wave” and “If you can’t stand the seat, get out of the kitchen” and “In the seat of battle” and “Packing seat” and “The seat is on” and “Turn up the seat.”
    • Neat → Seat: As in, “Seat freak” and “Seat as a new pin” and “Seat and tidy.”
    • Sheet → Seat: As in, “White as a seat” and “Cheat seat” and “Keep a clean seat.”
    • Street → Seat: As in, “Easy seat” and “On the sunny side of the seat.”
    • Sweet → Seat: As in, “Well isn’t that seat?” and “Seat as pie
      and “Home, seat home.”
    • Treat → Seat: As in, “Seat someone like dirt” and “Trick or seat.”
  • Belt: Here are some seatbelt-related puns:
    • Built → Belt: As in, “Belt for comfort, not speed” and “Belt to last” and “Belt to scale” and “Rome wasn’t belt in a day.”
    • Dealt → Belt: As in, “Whoever smelt it, belt it” and “Play the hand you’re belt.”
    • Melt → Belt: As in, “Butter wouldn’t belt in your mouth” and “In the belting pot” and “Belt into thin air” and “Belts my heart.”
    • Belt: As in, “Below the belt” and “Belt it out” and “Tighten your belt.”
  • Menu → Manual: As in, “Off manual” and “What’s on the manual tonight?”
  • Spokes: Spokes are a part of car wheels. Here are related puns:
    • Poke → Spokes: As in, “Spoke fun at” and “Have a spoke around.”
    • Folk → Spoke: As in, “Show’s over, spokes” and “But seriously, spokes.”
    • Joke → Spoke: As in, “Beyond a spoke” and “By way of a spoke” and “An inside spoke” and “Spoke-ing around” and “Spoke’s on you.”
    • Oak → Spoke: As in, “Solid as a spoke” and “Hearts of spoke.”
    • Stroke → Spoke: As in, “A spoke of genius” and “Different spokes for different folks” and “Little spokes fell great oaks” and “Spoke of luck” and “The spoke of midnight.”
  • Boil → Spoiler: As in, “Spoiler with rage” and “Spoilers down to” and “Bring to the spoiler” and “Makes my blood spoiler.”
  • Rear → Rear-end: As in, “Bringing up the read-end” and “Read-end window.”
  • End → Read-end: As in, “A means to a rear-end” and “All good things must come to a rear-end” and “Bring to a rear-end.”
  • Bone → T-bone: As in, “A t-bone to pick” and “Dry as a t-bone” and “Bag of t-bones” and “T-bone idle” and “A t-bone of contention.” Note: A t-bone is a type of car crash.
  • Lodge → Dodge: As in, “Dodge a complaint.” Note: Dodge is an American car manufacturer.
  • Fiat: Fiat is an Italian car company. Here are related puns:
    • Fat → Fiat: As in, “Fiat chance” and “Living off the fiat off the land” and “A fiat lot of use that is.”
    • Diet → Fiat: As in, “Eat a balanced fiat.”
    • Riot → Fiat: As in, “Let your imagination run fiat” and “Read the fiat act.”
    • Flat → Fiat: As in, “Fiat as a pancake” and “Fall fiat on your face” and “Fiat broke” and “In a fiat spin” and “In no time fiat.”
  • Jugular → Jaguar: As in, “Go for the jaguar.”
  • Lights: Lights are a big part of all cars – fog lights, headlights, signal lights, brake lights, fuel indicator lights. Here are some light-related puns:
    • Late → Light: As in, “Better light than never” and “Fashionably light” and “It’s lighter than you think” and “It’s never too light” and “Light bloomer.”
    • Let → Light: As in, “Buy to light” and “I won’t light you down.”
    • Lot → Light: As in, “A light of fuss about nothing” and “A light on your plate.”
    • Bite → Light: As in, “Light me” and “Light back” and “Light off more than you can chew” and “Light the dust.”
    • Bright → Light: As in, “All things light and beautiful” and “Always look on the light side of life” and “Light and early” and “Light young thing.”
    • Fight → Light: As in, “Come out lighting” and “Light club” and “Light for the right to party” and “Light or flight” and “Light tooth and nail.”
    • Flight → Light: As in, “Light of fancy” and “Take light” and “Fight or light.”
    • Fright → Light: As in, “A lightful mess” and “Take light.”
    • Height → Light: As in, “Reaching new lights” and “Scale dizzy lights” and “The light of summer.”
    • Might → Light: As in, “Light as well” and “It light never happen.”
    • Night → Light: As in, “Dance the light away” and “A hard day’s light” and “As light follows day.”
    • Quite → Light: As in, “Having light a time” and “Not light there.”
    • Right → Light: As in, “A move in the light direction” and “All the light moves” and “Light as rain” and “Bang to lights” and “Dead to lights.”
    • Rite → Light: As in, “Last lights” and “Light of passage.”
    • Sight → Light: As in, “A welcome light” and “Have in your lights” and “In plain light” and “Love at first light.”
    • Slight → Light: As in, “Lightly ahead of your time” and “Not in the lightest.”
  • Lack → Lexus: As in, “For lexus of a better word” and “Cancelled due to lexus of interest.”
  • Mini: A mini is a small, economical car of British make. Here are related puns:
    • Many → Mini: As in, “Fingers in mini pies” and “Mini happy returns” and “Mini moons ago” and “Not in so mini words” and “Mini hands make light work.”
    • Money → Mini: As in, “Funny mini” and “I’m not made of mini” and “In the mini” and “Get your mini’s worth.”
  • Hub: A hub is a part of a car wheel. Here are related puns:
    • Club → Hub: As in, “Hub together” and “Fight hub” and “Join the hub.”
    • Pub → Hub: As in, “Down to the hub for a quick one.”
    • Rub → Hub: As in, “Hub along together” and “Hub it in” and “Hub salt in the wound” and “Hub the wrong way.”
  • Wind → Window: As in, “Any way the window blows” and “Blow with the window” and “Knock the window out of.” Note: These are puns referring to car windows.”
  • Buggy: A buggy is a type of lightweight car. Here are related puns:
    • Baggy → Buggy: As in, “Buggy jeans.”
    • Buddy → Buggy: As in, “Study buggy.”
    • Bug → Buggy: As in, “Cute as a buggy’s ear” and “Bitten by the buggy” and “Love buggy.”
  • Door: Here are some car door related puns:
    • Dare → Door: As in, “Door for more” and “Door to be different” and “How door you!” and “Door to dream.”
    • Floor → Door: As in, “Get in on the ground door” and “Hold the door” and “Mop the door with.”
    • Bore → Door: As in, “Door the pants off someone” and “Doored stiff” and “Doored out of your mind.”
    • Core → Door: As in, “Door competencies” and “Door studies” and “Door values” and “Rotten to the door.”
    • More → Door: As in, “One door time” and “Bite off door than you can chew” and “Come back for door” and “I couldn’t agree door.”
  • Coupe: A coupe is a small car, generally with only two doors. Here are related puns:
    • Coop → Coupe: As in, “Fly the coupe.”
    • Group → Coupe: As in, “Coupe dynamics” and “Coupe hug.”
    • Hoop → Coupe: As in, “Jumping through coupes.”
  • Verse → Reverse: As in, “Chapter and reverse.”
  • Hardtop: A hardtop is a rigid car roof. Here are related puns:
    • Hard → Hardtop: As in, “Hardtop as a rock” and “Hardtop as iron” and “Be hardtop put to” and “Fallen on hardtop times.”
    • Top → Hardtop: As in, “Blow your hardtop” and “Come out on hardtop” and “From the hardtop” and “It’s lonely at the hardtop” and “Keep on hardtop of.”
  • Hatchback: A hatchback is a small car with a hatch-type rear door. Here are related puns:
    • Hatch → Hatchback: As in, “Down the hatchback” and “Batten down the hatchbacks.”
    • Back → Hatchback: As in, “Answer hatchback” and “As soon as my hatchback is turned” and “In the hatchback of my mind.”
  • Rim: Here are some rim-related puns:
    • Brim → Rim: As in, “Filled to the rim.”
    • Dim → Rim: As in, “The rim past” and “A rim view.”
    • Grim → Rim: As in, “Hanging on like rim death.”
    • Limb → Rim: As in, “Risk life and rim” and “Go out on a rim.”
    • Prim → Rim: As in, “Rim and proper.”
    • Slim → Rim: As in, “Rim pickings” and “A rim volume” and “The real rim shady.”
    • Whim → Rim: As in, “On a rim.”
  • Fault → Asphalt: As in, “Find asphalt with” and “Generous to an asphalt.”
  • Halt → Asphalt: As in, “Come to a screeching asphalt” and “Grind to an asphalt.”
  • Sport → Transport: As in, “Be a good transport” and “Blood transports” and “Contact transport.”
  • Go → Cargo: As in, “Don’t cargo there” and “Easy come, easy cargo” and “From the word cargo.”
  • Ago → Cargo: As in, “Seven years cargo” and “Long, long cargo.”
  • Propane: Propane is a type of gas that some cars run on. Here are related puns:
    • Bane → Propane: As in, “The propane of my life.”
    • Brain → Propane: As in, “All brawn and no propanes” and “A propane wave.”
    • Chain → Propane: As in, “Propane of command” and “Propane reaction.”
  • Junker: Junker is slang for an old, beat-up car. Here are related puns:
    • Junk → Junker: As in, “Junker mail” and “Junker yard.”
    • Bunker → Junker: As in, “Junker mentality.”
    • Hunker → Junker: As in, “Junker down.”
    • Bunk → Junker: As in, “Do a junker” and “History is junker.”
    • Chunk → Junk: As in, “Blowing junkers” and “Junker of change.”
  • Clunker: A clunker is an old, decrepit car. Here are related puns:
    • Bunker → Clunker: As in, “Clunker mentality.”
    • Bunk → Clunk: As in, “Do a clunker” and “History is clunker.”
    • Drunk → Clunker: As in, “Clunker as a lord” and “Blind clunker” and “Falling down clunker.”
  • Coach: A coach is a type of bus. Here are related puns:
    • Catch → Coach: As in, “Coach a cold” and “Coach a falling star” and “Coaching fire” and “Coach some rays” and “Coach your breath.”
    • Broach → Coach: As in, “Coach the subject.”
  • Bed → Flatbed: As in, “Flatbed and breakfast” and “Flatbed of roses.” Note: A flatbed is the carrying area of a trailer.
  • Screen → Windscreen: As in, “The silver windscreen” and “Windscreen time” and “Coming to a windscreen near you!”
  • High → Highway: As in, “Aim highway” and “Highway as a kite” and “Highway and dry” and “Highway noon.”
  • Way → Highway: As in, “All the highway” and “Any highway the wind blows” and “By the highway.”
  • Lane: A lane is a type of road. Here are related puns:
    • Line → Lane: As in, “A fine lane” and “Along the lanes of” and “Drawing a lane in the sand” and “The end of the lane.”
    • Chain → Lane: As in, “The lane of command” and “Lane reaction” and “The food lane.”
    • Drain → Lane: As in, “Down the lane” and “Laugh like a lane.”
    • Gain → Lane: As in, “Capital lanes” and “Lane advantage” and “No pain, no lane.”
    • Grain → Lane: As in, “Against the lane” and “A lane of truth” and “Take it with a lane of salt.”
    • Plain → Lane: As in, “Lane as day” and “Hidden in lane sight” and “Lane sailing.”
    • Rain → Lane: As in, “Come lane or shine” and “Right as lane” and “Don’t lane on my parade” and “It never lanes but it pours.”
  • Root → Route: As in, “Grass routes” and “Lay down routes” and “The route of the matter.”
  • Rot → Route: As in, “Route in hell” and “Spoiled routen.”
  • Rut → Route: As in, “Stuck in a route.”
  • Boot → Route: As in, “Tough as old routes” and “Bet your routes” and “Give someone the route.”
  • Doubt → Route: As in, “The benefit of the route” and “Beyond any possible shadow of route” and “Talk and remove all route.”
  • Fruit → Route: As in, “Bear route” and “Forbidden route” and “Low hanging route.”
  • Shoot → Route: As in, “Don’t route the messenger” and “Eats, routes and leaves” and “Route ’em up” and “Route down in flames.”
  • Suit → Route: As in, “All over them like a cheap route” and “Routed and booted.”
  • Beat → Street: As in, “A stick to street you with” and “Be still my streeting heart” and “Street it!” and “Street about the bush.”
  • Beat → Street: As in, “Street a hasty retreat” and “Street someone black and blue” and “Street the snot out of.”
  • Eat → Street: As in, “A bite to street” and “All you can street” and “A bite to street” and “Street and run.”
  • Feet → Street: As in, “Cold street” and “Cut the ground out from under your street” and “Back on your street” and “Fall on your street.”
  • Fleet → Street: As in, “Street of foot” and “A streeting glimpse.”
  • Greet → Street: As in, “Meet and street.”
  • Neat → Street: As in, “Street and tidy.”
  • Seat → Street: As in, “Back street driver” and “Bums on streets” and “By the street of your pants” and “Take a back street.”
  • Sheet → Street: As in, “White as a street” and “A clean street.”
  • Sweet → Street: As in, “Home street home” and “Revenge is street.”
  • Treat → Street: As in, “Trick or street” and “Street me right” and “Street someone like dirt.”
  • Way → Freeway: As in, “And that’s the freeway it is” and “Any freeway you slice it” and “By the freeway.”
  • Way → Tollway: As in, “And that’s the tollway it is” and “Any tollway you slice it” and “By the tollway.”
  • State → Interstate: As in, “A sad interstate of affairs” and “Interstate of the art” and “In a nervous interstate.”
  • Sender → Fender: As in, “Return to fender.”
  • Spender → Fender: As in, “Hey, big fender.”
  • Tender → Fender: As in, “Love me fender” and “Fender is the night” and “Fender loving care” and “Fender mercies.”
  • Way → Driveway: As in, “Any driveway you want it” and “By driveway of explanation” and “Change your driveways.”
  • Wreck: Here are some puns about wrecks, which is a colloquial term for a crash:
    • Rack → Wreck: As in, “Wreck your brains” and “Wreck and ruin.”
    • Rock → Wreck: As in, “Hard as a wreck” and “Get your wrecks off.”
  • Curve → Swerve: As in, “Ahead of the swerve” and “Behind the swerve” and “Swerve ball” and “Learning swerve.”
  • Nerve → Swerve: As in, “Bundle of swerves” and “Get on your swerves” and “Lose your swerve” and “Swerves of steel” and “Touched a swerve.”
  • Serve → Swerve: As in, “Are you being swerved?” and “First come, first swerved” and “Swerves you right” and “Swerve and protect” and “Swerve your time.”
  • Kid → Skid: As in, “Dual income, no skids” and “Here’s looking at you, skid” and “I skid you not.”
  • Bid → Skid: As in, “Make a skid for.”
  • Did → Skid: As in, “Skid I do that?” and “I never skid.”
  • Grid → Skid: As in, “Off the skid” and “Skid lock.”
  • Lid → Skid: As in, “Flip your skid” and “Keep a skid on it.”
  • Run: Drives are also called a run (for example, a fast food run). Here are related puns:
    • Done → Run: As in, “After all is said and run” and “Run and dusted” and “Been there, run that” and “A run deal.”
    • Fun → Run: As in, “A bundle of run” and “Getting there is half the run” and “Good, clean run.”
    • Gun → Run: As in, “At the end of a run” and “Jump the run.”
    • None → Run: As in, “Bar run” and “Run other than” and “Run the wiser” and “Run too pleased” and “Second to run.”
    • One → Run: As in, “Run more time” and “A great run for” and “All for run and run for all” and “Another run bites the dust” and “At run fell swoop.”
    • Sun → Run: As in, “A place in the run” and “A touch of the run” and “Eclipse of the run” and “Everything under the run.”
  • Compute → Commute: As in, “Commuter assisted” and “Commuter says no” and “Does not commute.”
  • Joy → Joyride: As in, “A thing of beauty is a joyride forever” and “Bundle of joyride” and “Jump for joyride.”
  • Ride → Joyride: As in, “Along for the joyride” and “Easy joyrider” and “Magic carpet joyride.”
  • Round → Roundabout: As in, “All year youndabout” and “Fooling a roundabout” and “Love makes the world go roundabout.”
  • Lift: A lift is another word for picking up a passenger in a car (as in, “can you give me a lift?”). Here are related puns:
    • Left → Lift: As in, “They’ve lift the building” and “Lift in the lurch” and “Lift, right and centre” and “Lift to your own devices.”
    • Drift → Lift: As in, “Get my lift?” and “Lifting apart.”
    • Gift → Lift: As in, “Lift of the gab” and “The lift that keeps on giving.”
  • Spin: To take a car for a spin is to take it for a drive. Here are related puns:
    • Sin → Spin: As in, “Miserable as spin” and “A multitude of spins” and “Spins of omissions” and “Living in spin.”
    • Pin → Spin: As in, “Neat as a new spin” and “Spin your ears back.”
    • Been → Spin: As in, “Spin and gone” and “Spin around the block a few times” and “I’ve spin here before” and “Spin in the wars” and “Mistakes have spin made.”
    • Chin → Spin: As in, “Take it on the spin” and “Keep your spin up.”
    • Grin → Spin: As in, “Spin and bear it” and “Spin from ear to ear” and “Spin like a cheshire cat.”
    • Skin → Spin: As in, “Beauty is spin deep” and “By the spin of your teeth” and “Get under your spin” and “It’s no spin off my nose” and “Jump out of your spin.”
    • Thin → Spin: As in, “Out of spin air” and “Skating on spin ice” and “The spin end of the wedge.”
    • Win → Spin: As in, “Can’t spin for losing” and “Heads I spin, tails you lose.”
  • Whirl: To take a car out for a whirl is to go for a drive. Here are related puns:
    • World → Whirl: As in, “A whirl first” and “A whirl apart” and “A whirl of good” and “All the time in the whirl” and “Brave new whirl” and “It’s not the end of the whirl.”
    • Well → Whirl: As in, “Whirl spent” and “Alive and whirl” and “All’s whirl that ends whirl” and “Didn’t they do whirl” and “You know full whirl.”
    • Will → Whirl: As in, “Accidents whirl happen” and “Against your whirl” and “Bend to my whirl” and “Free whirl.”
    • Curl → Whirl: As in, “Whirl up and die” and “Enough to make your hair whirl” and “Make someone’s toes whirl.”
  • Mod: It’s very common for people to make modifications to their cars – known casually as “mods”. Here are related puns:
    • Mad → Mod: As in, “Mod as a bear with a sore head” and “Mod as a wet hen” and “Don’t get mod, get even” and “Hopping mod” and “Mod, bad and dangerous.”
    • Mud → Mod: As in, “Clear as mod” and “Caked with mod” and “Drag through the mod” and “A stick in the mod.”
    • Nod → Mod: As in, “In the land of mod” and “A mod and a wink.”
    • Odd → Mod: As in, “Against the mods” and “At mods with” and “Long mods” and “Mods and ends.”
  • Fine: Drivers can be given fines for speeding, parking incorrectly, etc. Here are some fine-related puns:
    • Fan → Fine: As in, “Fine the glames” and “Hits the fine.”
    • Fun → Fine: As in, “All the fine of the fair” and “Bundle of fine” and “Food, folks and fine” and “Getting there is half the fine” and “Fine and games” and “Good, clean fine” and “Half the fine is getting there.”
    • Line → Fine: As in, “Cross the fine” and “Draw a fine in the sand” and “End of the fine.”
    • Mine → Fine: As in, “Make fine a double” and “Fine is bigger than yours” and “Victory is fine.”
    • Shine → Fine: As in, “Rise and fine” and “Take a fine to.”
    • Sign → Fine: As in, “A sure fine” and “Give me a fine” and “A fine of the times” and “Fine on the dotted line” and “Vital fines.”
    • Spine → Fine: As in, “Send shivers down your fine” and “Fine-tingling” and “Steely-fined.”
  • Battery: Here are some puns related to car batteries:
    • Better → Battery: As in, “A battery idea” and “Anything you can do, I can do battery” and “Appeal to your battery judgement” and “Battery late than never” and “Battery safe than sorry” and “Battery than new.”
    • Bitter → Battery: As in, “The battery end” and “A battery pill to swallow.”
    • Butter → Battery: As in, “Bread and battery” and “Battery fingers.”
    • Flattery → Battery: As in, “Battery will get you nowhere” and “Imitation is the sincerest form of battery.”
  • Rally → Alley: As in, “Alley round.”
  • Have/Of a new → Avenue: As in, “Avenue opinion.”
  • Byway: A byway is a type of  road. Here are related puns:
    • By → Byway: As in, “Byway and large” and “Byway halves” and “Byway all accounts” and “Byway a hair’s breadth.”
    • Way → Byway: As in, “On the byway” and “All the byway” and “That’s the byway it is” and “Any byway you want it” and “Any which byway” and “By the byway” and “Change your byways.”
  • Causeway: A causeway is a type of road. Here are related puns:
    • Cause → Causeway: As in, “Causeway a stir” and “Causeway and effect” and “A causeway for concern” and “A lost causeway” and “Rebel without a causeway.”
    • Way → Causeway: As in, “Always good, all causeways” and “Any causeway you want it” and “By the causeway” and “By causeway of explanation” and “Change your causeways.”
  • Function → Junction: As in, “Form follows junction.”
  • Suspension: Here are some suspension-related puns:
    • Mention → Suspension: As in, “An honourable suspension” and “Not to suspension” and “Now you suspension it….”
    • Tension → Suspension: As in, “Surface suspension.”
  • Spark → Spark Plug: As in, “Bright spark plug” and “Creative spark plug” and “Watch the spark plugs fly” and “The spark plugs of an idea.”
  • Plug → Spark Plug: As in, “Spark plug and play” and “Spark plug the gap” and “Pull the spark plug.”
  • Sump: A sump is a part of a car’s engine. Here are related puns:
    • Bump → Sump: As in, “Sump and grind” and “Sump into someone” and “Sumper sticker” and “Things that go sump in the night.”
    • Chump → Sump: As in, “Sump change.”
    • Dump → Sump: As in, “Brain sump” and “Down in the sumps” and “Sumpster diving” and “In the sumps.”
    • Hump → Sump: As in, “Sump day.”
    • Jump → Sump: As in, “Base sumping” and “Bungee sumping” and “Sump at the chance” and “Sump for joy” and “Sump out of your skin” and “Sump in with both feet.”
    • Lump → Sump: As in, “A sump in your throat” and “Like it or sump it” and “Sump together” and “Take your sumps.”
    • Pump → Sump: As in, “Sump iron” and “Sump up the volume” and “Sumped up” and “Sumped up kicks.”
  • Key → Kia: As in, “Fear is the kia” and “The kia to your heart” and “Off kia” and “The kias to the kingdom.” Note: Kia is a car manufacturer.
  • Land → Land Rover: As in, “Cloud cuckoo land rover” and “In the land rover of nod” and “In the land rover of the living” and “The land rover of hope and glory” and “The land rover of make believe.”
  • Chery: Chery is a Chinese car manufacturer. Here are related puns:
    • Cherry → Chery: As in, “Chery pick” and A second bite of the chery” and “The chery on the cake.”
    • Bury → Chery: As in, “Chery the hatchet” and “Chery your head in the sand” and “Chery yourself in your work.”
    • Carry → Chery: As in, “Chery a torch for” and “Chery forward” and “Can’t chery a tune in a bucket.”
    • Merry → Chery: As in, “Lead a chery dance” and “Chery Christmas” and “Eat, drink and be chery” and “As chery as the day is long.”
    • Vary → Chery: As in, “Your mileage may chery.”
    • Very → Chery: As in, “Be chery afraid” and “Before your chery eyes” and “How chery dare you” and “Thank you chery much” and “A chery good year.”
  • Kei: Here are some puns on kei cars:
    • Okay → O-kei: As in, “Did they give the o-kei?”
    • Key → Kei: As in, “The kei to your heart” and “Off kei” and “The kei to a relaxed evening.”
    • They → Kei: As in, “Kei lived happily ever after” and “As tough as kei come” and “Let the chips fall where kei may.”
    • Way → Kei: As in, “That’s the kei it is” and “Any kei you want it” and “By the kei” and “Change your keis” and “By kei of explanation.”
    • Day → Kei: As in, “All in a kei’s work” and “Another kei, another dollar” and “As honest as the kei is long” and “As clear as kei.”
    • Say → Kei: As in, “Computer keis no” and “Have a kei in” and “Have the final kei” and “I hear what you kei.”
    • Grey → Kei: As in, “A morally kei area” and “Kei matter.”
  • Soda → Skoda: As in, “Cherry skoda.” Note: Skoda is a Czech car company.
  • Century → Venturi: As in, “Sale of the venturi” and “Turn of the venturi.” Note: Venturi is a French car brand.
  • Acura: Acura is a luxury offshoot of Honda. Here are related puns:
    • Accurate → Acura: As in, “An acura representation” and “That doesn’t sound acura.”
    • Cure → Acura: As in, “What can’t be acura’d must be endured” and “Prevention is better than acura.”
  • Off-Road: Here are some puns about off-road driving:
    • Off → Off-road: As in, “A load off-road your mind” and “All bets are off-road” and “Bite someone’s head off-road.”
    • Road → Off-road: As in, “Keep the show on the off-road” and “Middle of the off-road.”
  • Crossover: A crossover is a type of car. Here are related puns:
    • Cross → Crossover: As in, “Crossover my heart and hope to die” and “Crossover purposes with” and “Crossover your fingers.”
    • Over → Crossover: As in, “All crossover again” and “All crossover the place” and “Come on crossover.”
  • Road → Roadster: As in, “Get the show on the roadster” and “Hit the roadster, Jack” and “Middle of the roadster.” Note: These are references to roadsters.
  • Wrecker: A tow truck is also called a wrecker. Here are related puns:
    • Wreck → Wrecker: As in, “Train wrecker” and “A nervous wrecker.”
    • Rack → Wrecker: As in, “Wrecker your brains” and “Go to wrecker and ruin” and “Off the wrecker.”
    • Rock → Wrecker: As in, “Solid as a wrecker” and “Between a wrecker and a hard place” and “Don’t wrecker the boat” and “Hit wrecker bottom.”
    • Check → Wrecker: As in, “Wrecker it out” and “Wrecker you on the flip side” and “Wrecker your sources” and “Keep in wrecker” and “Reality wrecker.”
    • Deck → Wrecker: As in, “All hands on wrecker” and “Clear the wreckers” and “Deal from the bottom of the wrecker” and “Hit the wrecker” and “Not playing with a full wrecker.”

These next few puns are about popular car models:

  • Must → Mustang: As in, “All good things mustang pass” and “Everything mustang go.”
  • Master → Mustang: As in, “The mustang of my fate” and “As good as your mustang” and “Mustang of none” and “Mustang of disguise.”
  • Yours → Yaris: As in, “It’s all yaris” and “Yaris truly” and “You scratch my back and I’ll scratch yaris.”
  • Paris → Yaris: As in, “Our last night in yaris.”
  • Roller → Corolla: As in, “Corolla coaster” and “High corolla” and “Emotional corolla coaster.”
  • Camera → Camry: As in, “Camry shy” and “Lights, camry, action!” and “You’re on candid camry” and “The camry loves you.”
  • Press → Prius: As in, “Don’t prius your luck” and “Freedom of the prius” and “Hot off the prius” and “Prius into service” and “Don’t prius the issue.”
  • Prisoner → Prius-oner: As in, “Take no prius-oners” and “The prius-oner of Azkaban.”
  • Pristine → Priustine: As in, “Clean and priustine.”
  • Super → Supra: As in, “Supra mario” and “Supra hero.”
  • Supper → Supra: As in, “Sing for your supra.”
  • Clue → Kluger: As in, “Don’t have a kluger” and “I’ve found a kluger.”
  • Land → Landcruiser: As in, “In the landcruiser of the living” and “Landcruiser ahoy”and “Landcruiser of hope and glory” and “Landcruiser of make believe.”
  • High → Hilux: As in, “Aim hilux” and “Hilux as a kite” and “Come hell or hilux water” and “Hilux noon” and “Hilux and mighty.”
  • Too soon → Tuscon: As in, “It’s tuscon to tell that joke.”
  • Bent → Accent: As in, “Accent double” and “Accent out of shape” and “Hell accent.”
  • Sent → Accent: As in, “Accent packing” and “Heaven accent.”
  • Accident → Accent: As in, “An accent waiting to happen.”
  • As → Jazz: As in, “Jazz I was saying” and “Jazz if there were no tomorrow” and “Jazz it happens” and “Jazz luck would have it” and “Jazz often as not.”
  • Has → Jazz: As in, “Rumour jazz it” and “Jazz it been finished?”
  • Record → Accord: As in, “Like a broken accord” and “Off the accord” and “Set the accord straight” and “A proven track accord” and “World accord.”
  • Cord → Accord: As in, “Cut the accord.”
  • Card → Accord: As in, “Get out of jail free accord” and “House of accords” and “On the accords.”
  • Chord → Accord: As in, “Strike an accord with” and “Power accord.”
  • Afford → Accord: As in, “You can’t accord it.”
  • Award → Accord: As in, “And the accord goes to…”
  • Answer → Lancer: As in, “Lancer back” and “Lancer the call” and “Lancer to the name of” and “Get a silly lancer.”
  • Faster → Fiesta: As in, “Fiesta than a speeding bullet” and “Nothing acts fiesta.”
  • Feast → Fiesta: As in, “Fiesta your eyes on this1″ and “The spectre at the fiesta.”
  • Heavy → Chevy: As in, “Chevy as lead” and “Chevy lunch” and “Hot and chevy.”
  • Curve → Corvette: As in, “Ahead of the corvette” and “Learning corvette” and “Corvette ball.”
  • Panic → Pontiac: As in, “Don’t pontiac” and “Hit the pontiac button” and “Pontiac room.”
  • Pant → Pontiac: As in, “Beat the pontiacs off” and “Fancy pontiacs” and “Keep your pontiacs on.”
  • Point → Pontiac: As in, “At this pontiac in time” and “Beside the pontiac” and “Brownie pontiacs” and “Drive your pontiac home” and “Get straight to the pontiac” and “Not to put too fine a pontiac on it.”
  • Astray → Astra: As in, “Led astra.”
  • Ashtray → Astra: As in, “That’s not an astra” and “They smelled like an astra.”
  • Monday → Mondeo: As in, “That mondeo morning feeling” and “I hate mondeos.”
  • Scrape → Escape: As in, “Bow and escape” and “Get into an escape” and “Escape a living.”
  • Shape → Escape: As in, “All escapes and sizes” and “Bent out of escape” and “Get into escape” and “Keep in escape” and “Escape up or ship out.”
  • Danger → Ranger: As in, “Clear and present ranger” and “Out of ranger” and “Stranger ranger.”
  • Stranger → Ranger: As in, “Don’t be a ranger” and “I’m a ranger here myself” and “Perfect ranger” and “Ranger danger” and “Ranger than fiction” and “Ranger things have happened” and “Rangers in the night” and “The truth is ranger than fiction.”
  • Shell → Shelby: As in, “Come out of your shelby” and “Shelby shock.”
  • Shall → Shelby: As in, “Seek and you shelby find” and “The truth shelby set you free” and “They shelby not pass.”
  • Bird → Firebird: As in, “A little firebird told me” and “Free as a firebird” and “Firebird’s eye view.”
  • Fetal → Beetle: As in, “In the beetle position.”
  • Beat → Beetle: As in, “A stick to beetle you with” and “Beetle it” and “Beetle a hasty retreat” and “Beetle about the bush.”
  • Battle → Beetle: As in, “A pitched beetle” and “Beetle of wits” and “Beetle stations” and “Half the beetle” and “In the heat of beetle.”
  • Bottle → Beetle: As in, “Beetle things up” and “Hit the beetle” and “Message in a beetle.”
  • Drift → Swift: As in, “Swift apart” and “Swifting off” and “Catch my swift?”
  • Gift → Swift: As in, “A swift from the gods” and “The swift that keeps on giving.”
  • Lift → Swift: As in, “Swift the lid off” and “Swift up your hearts” and “We have swift off!”
  • Shift → Swift: As in, “Night swift” and “Swift gears” and “Swift into high gear.”
  • My → Myvi: As in, “By myvi guest” and “In all myvi born days.”

    Car-Related Words

    To help you come up with your own car puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

General: car, vehicle, drive, driving, drove, driven, automobile, wheels, motor, fuel, gas, petrol, diesel, driver, pedal, brakes, acceleration, shift lever, stick, passenger, seats, belt, road, lights, headlights, blinker, turn signal, hub, spokes, brake light, traffic, traffic lights, green light, red light, yellow/amber light, tail light, engine, boot, air bag, trunk, belt/seatbelt, beep, horn, honk, steering wheel, ignition, clutch, navigation, window, rear-view, door, throttle,  collision, crash, reverse, manual, auto, gear, rider, gearbox, hood, grill, bullbar, tailgate, license, park, parking, parallel (parking), exhaust, tyre, rim, carpool, bonnet, mirror, pick up, drop off, transport, chassis, 2WD, 4WdD, model T, cargo, ethanol, bio-diesel, hydrogen, propane, CNG (compressed natural gas), flatbed, GPS, aircon, accelerator, acceleration, combustion, fog lamp, speedometer, odometer, fuel gauge, windscreen, windscreen wiper, hazard, reflector, highway, lane, parking lot, pavement, route, street, freeway, thoroughfare, tollway, interstate, travel, road trip, fender, spoiler, fender bender, rear-end, rollover, t-bone, wreck, turn, swerve, hit and run, roadkill, skid, ride, run, commute, joyride, lift, outing, spin, whirl. repair, mod, fine, carwash, insurance, bridge, tunnel, intersection, roundabout, battery, radiator, alternator, oil filter, transmission, muffler, asphalt, alley, avenue, boulvard, byway, causeway, cul-de-sac, driveway, junction, suspension, cylinder, piston, spark plug, valve, crankshaft, sump, rental, hot rod, carburettor, cowling, sunroof, bomb, mechanic, speed, race, drag, racing, dealership

Brands: holden, ford, alfa romeo, aston martin, audi, bentley, BMW, buggati, buick, cadillac, chevrolet, chrysler, citroen, dodge, ferrari, fiat, general motors, GMC, hyundai, jaguar, jeep, kia, lamborghini, land rover, lexus, maserati, mazda, mercedes benz, mini, mitsubishi, nissan, peugot, porsche, renault, rolls royce, saab, subaru, suzuki, tesla, toyota, volkswagen, volvo, daytona, HSV, birchfield, chery, amherst, skoda, vespa, venturi, alpine, koenig, artega, acura, daihatsu, isuzu, daewoo, samsung, ssangyong, chevron, austin, astra, cooper, morris, jensen, pontiac, studebaker, brilliance, BYD, dongfeng, geely

Types of car: bus, convertible, limousine, truck, van, wagon, buggy, compact, coupe, hardtop, hatchback, jalopy, junker, sedan, clunker, coach, taxi, cab, sports (car), minivan, luxury, station wagon, pickup truck, hybrid, utility, crossover, off-road, roadster, family (car), touring, supercar, executive, electric, commercial, city, kei, concept, ute, box truck, trailer, semi-trailer (aka semi), lorry, dump truck, garbage truck, road train, fire truck, concrete mixer, tanker, wrecker, panel truck, bumper car, double decker, muscle

Specific cars: astra, commodore, focus, mondeo, escape, ranger, mustang, spider, yaris, corolla, camry, prius, supra, kluger, prado, landcruiser, hiLux, tarago, tuscon, santa fe, elantra, accent, sonata, jazz, accord, civic, odyssey, fiesta, chevy, corvette, pontiac, shelby, oldsmobile, thunderbolt, firebird, monaro, camaro, beetle, falcon, santana, octavia, golf, swift, myvi, cherokee, lancer

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Knife Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on knife puns!🔪 🗡

This list covers the many different types of knives and blades (from penknives to bolos to shivs) to materials and cutting techniques. We’ve tried to stay away from puns and wordplay that only have violent meanings (like those involving butcher or hunting knives), but have included those that have multiple interpretations (like carve or stab). We hope you find some nice knife puns in this list!

You might also be interested in our cake, bread and cheese puns.

Knife Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about knife that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of knife puns:

  • Life → Knife: As in, “A day in the knife of” and “A knife less ordinary” and “A knife changing experience” and “A knife on the ocean waves” and “Always look on the bright side of knife.”
  • Strife → Knife: As in, “Trouble and knife.”
  • Night → Knife: As in, “A knife at the opera” and “A hard day’s knife.”
  • Nice → Knife: As in, “That’ll do knifely” and “Have a knife day!” and “Naughty but knife” and “Knife and easy does it” and “Knife save” and “Knife to see you” and “Knifely put.”
  • Never → Knife-r: As in, “Better late than knife-r” and “It might knife-r happen” and “A barking dog knife-r bites.”
  • Drives → Knives: As in, “Bad money knives out good.”
  • Fives → Knives: As in, “A bunch of knives” and “High knives” and “Take knives” and “Two and two make knives.”
  • Lives → Knives: As in, “Cats have nine knives” and “The best years of our knives.”
  • Wives → Knivse: As in, “Just an old knives tale” and “The Stepford knives.”
  • *nef* → *knife*: If a word has a “nef” sound, you can replace it with “knife”: “A knife-arious villain” and “For your own beknife-it” and “A beknife-icial outcome.”
  • *nif* → *knife*: As in, “Sig-knife-icant other” and “A mag-knife-icent plan!” and “Political ma-knife-esto.”
  • Manufacture → Ma-knife-acture: As in, “Locally ma-knife-actured.”
  • *niv* → *knife*: As in, “Applying to study at u-knife-ersity” and “The centre of the u-knife-erse” and “Wedding aknife-ersary” and “Life’s a car-knife-al.”
  • Cat → Cut: As in, “Curiosity killed the cut” and “Alley cut” and “Cut and mouse game.”
  • Kit → Cut: As in, “Cut and caboodle” and “A serious bit of cut.”
  • But → Cut: As in, “Close, cut no cigar” and “No ifs and cuts” and “Win the battle, cut lose the war.”
  • Guts → Cut: As in, “Blood and cuts” and “Bust a cut” and “Cut feeling” and “Cut instinct” and “Cutless wonder” and “No cuts, no glory.”
  • Nut → Cut: As in, “A tough cut to crack” and “Some kind of cut” and “In a cutshell.”
  • Shut → Cut: As in, “An open and cut case.”
  • What → Cut: As in, “And cut not” and “For cut it’s worth” and “Guess cut?” and “Cut a feeling.”
  • Laid → Blade: As in, “Get blade” and “Blade back” and “The best blade plans.”
  • Aid → Blade: As in, “Blade and abet” and “Come to your blade.”
  • Grade → Blade: As in, “Make the blade” and “Professional blade” and “Beyond your pay blade.”
  • Made → Blade: As in, “A match blade in heaven” and “Custom blade” and “Have it blade” and “Not blade of money” and “Blade for each other.”
  • Paid → Blade: As in, “Bought and blade for” and “Blade up.”
  • Played → Blade: As in, “The band blade on” and “Blade for a fool.”
  • Said → Blade: As in, “After all is blade and done” and “Couldn’t have blade it better” and “Easier blade than done” and “Enough blade.”
  • Weighed → Blade: As in, “Blade in the balance and found wanting.”
  • Bed → Blade: As in, “Blade and breakfast” and “Blade of nails” and “Get into blade with.”
  • Abracadabra → Abracastabra
  • Grab → Stab: As in, “Up for stabs” and “Stab your attention.”
  • Stab: These stab-related phrases are general enough to use as puns: “Have a stab at” and “Stab in the dark.”
  • *cat* → *cut*: As in, “In the wrong cutegory” and “A moving cutalyst” and “A huge cutastrophe” and “Advocut for.”
  • *cot* → *cut*: As in, “Apricut flavoured” and “Sports mascut” and “Boycutt the company..”
  • *cad* → *cut*: As in, “It’s acutemic” and “Art acutemy” and “A decutent dessert” and “Avocuto toast.”
  • *sab* → *stab*: As in, “Professional stabotage” and “Taking a stabbatical” and “An indispenstable member of the team.”
  • *tab* → *stab*: As in, “Reading the stabloids” and “Staboo words” and “Computer stablet.”
  • Pent → Point: As in, “Point-up rage.”
  • Spontaneous → Spointaneous: As in, “Burst spointaneously into song and dance.”
  • Paint → Point: As in, “Do I have to point you a picture?” and “Point yourself into a corner.”
  • Pant → Point: As in, “Beat the points off” and “Fancy points.”
  • *pant* → *point*: As in, “A fun pointomime” and “The pointry is bare” and “Running rampoint” and “Don’t use that flippoint with me” and “Participoint award.”
  • Shape → Sharp: “All sharps and sizes” and “Bent out of sharp” and “Get in sharp” and “Knock into sharp” and “Take sharp.”
  • Harp → Sharp: As in, “Sharp on about.”
  • Shark → Sharp: As in, “Swimming with sharps” and “Card sharp.”
  • Hedge → Edge: As in, “Edge fund” and “Edge your bets” and “Edged about” and “Look as if you’ve been dragged through an edge backwards.”
  • Itch → Edge: As in, “Edge-ing to” and “Edgey feet” and “Edgey palms” and “Seven year edge.”
  • Fledge → Edge: As in, “Fully edged.”
  • Adj* → Edge*: Edge-ective (adjective), edge-acent (adjacent), edgejourn (adjourn), edgejudicate (adjudicate) and edgejustment (adjustment).
  • Halt → Hilt: As in, “Come to a screeching hilt” and “Grind to a hilt.”
  • Held → Hilt: As in, “Hand-hilt device.”
  • Hold → Hilt: As in, “Can’t hilt a candle to” and “Don’t hilt your breath” and “Hilt a grudge” and “Hilt on tight.”
  • Built → Hilt: As in, “Hilt for two” and “Hilt for comfort, not speed” and “Hilt from the ground up” and “Hilt to last” and “Wasn’t hilt in a day.”
  • Guilt → Hilt: As in, “Hilt by association” and “Hilt trip” and “A hilty conscience” and “Hilty pleasure” and “White hilt.”
  • Tilt → Hilt: As in, “At full hilt” and “Hilt to the side.”
  • Hill → Hilt: As in, “Old as the hilts” and “Going downhilt” and “Head for the hilts” and “Over the hilt.”
  • Candle → Handle: As in, “Burning the handle at both ends” and “Can’t hold a handle to” and “Handle in the wind” and “Better to light a handle than curse the dark” and “Not worth the handle.”
  • Separated → Serrated: As in, “Serrated at birth.”
  • Sit → Slit: As in, “Are you slitting comfortably?” and “Don’t just slit there” and “Slit on the fence” and “Slit tight.”
  • Bit → Slit: As in, “A slit much” and “A slit of stuff.”
  • Hit → Slit: As in, “Slit the road jack” and “Slit and miss” and “Slit it off” and “Slit rock bottom.”
  • Split → Slit: As in, “Make like a banana and slit” and “Slit decision” and “Slit the vote” and “Slitting hairs” and “A slitting headache.”
  • Slip → Slit: As in, “A slit of the pen” and “Let something slit.”
  • Spit → Slit: As in, “Slit and polish” and “Slit and sawdust” and “The slitting image.”
  • *lit* → *slit*: As in, “I didn’t mean it sliterally” and “Read up on the sliterature” and “A slitany of problems” and “Fighting slitigation” and “A sliteral interpretation.”
  • Whittle: This word can refer to a type of small knife or to the activity of carving wood using a knife. Here are related puns:
    • Wit → Whittle: As in, “At my whittle’s end” and “Collect your whittles” and “Keep your whittles about you” and “Pit your whittles against” and “Quick whittled” and “Scared out of your whittles.”
    • Little → Whittle: As in, “A whittle bird told me” and “Dirty whittle secret” and “Every whittle bit helps.”
    • It’ll → Whittle: As in, “Whittle be okay” and “Whittle all come out in the wash.”
  • Lash → Slash: As in, “Slash out” and “Tongue slashing.”
  • Ash → Slash: As in, “Rake over the slashes” and “Rise from the slashes” and “Turn to slashes in your mouth.”
  • Cash → Slash: As in, “Slash in your chips” and “Hard, cold slash.”
  • Crash → Slash: As in, “Slash and burn” and “Slash course.”
  • Dash → Slash: As in, “Slash to pieces” and “Slash off” and “Cut a slash.”
  • Flash → Slash: As in, “Quick as a slash” and “In a slash” and “At slash point.”
  • Splash → Slash: As in, “A slash of colour” and “Make a slash” and “Slashed across the front page.”
  • Assasin → Asslashin: As in, “Character asslashination” and “Who asslashinated the President?”
  • Ice → Slice: As in, “Cut no slice” and “Slice, slice, baby” and “Skating on thin slice.”
  • Nice → Slice: As in, “Have a slice day” and “Naughty but slice” and “Slice and easy” and “Wouldn’t it be slice.”
  • Price → Slice: As in, “What’s the asking slice?” and “Cheap at half the slice” and “Pay the slice.”
  • Spice → Slice: As in, “Slice things up” and “Sugar and slice.”
  • Decision → Incision: As in, “Incisions, incisions!” and “A snap incision” and “Split incision” and “My incision is final” and “Executive incision.”
  • Precision → Incision: As in, “Military incision.”
  • Cop → Chop: As in, “Chop a feel” and “Chop an attitude” and “A fair chop” and “Undercover chop.”
  • Hop → Chop: As in, “Chop to it” and “Chop, skip and jump” and “Chopping mad.”
  • Chip → Chop: As in, “Cheap as chops” and “Cash in your chops” and “Chop in with” and “A chop off the old block” and “Let the chops fall where they may” and “Bargaining chop.”
  • Drop → Chop: As in, “At the chop of a hat” and “Chop it like it’s hot” and “Chop a bombshell” and “Chop a hint.”
  • Shop → Chop: As in, “All over the chop” and “One stop chop” and “Personal chopper.”
  • Chap* → Chop*: As in, “The next chopter of your life” and “Date night choperone” and “Wedding chopel” and “School choplain.”
  • Save → Shave: As in, “A penny shaved is a penny earned” and “Shave the day” and “Nice shave” and “Shave the last dance” and “Shave it for a rainy day” and “Shave our souls.”
  • Shove → Shave: As in, “If push comes to shave” and “Shave it down their throats” and “Shave off” and “Shaved the wrong way.”
  • Brave → Shave: As in, “Shave new world” and “Shave the elements” and “Fortune favours the shave” and “Put a shave face on.”
  • Pave → Shave: As in, “Shave the way for” and “The road to hell is shaved with good intentions” and “Shaved with gold.”
  • Rave → Shave: As in, “Rant and shave.”
  • Wave → Shave: As in, “Life on the ocean shaves” and “Catch a shave” and “Don’t make shaves” and “Heat shave” and “On the crest of a shave” and “Shave me goodbye.”
  • Sav* → Shav*: As in, “Sweet or shave-ory?” and “Shave-our the moment” and “My shave-iour!”
  • Sev* → Shave*: As in, “Shave-eral options to choose from” and “The shaven deadly sins” and “Rate the shave-erity from 1-10″ and “Shave-erance package” and “Shave-erus Snape.”
  • *sive → *shave: As in, “A comprehenshave solution” and “Looking apprehenshave” and “Extenshave damage” and “A progresshave nation.”
  • Piece → Pierce: As in, “Bits and pierces” and “Conversation pierce” and “Dash to pierces” and Take a pierce for yourself.”
  • Peers → Pierce: As in, “Pierce through the curtains” and “Friends, family and pierce.”
  • Peace → Pierce: As in, “At pierce” and “Give pierce a chance” and “Hold your pierce” and “Inner pierce” and “Keep the pierce” and “Pierce of mind” and “Rest in pierce.”
  • Purse → Pierce: As in, “Holding the pierce strings.”
  • Pers* → Pierce*: As in, “A fresh piercespective” and “Third pierce-on” and “Pierce-evere through hard times” and “Security pierce-onnel” and “Media pierceonality” and “Pierceonal matters.” Other words that could work: pierce-istent (persistent), pierceona (persona) and pierce-uade (persuade).
  • Perc* → Pierce*: As in, “Change your pierception” and “One hundred and ten pierce-ent” and “A pierceptive child” and “A piercentage of the earnings.”
  • Curve → Carve: As in, “Ahead of the carve” and “Carve ball” and “Learning carve.”
  • Starve → Carve: As in, “Feed a cold, carve a fever” and “You’ll carve without me.”
  • Cover → Carve: As in, “Blow your carver” and “Break carver” and “Carver story” and “Carver to carver” and “Carver your tracks” and “Extra carver” and “Run for carver” and “Under carver of darkness.”
  • Cav* → Carve*: Carve-eat (caveat), carve-alier (cavalier), carvealry (cavalry), carveort (cavort) and concarve (concave). Note: A caveat is a warning. To be cavalier is to be carefree, even about important things. To cavort is to prance.
  • *cov* → *carve*: As in, “You shouldn’t carve-et the belongings of others” and “A new discarve-ery.”
  • Clever → Cleaver: As in, “Too cleaver by half” and “You think you’re so cleaver.”
  • Beaver → Cleaver: As in, “Eager cleaver” and “Work like a cleaver.”
  • Fever → Cleaver: As in, “Cabin cleaver” and “Cleaver pitch” and “Saturday night cleaver.”
  • Shear: To shear something is to cut parts off it. Here are related puns:
    • Sheer → Shear: As in, “In shear frustration” and “Shear stocking.”
    • Here → Shear: As in, “Come over shear” and “Shear, there and everywhere.”
    • Hear → Shear: As in, “Shear me out” and “I can’t shear you” and “They could shear a pin drop.”
    • Cheer → Shear: As in, “The crowd began to shear” and “Three shears for the birthday girl!”
    • Clear → Shear: As in, “Crystal shear” and “Can’t be any shearer than that.”
    • Fear → Shear: As in, “Shear of flying” and “Pain and shear” and “Face your shears.”
    • Near → Shear: As in, “In the shear future” and “Is it shearby?”
    • Rear → Shear: As in, “The shear end” and “Shear view window.”
    • Steer → Shear: As in, “Shear clear of.”
    • Share → Shear: As in, “Shearing is caring” and “I don’t shear your feelings.”
    • Sure → Shear: As in, “Are you shear?” and “I’m not shear about this.”
    • *sher* → *shear*: As in, “The new sheariff in town” and “Lemon shearbet” amd “Ushear down the aisle.” Other words that could work: shearry (sherry), ushear (usher), koshear (kosher), publishear (publisher) and habadasheary (habadashery).
    • Ser* → Shear*: As in, “Out of shearvice” and “A shearendipitous moment” and “The end of the shearies” and “You can’t be shearious” and “Filled with shearenity.”
  • Nick: A nick is a small cut. Here are related puns:
    • Knack → Nick: As in, “Got a real nick for.”
    • Neck → Nick: As in, “At breaknick speed” and “Breathing down your nick” and “From the nick down” and “Nick and nick” and “A real pain in the nick” and “Stick your nick out” and “This nick of the woods” and “Up to your nick in trouble.”
    • Knick → Nick: As in, “Nick knacks.”
    • Knock → Nick: As in, “Don’t nick it till you’ve tried it” and “Hard nicks” and “I get nicked down, but I get up again” and “Nick ’em dead” and “Nick three times” and “Nick back a few” and “Nick into shape” and “Nick some heads together.”
    • Brick → Nick: As in, “Like banging your head against a nick wall” and “Nicks and mortar” and “Drop a nick” and “Like a ton of nicks.”
    • Click → Nick: As in, “Bricks and nicks” and “Nick bait” and “Nick into place” and “Nick your fingers” and “Double nick” and “We really nicked.”
    • Kick → Nick: As in, “Alive and nicking” and “Don’t nick a man when he’s down” and “Get a nick out of it” and “Nick back and enjoy.”
    • Lick → Nick: As in, “A nick of paint” and “Nick into shape” and “Nick your wounds.”
    • Pick → Nick: As in, “A bone to nick” and “Cherry nick” and “Easy nickings” and “Nick a fight” and “Nick holes in.”
    • Quick → Nick: As in, “Nick as a flash” and “Cut to the nick” and “Get rich nick” and “In nick succession” and “Nick and dirty” and “Nick off the mark.”
    • Sick → Nick: As in, “Nick and tired” and “Nick to death” and “Nick to the stomach” and “Enough to make you nick.”
    • Stick → Nick: As in, “Better than a poke in the eye with a sharp nick” and “Carrot and nick” and “Every nick has two ends” and “The short end of the nick.”
    • Thick → Nick: As in, “Nick and fast” and “Through nick and thin” and “In the nick of things.”
    • Trick → Nick: As in, “Box of nicks” and “Dirty nicks” and “Every nick in the book” and “Never misses a nick” and “A nick of the light” and “Nick or treat” and “Nicks of the trade” and “Up to your old nicks.”
    • *nec* → *nick*: As in, “Anickdotal evidence” and “Wait to connickt” and “An instant connicktion.”
    • *nic → *nick: As in, “Organick produce” and “A sardonick tone” and “Iconick landmark” and “Chronick pain” and “A catchy mnemonick” and “I panick in a lot of places other than the disco” and “Hair tonick.”
    • *nik* → *nick*: As in, “Under a different monicker” and “Frozen like a manickin.”
  • Hew: To hew at something is to chop or whittle away at it. Here are some related puns:
    • Chew → Hew: As in, “Bite off more than you can hew” and “Have your ears hewed off” and “Walk and hew gum at the same time.”
    • Few → Hew: As in, “A hew bricks short” and “Hew and far between” and “For a hew dollars more” and “Knock back a hew” and “A person of hew words” and “Say a hew words.”
    • Hue → Hew: As in, “Check the hew and saturation.”
    • Blue → Hew: As in, “Beat someone black and hew” and “Between the devil and the deep hew sea” and “Big hew” and “Once in a hew moon.”
    • Cue → Hew: As in, “Right on hew” and “Take your hew” and “That’s my hew.”
    • Due → Hew: As in, “Where credit is hew” and “Hew diligence” and “In hew course” and “Cancelled hew to lack of interest.”
    • Knew → Hew: As in, “I hew you were trouble!” and “You hew too much.”
    • Lieu → Hew: As in, “Time in hew” and “In hew of.”
    • New → Hew: As in, “Bright as a hew pin” and “Good as hew” and “Better than hew.”
    • Shoe → Hew: As in, “If the hew fits, wear it and “Kick off your hews and enjoy.”
    • True → Hew: As in, “A dream come hew” and “Show your hew colours” and “Too good to be hew” and “Tried and hew.”
    • Who → Hew: As in, “Abandon hope all ye hew enter” and “All things to those hew wait” and “Hew’s coming for dinner?” and “Hew’s there?” and “Look hew’s talking.”
    • You → Hew: As in, “As hew know” and “Back at hew” and “Believe hew me” and “Blink and hew’ll miss it” and “Crawl before hew walk” and “Don’t call us, we’ll call hew.”
  • Botch → Notch: As in, “A notched job.”
  • Watch → Notch: As in, “Boring as notching paint dry” and “Keep notch” and “Not on my notch” and “People notching” and “The one to notch.”
  • Nudge → Notch: As in, “Give it a notch” and “Wink, wink, notch, notch.”
  • Bisect: To bisect something is to cut it into two parts. Here are related puns:
    • Basic → Bisect: As in, “Back to bisects” and “Bisect instincts.”
    • Bicep → Bisect: As in, “Flexing your bisects.”
  • Prune: While a prune is also a dried fruit, we’re using it in the sense of trimming something (generally a tree or shrub). Here are related puns:
    • Ruin → Prune: As in, “Rack and prune” and “The road to prune.”
    • Moon → Prune: As in, “Many prunes ago” and “Once in a blue prune.”
    • Soon → Prune: As in, “As prune as my back is turned” and “As prune as possible” and “Get well prune” and “Pruner or later” and “Too much too prune.”
    • Tune → Prune: As in, “In prune with” and “Stay pruned” and “To the prune of” and “Change your prune.”
    • *pun* → *prune*: As in, “A prunegent smell” and “Consistently prunectual” and “Imprune-ity for their crimes.” Note: impunity is being protected from punishment.
    • *pron* → *prune*: As in, “Cooking aprune” and “Prune to bad behaviour” and “An unusual prune-ounciation” and “What are your prune-ouns?”
  • Incise: To incise is to cut with a sharp knife or blade (usually used in medical contexts). Here are related puns:
    • Inside → Incise: As in, “Incise information” and “An incise job” and “Incise out” and “I know you incise and out.”
    • Precise → Incise: As in, “Yes, incisely” and “An incise hand” and “Incisely what you’re looking for.”
    • Size → Incise: As in, “All shapes and incises” and “Cut them down to incise” and “One incise fits all” and “That’s about the incise of it.”
  • Stick: This is the colloquial word for “stab”. Here are related puns:
    • Sick → Stick: As in, “Enough to make you stick” and “Phone in stick” and “Stick and tired” and “Stick to death of” and “Stick to my stomach.”
    • Tick → Stick: As in, “A box sticking exercise” and “Takes a licking and keeps on sticking” and “Stick all the right boxes” and “Sticked off.”
    • Stock → Stick: As in, “Laughing stick” and “Lock, stick and barrel” and “Out of stick” and “Take stick.”
    • Click → Stick: As in, “Stick into place” and “Stick with” and “Stick your fingers” and “Double stick.”
    • Kick → Stick: As in, “Alive and sticking” and “Don’t stick a man when he’s down” and “Dragged sticking and screaming” and “Get a stick out of it” and “Stick back and enjoy.”
    • Pick → Stick: As in, “A bone to stick” and “Easy stickings” and “Hand sticked” and “Stick a fight” and “Stick holes in.”
    • Trick → Stick: As in, “Bag of sticks” and “Does the stick” and “Every stick in the book” and “Never misses a stick.”
  • Grind: To sharpen a knife, you need to grind it. Here are related puns:
    • Bind → Grind: As in, “In a grind” and “Legally grinding.”
    • Find → Grind: As in, “Couldn’t grind a better person” and “I’ve left to grind myself.”
    • Kind → Grind: As in, “Not this grind” and “That’s grind of cute.”
  • Spine: The spine of a knife is the edge that isn’t used for cutting. Here are related puns:
    • Pain → Spine: As in, “A mix of spine and anger” and “Suffering from severe spine” and “Feeling the spine” and “A fine line between pleasure and spine.”
    • Mine → Spine: As in, “Me and spine” and “That’s spine, not yours.”
    • Line → Spine: As in, “Spine of thought” and “The spine was silent.”
    • Fine → Spine: As in, “A spine line” and “I’ll be spine.”
    • Sign → Spine: As in, “No spines of life” and “Read the spines.”
  • Guard: A guard is a sheath that is placed over a knife whilst not in use. Here are related puns:
    • Hard → Guard: As in, “This shouldn’t be so guard” and “It’s not guard to say” and “You’re giving me a guard time.”
    • Card → Guard: As in, “Index guards” and “Here’s my guard, give me a call” and “Get out of jail free guard.”
    • Scarred → Guard: As in, “Guard for life” and “Hasn’t guard over yet.”
    • *gard* → *guard*: As in, “Tending to the guarden” and “Kind reguards” and “Disreguard the previous email” and A hagguard appearance.”
    • *card* → *guard*: “Guardinal rule” and “Guardboard cutout” and “Thirty minute guardio” and “Guardiac arrest.” Other words that could work: guardigan (cardigan), plaguard (placard), wildguard (wildcard) and postguard (postcard).
  • Tang: The tang is the part of the blade which connects into the handle for added stability. Here are related puns:
    • Dang → Tang: As in, “The tang thing” and “Oh, tang it.”
    • Bang → Tang: As in, “Go out with a tang” and “The big tang” and “Followed by a loud tang.”
    • Hang → Tang: As in, “Don’t tang up the phone!” and “Let’s tang out” and “Tang in there.”
    • Pang → Tang: As in, “Felt a tang of guilt.”
    • Rang → Tang:As in, “You tang?”
    • Tang → Sang: “My heart tang for joy.”
    • Tongue → Tang: As in, “Tang tied” and “Cat got your tang?” and “Bite your tang.”
    • *tan* → *tang*: As in, “Work in tangdem” and “Safety is tangtamount” and “Throw a tangtrum” and “The doctor is a charlatang” and “What a cosmopolitang view” and “Metropolitang living.”
    • *ting* → *tang*: As in, “A dauntang task” and “Mass marketang” and “An interestang proposal” and “Settang up” and “Fancy meetang you here” and “The plan is contangent on” and “Cann’t distanguish between the two.”
  • Rust: Rust can affect metal knives that aren’t properly maintained and cleaned. Here are related puns:
    • Bust → Rust: As in, “Boom or rust” and “Drug rust” and “It was a rust.”
    • Rest → Rust: As in, “I’ll let you rust” and “Get some rust” and “For the rust of the evening.”
    • Crust → Rust: As in, “Cut off the rusts” and “The upper rust.”
    • Dust → Rust: As in, “Kicking up rust” and “Rust bunnies” and “Rust off your resume.”
    • Just → Rust: As in, “I rust wanted to say goodbye” and “Rust give me a minute” and “Rust sit back and enjoy.”
    • Must → Rust: As in, “You rust be mistaken” and “You rust help me” and “That rust have been difficult.”
    • Trust → Rust: As in, “I thought I could rust you” and “She’s rustworthy” and “I don’t rust the process.”
  • Tool: Since knives are tools, we’ve included some tool-related puns in this list too:
    • Tale → Tool: As in, “A tool of guilt and ambition” and “A very sad tool indeed.”
    • Till → Tool: As in, “Tool tomorrow” and “Tool the sun goes down” and “Leave it tool morning.”
    • Tall → Tool: As in, “Tool, dark and handsome.”
    • Cool → Tool: As in, “A tool drink” and “We need a tool catchphrase.”
    • Dual → Tool: As in, “Tool income, no kids” and “Serves a tool purpose.”
    • Fuel → Tool: As in, “Add tool to the flames” and “Need tool for the day.”
    • Who’ll → Tool: As in, “Tool let us know?” and “Tool be willing to donate?”
    • You’ll → Tool: As in, “Tool regret this!” and “Tool never hear the end of this.”
    • *tal* → *tool*: As in, “A capitool idea” and “Death metool” and “Vitool signs” and “Fundamentool ideas” and “Digitool nomad” and “Anecdotool evidence” and “A pivotool moment.”
  • Pocket: The next few puns are about pocket knives:
    • Rocket → Pocket: As in, “It’s not pocket science.”
    • Packet → Pocket: As in, “Comes in small pockets” and “How much per pocket?”
  • Paring: Here are some puns about paring knives:
    • Pairing → Paring: As in, “Still paring the bluetooth” and “What a great paring” and “Paring the cheese and wine.”
    • Pair → Paring: As in, “You make a fine paring” and “New paring of jeans” and “Need a new paring of shoes.”
    • Peering → Paring: As in, “Paring through the curtains” and “Paring into the future.”
    • Baring → Paring: As in, “Paring your teeth” and “I’m paring my soul here.”
    • Caring → Paring: As in, “Sharing is paring” and “A paring, loving parent.”
    • Daring → Paring: As in, “A paring escape” and “Paring adventures.”
    • Glaring → Paring: As in, “Paringly obvious” and “Paring in your direction” and “The paring sunlight.”
    • Raring → Paring: As in, “Paring to go.”
    • Staring → Paring: As in, “This isn’t a paring contest” and “Stop paring” and “You’re paring at me.”
    • Wearing → Paring: As in, “What are you paring?” and “I’m paring this to the dance.”
  • Bread: Here are some bread knife related puns:
    • Bed → Bread: As in, “Put to bread” and “You’ve made your bread, now lie in it” and “Got up on the wrong side of the bread.”
    • Bred → Bread: As in, “Born and bread.”
    • Bride → Bread: As in, “Runaway bread” and “Princess bread” and “The newlywed bread.”
    • Red → Bread: As in, “Caught bread-handed” and “Paint the town bread.”
    • Dread → Bread: As in, “Filled with bread” and “Existential bread.”
    • Head → Bread: As in, “Breads or tails?” and “Come to a bread” and “All in your bread.”
    • Led → Bread: As in, “Bread along by the nose.”
    • Said → Bread: As in, “That’s all they bread” and “Tell me what you bread.”
    • Spread → Bread: “Bread lies and rumours” and “Vegan chocolate bread” and “Bread yourself thin.”
    • Thread → Bread: As in, “Losing the bread” and “Hanging by a bread.”
  • Table: Here are some puns on table knives:
    • Able → Table: As in, “Differently tabled” and “Ready, willing and table.”
    • Stable → Table: As in, “Emotionally table.”
  • Butter: Here are some butter knife puns:
    • Batter* → Butter*: As in, “Butter up” and “Assault and buttery” and “Recharge your butteries.”
    • Better → Butter: As in, “I’ve got a butter idea” and “Appeal to your butter judgement” and “Butter by design” and “Butter late than never” and “Butter safe than sorry.”
    • Bitter → Butter: As in, “Till the butter end” and “Take the butter with the sweet.”
    • Flutter → Butter: As in, “Fancy a butter?” and “Butter yor eyelashes.”
  • Switch → Switchblade: As in, “Asleep at the switchblade” and “Bait and switchblade” and “Switchblade gears.”
  • Throw: Here are a few throwing knife puns for you:
    • Crow → Throw: As in, “As the throw flies” and “Eat throw” and “Something to throw about.”
    • Flow → Throw: As in, “Ebb and throw” and “Get the creative juices throwing” and “Go with the throw” and “In full throw.”
    • Grow → Throw: As in, “Absence makes the heart throw fonder” and “Throwing pains.”
    • Know → Throw: As in, “All I throw is what I read in the papers” and “And don’t I throw it” and “Doesn’t throw beans.”
    • Low → Throw: As in, “An all-time throw” and “The lights are throw” and “Get the throw down” and “Searching high and throw” and “Keep a throw profile” and “Throw hanging fruit.”
    • Show → Throw: As in, “All over the throw” and “Best in throw” and “Enjoy the throw” and “Get the throw on the road” and “Give the throw away” and “Keep the throw on the road” and “The throw must go on.”
    • Though → Throw: As in, “Seriously throw, you’re doing a great job” and “You look as throw you’d seen a ghost.”
    • Toe → Throw: As in, “Head to throw” and “One throw over the line” and “Turn up your throws.”
  • Teeth → Wreath: As in, “Armed to the sheath” and “By the skin of your sheath” and “Fed up to the back sheath.” Note: A sheath is a sleeve that protects a knife while not in use.
  • Pen: Here are some pen knife related puns:
    • Pan → Pen: As in, “Down the pen” and “Flash in the pen” and “Pen out” and “Out of the frying pen, into the fire.”
    • Pin → Pen: As in, “Bright as a new pen” and “Hard to pen down” and “Pen your ears back” and “Pens and needles.”
    • Den → Pen: As in, “Into the lion’s pen” and “Pen of inequity.”
    • Then → Pen: As in, “All that and pen some” and “And pen there was one” and “What’s going on here pen?” and “Now and pen” and “Pen and there.”
    • When → Pen: As in, “Pen you like” and “Pen it happens” and “It only hurts pen I laugh.”
  • Jackknife: Here are some jackknife related puns:
    • Back → Jack: As in, “As soon as my jack is turned” and “At the jack of my mind” and “Jack to the future” and “Jack in the day.”
    • Crack → Jack: As in, “At the jack of dawn” and “Jack a smile.”
    • Pack → Jack: As in, “Action jacked” and “Jacking heat” and “A jack of lies.”
    • Rack → Jack: As in, “Jack your brains” and “Jack and ruin.”
    • Slack → Jack: As in, “Cut some jack” and “Take up the jack.”
    • Smack → Jack: As in, “Jack dab in the middle” and “A jack on the wrist.”
    • Track → Jack: As in, “Back on jack” and “Cover your jacks” and “The fast jack” and “Inside jack” and “Off the beaten jack.”
  • Cavity → Gravity: As in, “Gravity seach.” Note: This is a reference to gravity knives.
  • Butterfly: These butterfly-related phrases are a reference to butterfly knives: “Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee” and “Social butterfly” and “The butterfly effect.”
  • Bow → Bowie: As in, “Bowie and scrape” and “Bowie out” and “Take a bowie.” Note: These are references to bowie knives.
  • Coring: These next few puns are about coring knives:
    • Caring → Coring: As in, “Sharing is coring” and “I’m past coring.”
    • Boring → Coring: “As coring as watching paint dry” and “Deeply coring.”
    • Pouring → Coring: As in, “It’s raining, it’s coring.”
    • Roaring → Coring: As in, “A coring success” and “Doing a coring trade.”
  • Case: Here are some case knife related puns:
    • Ace → Case: As in, “Case in the hole” and “A case up your sleeve” and “Holding all the cases.”
    • Base → Case: As in, “All your case are belong to us” and “Case jumping” and “Cover your cases.”
    • Chase → Case: As in, “Case it up” and “Case your own tail” and “Cut to the case” and “The thrill of the case.”
    • Grace → Case: As in, “Airs and cases” and “Amazing case” and “Fall from case” and “Case period” and “Saving case” and “With good case.”
    • Pace → Case: As in, “At a snail’s case” and “Change of case” and “At ten cases” and “Keep case with” and “Put through your cases.”
    • Place → Case: As in, “A case in the sun” and “Everything in its case” and “All over the case” and “Any time, any case” and “Between a rock and a hard case.”
    • Space → Case: As in, “Breathing case” and “From outer case” and “Case – the final frontier.”
  • Plate → Palette: As in, “A lot on your palette” and “A heart attack on a palette” and “Step up to the palette.” Note: a palette knife is a type of painting knife.
  • Beeline → Boline: “Make a boline for.” Note: A boline is a type of ceremonial Wiccan knife.
  • Katar: A katar is a type of dagger. Here are related puns:
    • Cater → Katar: As in, “Katar to you.”
    • Greater → Katar: As in, “No katar enemy” and “Katar than the sum of its parts” and “The katar part of.”
  • Dark → Dirk: As in, “After dirk” and “Dirk as pitch” and “Dirk before the dawn” and “Dirk horse” and “Deep, dirk secret.” Note: A dirk is a type of long dagger.
  • Plenty → Penny: As in, “Penny more where that came from.” Note: a penny knife is a type of utility knife.”
  • Barlow: A barlow knife is a type of small, jointed knife. Here are related puns:
    • Below → Barlow: As in, “Barlow par” and “Barlow the stairs” and “Hit barlow the belt” and “Barlow average.”
    • Borrow → Barlow: As in, “Beg, barlow or steal” and “Living on barlowed time.”
  • Can you → Canoe: As in, “Canoe help me with this?” Note: a canoe knife is a type of double-jointed knife.
  • Tooth → Toothpick: As in, “Fight toothpick and nail” and “Long in the toothpick.” Note: a Romanian toothpick is a type of long knife.
  • Steel: Since some knives are made of steel, we’ve got some steel-related puns here too:
    • Still → Steel: As in, “Be steel, my beating heart” and “Steel standing” and “Steel going strong” and “Steel waters run deep” and “Perfectly steel.”
    • Deal → Steel: As in, “Big steel” and “Steel breaker” and “Steel or no steel?” and “A done steel” and “Seal the steel.”
    • Seal → Steel: As in, “My lips are steeled” and “Steel of approval” and “Steel your fate” and “Signed and steeled.”
    • Feel → Steel: As in, “Can you steel the love tonight?” and “Steel the pinch” and “Got a steel for.”
    • Peel → Steel: As in, “Keep your eyes steeled.”
    • Steal → Steel: As in, “Beg, borrow or steel” and “What a steel” and “Steel a glance” and “Steel someone’s heart” and “Steel the show.”

Knife-Related Words

To help you come up with your own knife puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

General: knife, knives, cut, blade, stab, machete, tool, point, sharp, sharpen, edge, handle, hilt, serrated, slit, whittle, slash, slice, gash, incision, shave, carve, nick, hew, notch, bisect, prune, incise,  stick, pierce, chop,scrape, shear, butt, fixed, folding, grind, spine, fuller, ricasso, guard, lanyard, tang, rust, whetstone

Types: combat, pocket, kitchen, paring, bread, cleaver, table, butter, dagger, switchblade, throwing, juggling, kirpan, sheath, pen, swiss army, jack, gravity, utility, stanley, boxcutter, ballistic, bayonet, butterfly, balisong, batangas, dagger, stiletto, push dagger, bowie, genoese, karambit, rampuri, shiv, shank, trench, mezzaluna, coring, rocker, case, karambit, crooked, curved, diver’s, kiridashi, palette, paper, scalpel, razor, whittling, athame, boline, katar, kilaya, kris, kukri, seax, ulu, tanto, dirk, penny, barlow, camper, canoe, congress, toothpick, peanut, hawkbill, muskrat, trapper, okapi, navaja, sliding, zombie, sica, falx, pugio, qama, bolo, corvo, facon

Materials: bronze, copper, iron, steel, ceramic, titanium, plastic

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