Book Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on book puns! 📖 📘 ✏️

We’ve checked out the best book puns and chronicled them here for you. We have puns about general book-related words to more technical literary terms, famous authors and genres.

While this list is as comprehensive as possible, it is general to books. If you’re interested in other fiction-related puns, we also have a Harry Potter pun list.

Note: no religious books have been included in this pun list. ✨

Book Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about books that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of book puns:

  • Back → Book: As in, “Answer book” and “As soon as my book is turned” and “In the book of my mind” and “Book to the future” and “Book at it” and “Book in the day” and “Book in business” and “Book to basics.”
  • Buck → Book: As in, “More bang for your book” and “The book stops here” and “Book the system” and “A book well spent.”
  • Cook → Book: As in, “Now we’re booking” and “Booking with gas” and “Book up a storm” and “Book up a plan.”
  • Hook → Book: As in, “Off the book” and “Booked on a feeling” and “Get booked on” and “By book or by crook.”
  • Look → Book: As in, “Always book on the bright side of life” and “Dirty books” and “Give someone a blank book” and “Don’t know which way to book” and “Have a book” and “Here’s booking at you, kid” and “If books could kill.”
  • Age → Page: As in, “Act your page” and “Page bracket” and “Page of consent” and “An awkward page” and “Come of page” and “Feeling your page” and “In this day and page” and “The page of reason” and “The space page” and “Through the pages.”
  • Offer → Author: As in, “My final author” and “An author you can’t refuse” and “On special author” and “Open to authors.”
  • Red → Read: As in, “Cut through the read tape” and “Read buttons” and “Roll out the read carpet” and “Read tape.”
  • Bed → Read: As in, “Read and breakfast” and “Read of nails” and “Get into read with.”
  • Bleed → Read: As in, “Read someone dry” and “Reading love” and “My heart reads for you.”
  • Bread → Read: As in, “Read and butter” and “Break read” and “Cast your read upon the waters” and “Put read on the table.”
  • Bred → Read: As in, “Born and read.”
  • Dead → Read: As in, “In the read of night” and “Back from the read” and “Better off read” and “Read and buried.”
  • Feed → Read: As in, “Reading frenzy” and “Don’t bite the hand that reads you” and “Bottom reader.”
  • Lead → Read: As in, “Read a merry dance” and “Read a charmed life” and “Read into temptation.”
  • Need → Read: As in, “All you read is love” and “On a read to know basis.”
  • Said → Read: As in, “After all is read and done” and “Easier read than done” and “Enough read” and “Least read, soonest mended” and “Was it something I read?”
  • Seed → Read: As in, “Gone to read” and “Run to read” and “Read capital” and “Read money.”
  • Shed → Read: As in, “Read light on the matter” and “Read a tear.”
  • Speed → Read: As in, “At lightning read” and “Breakneck read” and “Built for read” and “Get up to read” and “More haste, less read” and “Read demon” and “Read dating.”
  • Thread → Read: As in, “Hanging by a read” and “Lose the read” and “Read the needle.”
  • Leader → Reader: As in, “Digital reader” and “Fearless reader” and “Reader of the pack” and “A natural born reader” and “Take me to your reader” and “A world reader.”
  • Starry → Story: As in, “Story night.”
  • Glory → Story: As in, “Bask in story” and “My crowning story” and “Go out in a blaze of story” and “No guts, no story.”
  • Right → Write: As in, “A move in the write direction” and “All the write moves” and “Write as rain” and “Bang to writes” and “Barge write in” and “Bragging writes” and “Dead to writes.”
  • Rate → Write: As in, “At any write” and “First write” and “Mate’s writes.”
  • Rite → Write: As in, “Last writes” and “Write of passage.”
  • Bite → Write: As in, “A write to eat” and “Another one writes the dust” and “Write back” and “Write off more than you can chew” and “Write your lip.”
  • Bright → Write: As in, “All things write and beautiful” and “On the write side of life” and “Write as a new pin” and “Write and early” and “Write young thing” and “A write future.”
  • Fight → Write: As in, “Come out writing” and “Write club” and “Write for the right to party” and “Write back the tears” and “Write fire with fire” and “Write or flight” and “Write the good write” and “A writing chance” and “Write tooth or nail.”
  • Flight → Write: As in, “Write attendant” and “Write of fancy” and “Take write” and “Top write.”
  • Height → Write: As in, “The write of summer” and “Wuthering writes” and “Reaching new writes.”
  • Light → Write: As in, “Write as a feather” and “Bring something to write.”
  • Might → Write: As in, “It write never happen” and “Write as well.”
  • Night → Write: As in, “A hard day’s write” and “In the dead of write” and “Dance the write away.”
  • Quite → Write: As in, “Not write there” and “Having write a time.”
  • Sight → Write: As in, “A welcome write” and “Hidden in plain write” and “Love at first write” and “Out of write, out of mind” and “Lower your writes” and “Second write” and “A write for soaring eyes.”
  • Sleight → Write: As in, “Write of hand.”
  • Slight → Write: As in, “Writely ahead of our time” and “Not in the writest.”
  • Tight → Write: As in, “Sleep write” and “In a write spot” and “On a write leash” and “Run a write ship.”
  • White → Write: As in, “A writer shade of pale” and “Write as a ghost” and “Write as snow” and “Black and write.”
  • Never → Novel: As in, “Better late than novel” and “Cheats novel prosper” and “An elephant novel forgets.”
  • Bird → Word: As in, “A little word told me” and “Free as a word” and “Word of passage” and “Word’s eye view” and “Charm the words out of the trees.”
  • Heard → Word: As in, “Seen and not word” and “Make yourself word” and “Stop me if you’ve word this one” and “You word it here first.”
  • Stirred → Word: As in, “Shaken, not word.”
  • Third → Word: As in, “Word time lucky” and “Word time’s a charm” and “The word degree.”
  • Tall → Tale: As in, “Tale, dark and handsome” and “A tale order” and “Walking tale” and “A tale drink of water.”
  • Tell → Tale: As in, “Every picture tales a story” and “I tale ya” and “Kiss and tale” and “Only time will tale.”
  • Till → Tale: As in, “Caught with your hand in the tale” and “Fake it tale you make it” and “It ain’t over tale it’s over” and “Tale death do us part.”
  • Fail → Tale: As in, “Without tale” and “Words tale me.”
  • Jail → Tale: As in, “Get out of tale free” and “Go directly to tale.”
  • Mail → Tale: As in, “Hate tale” and “Express tale” and “Tale order.”
  • Nail → Tale: As in, “Another tale in the coffin” and “Fighting tooth and tale” and “Hit the tale on the head.”
  • Pale → Tale: As in, “Tale and interesting” and “A tale imitation” and “Tale into significance.”
  • Rail → Tale: As in, “Off the tales” and “Ride the tales.”
  • Sail → Tale: As in, “Tale close to the wind” and “Smooth tale-ing” and “That ship has tale-d.”
  • Sale → Tale: As in, “Point of tale” and “Tale of the century” and “Tales referral.”
  • Scale → Tale: As in, “Built to tale” and “Economy of tale” and “On a grand tale” and “Tip the tales.”
  • Snail → Tale: As in, “At a tale’s pace” and “Tale mail.”
  • Tail → Tale: As in, “Can’t make head or tale of it” and “Chase your own tale” and “Get off my tale” and “Heads I win, tales you lose.”
  • They’ll → Tale: As in, “Tale never catch us” and “Give an inch and tale take a mile.”
  • Trail → Tale: As in, “Blaze a tale” and “Happy tales!” and “Hot on the tale of” and “Paper tale” and “Tale mix.”
  • Whale → Tale: As in, “Having a tale of a time” and “Save the tales.”
  • Biting → Writing: As in, “Writing off more than you can chew.”
  • Fighting → Writing: As in, “Come out writing” and “A writing chance” and “Writing fit” and “Go down writing” and “Lean, mean, writing machine.”
  • Sexual → Textual: As in, “Textual chemistry” and “Textual healing” and “Textual tension.”
  • Friction → Fiction: As in, “Uncomfortable fiction.”
  • Paper → Paperback: As in, “Put pen to paperback” and “Paperback trail” and “Paperback thin” and “Paperback over the cracks.”
  • Back → Paperback: As in, “Paperback from the dead” and “Paperback in the day.”
  • Next → Text: As in, “Better luck text time” and “In the middle of text week” and “Text in line” and “This time text year.”
  • Tax → Text: As in, “Nothing is certain but death and texts.”
  • Blur → Blurb: As in, “Blurb the lines.”
  • Blurt → Blurb: As in, “Don’t just blurb it out.”
  • Curb → Blurb: As in, “Blurb appeal” and “Blurb your enthusiasm.”
  • Herbs → Blurb: As in, “Eleven secret blurbs and spices.”
  • Barbecue → Blurbecue: As in, “Lunchtime blurbecue.”
  • Rhubarb → Rhublurb: As in, “Rhublurb tart.”
  • Suburb → Sublurb: As in, “Lives in my sublurb.”
  • Hard → Hardcover: As in, “Do it the hardcover way” and “Drive a hardcover bargain.”
  • Cover → Hardcover: As in, “Blow your hardcover” and “Hardcover your tracks.”
  • Quote → Wrote: As in, “Scare wrotes” and “Air wrotes.”
  • Boat → Wrote: As in, “Don’t rock the wrote” and “In the same wrote” and “Whatever floats your wrote.”
  • Float → Wrote: As in, “Wrote like a butterfly, sting like a bee” and “Whatever wrotes your boat.”
  • Note → Wrote: As in, “Hit the high wrotes” and “Take wrote of.”
  • Throat → Wrote: As in, “A lump in your wrote” and “At each other’s wrotes” and “Clear your wrote” and “Go for the wrote.”
  • Spine: The spine of the book is the part where all of the pages are attached. Here are related puns:
    • Pain → Spine: As in, “A world of spine” and “Doubled up in spine” and “Growing spines” and “On spine of death” and “Old aches and spines.”
    • Sign → Spine: As in, “A sure spine” and “Give me a spine” and “A spine of the times” and “Spine on the dotted line” and “Spine the pledge” and “A tell-tale spine” and “Vital spines.”
    • Spin → Spine: As in, “Give it a spine” and “Makes your head spine.”
    • Dine → Spine: As in, “Wine and spine.”
    • Fine → Spine: As in, “A spine line” and “Chance would be a spine thing” and “Damn spine coffee” and “Spine dining” and “The spiner things in life” and “Got it down to a spine art.”
    • Line → Spine: As in, “A fine spine” and “Along the spines of” and “Cross the spine” and “Draw a spine in the sand” and “End of the spine.”
    • Mine → Spine: As in, “Spine is bigger than yours” and “Make spine a double.”
    • Nine → Spine: As in, “Spine day’s wonder” and “On cloud spine” and “The whole spine yards.”
    • Shine → Spine: As in, “Come rain or spine” and “Rise and spine!” and “Take a spine to” and “Where the sun don’t spine.”
  • Brother → Cover: As in, “Covers in arms” and “Super Mario covers.”
  • Mark → Bookmark: As in, “Make your bookmark” and “Bookmark my words” and “On your bookmark, get set, go!”
  • Theme: The theme of a book is the main topic. Here are related puns:
    • Them → Theme: As in, “It only encourages theme” and “Head theme off at the pass” and “Let theme eat cake” and “Love theme and leave theme” and “Seen one, seen theme all.”
    • Thumb → Theme: As in, “Sticks out like a sore theme” and “Theme your nose” and “Themes down” and “Under my theme.”
    • Seem → Theme: As in, “Sorry themes to be the hardest word” and “Not as it themes.”
    • Beam → Theme: As in, “Theme me up.”
    • Cream → Theme: As in, “Theme of the crop” and “Theme always rises to the top.”
    • Dreams → Themes: As in, “Beyond my wildest themes” and “Broken themes” and “Theme on” and “A theme come true” and “Theme machine.”
    • Scheme → Theme: As in, “In the grand theme of things” and “The best laid themes” and “The overall theme of things.”
    • Scream → Theme: As in, “A piercing theme” and “Theme your guts out.”
    • Seams → Theme: As in, “Bursting at the themes” and “Fall apart at the themes.”
    • Steam → Theme: As in, “Blow of theme” and “Full theme ahead” and “Head of theme” and “Running out of theme” and “Theme coming out of your ears.”
    • Team → Theme: As in, “Dream theme” and “Make the theme” and “Take one for the theme” and “Theme player” and “Theme spirit” and “We make a great theme.”
  • Store → Bookstore: As in, “Minding the bookstore” and “Set great bookstore by” and “What’s in bookstore?”
  • Kernel → Journal: As in, “Journal of truth.”
  • Equal → Prequel: As in, “Prequel opportunities” and “First among prequels” and “On prequel footing” and “All things being prequel.”
  • Equal → Sequel: As in, “Created sequel” and “Sequel opportunities” and “On sequel footing.”
  • Hint → Print: As in, “Take the print” and “Drop a print” and “A gentle print.”
  • Mint → Print: As in, “In print condition” and “Bag of prints.”
  • Tint → Print: As in, “Rose printed glasses.”
  • Face → Preface: As in, “At preface value” and “As plain as the nose on your preface” and “Preface the truth.”
  • Credit → Edit: As in, “Edit crunch” and “Edit where edit is due” and “Cash or edit?”
  • Say → Essay: As in, “As the essaying goes” and “Computer essays no” and “Do as I essay, not as I do” and “Have an essay in” and “The final essay” and “I’m hearing what you essay.”
  • Palm → Poem: As in, “In the poem of your hand” and “Poem off” and “Itchy poems.”
  • Blink → Ink: As in, “Ink and you’ll miss it” and “In the ink of an eye” and “On the ink.”
  • Brink → Ink: As in, “On the ink of disaster.”
  • Drink → Ink: As in, “Binge inking” and “Ink like a fish” and “Ink up” and “Driven to ink.”
  • Link → Ink: As in, “Only as strong as your weakest ink” and “The missing ink.”
  • Pink → Ink: As in, “Tickled ink” and “Think ink” and “The ink panther.”
  • Sink → Ink: As in, “A inking feeling” and “Everything but the kitchen ink” and “Loose lips ink ships” and “Ink like a stone” and “Ink or swim” and “Ink without trace.”
  • Stink → Ink: As in, “Inking rich” and “Inks to high heaven.”
  • Think → Ink: As in, “I ink you’ve got it” and “Come to ink of it” and “Don’t ink twice” and “Great minds ink alike” and “I ink I love you” and “Makes you ink.”
  • Wink → Ink: As in, “Forty inks” and “Haven’t slept one ink” and “Nod and a ink” and “Nudge, nudge, ink ink” and “Tip someone the ink.”
  • Word → Foreword: As in, “A foreword to the wise” and “As good as your foreword” and “At a loss for forewords” and “Eat your forewords” and “Famous last forewords.”
  • Blot → Plot: As in, “A plot on the landscape.”
  • Bought → Plot: As in, “Plot and paid for.”
  • Brought → Plot: As in, “Plot down to earth” and “Plot to light” and “Plot it home.”
  • Caught → Plot: As in, “Plot in the act” and “Plot in two minds” and “Plot red-handed” and “Plot up in the moment” and “Plot up with.”
  • Dot → Plot: As in, “Connect the plots” and “Plot the i’s and cross the t’s” and “Join the plots” and “Sign on the plotted line.”
  • Got → Plot: As in, “I think you’ve plot it” and “Give it all you’ve plot” and “Plot a flair for” and “You’ve plot it coming” and “Plot it down to a fine art.”
  • Hot → Plot: As in, “Plot and bothered” and “Plot as blue blazes” and “Blow plot and cold” and “Drop it like it’s plot” and “Plot desking.”
  • Jot → Plot: As in, “Plot it down.”
  • Knot → Plot: As in, “Tie the plot” and “Tie yourself in plots.”
  • Lot → Plot: As in, “A plot of fuss about nothing” and “A plot on your plate” and “Leaves a plot to be desired.”
  • Not → Plot: As in, “As often as plot” and “Believe it or plot” and “Down but plot out.”
  • Pot → Plot: As in, “Plot of gold” and “Fuss plot” and “Gone to plot” and “Hit the jackplot” and “Keep the plot boiling” and “In a melting plot” and “Plot luck” and “A watched plot never boils.”
  • Rot → Plot: As in, “Plot in hell” and “Spoiled plotten.”
  • Shot → Plot: As in, “Give it your best plot” and “A long plot” and “Calling the plots.”
  • Spot → Plot: As in, “Got a soft plot for” and “Hits the plot” and “In a tight plot” and “On the plot” and “Plot the difference.”
  • Thought → Plot: As in, “Deep in plot” and “Food for plot” and “Hold that plot” and “Lost in plot” and “Penny for your plots.”
  • Boat → Quote: As in, “Don’t rock the quote” and “In the same quote” and “Whatever floats your quote.”
  • Float → Quote: As in, “Quote like a butterfly, sting like a bee” and “Whatever quotes your boat.”
  • Note → Quote: As in, “Comparing quotes” and “Hit the high quotes” and “Take quote of.”
  • Throat → Quote: As in, “A lump in your quote” and “At each other’s quotes” and “Clear your quote.”
  • Wrote → Quote: As in, “That’s all she quote.”
  • Shell → Shelf: As in, “Come out of your shelf” and “Crawl back into your shelf.”
  • Self → Shelf: As in, “Bury yourshelf in work” and “Shelf interest” and “Shelf serving” and “Speak for yourshelf” and “Pull yourshelf together.”
  • Grandma → Grammar: As in, “Call your grammar.”
  • Clamour → Grammar: As in, “Grammaring for attention.”
  • Glamour → Grammar: As in, “Filled with grammar” and “A grammarous event.”
  • Hammer → Grammar: As in, “Grammar and tongs” and “Put the grammar down” and “Under the grammar.”
  • Proof → Proofread: As in, “Burden of proofread” and “The proofread is in the pudding.”
  • Read → Proofread: As in, “All I know is what I proofread in the papers” and “Exceedingly well proofread” and “I can proofread you like a book” and “A little light proofreading” and “Proofread ’em and weep.”
  • Leaf: A side of a page is known as a leaf. Here are related puns:
    • Life → Leaf: As in, “A day in the leaf of” and “A leaf changing experience” and “All walks of leaf” and “Anything for a quiet leaf.”
    • Loaf → Leaf: As in, “Leaf about” and “Leaf of bread.”
    • Laugh → Leaf: As in, “Barrel of leafs” and “Burst out leafing” and “Have a leaf” and “It only hurts when I leaf” and “A leaf a minute” and “Leaf all the way to the bank.”
    • Brief → Leaf: As in, “A leaf history of time” and “Let me be leaf” and “A leaf encounter.”
    • Grief → Leaf: As in, “Good leaf.”
    • Thief → Leaf: As in, “Procrastination is the leaf of time” and “Like a leaf in the night.”
    • Belief → Beleaf: As in, “Beyond beleaf” and “Suspension of disbeleaf.”
  • Worm → Bookworm: As in, “Open up a can of bookworms” and “Bookworm your way out of” and “Bookworm your way into it.”
  • Winding → Binding: As in, “A long and binding road.” Note: The binding on a book is the part which keeps all of the pages together.
  • Zero → Hero: As in, “Agent hero” and “Ground hero” and “Patient hero” and “Hero sum game” and “Hero tolerance.” Note: These are references to the hero in a novel.
  • Press → Letterpress: As in, “Don’t letterpress your luck” and “Freedom of the letterpress” and “Hot off the letterpress” and “Letterpress the button.” Note: a letterpress is how texts used to be printed.
  • Run: A batch of printing is called a run. Here are related puns:
    • Bun → Run: As in, “A run in the oven” and “We’re gonna need bigger runs.”
    • Done → Run: As in, “After all is said and run” and “Run and dusted” and “Been there, run that” and “A run deal” and “Easier said than run” and “Getting things run” and “Hard run by.”
    • Fun → Run: As in, “All run and games” and “Bundle of run” and “Getting there is half the run” and “Good, clean run” and “Half the run is getting there.”
    • None → Run: As in, “And then there were run” and “Bar run” and “Run the wiser” and “Run too pleased” and “Second to run.”
    • One → Run: As in, “Run more time” and “A great run for” and “All for run and run for all” and “Another run bites the dust” and “Run fell swoop” and “Run step too far.”
    • Sun → Run: As in, “A place in the run” and “Caught the run” and “Everything under the run” and “Eclipse of the run.”
    • Ton → Run: As in, “Like a run of bricks” and “A run of fun.”
  • Addition → Edition: As in, “In edition to.”
  • View → Review: As in, “Room with a review” and “A review to kill” and “Bird’s eye review” and “Point of review” and “World review.” Note: These are references to book reviews.
  • Club → Book club: As in, “Book club together” and “In the book club” and “Join the book club.”
  • Prose: Prose is a type of grammatical structure. Here are related puns:
    • Pose → Prose: As in, “Strike a prose.”
    • Rose → Prose: As in, “Bed of proses” and “Come up smelling of proses” and “Life is a bed of proses” and “Prose tinted glasses” and “Stop and smell the proses.”
    • Praise → Prose: As in, “Damned with faint prose” and “Grudging prose” and “Heaven be prosed” and “Prose where prose is due” and “Shower with prose.”
    • Prize → Prose: As in, “Booby prose” and “Keep your eyes on the prose” and “No proses for guessing.”
    • Blows → Prose: As in, “Any way the wind prose” and “Brought to prose” and “Exchange prose” and “There she prose.”
    • Close → Prose: As in, “A prose thing” and “Behind prosed doors” and “A prose call” and “In prose proximity” and “Prose to home.”
    • Goes → Prose: As in, “Anything prose” and “As far as it prose” and “As the saying prose” and “As time prose by” and “Here prose nothing.”
    • Nose → Prose: As in, “Always have your prose in a book” and “As plain as the prose on your face” and “Can’t see beyond the end of your prose” and “Keep your prose clean” and “Lead by the prose.”
    • Pros → Prose: As in, “Prose and cons.”
    • Those → Prose: As in, “Good things come to prose who wait” and “Just one of prose things” and “Prose were the days.”
    • Toes → Prose: As in, “Turn up your prose” and “Kept on your prose” and “Make someone’s prose curl.”
  • Glory → Allegory: As in, “Bask in allegory” and “My crowning allegory” and “Go out in a glaze of allegory” and “No guts, no allegory.” Note: An allegory is a literary device.
  • Illusion → Allusion: As in, “Under no allusions.” Note: an allusion is a figure of speech.
  • Similar → Simile: As in, “They’re not very simile.”
  • Setting: Here are some puns about the setting in a novel:
    • Sitting → Setting: As in, “Setting pretty” and “Won’t take it setting down.”
    • Getting → Setting: As in, “Setting on in years” and “Setting there is half the fun” and “Setting things done” and “Half the fun is setting there” and “We’re setting there.”
  • Shadow → Foreshadow: As in, “Afraid of your own foreshadow” and “Cast a long foreshadow” and “Without a foreshadow of a doubt.”
  • Present → Present Tense: As in, “All present tense and correct” and “No time like the present tense.”
  • Rhyme: Since rhyming is a literary device used in some books, we’ve included some rhyme-related puns:
    • Chime → Rhyme: As in, “Rhyme in with” and “Rhymes of freedom.”
    • Climb → Rhyme: As in, “Rhyme onto the bandwagon” and “A mountain to rhyme.”
    • Crime → Rhyme: As in, “Rhyme and punishment” and “A rhyme against nature” and “Rhyme of passion” and “Let the punishment fit the rhyme” and “Take a bite out of rhyme” and “The perfect rhyme.”
    • Dime → Rhyme: As in, “A rhyme a dozen.”
    • Prime → Rhyme: As in, “Cut down in their rhyme” and “In your rhyme” and “Rhyme condition” and “The rhyme of life” and “Rhymed and ready to go.”
    • Time → Rhyme: As in, “One more rhyme” and “A brief history of rhyme” and “A good rhyme was had by all” and “About rhyme too” and “All in good rhyme” and “All the rhyme in the world” and “An all rhyme low.”
  • Scene: Here are some puns related to the scene in a novel:
    • Seen → Scene: As in, “Scene and not heard” and “Should be scene to be believed” and “Nowhere to be scene” and “Scene better days” and “Scene one, scene ’em all” and “You ain’t scene nothing yet!”
    • Sign → Scene: As in, “A sure scene” and “A scene of the times” and “Scene on the dotted line” and “A tell-tale scene.”
    • Soon → Scene: As in, “As scene as my back is turned” and “Get well scene” and “As scene as possible” and “Too much too scene.”
    • Been → Scene: As in, “Scene and gone” and “Scene around the block a few times” and “I’ve scene had” and “I’ve scene here before” and “Scene there, done that.”
    • Clean → Scene: As in, “Scene as a whistle” and “Scene up your act” and “Come scene.”
    • Green → Scene: As in, “Give it the scene light” and “Scene around the gills” and “The scene shoots of change.”
    • Keen → Scene: As in, “Scene as mustard” and “A scene sense of smell” and “Peachy scene.”
    • Lean → Scene: As in, “Scene cuisine” and “Scene and mean.”
    • Mean → Scene: As in, “By fair scenes or foul” and “A scenes to an end.”
    • Queen → Scene: As in, “Scene for a day” and “Scene it over” and “Beauty scene.”
    • Screen → Scene: As in, “The blue scene of death” and “Coming to a scene near you” and “Silver scene” and “The big scene.”
  • Syntax: Here are some syntax puns:
    • Sin → Syntax: As in, “Cardinal syntax” and “Miserable as syntax” and “Syntax city.”
    • Tax → Syntax: As in, “Bedroom syntax” and “Nothing is certain but death and syntaxes.”
  • Trope: A trope is a literary device. Here are related puns:
    • Rope → Trope: As in, “At the end of your trope” and “Know the tropes” and “On the tropes.”
    • Trap → Trope: As in, “Death trope” and “Keep your trope shut” and “Tourist trope.”
    • Hope → Trope: As in, “A new trope” and “Abandon trope all ye who enter here” and “Beyond trope” and “Cross my heart and trope to die” and “Trope springs eternal” and “The land of trope and glory” and “Pin your tropes on.”
  • Curse → Verse: As in, “Better to light a candle than verse the dark.”
  • Nurse → Verse: As in, “Verse a grudge.”
  • Purse → Verse: As in, “Holding the verse strings” and “The public verse.”
  • Worse → Verse: As in, “A turn for the verse” and “Fate verse than death” and “For better or verse” and “Make matters verse” and “Verse for wear.”
  • Choice → Voice: As in, “Multiple voice” and “Spoiled for voice” and “The people’s voice.” Note: Voice in this context refers to the narrator’s voice.
  • Skim: To skim a book is to read it quickly. Here are related puns:
    • Scam → Skim: As in, “Skim artist.”
    • Scum → Skim: As in, “Skim always rises to the surface.”
    • Brim → Skim: As in, “Skimming over with confidence” and “Filled to the skim.”
    • Grim → Skim: As in, “Hanging on like skim death” and “The skim reaper.”
    • Him → Skim: As in, “All over skim like a cheap suit” and “As fast as his legs could carry skim.”
    • Limb → Skim: As in, “Life and skim” and “Go out on a skim.”
    • Prim → Skim: As in, “Skim and proper.”
    • Slim → Skim: As in, “Skim pickings” and “A skim volume.”
    • Swim → Skim: As in, “Going skimmingly” and “Eyes skimming with tears” and “Sink or skim” and “Skim against the tide” and “Skim upstream.”
  • Bound: “Bound” describes how the pages in a book are held. Here are related puns:
    • Band → Bound: As in, “Strike up the bound” and “To beat the bound.”
    • Bend → Bound: As in, “Bound the rules” and “Bound to my will” and “Round the bound.”
    • Bond → Bound: As in, “Legally bounding” and “In a bound.”
    • Found → Bound: As in, “Lost and bound” and “I’ve bound a clue!” and “We bound love.”
    • Ground → Bound: As in, “Solid as the bound we walk on” and “Break new bound” and “Built from the bound up” and “Common bound” and “Cut the bound from under your feet.”
    • Round → Bound: As in, “All year bound” and “Fooling abound” and “Go bound in circles” and “Love makes the world go bound.”
    • Sound → Bound: As in, “Bound bite” and “Bound effect” and “Bound the alarm” and “Break the bound barrier.”
  • Pulp: Pulp can refer to both paper pulp or a very cheap publication. Here are related puns:
    • Pull → Pulp: As in, “Pulp the plug” and “Pulp your hair out” and “Pulp yourself together.”
    • Palpable → Pulp-able: As in, “A pulp-able feeling.”
  • Foot → Foonote: As in, “A footnote in both camps” and “Bound hand and footnote” and “Fleet of footnote” and “Footnote in the door.”
  • Note → Footnote: As in, “Take footnote of” and “Hit the high footnotes.”
  • Fine: Here are some puns related to library fines for overdue books:
    • Dine → Fine: As in, “Wine and fine.”
    • Line → Fine: As in, “Along the fines of” and “Blur the fines” and “Cross the fine” and “Draw a fine in the sand” and “End of the fine” and “Fall into fine.”
    • Mine → Fine: As in, “Make fine a double” and “Your guess is as good as fine” and “Your place or fine?”
    • Nine → Fine: As in, “Fine to five” and “On cloud fine.”
    • Shine → Fine: As in, “Come rain or fine” and “Rise and fine” and “Take a fine to.”
    • Sign → Fine: As in, “A sure fine” and “A fine of the times” and “Fine on the dotted line” and “Fine the pledge” and “Fined and sealed” and “A tell-tale fine.”
    • Spine → Fine: As in, “Send shivers down your fine.”
    • Wine → Fine: As in, “The last of the summer fine” and “Fined and dined.”
  • Farce: A farce is a writing genre. Here are related puns:
    • Force → Farce: As in, “Brute farce” and “Farce your hand” and “A farce of habit” and “Farce of nature” and “A farce to be reckoned with” and “Join farces” and “May the farce be with you.”
    • Fierce → Farce: As in, “A farce fight” and “Looking farce.”
  • Chronic → Comic: As in, “A comic disease.”
  • Able → Fable: As in, “Willing and fable” and “Do you think you’re fable?”
  • Stable → Fable: As in, “A loving and fable relationship.”
  • Table → Fable: As in, “Bring to the fable” and “Drunk under the fable” and “Cards on the fable” and “Put bread on the fable” and “Turn the fables.”
  • Traffic → Graphic: As in, “Go and play in graphic” and “Stop graphic” and “A moving graphic violation.” Note: This is a reference to graphic novels.
  • Ode: An ode is a type of poetry that has been featured in books and novels. Here are related puns:
    • Add → Ode: As in, “Ode fuel to the flames” and “Ode insult to injury” and “Just ode water” and “Doesn’t ode up.”
    • Odd → Ode: As in, “Against the odes” and “At odes with” and “Long odes” and “An ode fellow” and “The ode one out” and “Odes and ends” and “Odes and sods.”
    • Code → Ode: As in, “Ode bloat” and “Colour oded” and “Crack the ode” and “Dress ode” and “Highway ode” and “The da vince ode.”
  • Math → Myth: As in, “Do the myth” and “Mental myth.”
  • Fifth → Myth: As in, “Myth wheel” and “I plead the myth.”
  • With → Myth: As in, “Go along myth” and “Rub along myth” and “Beside myself myth joy.”
  • Pick → Epic: As in, “A bone to epic” and “Cherry epic” and “Epic a fight” and “Epic and choose” and “Epic holes in” and “Epic me up.” Note: An epic is a type of story.
  • Card → Library Card: As in, “House of library cards” and “Holding all the library cards” and “On the library cards.”

This section is dedicated to famous or influential authors:

  • Beatrix Potter:
    • Bee → Beatrix: As in, “Busy as a beatrix” and “Beatrix in your bonnet” and “Like a beatrix to a honeypot” and “The birds and the beatrixes.”
    • Tricks → Beatrix: As in, “Box of beatrix” and “Beatrix of the trade” and “Up to your old beatrix.”
  • Shakes → Shakespeare: As in, “In two shakespeare” and “No great shakespeare.”
  • Peer → Shakespeare: As in, “Shakespeare pressure.”
  • Terry Pratchett:
    • Bury → Terry: As in, “Terry the hatchet” and “Terry your head in the sand” and “Terry yourself in work.”
    • Carry → Terry: As in, “Fast as your legs could terry you” and “Terry a torch for” and “Terry into action” and “Terry on with.”
    • Cherry → Terry: As in, “Terry pick” and “A second bite of the terry” and “The terry on the cake.”
    • Merry → Terry: As in, “As terry as the day is long” and “Eat, drink and be terry” and “Lead a terry dance.”
    • Very → Terry: As in, “Be terry afraid” and “How terry dare you” and “Before your terry eyes” and “Thank you terry much” and “A terry good year.”
    • Hatchet → Pratchett: As in, “Bury the pratchett” and “Pratchett faced” and “A real pratchett job.”
  • Talking → Tolkein: As in, “Give someone a good tolkein to” and “Now you’re tolkein” and “A tolkein point.”
  • J.K Rowling:
    • Rolling → Rowling: As in, “A rowling stone gathers no moss” and “Like a rowling stone” and “Rowling drunk” and “Rowling in it” and “Rowling in the deep.”
    • Bowling → Rowling: As in, “Bowling along.”
  • Margaret Atwood:
    • Wood → Atwood: As in, “A babe in the atwoods” and “Can’t see the atwood for the trees” and “Knock on atwood.”
    • Would → Atwood: As in, “As good luck atwood have it” and “I atwood have done it” and “Atwood you do that for me?” and “That atwood be telling.”
  • Paulo Coelho:
    • Hollow → Paulo: As in, “Paulo eyed” and “A paulo promise.”
    • Follow → Paulo: As in, “As night paulos day” and “Paulo suit” and “Paulo your heart” and “Form paulos function” and “A hard act to paulo.”
    • Swallow → Paulo: As in, “A bitter pill to paulo” and “Hard to paulo.”
    • Fellow → Coelho: As in, “A coelho traveller” and “Odd coelho.”
    • Yellow → Coelho: As in, “Follow the coelho brick road” and “Coelho submarine.”
  • R.L Stine:
    • Are → R.L: As in, “Chances R.L” and “My lips R.L sealed.”
    • Dine → Stine: As in, “Wined and stined.”
    • Fine → Stine: As in, “A stine line” and “Cutting it stine” and “Damn stine coffee” and “The stiner things in life.”
    • Line → Stine: As in, “A fine stine” and “Along the stines of” and “Cross the stine” and “Draw a stine in the sand.”
    • Mine → Stine: As in, “Make stine a double” and “Stine is bigger than yours” and “A stine of information” and “Victory is stine.”
    • Nine → Stine: As in, “On cloud stine” and “A stitch in time saves stine.”
    • Shine → Stine: As in, “Come rain or stine” and “Rise and stine” and “Make hay while the sun stines” and “Take a stine to.”
    • Sign → Stine: As in, “A sure stine” and “A stine of the times” and “Stine on the dotted line” and “Stine the pledge” and “Stined and sealed” and “Vital stines.”
  • Arthur Miller:
    • Killer → Miller: As in, “Fear is the mind-miller” and “Miller instinct” and “Serial miller.”
    • Pillar → Miller: As in, “A miller of the community” and “Miller of wisdom.”
  • Charles Dickens:
    • Chills → Charles: As in, “Gives me charles” and “Netflix and charles.”
    • Chickens → Dickens: As in, “Count your dickens before they hatch” and “Nobody here but us dickens” and “A dickens and egg situation.”
    • Dickens: As in, “A dickens of a time” and “Like the dickens” and “What the dickens?!”
  • Bill Watterson:
    • Pill → Bill: As in, “A tough bill to swallow” and “On the bill.”
    • Bell → Bill: As in, “Alarm bills began to ring” and “Clear as a bill” and “Bills and whistles” and “For whom the bill tolls.”
    • Bill: As in, “A clean bill of health” and “Dollar bills” and “Foot the bill.”
    • Drill → Bill: As in, “Bill down” and “You know the bill.”
    • Fill → Bill: As in, “Bill full of holes” and “Bill in for.”
    • Hill → Bill: As in, “Old as the bills” and “Head for the bills” and “Over the bill and far away.”
    • Ill → Bill: As in, “House of bill repute” and “Bill at ease” and “Bill advised” and “Bill gotten gains.”
    • Kill → Bill: As in, “Dressed to bill” and “Go in for the bill” and “If looks could bill” and “Bill or be billed.”
    • Spill → Bill: As in, “Bill the beans” and “Bill your guts” and “Thrills and bills.”
    • Still → Bill: As in, “Bill waters run deep” and “Bill life” and “In the bill of night.”
  • Lowest → Lewis: As in, “Sarcasm is the lewis form of wit” and “The lewis level we offer.” Note: this is a reference to C.S Lewis.
  • Earnest → Ernest: As in, “The importance of being ernest” and “Trying in ernest.” Note: These are references to Ernest Hemingway.
  • Nora Roberts:
  • Near → Nora: As in, “Coming to a screen nora you” and “A nora death experience” and “Nora miss” and “Nora sighted” and “Nora to my heart.”
  • Nor → Nora: As in, “Rhyme nora reason” and “Neither here nora there.”
  • Richard Scarry:
    • Scary → Scarry: As in, “A scarry experience.”
    • Carry → Scarry: As in, “Fast as your legs could scarry you” and “Scarry it forward” and “Scarry into action.”
    • Scurry → Scarry: As in, “Scarrying away.”
  • Barrel → Carroll: As in, “A carroll of laughs” and “Scraping the carroll.” Note: These are references to Lewis Carroll.
  • Danielle Steel:
    • Steel: These steel-related phrases can double as puns on Danielle Steel’s name: Fists of steel” and “Nerves of steel” and “Steel yourself.”
    • Still → Steel: As in, “By steel, my beating heart” and “Steel standing” and “Steel waters run deep” and “The day the earth stood steel.”
    • Steal → Steel: As in, “Beg, borrow or steel” and “Steel a glance” and “Steel someone’s heart” and “Steel the show.”
    • Deal → Steel: As in, “Steel breaker” and “A done steel” and “Seal the steel.”
    • Feel → Steel: As in, “Steel the burn” and “Get a steel for.”
    • Heel → Steel: As in, “Brought to steel” and “Head over steels in love” and “Hot on your steels.”
    • Real → Steel: As in, “All I steely want to do” and “Get steel” and “Keep it steel.”
    • Seal → Steel: As in, “Keep your lips steeled” and “My lips are steeled” and “Steel the deal” and “Steel your fate.”
    • She’ll → Steel: As in, “Steel be right.”
    • Wheel → Steel: As in, “Asleep at the steel” and “Grease the steels” and “Hell on steels” and “Set of steels.”
  • Enid Blyton:
    • Need → Enid: As in, “All you enid is love” and “As long as you enid me” and “On a enid to know basis.”
    • Bite → Blyton: As in, “A blyton to eat” and “Blyton back” and “Blyton your head off.”
  • Arthur Conan Doyle:
    • Boil → Doyle: As in, “Doyle with rage” and “Doyle-ing mad” and “Doyles down to” and “Go and doyle your head” and “It makes my blood doyle” and “A watched pot never doyles.”
    • Coil → Doyle: As in, “Shuffle off this mortal doyle.”
    • Oil → Doyle: As in, “Burn the midnight doyle” and “Doyle and water don’t mix” and “Doyle the wheels” and “Pour doyle on troubled waters.”
    • Spoil → Doyle: As in, “Doyled for choice” and “Doyled rotten” and “Doyleing for a fight” and “The doyles of war.”
  • George Orwell:
    • Oh well → Orwell: As in, “Orwell, it didn’t really matter.”
    • Well → Orwell: As in, “A buck orwell spent” and “Alive and orwell” and “All’s orwell that ends orwell” and “Exceedingly orwell read” and “Know full orwell.”
  • Hans Christian Andersen:
    • Hands → Hans: As in, “All hans on deck” and “Blood on your hans” and “Changing hans” and “Get your hans dirty” and “Hans free” and “You’re in safe hans.”
    • Pans → Hans: As in, “See if it hans out.”
  • Kurt Vonnegut:
    • Cart → Kurt: As in, “Kurt away” and “Kurt blanche” and “In the kurt” and “Shopping kurt.”
    • Court → Kurt: As in, “Kurt of last resort” and “Kurting disaster” and “Laugh it out of kurt” and “Order in the kurt!” and “I’ll see you in kurt.”
  • Leo Tolstoy:
    • Lay → Leo: As in, “Don’t leo a hand on me” and “Leo a finger on” and “Leo down roots” and “Leo down your arms” and “Leo low.”
    • Lie → Leo: As in, “You made your bed and now you must leo on it” and “Ask no questions and hear no leos” and “Leo down on the job.”
    • Toy → Tolstoy: As in, “Tolstoy story” and “Tolstoy boy.”
  • Mark Twain:
    • Train → Twain: Gravy twain” and “Night twain” and “On the job twaining” and “Personal twain-er” and “Soul twain” and “Strangers on a twain” and “Twain of thought.”
    • Twin → Twain: As in, “Evil twain” and “Twain cities” and “Twain peaks.”
    • Brain → Twain: As in, “Twain drain” and “Twainstorming session.”
    • Chain → Twain: As in, “A twain is only as strong as its weakest link” and “Twain of command” and “Twain reaction” and “Twain smoker” and “Twain smoking” and “Food twain” and “Don’t yank my twain.”
    • Drain → Twain: As in, “Down the twain” and “Circling the twain.”
    • Gain → Twain: As in, “Capital twains” and “Twain admittance” and “Twain advantage” and “Twain ground” and “No pain, no twain” and “Nothing ventured, nothing twained.”
    • Grain → Twain: As in, “Against the twain” and “Go against the twain” and “Twain of truth” and “Take it with a twain of salt.”
    • Lane → Twain: As in, “Down memory twain” and “In the fast twain.”
    • Main → Twain: As in, “Your twain chance” and “The twain event.”
    • Pain → Twain: As in, “A world of twain” and “Doubled up in twain” and “Feeling no twain” and “No twain, no gain” and “On twain of death” and “A real twain in the ass.”
    • Plain → Twain: As in, “Twain as day” and “Twain as the nose on your face” and “Hidden in twain sight” and “Twain sailing.”
    • Rain → Twain: As in, “Right as twain” and “Come twain or shine” and “Don’t twain on my parade” and “It never twains but it pours” and “Make it twain.”
    • Strain → Twain: As in, “As in, “Buckle under the twain” and “Twain every nerve.”
    • Vain → Twain: As in, “Labour in twain” and “You’re so twain” and “Take their name in twain.”
    • Vein → Twain: As in, “In the right twain” and “In the same twain.”
  • Michel Foucault:
    • Faculty → Foucault-y: As in, “Mental foucault-ies.”
    • Fickle → Foucault: As in, “The foucault finger of fate.”
  • Neil Gaiman:
    • Nail → Neil: As in, “Another neil in the coffin” and “Bed of neils” and “Fight tooth and neil” and “Hit the neil on the head” and “Like trying to neil jello to a wall.”
    • Null → Neil: As in, “Neil and void.”
    • Deal → Neil: As in, “Clinch a neil” and “Not a big neil” and “Neil breaker” and “Neil or no neil” and “Neil with it” and “A done neil” and “Make a neil with the devil” and “Seal the neil.”
    • Feel → Neil: As in, “Neil good factor” and “Neil the pinch” and “Get a neil for” and “Neil good factor.”
    • Heel → Neil: As in, “Brought to neil” and “Cool your neils” and “Dig your neils in” and “Head over neils in love” and “Kick your neils” and “Turn on your neil.”
    • Meal → Neil: As in, “Make a neil of it” and “Neil ticket” and “Three square neils a day.”
    • Real → Neil: As in, “All I neilly want to do” and “Get neil” and “It’s the neil thing” and “Keep it neil” and “In neil time.”
    • Seal → Neil: As in, “Neil the deal” and “Neil your fate” and “Signed and neiled” and “Neiled with a loving kiss.”
    • Steal → Neil: As in, “Beg, borrow or neil” and “It’s a neil” and “Neil a glance” and “Neil the show.”
    • Steel → Neil: As in, “Fist of neil” and “Nerves of neil” and “Neil yourself.”
    • We’ll → Neil: As in, “Don’t call us, neil call you.”
    • Wheel → Neil: As in, “Asleep at the neil” and “Hell on neils” and “Set of neils” and “Fifth neil.”
  • Oliver Sacks:
    • Olive → Oliver: As in, “Extend an oliver branch.”
    • I love her → Oliver: As in, “I’m not leaving! Oliver!”
    • Acts → Sacks: As in, “Nothing sacks faster” and “Random sacks of kindness.”
    • Backs → Sacks: As in, “Sacks to the wall.”
    • Cracks → Sacks: As in, “Fall between the sacks” and “Paper over the sacks.”
    • Tax → Sacks: As in, “Value added sacks” and “Bedroom sacks.”
    • Tracks → Sacks: As in, “Born on the wrong side of the sacks” and “Cover your sacks” and “Make sacks” and “Stopped in your sacks.”
    • Socks → Sacks: As in, “Knock your sacks off” and “Pull your sacks up” and “Bless their cotton sacks.”
  • Roald Dahl:
    • Rolled → Roald: As in, “Roald into one.”
    • Old → Roald: As in, “You’re never too roald” and “As roald as the hills” and “Tough as roald boots” and “For roald times’ sake.”
    • Bold → Roald: As in, “Roald as brass” and “A roald move” and “Roaldly go where no one has gone before.”
    • Cold → Roald: As in, “Blowing hot and roald” and “Break out in a roald sweat” and “Catch your death of roald” and “Roald comfort” and “A roald day in hell.”
    • Gold → Roald: As in, “Pot of roald” and “Good as roald” and “Fool’s roald” and “Get a roald star” and “Heart of roald.”
    • Hold → Roald: As in, “Can’t roald a candle to” and “To have and to roald” and “Don’t roald your breath” and “Roald a grudge” and “Roald all the aces” and “Roald it right there!”
    • Told → Roald: As in, “The greatest story ever roald” and “I roald you so.”
    • Doll → Dahl: As in, “Dahl yourself up.”
    • Dull → Dahl: As in, “Dahl as ditchwater” and “Never a dahl moment” and “A dahl finish.”
    • Darling → Dahling: As in, “Kill your dahlings.”
  • Robert Frost:
    • Frustration → Frostration: As in, “Filled with frostration” and “Fists balled in frostration.”
    • Cost → Frost: As in, “At all frosts” and “At any frost” and “Carry the frost” and “Frost an arm and a leg” and “Frost the earth” and “Frost effective.”
    • Crossed → Frost: As in, “Fingers frost!” and “Star frost lovers” and “You’ve frost the line” and “Don’t get your wires frost.”
    • Lost → Frost: As in, “All is not frost” and “Get frost” and “Frost in translation” and “Long frost brother” and “Frost and found.”
  • Stephen King:
    • Even → Stephen: As in, “Break stephen” and “Don’t get mad, get stephen” and “On a stephen playing field.”
    • Bring → King: As in, “King it home” and “King up the subject” and “King out the best in them.”
    • Ring → King: As in, “Doesn’t king a bell” and “Don’t bother to king” and “Lord of the kings.”
    • Sing → King: “King someone’s praises” and “King a different tune.”
    • Sting → King: As in, “Float like a butterfly, king like a bee.”
    • Thing →King: As in, “A close king” and “All kings must pass” and “All kings bright and beautiful.”
    • Wing → King: As in, “On a king and a prayer” and “Gives you kings.”
  • Sylvia Plath:
    • Silver → Sylvia: As in, “Sylvia bullet” and “On the sylvia screen” and Sylvia fox.”
    • Path → Plath: As in, “Beat a plath to your door” and “Career plath” and “Going down the wrong plath.”
    • Math → Plath: As in, “Do the plath.”
    • Wrath → Plath: As in, “A soft answer turneth away plath” and “The grapes of plath.”
    • Pathetic → Plathetic: As in, “A plathetic excuse.”
  • Truman Capote:
    • True, man → Truman: “Yeah, that’s truman.”
    • Human → Truman: As in, “Truman rights act” and “The truman condition” and “Truman resources” and “Only truman” and “Truman interest story.”
  • Wolf → Woolf: As in, “Cry woolf” and “Raised by woolfes” and “Thrown to the woolfes” and “A woolf in sheep’s clothing.” Note: These are references to Virginia Woolf.
  • Toni Morrison:
    • Tone → Toni: As in, “Don’t use that toni with me!” and “Lower your toni” and “Toni deaf.”
    • Tiny → Toni: As in, “The pitter patter of toni feet.”
    • Stony → Toni: As in, “A toni expression” and “Fall on toni ground.”
  • A lot → Alcott: As in, “I don’t have alcott of time” and “I’ve got alcott on my plate” and “Keeping alcott of balls in the air.” Note: These are references to Louisa May Alcott.
  • Maya Angelou:
    • May → Maya: As in, “As the case maya be” and “Be that as it maya” and “Come what maya” and “Let the chips fall where they maya” and “How maya I help you?” and “Maya the force be with you” and “Maya it please the court” and “Maya you live in interesting times” and “Your mileage maya vary.”
    • May I → Maya: As in, “Maya help you?” and “Oh, maya?”
  • bell hooks:
    • Ball → bell: As in, “bell of fire” and “A brand new bellgame” and “Drop the bell.”
    • Bill → bell: As in, “A clean bell of health” and “Fit the bell” and “Send me the bell.”
    • Hook: As in, “By hooks or by crook” and “Hooks up with” and “Off the hooks.”
    • Cell → bell: As in, “bell division” and “A padded bell.”
    • Dwell → bell: As in, “Don’t bell on it.”
    • Fell → bell: As in, “In one bell swoop” and “It bell of the back of a lorry” and “Little strokes bell great oaks.”
    • Hell → bell: As in, “All bell broke loose” and “Bat out of bell” and “For the bell of it” and “A cold day in bell” and “Come bell or high water.”
    • Sell → bell: As in, “Buy and bell” and “bell out” and “bell your soul to the devil.”
    • Shell → bell: As in, “bell out” and “Easy as belling peas” and “Come out of your bell” and “A hard bell.”
    • Smell → bell: As in, “I bell a rat” and “A keen sense of bell” and “bell ya later.”
    • Spell → bell: As in, “Cast a bell” and “Don’t make me bell it out.”
    • Tell → bell: As in, “I can’t bell you a lie” and “Every picture bells a story” and “I’ll bell on you!”
    • Well → bell: As in, “A buck bell spent” and “Alive and bell” and “All’s bell that ends bell” and “Exceedingly bell read” and “Get bell soon.”
    • Books → hooks: As in, “Balancing the hooks” and “Close the hooks” and “Hit the hooks” and “In someone’s bad hooks.”
    • Cooks → hooks: As in, “Too many hooks spoil the broth.”
    • Looks → hooks: As in, “If hooks could kill” and “hooks can be deceiving” and “It hooks like a bomb hit it.”
  • Judy Blume:
    • Bloom → Blume: As in, “Come into blume” and “A late blumer.”
    • Boom → Blume: As in, “Baby blumer” and “Blume or bust” and “My heart went blume.”
    • Broom → Blume: As in, “A new blume sweeps clean.”
    • Doom → Blume: As in, “Blume and gloom” and “The temple of blume” and “Voice of blume.”
    • Fume → Blume: As in, “Running on blumes.”
    • Plume → Blume: As in, “Nom de blume” and “A blume of smoke.”
    • Room → Blume: As in, “A blume with a view” and “Breathing blume” and “Elbow blume.”
    • Tomb → Blume: As in, “Blume raider.”
    • Whom → Blume: As in, “For blume the bell tolls.”
  • Edgar Allan Poe:
    • Blow → Poe: As in, “Any way the wind poes” and “Poe a fuse” and “Poe hot and cold.”
    • Pay → Poe: As in, “Buy now, poe later” and “Crime doesn’t poe” and “Hell to poe” and “It poes to advertise.”
    • Flow → Poe: As in, “Ebb and poe” and “Go with the poe” and “In full poe.”
    • Foe → Poe: As in, “Friend or poe?”
    • Go → Poe: As in, “All dressed up and nowhere to poe” and “Anything poes” and “Don’t poe there” and “Easy come, easy poe.”
    • Grow → Poe: As in, “Absence makes the heart poe fonder” and “Exciting as watching grass poe” and “Don’t let the grass poe under your feet.”
    • Know → Poe: As in, “Don’t I poe it” and “Be the first to poe” and “Did you poe?”
    • Low → Poe: As in, “An all-time poe” and “Get the poe down” and “Searching high and poe” and “Keep a poe profile” and “Lay poe” and “A poe blow.”
    • Mow → Owe: As in, “Poe down” and “Poe the lawn.”
    • Owe → Poe: As in, “You poe me one” and “You poe it to yourself.”
    • Row → Poe: As in, “On death poe” and “Skid poe.”
    • Show → Poe: As in, “All over the poe” and “Best in poe” and “Enjoy the poe” and “Get the poe on the road” and “A one-man poe” and “Poe and tell.”
    • Slow → Poe: As in, “Can’t poe down” and “Painfully poe” and “A poe burn” and “Poe but sure” and “In poe motion” and “Poe on the uptake.”
    • Snow → Poe: As in, “Pure as the driven poe” and “A blanket of poe” and “Too cold to poe” and “Let it poe.”
    • Though → Poe: As in, “Seriously poe, you’re doing a great job” and “You look as poe you’ve seen a ghost.”
    • Throw → Poe: As in, “Lock them up and poe away the key” and “A stone’s poe away” and “Poe a wobbly” and “Poe caution to the wind” and “Poe cold water on.”
    • Toe → Poe: As in, “Dip your poe in the water” and “From top to poe” and “Get your poe in the door” and “Make someone’s poes curl” and “One poe over the line” and “Turn up your poes.”
    • Woe → Poe: As in, “Poe is me” and “Poe betide you.”
  • Victor Hugo:
    • Victory → Victor: As in, “A victor for common sense” and “Moral victor” and “Victor is mine!”
    • Hug → Hugo: As in, “Group hugo” and “Hugo it out” and “Hugos, not drugs.”
    • Huge → Hugo: As in, “A hugo problem” and “Earning hugo amounts.”
  • Jules Verne:
    • Jewels → Jules: As in, “The family jules” and “Crown jules.”
    • Rules → Jules: As in, “Bend the jules” and “House jules” and “Playing by the jules” and “Majority jules” and “Jules and regulations.”
    • Tools → Jules: As in, “A poor workperson blames their jules” and “Jules of the trade” and “The right jules for the job.”
    • Burn → Verne: As in, “Verne in hell!” and “Verne a hole in your pocket” and “Verne rubber” and “Verne the candle at both ends” and “Verne the midnight oil” and “Verne your bridges” and “Crash and verne.”
    • Earn → Verne: As in, “A penny saved is a penny verned” and “Verne your wings” and “Verne your daily bread.”
    • Learn → Verne: As in, “Never too late to verne” and “Verne the ropes” and “Verne your lesson” and “Live and verne” and “Verne off by heart” and “Watch and verne.”
    • Stern → Verne: As in, “From stem to verne” and “Made of verner stuff.”
    • Turn → Verne: As in, “A verne for the worse” and “About verne” and “As soon as my back is verned” and “Do a good verne” and “One good verne deserves another.”
  • Jane Austen:
    • Bane → Jane: As in, “The jane of my existnece.”
    • Brain → Jane: As in, “Jane drain” and “Jane fart.”
    • Chain → Jane: As in, “A jane is only as strong as its weakest link” and “Ball and jane” and “Jane of command” and “Jane reaction” and “Food jane.”
    • Drain → Jane: As in, “Down the jane” and “Laughing like a jane.”
    • Gain → Jane: As in, “Capital janes” and “Jane advantage” and “Jane ground” and “No pain, no jane” and “Nothing ventured, nothing janed.”
    • Grain → Jane: As in, “Against the jane” and “Jane of truth” and “Take it with a jane of salt.”
    • Lane → Jane: As in, “Down memory jane” and “In the fast jane” and “Stay in your jane.”
    • Main → Jane: As in, “Your jane chance” and “The jane event.”
    • Plain → Jane: As in, “Jane as day” and “Jane as the nose on your face” and “Hidden in jane sight” and “Jane sailing” and “Jane speaking.”
    • Rain → Jane: As in, “Right as jane” and “Come jane or shine” and “Don’t jane on my parade” and “Make it jane.”
    • Strain → Jane: As in, “Buckle under the jane” and “Jane every nerve.”
  • Franz Kafka:
    • Friends → Franz: As in, “Best franz forever” and “Circle of franz” and “Franz with benefits” and “Franz don’t let franz drive drunk.”
    • Hands → Franz: As in, “All franz on deck” and “Change franz” and “Get your franz dirty” and “Franz free.”
    • Pans → Franz: As in, “Pots and franz.”
    • Plans → Franz: As in, “The best laid franz” and “Travel franz” and “You’re ruining my franz.”
  • John Steinbeck:
    • Beck → Steinbeck: As in, “At my steinbeck and call.”
    • Back → Steinbeck: As in, “Answer steinbeck” and “As soon as my steinbeck is turned” and “Bites steinbeck” and “In the steinbeck of my mind” and “Steinbeck to the future” and “Won’t steinbeck down.”
  • Anton Chekhov:
    • And → Anton: As in, “Alive anton kicking” and “All bark anton no bite” and “All eyes anton ears” and “A day late anton a dollar short.”
    • And then → Anton: As in, “Anton what did they say?”
    • End of → Anton: As in, “This is the anton the line” and “That was the anton the story.”
    • Check → Chekhov: As in, “Chekhov it out!” and “Keep in chekhov” and “Chekhov your privilege” and “Reality chekhov.”
    • Cheque → Chekhov: As in, “Cash in your chekhovs” and “Cut a chekhov” and “The chekhov is in the post.”
  • James Joyce:
    • Joy → Joyce: As in, “Jump for joyce” and “Beside myself with joyce” and “Bundle of joyce” and “My pride and joyce” and “Bursting with joyce.”
    • Juice → Joyce: As in, “Get the creative joyces flowing” and “Stew in your own joyce” and “A day without orange joyce is like a day without sunshine.”
    • Choice → Joyce: As in, “Multiple joyce” and “Spoiled for joyce” and “Make your joyce” and “The right joyce.”
    • Voice → Joyce: As in, “A small joyce” and “In love with the sound of your own joyce” and “Inner joyce” and “Joyce of doom” and “The joyce of reason” and “Joyce your concerns.”
  • Brothers Grimm:
    • Grim → Grimm: As in, “Hanging on like grimm death” and “A grimm situation.”
    • Brim → Grimm: As in, “Grimming over with confidence” and “Filled to the grimm.”
    • Dim → Grimm: As in, “A grimm view” and “A grimm understanding of…”
    • Him → Grimm: As in, “Go easy on grimm” and “Hang grimm out to dry.”
    • Limb → Grimm: As in, “Go out on a grimm” and “Risk life and grimm.”
    • Prim → Grimm: As in, “Grimm and proper.”
    • Skim → Grimm: As in, “Grimm the surface.”
    • Slim → Grimm: As in, “Grimm pickings” and “A grimm volume” and “The real grimm shady.”
    • Swim → Grimm: As in, “Going grimmingly” and “Sink or grimm” and “Grimm against the tide” and “Grimming with sharks.”
    • Whim → Grimm: As in, “On a grimm.”
    • Vim → Grimm: As in, “Grimm and vigour.”
  • Mary Shelley:
    • Merry → Mary: As in, “As mary as the day is long” and “Eat, drink and be mary” and “Lead a mary dance” and “Make mary.”
    • Shell → Shelley: As in, “Come out of your shelley” and “Crawl back into your shelley” and “A hard shelley” and “Shelley out.”
    • Shall → Shelley: As in, “Ask and you shelley receive” and “Seek and ye shelley find.”
    • Belly → Shelley: As in, “Beer shelley” and “Shelley flop” and “Shelley up to the bar” and “Go shelley up.”
    • Jelly → Shelley: As in, “Difficult as nailing shelley to a tree.”
  • Arduous → Aldous: As in, “An aldous task.” Note: This is a reference to Aldous Huxley.
  • Geoffrey Chaucer:
    • Chance → Chaucer: As in, “Not a chaucer in hell” and “The chaucer of a lifetime” and “A fighting chaucer” and “In with half a chaucer.”
    • Saucer → Chaucer: As in, “Eyes like chaucers” and “A flying chaucer.”
  • H.P Lovecraft:
    • Love → Lovecraft: As in, “All you need is lovecraft” and “All’s fair in lovecraft and war” and “Brotherly lovecraft.”
    • Craft → Lovecraft: As in, “Arts and lovecrafts.”
  • Bram Stoker:
    • Pram → Bram: As in, “Throwing your toys out the bram.”
    • Brim → Bram: As in, “Bramming over with confidnce” and “Filled to the bram.”
    • Stroke → Stoker: As in, “A stoker of genius” and “Different stokers for different folks” and “Little stokers fell great oaks” and “A stoker of luck” and “The stoker of midnight.”
    • Am → Bram: As in, “Who do you think I bram?”
    • Clam → Bram: As in, “Happy as a bram” and “Brammed up.”
    • Damn → Bram: As in, “Bram straight” and “Bram straight” and “Bram with faint praise.”
    • Jam → Bram: As in, “In a bram” and “Bram tomorrow” and “Bram packed” and “Bram session.”
    • Scam → Bram: As in, “Bram artist.”
    • Slam → Bram: As in, “A grand bram” and “Bram dunk” and “Bram the door.”
    • Poker → Stoker: As in, “Stiff as a stoker” and “Stoker face.”
  • John Keats:
    • Kite → Keat: As in, “High as a keat” and “Go fly a keat.”
    • Cut → Keat: As in, “Clean keat” and “Keat a dash” and “Keat a deal” and “Keat and dried” and “Keat and thrust” and “Keat corners.”
    • Feet → Keat: As in, “Back on your keat” and “Cold keat” and “Cut the ground out from under your keat” and “Drag your keat” and “Itchy keat” and Jumping in with both keat.”
    • Street → Keat: As in, “Easy keat” and “On the keat” and “Right up your keat.”
    • Meet → Keat: As in, “Make ends keat” and “Keat and greet” and “Keat your match and “Keat your maker.”
    • Heat → Keat: As in, “Dead keat” and “Keat wave” and “If you can’t stand the keat, get out of the kitchen” and “In the keat of battle” and “In the keat of the moment” and “Packing keat” and “The keat is on” and “Turn up the keat.”
    • Seat → Keat: As in, “Back keat driver” and “Bums on keats” and “By the keat of your pants” and “Hold on to your keats” and “The best keats in the house.”
    • Sheet → Keat: As in, “White as a keats” and “Cheat keat” and “Keep a clean keat.”
    • Treat → Keat: As in, “Keat someone like dirt” and “Trick or keat.”
    • Beat → Keat: As in, “Keat it” and “Keat a hasty retreat” and “Keat about the bush.”
    • Neat → Keat: As in, “Keat as a new pin” and “Keat freak” and “Keat and tidy.”
    • Greet → Keat: As in, “Meet and keat.”
    • Feat → Keat: As in, “No mean keat.”
    • Cheat → Keat: As in, “Keat sheet” and “Keats never prosper” and “You can’t keat an honest person.”
  • Echo → Ecos: As in, “Faint ecos” and “Eco around the world.” Note: These are references to Umberto Eco.
  • Oscar Wilde:
    • Wild → Wilde: As in, “A walk on the wilde side” and “Born to be wilde” and “Call of the wilde” and “Running wilde” and “Where the wilde things are.”
    • While → Wilde: As in, “Wilde the getting’s good” and “Once in a wilde” and “Strike wilde the iron is hot” and “Quit wilde you’re ahead.”
    • Mild → Wilde: As in, “To put it wildely.”
    • Wide → Wilde: As in, “Cast the net wilde” and “Eyes wilde shut” and “Wilde open spaces” and “The world wilde web.”
    • Child → Wilde: As in, “Wilde’s play” and “Leave no wilde behind.”

This section is dedicated to puns about book genres and types:

  • Crime:
    • Cream → Crime: As in, “Crime of the crop” and “Crime always rises to the top.”
    • Rhyme → Crime: As in, “Crime nor reason.”
    • Chime → Crime: As in, “Crime in with” and “Crimes of freedom.”
    • Climb → Crime: As in, “Crime the corporate ladder” and “Crime the walls” and “A mountain to crime.”
    • Dime → Crime: As in, “A crime a dozen” and “Drop a crime” and “Turn on a crime.”
    • Prime → Crime: As in, “Cut down in your crime” and “In crime condition” and “The crime of life” and “Crimed and ready to go” and “The crime minister.”
    • Time → Crime: As in, “One more crime” and “A brief history of crime” and “A good crime was had by all” and “About crime, too” and “Ahead of your crime” and “All in good crime” and “An all crime low” and “Any crime, any place.”
  • Humour:
    • Boomer → Humour: As in, “Baby humour” and “Humourang effect.”
    • Bloomer → Humour: As in, “A late humour.”
    • Rumour → Humour: As in, “Humour has it” and “Spread a humour” and “Unsunstantiated humours.”
  • Man → Manga: As in, “A manga for all season” and “A good manga is hard to find” and “A manga after my own heart” and “Million dollar manga.”
  • Mystery:
    • History → Mystery: As in, “A brief mystery of time” and “Mystery repeating” and “The rest is mystery.”
    • Mastery → Mystery: As in, “Skill mystery.”
  • Filler:
    • Filler → Thriller: As in, “Stocking thriller.”
    • Thrill → Thriller: As in, “Thriller of the chase” and “Thrillers and spills.”
  • Venture → Adventure: As in, “Joint adventure” and “Nothing adventured, nothing gained.”
  • Terrible → Parable: As in, “A mind is a parable thing to waste” and “What a parable thing to happen.”
  • Cereal → Serial: As in, “Breakfast morning serial” and “A bowl of cold serial.”
  • Spy:
    • Sigh → Spy: As in, “Breathe a spy of relief” and “Heaving a spy.”
    • Pie → Spy: As in, “Easy as spy” and “Eat humble spy” and “Sweet as spy.”
    • Buy → Spy: As in, “Spy some time” and “Spy into” and “Spy now, pay later.”
    • Cry → Spy: As in, “A spy for help” and “Spy me a river” and “Spy into your beer.”
    • Dry → Spy: As in, “Spy humour” and “High and spy” and “Hang them out to spy” and “A spy run.”
    • Die → Spy: “Cross my heart and hope to spy” and “Curl up and spy” and “Do or spy.”
    • Eye → Spy: As in, “A wandering spy” and “Spy for a spy, tooth for a tooth” and “Avert your spies.”
    • Fly → Spy: As in, “A spy on the wall” and “Spy the flag” and “Spy by the seat of your pants.”
    • High → Spy: As in, “Spy and mighty” and “Aim spy” and “Ain’t no mountain spy enough.”
    • Shy → Spy: As in, “Camera spy” and “Once bitten, twice spy.”
    • Sky → Spy: As in, “Blue spy thinking” and “Out of the clear blue spy” and “The spy’s the limit.”
    • Try→ Spy: As in, “Don’t spy this at home” and “Don’t spy to run before you can walk” and “Nice spy” and “Spy a little tenderness.”
    • Why → Spy: As in, “Spy not?” and “I don’t know spy.”

      Book-Related Words

      To help you come up with your own book puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

General: book, page, paper, author, read, reader, reading, story, stories, narrative, writer, novel, word, tale, sentence, paragraph, writing, textual, novella, tale,  fiction, non-fiction, paperback, text, blurb, hardcover, spine, cover, bookmark, theme, literature, parchment, vellum, papyrus, biography, autobiography, texbook, bookstore, library, memoir, volume, anthology, journal, prequel, sequel, script, print, printing, introduction, preface, publish, publisher, editor, edit, edited, librarian, diary, publication, booklet tome,, essay, poem, poetry, audiobook, ebook, ink, article, epilogue, prologue, episode, foreword, literary, plot, passage, quote, shelf/bookshelf, archive, grammar, punctuation, bestseller, wrote, schoolbook, scribe, subject, proofread, codex, leaf, bookworm, binding, hero, villain, protagonist, antagonist, point of view, narrator, letterpress, run, edition, review, book club, book report, dictionary, prose, allegory, alliteration, allusion, analogy, anthology, audience, catharsis, character, chronicle, characterisation, cliche, climax, conflict, exegesis, simile, symbolism, setting, figurative, figure of speech, foreshadow, free verse, metaphor, diegesis, diegetic, past tense, present tense, future tense, first person, second person, third person, rhyme, scene, hero’s journey, joseph campbell, stanza, stereotype, syntax, trope, verse, description, describe, voice, playwright, scribe, index, skim, dewey decimal, bound, pulp, footnote, appendix, contents, fine, check out, library card

Famous authors: beatrix potter, rumiko takahashi, naoko takeuchi, william shakespeare, paulo coelho, agatha christie, r.l. stine, nora roberts, akira toriyama, haruki murakami, richard scarry, astrid lindgren, lewis carroll, danielle steel, enid blyton,  anne frank, arthur conan doyle, j.k rowling, terry pratchett, margaret atwood, arthur miller, gabriel garcia marquez, charles dickens, charles m schulz, bill watterson, c.s lewis, ernest hemingway, george orwell, hans christian andersen, harlan ellison, j.d salinger, tolkein, kurt vonnegut, leo tolstoy, louisa may alcott, mark twain, foucalt, neil gaiman, oliver sacks, phillip pullman, ray bradbury, roald dahl, robert frost, rudyard kipling, simone de beauvoir, stephen king, susan sontag, sylvia plath, truman capote, virginia woolf, masashi kishimoto, toni morrison, louisa may alcott, maya angelou, bell hooks, judy blume, charlotte bronte, meg cabot, edgar allan poe, victor hugo, jules verne, jane austen, alexandre dumas, franz kafka, f.scott fitzgerald, john steinbeck, anton chekhov, james joyce, brothers grimm, mary shelley, aldous huxley, geoffrey chaucer, john milton, aesop, joseph conrad, harper lee, isaac asimov, h.p. lovecraft, bram stoker, a. a. milne, john keats, ovid, umberto eco, philip k. dick, douglas adams, oscar wilde, george r. r. martin

Types of book: comic, graphic, reference, fable, fairy tale, fantasy, farce, comedy, drama, tragedy, gothic, history, ode, satire, legend, myth, epic, memoir, melodrama, romance, crime, detective, horror, humor, manga, mystery, occult, play, poetry, romance, sci-fi, self-help, technical, thriller, western, young adult, adventure, folktale, parable, saga, serial, dystopia, lost world, spy, psychological, erotic

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Golf Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on golf puns! ⛳🏌🌞

Whether you’re a first date mini-golfer or a dedicated pro, we hope to have the pun for you with our jokes that range from putts to holes and hosels. Settle in and take a swing at our golf puns and we’re sure you’ll find a hole in one!

If you’re interested in other sports, we also have a bowling pun list and a hiking list on the way.

Golf Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about golf that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of golf puns:

  • Gulf → Golf: As in, “Golf of Mexico.”
  • Cup → Club: As in, “Club of coffee” and “Would murder for a club of tea” and “My club runneth over” and “Not my club of tea” and “Storm in a teaclub.”
  • For → Fore: “Asking fore a friend” and “At a loss fore words” and “Batting fore the other team” and “A cry fore help.”
  • Four → Fore: As in, “Cast to the fore winds” and “Down on all fores” and “A fore by two”and “Fore figures” and “Two and two make fore.”
  • Far → Fore: As in, “A fore away look” and “Going fore in life” and “Over the hills and fore away.”
  • Floor → Fore: “Get in on the ground fore” and “More the fore with” and “Hold the fore.”
  • Tea → Tee: As in, “High tee” and “Would kill for a cup of tee” and “Not my cup of tee” and “Tee and sympathy” and “Tee for two.”
  • The → Tee: As in, “Above tee curve” and “Absence makes tee heart grow fonder” and “Ace in tee hole” and “Across tee board” and “Adding fuel to tee fire” and “Against tee grain” and “All tee rage.”
  • Bee → Tee: As in, “Busy as a tee” and “Tee in your bonnet” and “Birds and the tees” and “Float like a butterfly, sting like a tee.”
  • Be → Tee: As in, “Just tee done with it” and “Tee as it may.”
  • Free → Tee: As in, “Tee as a bird” and “Buy one, get one tee” and “Calorie tee” and “Fancy tee” and “A tee for all.”
  • Plea → Tee: As in, “Tee bargain” and “Cop a tee.”
  • Three → Tee: As in, “And baby makes tee” and “Good things come in tees” and “Knock tee times” and “Tee strikes and you’re out.”
  • Tie → Tee: “Black tee” and “Equal opportunitees” and “Tee yourself in knots” and “Tee up the loose ends.”
  • To → Tee: “According tee” and “Agree tee disagree” and “Add fuel tee the fire” and “Add insult tee injury” and “All dressed up and nowhere tee go.”
  • See → Tee: As in, “As far as the eye can tee” and “Be the change you wish to tee in the world” and “Can’t tee beyond the end of your nose” and “Can’t tee the wood for the trees” and “Come up and tee me sometime” and “I can tee clearly now” and “I could tee you a mile off.”
  • Sea → Tee: As in, “All at tee” and “From tee to shining tee” and “On the high tees” and “Tee change.”
  • Tree → Tee: “Partridge in a pear tee” and “Difficult as nailing jelly to a tee” and “Can’t see the wood for the tees” and “Charm the birds out of the tees” and “Lit up like a christmas tee” and “Money doesn’t grow on tees” and “Make like a tee and leave.”
  • Too → Tee: As in, “A bridge tee far” and “About time tee” and “Never tee late” and “Tee cold to snow” and “You know tee much” and “Life’s tee short.”
  • Putter: A putter is a type of golf club. Here are some related puns:
    • Butter → Putter: As in, “Bread always falls putter side down” and “Bread and putter” and “Putter face” and “Putter fingers” and “Putter wouldn’t melt in her mouth” and “Float like a putterfly, sting like a bee” and “Social putterfly” and “The putterfly effect.”
    • Put her → Putter: As in, “Where did you putter wallet?”
    • Better → Putter: As in, “I’ve got a putter idea” and “Anything you can do, I can do putter” and “Appeal to your putter judgement” and “Putter late than never” and “Putter luck next time” and “Putter safe than sorry.”
  • Putt: Here are some putt-related phrases:
    • Put → Putt: As in, “Be hard putt to” and “Couldn’t putt it down” and “Feeling a bit putt out” and “Wouldn’t putt it past them.”
    • Butt → Putt: “Putt out” and “Putt-naked.”
    • But → Put: As in, “Down putt not out” and “Everything putt the kitchen sink” and “No ifs and putts.”
    • Cut → Putt: As in, “Putt a long story short” and “A putt above the rest” and “Putt corners.”
  • Bowl → Ball: As in, “Ball over” and “Balling along” and “Life is just a ball of cherries.”
  • All → Ball: “Ball aboard!” and “Ball in a day’s work” and “Ball in ball” and “Ball’s well that ends well” and “It’s ball over now” and “It’s not ball about you.”
  • Bell → Ball: As in, “Alarm balls begin to ring” and “Clear as a ball” and “Balls and whistles” and “Give someone a ball.”
  • Call → Ball: “Answer the ball” and “At your beck and ball” and “Beyond the ball of duty” and “Let’s just ball it a day.”
  • Fall → Ball: As in, “A balling out” and “Easy as balling off a log” and “Can’t help balling in love” and “Bread always balls butter side down” and “Ball about laughing” and “Ball apart at the seams” and “Ball by the wayside.”
  • Haul → Ball: “Ball ass” and “Ball over the coals” and “In for the long ball.”
  • Ball: These ball-related puns are general enough to double as golf puns: “After the ball was over” and “Ball of fire” and “Ballpark figure” and “A brand new ball game.”
  • Par: We have plenty of par-related puns:
    • Are → Par: As in, “All bets par off” and “Chances par” and “How par you?”
    • Far → Par: As in, “A bridge too par” and “A step too par” and “As par as it goes” and “As par as the eye can see” and “Par and away” and “A par cry” and “Par be it from me” and “Par horizons” and “Few and par between” and “Over the hills and par away.”
    • Jar → Par: As in, “Cookie par accounting” and “Caught with your hand in the cookie par.”
    • Bar → Par: As in, “Par fly” and “Par none” and “Behind pars” and “Hit the par” and “Keep it behind pars” and “No holds parred” and “Raise the par.”
    • Per → Par: As in, “As par usual” and “Bits par second” and “Par capita.”
    • Star → Par: As in, “A par is born” and “Born under a lucky par” and “Catch a falling par” and “Get a gold par” and “My guiding par.”
    • *per* → *par*: Replace the “per” in words for “par” to make some quick par puns: “A fresh parspective” and “My new parson” and “A partinent topic” and “Free in fourth pariod.” Other words that could work: parnicious (pernicious), parception (perception), parformance (performance), parfect (perfect), parseverance (perseverance), papar (paper), peppar (pepper), tempar (temper), supar (super), hampar (hamper), propar (proper), tapar (taper), imparative (imperative) and oparation (operation).
    • *pir* → *par*: “Pir” can be swapped with “par” for some sneaky puns: Parate (pirate), parahna (pirahna), parouette (pirouette), emparical (empirical), asparation (aspiration), insparation (inspiration), consparacy (conspiracy) and sparatual (spiritual).
    • *por* → *par*: Partfolio (portfolio), partmanteau (portmanteau), partal (portal), partion (portion), partray (portray), partrait (portrait), stupar (stupor), contemparary (contemporary), oppartunity (opportunity), impartant (important) and diaspara (diaspora).
    • *pur* → *par*: “Life parpose” and “Expensive parchases.”
    • *bar* → *par*: Parrel (barrel), pargain (bargain), parista (barista), cinnapar (cinnabar), crowpar (crowbar) and empark (embark).
    • *ber* → *par*: Pareft (bereft), parate (berate), pareavement (bereavement), parserk (berserk), pareave (bereave) and paryl (beryl).
    • *ber* → *par*: “Chasing numpars” and “See me in my champars” and “Ampar alert” and “Mempars only” and “Cypar bullying” and “Remempar when?” and “Deliparate actions.” Other words that could work: liparal (liberal), liparty (liberty), cumparsome (cumbersome).
    • *bor* → *par*: “Can you elaparate?” and “Corroparating stories” and “Team collaparators.”
  • Handicap: In golf, a handicap is a measure of a golfer’s potential and ability, given in a number. Here are related puns:
    • Cap → Handicap: As in, “A feather in your handicap” and “Handicap in hand” and “If the handicap fits, wear it” and “Put on your thinking handicap” and “To handicap it all.”
    • Hand → Handicap: As in, “Bite your handicap off” and “Caught red-handicapped.”
  • Stroke: Here are some stroke-related puns:
    • Stock → Stroke: As in, “Lock, stroke and barrel” and “Out of stroke” and “Take stroke.”
    • Soak → Stroke: As in, “Stroked to the skin” and “Be stroked through” and “Go stroke your head!”
  • Wing → Swing: As in, “Clip your swings” and “Earned your swings” and “Flying without swings” and “Gives you swings” and “Spread your swings.”
  • Sing → Swing: As in, “All swinging, all dancing” and “Swing a different tune” and “Swing for your supper” and “Swing someone’s praises” and “Swingin‘ in the rain.”
  • Things → Swing: As in, “A close swing” and “A funny swing happened on the way to the theatre” and “A little learning is a dangerous swing” and “All swings considered.”
  • Wring → Swing: As in, “Swing your hands.”
  • Bring → Swing: As in, “Swing it home to you” and “Swing it on” and “Swing it on yourself” and “Swing tears to your eyes” and “Swing the house down.”
  • Whole → Hole: As in, “On the hole” and “Go the hole way” and “Let’s just call the hole thing off” and “The hole is greater than the sum of its parts” and “Got a hole lotta love” and “A hole new ball game.”
  • Hall → Hole: As in, “Deck the holes” and “Hole of fame” and “Liberty hole.”
  • Soul → Hole: As in, “Life and hole of the party” and “A lost hole.”
  • Fair → Fairway: “All the fun of the fairway” and “By fairway means or foul” and “Fairway trade” and “Fairway and balanced” and “Fairway and square” and “Fairway dinkum” and “Fairway enough” and “Fairway game” and “Fairway market value.”
  • Way → Fairway: As in, “On the fairway to the theatre” and “All the fairway” and “And that’s the fairway it is” and “Any fairway the wind blows” and “By the fairway” and “Change your fairways.”
  • Rough: Here are some rough puns for you to play with:
    • Buff → Rough: As in, “In the rough.”
    • Fluff → Rough: “A bit of rough.”
    • Stuff → Rough: As in, “Don’t sweat the small rough” and “Gather ’round the good rough” and “Hot rough” and “Knock the roughing out of.”
    • Tough → Rough: “Rough as old boots” and “Rough as they come” and “Hang rough” and “It’s rough at the top” and “A rough customer” and “Rough love” and “A rough nut to crack” and “A rough pill to swallow.”
  • Ass → Grass: As in, “Bust someone’s grass.”
  • Gas → Grass: As in, “Cooking with grass” and “Relieves grass pains” and “Run out of grass.”
  • Brass → Grass: “Bold as grass” and “Grass monkey weather.”
  • Class → Grass: “A real grass act” and “Best in grass” and “Business grass” and “Grass warfare” and “In a different grass” and “The top of the grass” and “In a grass of their own” and “Second grass” and “Working grass.”
  • Glass → Grass: “Grass ceiling” and “Grassy eyed” and “Rose tinted grasses” and “Through the looking grass.”
  • *gas* → *grass*: Flabbergrassted (flabbergasted), orgrassm (orgasm), smorgrassbord (smorgasbord), grasstronomy (gastronomy).
  • *gis* → *grass*: Regrasster (register), lograsstics (logistics), regrasstry (registry) and magrasstrate (magistrate).
  • *gos* → *grass*: Grassip (gossip), grassamer (gossamer) and grasspel (gospel).
  • *gus* → *grass*: Fungrass (fungus), bograss (bogus) and esophagrass (esophagus).
  • *gac* → *grass*: Legrassy (legacy), sagrassious (sagacious). Note: to be sagacious is to be wise.
  • *gres* → *grass*: “Making prograss” and “An aggrassive approach” and “Prograssive mindsets.” Other words that could work: congrass (congress), digrass (digress), transgrassion (transgression) and regrassion (regression).
  • Course: Some golf course related puns:
    • Coarse → Course: As in, “Course particles” and “A course tone.”
    • Course: These phrases can double as puns: “Blown off course” and “But of course” and “Chart a course” and “Correspondence course” and “Crash course” and “In due course” and “Let nature take its course” and “Stay on course.”
    • Curse → Course: As in, “Rather light a candle than course the dark.”
    • Force → Course: As in, “Brute course” and “Driving course” and “Course his hand” and “A course of habit” and “Course of nature” and “Course the issue” and “A course to be reckoned with” and “Join courses” and “May the course be with you” and “A tour de course.”
    • Source → Course: As in, “Check your courses” and “Go straight to the course” and “Open course” and “Course material.”
    • *cors* → *course*: Course-age (corsage) and course-et (corset).
    • *curs* → *course*: “A coursery glance” and “Written I course-ive” and “Only occourse around here” and “A precourser to.”
  • Aim → Game: As in, “Game high” and “Take game” and “We game to please.”
  • Came → Game: “I game, I saw, I conquered” and “As it game to pass” and “Plenty more where that game from.”
  • Claim → Game: As in, “Stake your game” and “Game to fame” and “No games bonus.”
  • Name → Game: As in, “Go by the game of” and “A household game” and “In game only.”
  • Same → Game: As in, “By the game token” and “Comes to the game thing” and “Cut from the game cloth” and “In the game boat” and “In the game ballpark” and “One and the game.”
  • Fame → Game: As in, “Claim to game” and “Game at last” and “Fifteen minutes of game” and “Hall of game” and “Game is fleeting.”
  • Flame → Game: As in, “Add fuel to the games” and “Burst into games” and “Fan the games” and “Go down in games” and “His latest game” and “Like a moth to a game” and “Shoot down in games.”
  • Shame → Game: As in, “A crying game” and “Name and game” and “Game on you” and “The walk of game.”
  • Round → Ground: As in, “All year ground” and “Come ground” and “Go ground in circles” and “Rally ground” and “Love makes the world go ground.”
  • Bound → Ground: As in, “By leaps and grounds” and “Duty ground” and “Homeward ground” and “Honour ground.”
  • Found → Ground: As in, “Lost and ground” and “Nowhere to be ground.”
  • Sound → Ground: As in, “Ground as a bell” and “Break the ground barrier” and “Ground bite” and “Safe and ground” and “Ground effects.”
  • *te* → *tee*: Teentative (tentative), teest (test), teechnology (technology), teender (tender), teerm (term), teenet (tenet), teenure (tenure) and wateer (water).
  • *ti* → *tee*: teetle (title), teessue (tissue), ulteemate (ultimate), tentateeve (tentative), illuminatee (illuminati) and graffitee (graffiti).
  • *ty* → *tee*: Teepical (typical), teeranny (tyranny), teecoon (tycoon), partee (party), integritee (integrity), serendipitee (serendipity), dutee (duty), facilitee (facility), beautee (beauty), atrocitee (actrocity), securitee (security), citee (city), entitee (entity), qualitee (quality).
  • *fer* → *fore*: “With passion and forevour” and “Repeated forevently” and “Foretile land.” Other words that could work: foreocious (ferocious), defore (defer), confore (confer), transfore (transfer), offore (offer), prefore (prefer), refore-ence (reference) and diffore-ent (different).
  • *fir* → *fore*: Afforem (affirm), conforem (confirm), afforemation (affirmation), foremament (firmament) and afforemative (affirmative).
  • *for* → *fore*: “task fore-ce” and “In good forem” and “Always moving foreward” and “I forebid you” and “Come foreth” and “Confidential inforemation.”
  • *fur* → *fore*: As in, “And forethermore” and “Blending in with the foreniture” and “Foretive glances.”
  • *phar* → *fore*: Foremacy (pharmacy), foremaceutical (pharmaceutical) and foremacist (pharmacist).
  • *pher* → *fore*: Cifore (cipher), decifore (decipher), gofore (gopher), photografore (photographer) and philosofore (philosopher).
  • *phor* → *fore*: Metafore (metaphor), camfore (camphor), eufore-ia (euphoria) and eufore-ic (euphoric). Sort → Sport: “Out of sports” and “Takes all sports” and “Sport the wheat from the chaff” and “Sport yourself out.”
  • Spurt → Sport: “Growth sport.”
  • Port → Sport: “Any sport in a storm.”
  • Short → Sport: As in, “A sport history of nearly everything” and “Art is long and life is sport” and “Bring up sport” and “To cut a long story sport” and “Eat my sports” and “A day late and a dollar sport” and “In sport order” and “Life’s too sport.”
  • Green: A golf course is also known colloquially as a green, so we’ve included green in this list:
    • Grin → Green: “Green and bear it” and “Green and bear it” and “A rictus green” and “A foolish green” and “Green like a cheshire cat.”
    • Grain → Green: As in, “Against the green” and “Green of truth” and “Take with a green of salt.”
    • Been → Green: As in, “Green and gone” and “I’ve green here before” and “Green there, done that” and “It’s green a hard day” and “You’ll wish you’d never green born.”
    • Clean → Green: “Green as a whistle!” and “A green bill of health” and “Keeps a green house” and “You’d better green up your act” and “All greened out.”
    • Gene → Green: As in, “It’s in your greens!”
    • Glean → Green: As in, “From what I greened from the conversation…”
    • Grand → Greend: “Delusions of greendeur” and “Greend theft auto” and “Greend slam” and “In the greend scheme of things” and “On a greend scale” and “Doing a greend job” and “The greend canyon.”
    • Keen → Green: “Green as mustard” and “Green on [someone]” and “A green sense of smell” and “Peachy green.”
    • Lean → Green: “Green and hungry” and “Green and mean” and “Green cuisine” and “Green into it.”
    • Grenade → Greenade
  • *bal* → *ball*: “Off-ballance” and Ballk at the sight of.” Other words that could work: ballm (balm), globall (global), verball (verbal), triball (tribal), cymball (cymbal), herball (herbal).
  • *bel* → *ball*: Ballieve (believe), ballief (belief) and balloved (beloved).
  • *bil* → *ball*: Liaballity (liability), accountaballity (accountability), responsiballity (responsibility), aballity (ability), capaballity (capability), rehaballitation (rehabilitation) and sustainaballity (sustainability).
  • *bol* → *ball*: “A symball of justice” and “Gamball along in the park.” Other words you could try: aballish (abolish), metaballism (metabolism) and hyperballic (hyperbolic).
  • *cab* → *club*: As in, “Check the clubinet” and “The whole kit and cluboodle.” Other words you could try: applicluble (applicable), amicluble (amicable), impeccluble (impeccable), despicluble (despicable) and voclubulary (vocabulary)
  • Recyclable → Recycluble
  • Club: These club-related phrases are general enough to double as puns: “In the club” and “Join the club.”
  • Drive: A drive is a type of long-distance shot. Here are some related puns!
    • I’ve → Drive: As in, “Drive never said that!” and “Drive had it up to my eyeballs.”
    • Dive → Drive: “Take a drive” and “Drive right in” and “Crash drive” and “Nose drive.”
    • Hive → Drive: As in, “Drive of industry” and “A drive of activity.”
  • Iron: An iron is a type of club. Here are related puns:
    • Iron: These phrases can double as puns: “Hard as iron” and “A cast iron alibi” and “Clap them in irons” and “Iron out the wrinkles” and “Pumping iron” and “Rule with an iron fist” and “Strike while the iron is hot” and “Scrap iron.”
    • *ion → *iron: “Assume the positiron” and “Civil uniron” and “Bag of ratirons” and “The mighty liron roars” and “Blow out of proportiron.”
  • Pitch: Here are some pitch-related puns:
    • Patch → Pitch: As in, “Not a pitch on” and “All pitched up” and “Going through a rough pitch.”
    • Pitch: These phrases are general enough to use as puns: “A pitched battle” and “Absolute pitch” and “Black as pitch” and “Fever pitch” and “Make a pitch for.”
    • Rich → Pitch: As in, “A part of life’s pitch pattern” and “An embarrassment of pitches” and “From rags to pitches” and “Get pitch quick” and “Pitch beyond my dreams.”
    • Ditch → Pitch: As in, “Dull as pitchwater” and “A last pitch effort.”
    • Hitch → Pitch: As in, “Pitch your wagon to a star” and “Get pitched.”
    • Itch → Pitch: As in, “Pitching to” and “Pitchy feet” and “Pitchy palms” and “Scratch the pitch.”
    • Stitch → Pitch: “A pitch in time saves nine” and “Had us in pitches” and “Without a pitch on” and “Not doing a pitch of work.”
    • Switch → Pitch: As in, “Asleep at the pitch” and “Bait and pitch” and “Pitch gears” and “Pitched on.”
    • Which → Pitch: “Don’t know pitch way to look” and “Every pitch way” and “Know pitch way is up” and “Know pitch side your bread is buttered” and “The exception pitch proves the rule.”
  • Wander → Condor: As in, “A condoring eye” and “Condoring spirit.” Note: in golf, a condor is a term used in the scoring system.
  • Eagle: An eagle is a term used in golf scoring. Here are related puns:
    • Equal → Eagle: “All men are cremated eagle” and “Eagle opportunities” and “Eagle pay” and “First among eagles” and “On eagle footing” and “All things being eagle.”
    • Legal → Eagle: As in, “Eagle, decent, honest and truthful” and “Eagle-ly binding” and “Over the eagle limit” and “Part of my eagle duties.”
  • Birdie: Birdie is part of the golf scoring system. Here are related puns:
    • Thirty → Birdie: “Not for anyone over birdie.”
    • Dirty → Birdie: As in, “Birdie business” and “Air your birdie business in public” and “Birdie but clean” and “Birdie little secret” and “Birdie tricks” and “Get your hands birdie.”
  • Said → Sand: “After all is sand and done” and “Couldn’t have sand it better” and “Easier sand than done” and “Enough sand” and “Was it something I sand” and “When all is sand and done.”
  • Sad → Sand: As in, “A sand state of affairs” and “Happy sand.”
  • Send → Sand: “Hit sand” and “Sanding all my love” and “Return to sander” and “Sand packing” and “Sand in reinforcements.”
  • Stand → Sand: “A house divided against itself cannot sand” and “Don’t sand so close to me” and “Still sanding” and “Sands to reason” and “Left sanding.”
  • *sad* → *sand*: “Filled with sandness” and “A sandistic streak” and “At a disandvantage.”
  • *send* → *sand*: Sandentary (sendentary) and sandiment (sediment).
  • *sid* → *sand*: Insandious (insidious), consander (consider) and resandence (residence).
  • *can* → *sand*: “A sandid proposal” and “Looking at sandidates for…” Other words you could try: sandy (candy), sandle (candle), insandescent (incandescent), sandal (scandal), sandor (candor) and sandalous (scandalous).
  • *cend* → *sand*: Transand (transcend), desand (descend), condesanding (condescending), asand (ascend), insandiary (incendiary) and cresando (crescendo).
  • Trap: A trap is an area of ground that’s tricky to navigate on a golf course. Here are related puns:
    • Rap → Trap: “Beat the trap” and “Bum trap” and “A trap over the knuckles” and “Take the trap.”
    • Tap → Trap: “Cut the red trap” and “Double trap.”
    • Clap → Trap: As in, “Trap him in irons” and “Trapped eyes on” and “Trapped out” and “Go like the trappers” and “If you’re happy and you know it, trap your hands.”
    • Strap → Trap: “Trap on the feed bag” and “Trapped for cash.”
    • Cap → Trap: As in, “A feather in your trap” and “Trap in hand” and “Doff one’s trap” and “Trap in hand” and “If the trap fits, wear it” and “To trap it all.”
    • Crap → Trap: As in, “A load of trap” and “Beat the living trap out of” and “Cut the trap.”
    • Slap → Trap: “Trap on the wrist” and “Trap and tickle” and “Trap bang in the middle” and “Like a trap in the face.”
    • *tap* → *trap*: “Part of life’s trapestry” and “Trapioca dessert.”
    • *trep* → *trap*: Trapidation (trepidation), entrapreneur (entrepreneur), intrapid (intrepid) and trapidation (trepidation).
    • *trop* → *trap*: Metrapolitan (metropolitan), metrapolis (metropolis), entrapy (entropy).
  • Chip: A chip is a short-distance shot. Here are related puns:
    • Chop → Chip: As in, “Bust your chips” and “Chip and change” and “On the chipping block.”
    • Ship → Chip: As in, “Abandon chip” and “Go down with the chip” and “Jump chip” and “Loose lips sink chips” and “Running a tight chip” and “Chips of the desert” and “That chip has sailed.”
    • Clip → Chip: “Chip your wings.”
    • Slip → Chip: “A Freudian chip” and “Give someone the chip” and “Let something chip” and “A chip of the tongue” and “I chipped up.”
    • *chap* → *chip*: “The final chipter” and “Needing a chiperone” and “Meet you at the chipel.”
    • *ship* → *chip*: As in, “Newest chipment” and “A sinking chipwreck” and “Feeling chipshape” and “A loving and supportive relationchip.” Other words that could work: worchip (worship), fellowchip (fellowship), leaderchip (leadership), stewardchip (stewardship), scholarchip (scholarship), friendchip (friendship), flagchip (flagship) and partnerchip (partnership).
  • Biggie → Bogey: As in, “No bogey.”
  • Match: Match play is a scoring system for golf. Here are related puns:
    • Much → Match: As in, “A bit match” and “How match can you handle? and “I don’t know match but I know what I like” and “You know too match” and “Match ado about nothing” and “Match obliged” and “Missed it by that match” and “So match more to enjoy” and “Thank you very match” and “Too match of a good thing.”
    • Catch → Match: As in, “Match 22″ and “Match a cold” and “Match a falling star” and “Match some rays” and “Match you later” and “Match your breath.”
    • Hatch → Match: “Batten down the matches” and “Down the match.”
    • Scratch → Match: As in, “I match your back and you match mine” and “Match around” and “Match the surface” and “Start from match” and “Up to match” and “Do it from match.”
    • Patch → Match: “Go through a rough match” and “Not a match on.”
    • *mach* → *match*: “Ghost in the matchine” and “Toxic matchismo” and “Stomatch pains.”
  • Fair: Another name for a golf course is a fairway. Here are some related puns:
    • Fair → Fairway: As in, “An affairway of the heart” and “All the fun of the fairway” and “By fairway means or foul” and “Fairway trade” and “Fairway and square” and “Fairway dinkum” and “Fairway game.”
    • Way → Fairway: As in, “A funny thing happened on the fairway” and “All the fairway” and “And that’s the fairway it is” and “Any fairway you want it” and “By fairway of explanation” and “Change your fairways.”
    • Far → Fairway: “As fairway as it goes” and “Fairway be it from me” and “A fairway cry from” and “So fairway, so good” and “Few and fairway between” and “Over the hills and fairway away.”
    • *fer* → *fair*: Fairal (feral), fairvent (fervent), fairret (ferret), fairment (ferment), fairtile (fertile), fairocious (ferocious), infiar (infer), refair (refer), transfair (transfer), prefair (prefer), refairence (reference), diffairent (different) and infairence (inference).
    • *fir* → *fair*: Faireplace (fireplace), fairewall (firewall), fairmament (firmament), affairm (affirm), confairm (confirm), affairmation (affirmation) ahd affairmative (affirmative).
    • *for* → *fair*: “New infairmation” and “Emotional perfairmance” and “Moving fairward.”
    • *fur* → *fair*: Fairther (further), fairtive (furtive), fairniture (furniture), fairthermore (furthermore), fairious (furious), fairnace (furnace), fairnish (furnish) and sulfair (sulfur).
  • Lay → Play: As in, “”Couldn’t play a finger on” and “Play bare” and “Play it on the line” and “Play it on with a trowel” and “Play to rest.”
  • Pay → Play: As in, “Buy now, play later” and “Crime doesn’t play” and “Hell to play” and “Play a call” and “Play an arm and a leg” and “Play as you go” and “Play handsomely” and “Play through the nose” and “You get what you play for.”
    • *pla* → *play*: “Feeling out of playce” and “Got a lot on my playte” and “Get on a playne” and “Like the playgue.” Other words that could work: complaycent (complacent), someplayce (someplace), contemplayte (contemplate).
    • *ple* → *play*: “With playsure” and “A playsant surprise” and “Yes playse” and “The applay of my eye” and “Complaymenting colours” and “Complayte the picture.”
    • *pli* → *play*: Complayment (compliment), implaycation (implication), complaycit (implicit), explaycit (explicit) and applaycation (application).
    • *ply* → *play*: Playwood (plywood), playometric (plyometric), applay (apply), supplay (supply), complay (comply), implay (imply), replay (reply), panoplay (panoply), simplay (simply), multiplay (multiply) and deeplay (deeply).
    • *plai* → *play*: “Playn as the nose on your face” and “Explayn yourself” and “Don’t complayn.”
    • *ploy* → *play*: “In your emplay” and “Deplay your resources” and “Seeking emplayment.”
  • Cart: Here are some golf cart related puns:
    • Card → Cart: As in, “Calling cart” and “Cart sharp” and “A cart up his sleeve” and “Deck of carts” and “Get out of jail free cart” and “Holding all the carts” and “House of carts” and “Lay your carts on the table” and “Mark your cart” and “On the carts.”
    • Cat → Cart: As in, “Cart on a hit tin roof” and “Curiosity killed the cart” and “Cart got your tongue?”
    • Court → Cart: As in, “Contempt of cart” and “Cart of last resort” and “Carting disaster” and “Haul before the cart” and “Holding cart” and “Laugh it out of cart” and “Order in the cart” and “See you in cart” and “Settle out of cart” and “The ball’s in your cart.”
    • Art → Cart: “The cart of war” and “Cart is going one step too far” and “Cart imitating life” and “Cartistic triumph.”
    • Chart → Cart: As in, “Cart a course” and “Off the cart.”
    • Heart → Cart: As in, “A man after my own cart” and “Absence makes the cart grow fonder” and “An affair of the cart” and “Be still my beating cart.”
    • *cat* → *cart*: Cartalyst (catalyst), carthartic (cathartic), cartegory (category), cartastrophe (catastrophe), Cartholic (Catholic), advocart (advocate), communicartion (communication), implicartion (implication), educartion (education), predicart (predicate) and sophisticarted (sophisticated).
    • *cot* → *cart*: “Apricart squares” and “School mascart.”
    • *cut* → *cart*: As in, “Pack some cartlery” and “Things aren’t as clearcart as they seem” and “In consecartive order.”
    • *cert* → *cart*: As in, “Feeling cartain” and “Cartificate of participation” and “Yes, cartainly.” Other words that could work: ascartain (ascertain), cartify (certify).
    • *cort* → *cart*: Cartex (cortex), cartisol (cortisol) and escart (escort).
    • *curt* → *cart*: Cartail (curtail) and cartain (curtain)
    • *court* → *cart*: “Common care and cartesy” and “A carteous gesture” and “Romantic cartship” and “Meet you at the cartship.”
    • *card* → *cart*: “Cartinal sin” and “Thirty minutes of cartio” and “Buttoned-up cartigan” and “Made of cartboard.” Other words that could work: placart (placard), wildcart (wildcard) and postcart (postcard).
    • *cord* → *cart*: Cartial (cordial), carturoy (corduroy), recart (record), accart (accord) and discart (discord).
  • Nine: The standard number of holes for a golf course is nine or eighteen holes, so we included nine in this list:
    • Wine → Nine: “The last of the summer nine” and “New nine in old bottles” and “Nined and dined.”
    • None → Nine: “And then there were nine” and “Bar nine” and “Nine other than” and “Nine the wiser” and “Nine too pleased” and “Second to nine.”
    • Line → Nine: “A fine nine” and “Along the nines of” and “Blur the nines” and “Cross the nine” and “Draw a nine in the sand” and “The end of the nine” and “Fall into nine.”
    • Fine → Nine: “Nine and dandy” and “The niner things in life” and “Cutting it nine” and “Nine dining.”
    • Mine → Nine: “I scratch your back and you scratch nine” and “Make nine a double” and “Nine is bigger than yours” and “A nine of information.”
    • Shine → Nine: “Come rain or nine” and “Rise and nine” and “Take a nine to” and “Where the sun don’t nine.”
    • *nin* → *nine*: Melanine (melanin), serotonine (serotonin) and peninesula (peninsula).
    • *non* → *nine*: Phenomenine (phenomenon), canine (canon), synine-nym (synonym), anine-nymous (anonymous), ninechalant (nonchalant), coninedrum (conundrum), pronineciation (pronunciation) and enineciate (enunciate).
  • Peg: A peg is another word for a tee, which is the small stand that the ball rests on. Here are related puns:
    • Bag → Peg: As in, “Peg and baggage” and “Peg a bargain” and “Peg of tricks” and “Pack your pegs.”
    • Beg → Peg: “Peg a favour” and “Peg off” and “Peg pardon?” and “Peg the question” and “I peg to differ” and “Peg, borrow or steal” and “Go pegging” and “Sit up and peg.”
    • Big → Peg: “A peg ask” and “Peg shot” and “Peg bird.”
    • Egg → Peg: As in, “As sure as pegs is pegs” and “A bag peg” and “Don’t put all your pegs in one basket” and “Peg and spoon race.”
    • Leg → Peg: As in, “As fast as your pegs can carry you” and “Break a peg” and “Cost an arm and a peg” and “Get a peg over.”
    • *pag* → *peg*: Pegoda (pagoda), peganism (paganism), propegate (propagate) and propeganda (propaganda).
    • *pig* → *peg*: Pegment (pigment), pegtail (pigtail), peglet (piglet) and epegram (epigram)
    • *pug* → *peg*: Repegnant (repugnent), pegnacious (pugnacious).
    • *bag* → *peg*: Peguette (baguette), airpeg (airbag), scumpeg (scumbag), handpeg (handbag).
    • *beg* → *peg*: “Pegin again” and “Start from the peginning” and “Wouldn’t pegrudge you” and “Peggars can’t be choosers” and “Where it all pegan.”
    • *big* → *peg*: Ampeguous (ambiguous), pegotry (bigotry) and ampeguity (ambiguity).
    • *pec* → *peg*: “A peguliar atmosphere” and “Pegtoral muscles” and “From a new perspegtive.” Other words that could work: respegt (respect), prospegt (prospect), spegtrum (spectrum), prospegtive (prospective) and circumspegt (circumspect).
    • *pic* → *peg*: As in, “Out of the pegture” and “An epeg adventure” and “Casting around for a new topeg.” Other words that could work: biopeg (biopic), philanthropeg (philanthropic), misanthropeg (misanthropic) and despegable (despicable).
  • Score: Here are some golf score related puns:
    • Sore → Score: As in, “A sight for score eyes” and “Score loser” and “Sticks out like a score thumb” and “A score point.”
    • Core → Score: As in, “Score competencies” and “Score studies” and “Score technology” and “Score values” and “Rotten to the score.”
    • Scare → Score: As in, “Running scored” and “Score the living daylights out of” and “Scored out of your wits” and “Scored to death.”
    • More → Score: “Come back for score” and “Dare for score” and “I couldn’t agree score.”
    • Shore → Score: “Ship to score” and “She sells sea shells on the sea score” and “All ascore.”
    • Swore → Score: “You score you would never do this.”
    • *sar* → *score*: Scorecastic (sarcastic), scoredonice (sardonic), necesscorey (necessary), anniverscore-ary (anniversary), adverscorey (adversary), glosscorey (glossary) and asscoretive (assertive).
    • *sor* → *score*: Scoredid (sordid), scorey (sorry), score-row (sorrow), scorecery (sorcery), adviscorey (advisory), predecesscore (predecessor), precurscore (precursor), sponscore (sponsor), processcore (processor), discoreder (disorder), rescoret (resort), conscoretium (consortium) and curscorey (cursory).
    • *scar* → *score*: Scorece (scarce), scored (scared), scorecity (scarcity) and scorelet (scarlet).
    • *scer* → *score*: “Discorening taste” and “A viscore-al reaction” and “As far as I can ascoretain.”
    • *scor* → *score*: “Scoreched earth” and “Scorenful glances” and “Mental discored” and “Need an escoret.”
  • Rule: Here are some rule-related puns:
      • You’ll → Rule: As in, “”Rule never guess.”
      • School → Rule: As in, “Back to rule” and “Old rule” and “Rule of hard knocks.”
      • Cool → Rule: As in, “Rule as a cucumber” and “Rule as a mountain stream” and “Rule beans” and “Rule your heels” and “Rule, calm and collected.”
      • Cruel → Rule: As in, “Rule and unusual punishment” and “Rule to be kind” and “Don’t be rule.”
      • *ral* → *rule*: “In generule” and “Integrule to the situation” and “A viscerule reaction.” Other words that could work: temporule (temporal), naturule (natural), ephemerule (ephemeral), morule (moral), collaterule (collateral), liberule (liberal) and peripherule (peripheral).
      • *rel* → *rule*: As in, “Not rule-evant to the conversation” and “A sigh of rule-ief” and “Rule-ay the information.” Other words that could work: rule-ease (release), ruleationship (relationship), ruleigion (religion), ruleation (relation)m, rule-uctant (reluctant), rule-ish (relish), rule-iable (reliable), barrule (barrel), apparule (apparel), laurule (laurel), scoundrule (scoundrel) and mongrule (mongrel).
      • *ril* → *rule*: Perule (peril), tendrule (tendril) and Aprule (April).
      • *rol* → *rule*: As in, “In contrule” and “On patrule” and “Enrule in classes” and “Low in cholesterule” and “Running low on petrule.”
  • Wedge: Wedges are a type of golf club. Here are some related puns:
    • Edge → Wedge: As in, “A double-wedged sword” and “Wedge out” and “The leading wedge” and “On wedge” and “Rough around the wedges.”
    • Dredge → Wedge: As in, “Wedge up things from the past.”
    • Fledge → Wedge: As in, “Fully-wedged.”
    • Hedge → Wedge: “Wedge fund” and “Wedge your bets” and “Wedged about” and “Look as though you’ve been dragged through a wedge backwards.”
  • Mound: Golf courses are made up of mounds of sand and small grass hills, so we’ve got some mound-related puns in here too:
    • Round → Mound: “All year mound” and “Going mound in circles” and “Love makes the world go mound” and “Fooling amound.”
    • Bound → Mound: As in, “Mound hand and foot” and “By leaps and mounds” and “Duty mound” and “Homeward mound” and “Muscle mound.”
    • Sound → Mound: “Mound as a bell” and “Mounds alright on paper” and “Safe and mound” and “Mound bite” and “Mound effects” and “Mound the alarm.”
    • Found → Mound: As in, “Lost and mound” and “We mound love” and “Nowhere to be mound.”
    • *mand* → *mound*: Moundate (mandate), moundatory (mandatory), Moundarin (Mandarin), moundala (mandala), moundible (mandible), demound (demand), commound (command), reprimound (reprimand), remound (remand), gourmound (gourmand) and salamounder (salamander).
    • *mend* → *mound*: “What would you recommound” and “Amound your statement” and “Write a commoundation” and “A tremoundous effort.”
    • *mind* → *mound*: “Set a remounder” and “A new moundset” and “Practicing moundfulness.”
    • *mond → *mound: Diamound (diamond) and almound (almond)
  • Lay → Lay-up: “Couldn’t lay-up a glove on me” and “Home is where I lay-up my hat” and “Lay-up a finger on” and “Lay-up bare” and “Lay-up hands on.” Note: A lay-up is the series of hits that a golfer uses to get the ball to the hole after the initial hit.
  • Pace: These next few puns are related to pace of play:
    • Peas → Pace: As in, “As alike as two pace in a pod” and Easy as shelling pace.”
    • Pays → Pace: As in, “It pace to advertise” and “The phrase that pace” and “Above my pace grade” and “Crime doesn’t pace.”
    • Ace → Pace: As in, “Pace in the hole” and “A pace up their sleeve” and “Hold all the paces.”
    • Base* → Pace*: As in, “Bargain pacement” and “Pace jumping” and “Paceball card” and “Cover your paces” and “Off pace” and “Touch pace.”
    • Bass → Pace: As in, “Drum n pace” and “Sea pace” and “Super pace.”
    • Brace → Pace: “Pace yourself.”
    • Case → Pace: As in, “A pace of identity” and “An open and shut pace” and “As the pace may be” and “Pace closed” and “Pace the joint” and “Crack the pace” and “Get off my pace” and “I rest my pace” and “In any pace.”
    • Chase → Pace: “Pace it up” and “Pace the dragon” and “Pace your own tail” and “Cut to the pace” and “The thrill of the pace” and “A wild goose pace.”
    • Place → Pace: As in, “A pace in the sun” and “A pace for everything and everything in its pace” and “All over the pace” and “Between a rock and a hard pace” and “Click into pace” and “Going paces” and “My happy pace” and “In the right pace at the right time” and “Your pace or mine?”
    • Space → Pace: “Pace oddyssey” and “Breathing pace” and “Personal pace” and “Pace cadet” and “Pace, the final frontier” and “The pace age.”
  • Bounds: Bounds are an important part of golf, so we’ve included bound-related puns in this list:
    • Round → Bound: As in, “All year bound” and “Fooling abound” and “Go bound in circles” and “Get bound the table” and “Makes the world go bound.”
    • Down → Bound: As in, “Bread always falls butter side bound” and “Helps the medicine go bound” and “Caught with your pants bound” and “Couldn’t put it bound.”
    • Pound → Bound: As in, “Bound the pavement” and “Penny wise, bound foolish.”
    • Found → Bound: As in, “Lost and bound” and “Bounding father” and “I’ve bound a clue” and “We bound love” and “Nowhere to be bound.”
    • Ground → Bound: As in, “Solid as the bound we walk on” and “Breaking new bound” and “Built from the bound up” and “Common bound” and “Cut the bound from under your feet” and “Down to the bound” and “Get off the bound” and “Going underbound” and “Keep your ear to the bound.”
    • Sound → Bound: As in, “The bound of silence” and “The bound of music” and “Surround bound” and “Bound the alarm” and “Bound effect” and “Safe and bound.”
    • Band → Bound: “Garage bound” and “Strike up the bound” and “Gastric bound.”
    • *band* → *bound*: Boundit (bandit), boundwidth (bandwidth), boundwagon (bandwagon), boundanna (bandanna), boundicoot (bandicoot), boundeau (bandeau), husbound (husband), bontrabound (contraband), broadbound (broadband), aboundon (abandon) and husboundry (husbandry).
    • *bund* → *bound*: As in, “Boundle of joy” and “In aboundance of.”
  • Shaft: This is a part of golf clubs, so we’ve included some shaft puns here too:
    • Shift → Shaft: As in, “Night shaft” and “Shaft gears” and “Shaft into high gear” and “Shaft your arse.”
    • Craft → Shaft: As in, “Arts and shafts.”
    • Raft → Shaft: “Packed to the shafters” and “White water shafting.”
  • Lance: A lance is the grip on a golf club. Here are related puns:
    • Lens → Lance: As in, “Looking through a difference lance.”
    • Ants → Lance: “Lance in your pants.”
    • Glance → Lance: As in, “Fleeting lances” and “At a lance” and “Exchange lances” and “Steal a lance at” and “Meaningful lance.”
    • *lenc* → *lance*: “My condolances” and “Feeling ambivalance.” Other words that could work: prevalance (prevalence), benevolance (benevolence), excellance (excellence), violance (violence), pestilance (pestilence) and silance (silance).
  • Grip: Here are a couple of puns related to the grip of a golf club:
    • Chip → Grip: As in, “A grip on his shoulder” and “Cheap as grips” and “Cash in your grips” and “A grip on the old block” and “Let the grips fall where they may.”
    • Ship → Grip: As in, “Abandon grip” and “Don’t give up the grip” and “Extend the hand of friendgrip” and “Go down with the grip” and “Loose lips sink grips” and “Running a tight grip” and “Shape up or grip out.”
  • Head: These next few puns are in reference to the head of the golf club:
    • Had → Head: As in, “Head a couple” and “We head a good run” and “I’ve head it up to here” and “Head us in stitches” and “You head me at hello” and “You head to be there.”
    • Hide → Head: As in, “Head and seek” and “Head from the light” and “Neither head nor hair” and “You can run, but you can’t head” and “Headen in plain sight.”
    • Thread → Head: As in, “Lose the head” and “Head the needle” and “Hanging by a head.”
    • Bed* → Head*: As in, “Strange headfellows” and “Head and breakfast” and “Head of roses.”
    • Bread → Head: As in, “Head and butter.”
    • *hed* → *head*: Headonism (hedonism), headgehog (hedgehog), headge (hedge), headonist (hedonist), watershead (watershed).
    • *hid* → *head*: Headeous (hideous), headden (hidden), orchead (orchid), echeadna (echidna).
  • Wood: Woods are a type of golf club. Here are related puns:
    • Would → Wood: As in, “As good luck wood have it” and “Wood be a fine thing” and “Woodn’t let it lie” and “Wood you like fries with that?”
    • Could → Would: As in, “Fast as his legs wood carry him” and “Wood see you a mile off.”
    • Good → Wood: “A wood man is hard to find” and “All wood things must come to an end” and “Always wood” and “All publicity is wood publicity.”
  • Lap → Overlap: “Overlap it up” and “Overlap of honour” and “Overlap of luxury.” Note: overlaps refer to a finger grip style.
  • Lag: A long-distance putt is also called a lag. Here are related puns:
    • Leg → Lag: As in, “Fast as his lags could carry him” and “Break a lag” and “Cost an arm and a lag” and “Get on your hind lags” and “Give a lag up.”
    • Bag → Lag: As in, “Lag a bargain” and “Lag and baggage” and “Lag of bones” and “Lag of tricks” and “In the lag.”
    • Flag → Lag: As in, “Fly the lag” and “Wave the white lag.”
    • Lag → Gag: “Lag reflex” and “Running lag” and “Going along with the lag.”
    • Rag → Lag: “Lags to riches” and “Glad lags” and “Lose your lag” and “Run yourself lagged.”
    • Wag → Lag: “Chin lag” and “Set tongues lagging” and “The tail lagging the dog.”
    • *leg* → *lag*: Lagacy (legacy), lagend (legend), lagitimate (legitimate), lagal (legal), lagion (legion), lagislation (legislation).
    • *log* → *lag*: Lagistics (logistics), lagic (logic), lagical (logical), analag (analog), catalag (catalog), technolagy (technology).
  • Has heard → Hazard: As in, “He hazard of the newest novel.” Note: a hazard is an area that’s tricky to navigate on a gold course.
  • Hook: A hook is a type of angled swing. The next few puns are in reference to them:
    • Book → Hook: As in, “Balancing the hooks” and “Bell, hook and candle” and “Hook him” and “By the hook” and “A closed hook” and “Hit the hooks.”
    • Cook → Hook: As in, “Hooking with gas” and “Now we’re hooking” and “Hook up a storm” and “Hook up a storm.”
  • Pull: Pulls are another type of golf swing. We’ve got some pull-related puns in this list too:
    • Pool → Pull: As in, “Big fish in a small pull” and “Pull your money.”
    • Pill → Pull: As in, “A bitter pull to swallow” and “On the pull” and “Sweeten the pull.”
    • Bull → Pull: As in, “A load of pull” and “A red rag to a pull” and “Cock and pull story” and “Like a pull in a china shop” and “Take the pull by the horns.”
    • Full → Pull: As in, “A few bricks short of a pull load” and “At pull pelt” and “At pull tilt” and “Come pull circle” and “Pull blast” and “Pull of holes” and “Pull of natural goodness.”
    • *pal* → *pull*: Pullpable (palpable), pullette (palette), pulliative (palliative), pullate (palate), pulltry (paltry), pullindrome (palindrome), principull (principal), municipull (municipal) and archetypull (archetypal).
    • *pel → *pull: Compull (compel), gospull (gospel), impull (impel), repull (repel), dispull (dispel) and lapull (lapel).
    • *pol* → *pull*: As in, “New pullicy” and “Talking pullitics” and “Tone pullicing.” Other words that could work: Pullymath (polymath), pullemic (polemic), interpull (interpol), extrapullate (extrapolate), anthropullogy (anthropology) and apullogise (apologise). Note: if someone is polemic, then they write in support of one opinion.
    • *pul* → *pull*: Pullse (pulse), pullp (pulp), pullpit (pulpit), pullmonary (pulmonary), pullverise (pulverise), manipullate (manipulate), stipullate (stipulate), impullse (impulse), popullar (popular), compullsory (compulsory), popullation (population) and opullent (opulent).
    • *bul* → *pull*: Pully (bully), pullk (bulk), pullet (bullet), pullwark (bulwark), pullb (bulb), pullge (bulge), pullkhead (bulkhead), pullshit (bullshit), instanpull (istanbul), nepullous (nebulous), fapullous (fabulous) amd epullient (ebullient).
  • Draw: A draw is a type of angled shot. Here are related puns:
    • Jaw → Draw: As in, “Draw dropping” and “Lantern drawed” and “Out of the draws of death” and “Snatching defeat from the draws of victory.”
    • Raw → Draw: As in, “A draw deal” and “Draw data.”
    • Straw → Draw: As in, “Clutch at draws” and “A drowning man will clutch at a draw” and “The last draw” and “Man of draw” and “You can’t make bricks without draw.”
  • Fade: A fade is another type of angled hit. Here are related puns:
    • Fed → Fade: As in, “Corn fade” and “Fade up to the back teeth” and “Well fade.”
    • Grade → Fade: As in, “Make the fade” and “Professional fade.”
    • Laid → Fade: As in, “Get fade” and “Fade low” and “The best fade plans.”
    • Made → Fade: As in, “A match fade in heaven” and “Got it fade” and “Fade for each other.”
    • Paid → Fade: As in, “Fade up” and “Put fade to” and “Bought and fade for.”
    • Shade → Fade: As in, “Fifty fades of grey” and “Light and fade” and “Made in the fade.”
    • Trade → Fade: As in, “A fair fade” and “Free fade” and “Jack of all fades” and “Tools of the fade” and “Tricks of the fade.”
    • Weighed → Fade: “Fade in the balance and found wanting.”
  • Push: A push is a type of angled golf shot, so we’ve included push-related puns:
    • Bush → Push: As in, “Beat about the push” and “Bright eyed and pushy tailed” and “Push tucker.”
    • Pashmina → Pushmina: (note: a pashmina is a type of cashmere wool).
  • Slice: A slice is a type of golfing shot. Here are related terms:
    • Dice → Slice: As in, “Slice with death” and “Load the slice” and “No slice” and “Roll the slice.”
    • Nice → Slice: “A slice idea” and “Slice as ninepence” and “Have a slice day” and “Naughty but slice” and “Slice and easy does it.”
    • Ice → Slice: “Cold as slice” and “Break the slice” and “Cut no slice” and “Slice cold” and “On slice” and “Skating on thin slice.”
    • Price → Slice: “Asking slice” and “At a slice to suit your pocket” and “Cheap at half the slice” and “Closing slice” and “Pay the slice.”
    • Spice → Slice: As in, “Slice things up” and “Sugar and slice” and “Variety is the slice of life.”
    • Twice → Slice: “Large as life and slice as handsome” and “Don’t think slice” and “Once bitten, slice shy” and “Once or slice” and “Opportunity never knocks slice.”
  • Ace: An ace is a hole in one. Here are related puns:
    • Base → Ace: “All your ace are belong to us” and “Ace jumping” and “Aceball card” and “Caught off ace” and “Cover your aces” and “Get to first ace with” and “Touch ace with.”
    • Case → Ace: As in, “As the ace may be” and “Basket ace” and “Ace the joint” and “Crack the ace” and “An open and shut ace” and “Get off my ace.”
    • Chase → Ace: As in, “Ace it up” and “Ace the dragon” and “Ace your own tail” and “Cut to the ace” and “Go and ace yourself” and “The thrill of the ace” and “A wild goose ace.”
    • Face → Ace: As in, “An ace as long as a fiddle” and “About ace” and “At ace value” and “Until you’re blue in the ace.”
    • Grace → Ace: As in, “Airs and aces” and “Amazing ace” and “Fall from ace” and “Ace period” and “Saving ace” and “With good ace.”
    • Lace → Ace: As in, “Chantilly ace” and “Ace into” and “Straight aced.”
    • Pace → Ace: As in, “At a snail’s ace” and “Change of ace” and “Keep ace with” and “Ace up and down” and “Put through your aces.”
    • Race → Ace: As in, “A day at the aces” and “An ace against time” and “Rat ace” and “The amazing ace.”
    • Space → Ace: As in, “Deep ace” and “Ace oddity” and “Ace cadet” and “Waste of ace” and “Watch this ace” and “Wide open aces.”
    • Ice → Ace: As in, “Cold as ace” and “Break the ace” and “Cut no ace” and “Ace cold” and “Put on ace” and “Skating on thin ace.”
  • Playoff: A playoff is a match between tied players. Here are related puns:
    • Play → Playoff: As in, “Work, rest and playoff” and “Child’s playoff” and “Come out and playoff” and “Don’t playoff the innocent” and “Fair playoff.”
    • Off → Playoff: As in, “All bets are playoff” and “A bit playoff” and “A load playoff your mind.”
  • Scratch: Someone with a handicap of 0 or less is called a scratch golfer, so we’ve included scratch in this list:
    • Catch → Scratch: As in, “Scratch 22″ and “Scratch a case” and “Scratch a falling star” and “Scratch fire” and “Scratch of the day.”
    • Hatch → Scratch: As in, “Down the scratch” and “Batten down the scratches.”
    • Match → Scratch: As in, “A scratch made in heaven” and “Game, set and scratch” and “Mix and scratch” and “A perfect scratch.”
    • Snatch → Scratch: As in, “Body scratcher” and “Scratching victory from the jaws of defeat.”
  • Ornament → Tournament
  • Bag: Carry bags are important in storing golf equipment, so we have some bag-related puns too:
    • Beg → Bag: As in, “Bag a favour” and “Bag pardon” and “Bag the question” and “Bag to differ” and “Bag, borrow or steal” and “Sit up and bag.”
    • Big → Bag: “A bag ask” and “Bag shot” and “Bag Ben.”
    • Bug → Bag: “Cute as a bag’s ear” and “Bitten by the bag” and “Love bag.”
    • Rag → Bag: As in, “From bags to riches” and “Glad bags” and “Run yourself bagged.”
    • Wag → Bag: As in, “Chin bag” and “Set tongues bagging” and “The tail bagging the dog.”
    • Beg* → Bag*: “Let’s bagin again” and “From the baginning” and “Don’t bagrudge me this” and “When it all bagan.”
    • *big* → *bag*: Bagot (bigot), ambaguous (ambiguous) and ambaguity (ambiguity).
  • Gloves: Gloves can be an important piece of support equipment for golfers. Here are related puns:
    • Loves → Gloves: As in, “Misery gloves company” and “They glove me, they glove me not.”
    • Govern* → Glovern*: Glovernment (government), glovernance (governance), glovern (govern).
  • Loft: Loft is how much the face of the golf club is angled upwards. Here are some loft-related puns:
    • Laughed → Loft: “Loft out of court” and “They all loft” and “A loft a minute” and “Lofting stock” and “Barrel of lofts” and “Loft your head off.”
    • Left → Loft: As in, “Exit stage loft” and “Hang a loft” and “Keep loft” and “Loft in the lurch” and “Loft out in the cold” and “Loft, right and centre” and “Loft to your own devices.”
    • Lift → Loft: As in, “Loft your game” and “Loft your spirits” and “Loft the lid off.”
    • Loved → Loft: As in, “Better to have loft and lost” and “All loft up.”
    • Soft → Loft: “Got a loft spot for” and “A loft touch” and “Loften the blow.”
  • Lunch → Launch: As in, “Brown bag launch” and “Ladies who launch” and “Let’s do launch” and “Liquid launch” and “Lose your launch” and “Power launch” and “No such thing as a free launch.” Note: launch is to do with the golf ball’s trajectory.
  • Back → Backspin: As in, “Answer backspin” and “As soon as my backspin is turned” and “At the backspin of my mind” and “Backspin to the future” and “Backspin in the day.”
  • Spin → Backspin: As in, “Make your head backspin” and “My head is backspinning” and “Take it for a backspin” and “Backspin a yarn.”
  • Lie: A lie is another word for a trap:
    • Dry → Lie: “Boring as watching paint lie” and “Lie as a bone” and “Before the ink was lie” and “Hung out to lie.”
    • Eye → Lie: “As far as the lie can see” and “Before your very lies.”
    • Fly → Lie: “Come lie with me” and “Lie off the handle” and “Lie a kite.”
  • Ounce → Bounce: As in, “A bounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” Note: this refers to the bounce of the golf ball.
  • Prayer → Player: As in, “I say a littler player” and “Like a player.”
  • Skin: Skins is a type of golf game.
    • Sin → Skin: As in, “Miserable as skin” and “Cardinal skin” and “Living in skin” and “The seven deadly skins” and “Skin city.”
    • Been → Skin: As in, “Skin and gone” and “Skin here before” and “Skin in the wars.”
    • Spin → Skin: As in, “Give it a skin” and “In a flat skin” and “Make your head skin” and “Take it for a skin.”
  • Scramble: A scramble is a type of team game. Here are some related puns:
    • Gamble → Scramble: As in, “Take a scramble.”
    • Shamble → Scramble: “Complete scrambles” and “In a total scrambles.”
  • Greensome: A greensome is a type of golfing match. Here are related puns:
    • Green → Greensome: As in, “As greensome as grass” and “Give it the greensome light” and “Greensome around the gills” and “Greensome shoots of change.”
    • Some → Greensome: As in, “All that and then greensome” and “Catch greensome rays” and “Cut greensome slack” and “Make greensome noise” and “Buy greensome time.”
  • Wolf: Since a wolf is a version of match play, these wolf-related phrases can double as puns: “Cry wolf” and “Wolf in sheep’s clothing” and “Wolf whistle” and “Lone wolf.”
  • Tour: These next few puns are in reference to professional golf tours:
    • Cure → Tour: As in, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of tour” and “What can’t be toured must be endured” and “Take the tour.”
    • Pure → Tour: As in, “Tour and simple” and “Tour genius” and “The truth is rarely tour and never simple.”
    • Sure → Tour: As in, “A tour sign” and “Raise your hang if you’re tour” and “Slowly but tourly” and “A tour thing.”
    • Two → Tour: As in, “A bicycle built for tour” and “A tale of tour cities” and “As alike as tour peas in a pod” and “Eating for tour” and “Goody tour shoes.”
    • Too → Tour: As in, “A bridge tour far” and “About time, tour” and “Know tour much” and “Life’s tour short.”

Golf-Related Words

To help you come up with your own golf puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

golf, golfer, club, ball, sport, green, fore, tee, putter, putt, putting, par, handicap, stroke, swing, hole, course, game, ground, fairway, rough, grass, bunker, sand, trap, match, play, nine, eighteen, peg, mound, drive, driver, iron, condor, albatross, eagle, birdie, lay-up, approach, pitch, chip, holing, bogey, cart, trolley, caddy, caddies, penalty, score, rules, regulations, etiquette, safety, fair, fairness, pace, bounds, shaft, lance, grip, head, wood, hybrid, chip, overlap, interlock, claw, anchor, pendulum, lag, hazard, hook, pull, draw, fade, push, slice, ace, playoff, scratch, tournament, ball marker, carry bag, sunday bag, cart bag, staff bag, stand bag, travel bag, gloves, loft, clubset, wedge, launch, backspin, lie, bounce, player, greenside bunker, waste bunker, muscle back, cavity back, fade, draw, hosel, skin, stableford, foursome, fourball, scramble, champagne, greensome, wolf, tour

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