Fire Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on fire puns! ✨🔥 ‎‍🚒

From the flaming hot to the tepid, fire puns are used widely in popular culture, whether it be for a game of Dungeons and Dragons or for a cheesy pun in your Tinder bio. Whatever the case may be, allow us to help you set hearts aflame (most likely with anger) with our list of fire puns.

While this list is as comprehensive as possible, it is specific to fire. If you’re after similarly themed puns, we do also have lists for cooking puns and candle puns.

Fire Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about fire that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of fire puns:

  • Far → Fire: As in, “A step too fire” and “As fire as it goes” and “As fire as the eyes can see” and “A fire cry from” and “Few and fire between” and “Over the hills and fire away” and “So fire, so good” and “As fire as I know” and “I wouldn’t go so fire as to..”
  • Fair → Fire: As in, “All’s fire in love and war” and “By fire means or foul.”
  • Furious → Fieryous: As in, “Fast and fieryous” and “Fieryously searching.”
  • Fame → Flame: As in, “Claim to flame” and “Flame at last” and “Fifteen minutes of flame” and “Hall of flame.”
  • Famous → Flameous: As in, “Almost flameous” and “Flameous last words.”
  • Frame → Flame: As in, “Freeze flame” and “You’re out of the flame” and “Flamed for murder.”
  • Aim → Flame: As in, “We flame to please” and “Flame high” and “Take flame.”
  • *far* → *fire*: If a word has “far” (or a similar sound in it), then we can replace it with “fire” to turn it into a fire pun: “a nefireious (nefarious) villain” and “Child welfire” and “Bid you firewell” and “A fireaway look in your eyes.”
  • *fer* → *fire*: Add heat to your wordplay by replacing the “fer” sound in words with “fire”: “A fireocious battle” and “My final offire.” Other words that could work: defire (defer), confire (confer), transfire (transfer), buffire (buffer), suffire (suffer), refire-ence (reference), diffire-ent (different) and infire-ence (inference).
  • *fir* → *fire*: firest (first), firesthand (firsthand), affiremation (affirmation) and affiremative (affirmative).
  • *for* → *fire*: As in, “Weather firecast” and “For the fireseeable future” and “And therefire…” and “A grim perfiremance.” Other words that could work: perfirem (perform), infiremation (information), firest (forest), afirementioned (aforementioned), firensic (forensic) and befire (before).
  • *phar* → *fire*: firemacy (pharmacy), firemaceutical (pharmaceutical) and fireaoh (pharaoh).
  • *pher* → *fire*: As in, “Perifire-al vision” and “Romantic atmosfire” and “Barefoot philosofire” and “Professional photografire.” Other words that could work: fireomone (pheromone), cifire (cipher), decifire (decipher), parafirenalia (paraphernalia), perifirey (periphery) and hemisfire (hemisphere).
  • Sapphire → Safire
  • *fair* → *fire*: As in, “Airy firey” and “Fireytale ending” and “Firely judged” and “In all fireness” and “Unfire choices” and “All the fun at the funfire.”
  • Chauffeur → Chauffire
  • *fier → *fire: firece (fierce), modifire (modifier), amplifire (amplifier), identifire (identifier), qualifire (qualifier), pacifire (pacifier) and emulsifire (emulsifier). Note: an emulsifier is a substance that keeps different substances together.
  • Create → Cremate: As in, “My latest cremation” and “Nothing improves cremativity like a lack of supervision” and “A cremative mind” and “Cremate a storm.”
  • Blame → Flame: As in, “Flame game” and “Don’t flame the messenger.”
  • *fam* → *flame*: As in, “Flame-ily matters” and “40 hour flame-ine” and “Sued for deflame-ation.”
  • Flam* → Flame*: Flameboyant (flamboyant) and flameingo (flamingo).
  • *phem* → *flame*: Blasflamey (blasphemy) and euflame-ism (euphemism).
  • Born → Burn: As in, “A star is burn” and “Burn to fly” and “Burn free” and “Burn this way” and “Burn again.”
  • *barn* → *burn*: As in, burnacle (barnacle) and burnyard (barnyard).
  • *born* → *burn*: As in, “Stubburn as a mule” and “My firstburn child.” Other words that could work: reburn (reborn), newburn (newborn)
  • Hibernate → Hiburnate
  • Borneo → Burneo
  • *bun* → *burn*: As in, “Burn in the oven” and “Easter Burnny.” Other words you could use: burndle (bundle), burnch (bunch), burnk (bunk), burnting (bunting), burngalow (bungalow), aburndant (abundant), aburndance (abundant) and ramburnctious (rambunctious). Note: to be rambunctious is to be noisy and energetic.
  • *bon* → *burn*: As in, “Burn voyage” and “Burn appetit.” Other words that could work: burnafide (bonafide), burnanza (bonanza), ribburn (ribbon), carburn (carbon) and bourburn (bourbon).
  • *pern* → *burn*: burnicious (pernicious), suburnatural (supernatural), suburnova (supernova), pumpburnickel (pumpernickel). Note: pumpernickel is a type of bread.
  • *ban* → *burn*: As in, “Suburburn living” and “Urburn sprawl” and “Adjust your turburn” and “Left aburndoned” and “Burnana ice cream.”
  • *ben* → *burn*: As in, “For your burnefit” and “Burnevolent ruler” and “Burnign tumour.” Other words that could work: burnefactor (benefactor), burnevolence (benevolence) and burneficial (beneficial). Notes: if something is benign, then it isn’t harmful. If something is benevolent or beneficial, then it for good or has good intentions.
  • *burn*: Emphasise the “burn” in certain words: burner, burnish, burning, burnout, sunburn, auburn, heartburn, Hepburn and sideburn.
  • Glaze → Blaze: As in, “With a peanut butter blaze” and “Eyes blazing over.”
  • Gaze → Blaze: As in, “Avert your blaze” and “Steely-eyed blaze.”
  • *blas* → *blaze*: As in, “Had a blaze-t” and “Such blazephemy!” and “You’ll get blaze-ted by the teacher.”
  • *blis* → *blaze*: As in, “At blazetering (blistering) speed” and “Blazefully (blissfully) unaware” and “Rock the establazement!” and “Establazed in 1990.”
  • Blizzard → Blaze-ard
  • *blaz* → *blaze*: As in, “An innovative trailblazer” and “Lend me your blazer” and “Emblaze-oned across her chest.”
  • Blaze: Some blaze-related phrases that could work as wordplay: “Cold as blue blazes” and “Blaze a trail” and “Go out in a blaze of glory” and “Go to blazes” and “Why the blazes..?”
  • Congratulations → Conflagration: As in, “Conflagrations are in order!” and “Conflagrations on your new job.” Note: a conflagration is a large fire.
  • Scotch → Scorch: As in, “Bottle of scorch” and “A scorch-fulled rage.”
  • Sketch → Scorch: As in, “Scorch artist” and “Thumbnail scorch.”
  • Ember → Member: As in, “Would you like to be an ember?”
  • *amber* → *ember*: As in, chember (chamber), clember (clamber) and chemberlain (chamberlain).
  • *ember*: Emphasise the “ember” in these words: member, remember, September, December, November, dismember and misremember.
  • *umber* → *ember*: As in, “What’s your nember?” and “A cembersome situation” and “Deep slember” and “Cool as a cucember.”
  • Ampersand → Embersand (note: an ampersand is an “and” (&) sign.)
  • *emper* → *ember*: As in, “Emberor penguin” and “Control your tember” and “Rising temberatures” and “A calm temberament” and “Temberate weather.”
  • *imper* → *ember*: As in, “It’s emberative that…” and “Embervious to” and “Emberial measurements” and “An embertinent attitude.” Other words that could work: emberious (imperious), emberialism (imperialism), embersonal (impersonal), emberceptible (imperceptible).
  • Much → Match: As in, “Well that’s a bit match” and “How match can you handle?” and “I don’t know match about it, but” and “You’ve seen too match” and “Missed it by that match” and “Match obliged” and “There’s so match more” and “Thank you very match” and “Too match information” and “Too match of a good thing” and “Too match, too soon” and “Well so match for that.”
  • Mitchell → Matchell
  • Michaelangelo → Matchelangelo
  • Maj* → Match*: As in, “Matchority (majority) rule” and “A matchestic display” and “Your matchesty.”
  • Mag* → Match*: matchic (magic) and matchistrate (magistrate).
  • *mat* → *match*: As in, “In the wrong formatch” and “Immatchure arguments” and “Leave it by the doormatch.” Other words that could work: diplomatch (diplomat), matchurity (maturity), prematchure (premature), matchure (mature) and laundromatch (laundromat).
  • Mutual → Matchual: As in, “The feeling is matchual” and “Matchual attraction” and “Matchual admiration” and “Matchually assured destruction.”
  • Match: These match-related phrases are general enough to double as fire puns: “A match made in heaven” and “Game, set, match.” and “Meet your match” and “Mix and match” and “More than a match for” and “A perfect match.”
  • Shoulder → Smoulder: As in, “A chip on their smoulder” and “A smoulder to cry on” and “Broad smoulders” and “The cold smoulder” and “A good head on their smoulders” and “A full head an smoulders above” and “Looking over your smoulder” and “Rubbing smoulders with” and “Square your smoulders.”
  • Boulder → Smoulder: As in, “Smoulder climbing.”
  • Solder → Smoulder: As in, “Smouldering iron.”
  • Soldier → Smoulder: As in, “Smoulder on.”
  • Smack → Smoke: As in, “Smoke dab in the middle” and “Feeling gobsmoked” and “An epic smokedown” and “A smoke on the wrist.”
  • *smic → *smoke: As in, cosmoke (cosmic), seismoke (seismic), cataclysmoke (cataclysmic), orgasmoke (orgasmic) and miasmoke (orgasmic).
  • Hate → Heat: As in, “Heat mail” and “Love-heat relationship” and “Heat to say it, but…” and “Heaters gonna heat.”
  • Height → Heat: As in, “Reaching new heats” and “The heat of fashion.”
  • Hit → Heat: As in, “Hard heatting” and “Heavy heatter” and “Heat the road” and “Heat and miss” and “Heat it off” and “Heat it out of the park” and “On someone’s heat list” and “Heat rock bottom” and “Heat the brakes” and “Heat the ground running” and “Heat the hay” and “Heat the jackpot” and “Heat the nail on the head.”
  • Hat* → Heat*: As in, “Down the heatch” and “An immense heatred for” and “Sharpen the heatchet.”
  • *het* → *heat*: heaterosexual (heterosexual), epitheat (epithet), ratcheat (ratchet) and propheat (prophet).
  • *hit* → *heat*: archeatect (architect), archeatecture (architecture) and heatman (hitman).
  • Tahiti → Taheati
  • Haiti → Heati
  • Lid → Lit: As in, “Flip your lit” and “Blow the lit off” and “Keep a lit on it.”
  • Let → Lit: As in, “Lit there be light” and “Don’t lit the sun go down on me” and “Just lit it lie” and “Lit it bleed” and “Lit bygones be bygones” and “Lit your hair down” and “Lit her rip” and “Lit it all hang out” and “Lit loose” and “Lit me count the ways” and “Lit nature take its course” and “Lit’s get physical” and “A room to lit.”
  • Lit: We can swap similar noises for “lit” to make references to lit fires in our wordplay:
    • *lat* → *lit*: As in, “Articulit yourself clearly” and “Emulit their work” and “Colliteral damage” and “A volitile situation.”
    • *let* → *lit*: As in, “Chain litter” and “Add some littuce” and “I need an outlit” and “Run the gauntlit” and “Bite the bullit.” Other words you could use: pallit (pallet), violit (violet), millit (millet), tablit (tablet), complit (complete), obsolit (obsolete).
    • *lid* → *lit*: As in, “A solit argument” and “Your identity is valit” and “Pallit complexion” and “Don’t treat them like invalits” and “Squalit conditions” and “Holitay season” and “Standing in solitarity” and “Payment valitated.”
    • *lit*: Emphasise the “lit” in these words: “Little by little” and “Read the literature” and “Not literally” and “A literal mess” and “Banana split.” Other words that could be used: litter, litigation, sunlit, moonlit, facilitate, facility, quality, humility, liability, politics, reality and accountability.
  • Light: Light can refer to both the byproduct of fire, and to the act of lighting a fire, so we’ve included it in this list. Note that all of these could also work for “alight (as in setting something alight)”, as in “Alight it be” and “Alight it all hang out”:
    • Let → Light: As in, “Light them down gently” and “Light it be” and “Light bygones be bygones” and “Light it all hang out” and “Light loose” and “Light me be brief” and “Light me count the ways” and “Light me make one thing perfectly clear” and “Light nature take its course.”
    • *lite → *light: We can sneak the word “light” into words that have similar sounds: “Polight conversation” and “An impolight gesture” and “Satellight tv” and “Wealthy socialights.”
    • *lit* → *light*: As in, “Secret facilighty” and “Facilightate conversation” and “Qualighty control” and “You’re a liabilighty!” and “Polightics is relevant to everyone.” Other words that could work: realighty (reality), accountabilighty (accountability) and humilighty (humility).
    • Late → Light: As in, “Better light than never” and “Catch you lighter” and “Fashionably light” and “Read any good books lightly?” and “It’s never too light to learn” and “A light bloomer” and “Light in the day” and “Light in the game” and “Running light” and “Sooner or lighter” and “Too little, too light.”
    • *lat* → *light*: As in, “Well-articulighted” and “Game emulightor” and “Collighteral damage.”
    • *lit* → *light*: As in, “In the lighterature” and “Not lighterally” and “A lighterary mind” and “Lightany of problems” and “A lighteral disaster.”
    • Light: These light-related phrases can double as candle puns: “Blinded by the light” and “Brought to light” and “Come on baby, light my fire” and “First light” and “Get of lightly” and “Go out like a light” and “Guiding light” and “Half light” and “In light of” and “Leading light” and “Light a fire under” and “Light at the end of the tunnel” and “Light entertainment” and “Light hearted” and “Lighten up!”
  • Kindle: To kindle is to start a fire, so we’ve got kindle-related words and phrases here for you:
    • Kind → Kindle: As in, “Cruel to be kindle” and “It’s a kindle of magic” and “Kindle words” and “Random acts of kindle-ness” and “One of a kindle” and “It takes all kindles” and “Kindle regards.”
    • Candle → Kindle: As in, “Burn the kindle at both ends” and “Can’t hold a kindle to” and “Better to light a kindle than curse the darkness.”
    • Kendall Jenner → Kindle Jenner
  • Torch: Torch can refer to fire in a couple of different ways (if you “torch” something, then you’ve set fire to it, and you can create a torch using fire as a light source) so we’ve included torch in this list:
    • Touch → Torch: As in, “A torch of frost” and “A torch of the sun” and “Don’t torch!” and “Finishing torches” and “The golden torch” and “Losing torch with” and “Stay in torch” and “Torch and go” and “Torching base with” and “Torch wood” and “Torched a nerve” and “A torching tribute” and “Torchy feely.”
    • Teach → Torch: As in, “Experience is the best torcher” and “Torch someone a lesson” and “That’ll torch you” and “Torching an old dog new tricks.”
    • *tach* → *torch*: As in, “No strings attorched” and “Forming attorchments” and “Detorch yourself from” and “Feeling detorched.”
    • Starch → Storch
    • Interchangeable → Intorchangeable
  • Tender → Tinder: As in, “Tinder loving care” and “Tinder is the night.”
  • Tinned → Tinder: As in, “Tinder vegetables.”
  • Distinguish → Extinguish: As in, “Dear extinguished guests” and “Can’t extinguish between the two.”
  • Pyro: The prefix “pyro” means “to do with fire”, so we’ve included it in this list:
    • Paro* → Pyro*:  If a word has a “paro” sound or similar, we can replace it with “pyro”, as in: “On pyrole (parole)” and “Song pyrody (parody) and “Pyroxsms (paroxysms) of laughter.” Note: A paroxysm is a sudden and random outburst.
    • *pero* → *pyro*: As in, “My pyrogative” and “Hydrogen pyroxide” and “A prospyrous venture” and “Parent chapyrone” and “Vegan Peppyroni pizza.” Note: hydrogen peroxide is a chemical compound commonly used as bleach.
    • Pirouette → Pyroette (A pirouette is a dance move where you turn a circle on the tips of your toes.)
    • *poro* → *pyro*: pyrous (porous), pyrosity (porosity),  osteopyrosis (osteoporosis), vapyrous (vaporous). Note: if something is porous, then it has lots of tiny holes that let fluids and gases through (like a sponge).
    • Sapporo → Sappyro (Sapporo is a city in Japan).
    • Payroll → Pyroll: As in, “The pyroll manager.”
    • *para* → *pyro*: As in, “A taste of pyrodise” and “Fool’s pyrodise” and “A pyrodigm shift” and “Running pyrollel” and “The pyrometers (parameters) of…” and “Honesty is pyromount to a relationship” and “Pyrogon of virtue” and “Rain on my pyrode (parade)” and “Herein lies the pyrodox” and “My love, my pyromour” and “In dispyrote locations.” Notes: a paramour is a secret or illicit lover. If things are disparate, then they are separate or apart. A paradox is a statement which contradicts itself.
    • *pera* → *pyro*: As in, “Tropical tempyrotures” and “Your co-opyrotion is appreciated” and “It’s impyrotive that…” and “Smooth opyrotor.”
    • *pira* → *pyro*: As in, “The pyrote’s (pirate’s) life for me” and “Circling like pyronhas” and “While convenient, pyrocy (piracy) is illegal” and “I aspyro (aspire) to…” and “Serve as inspyrotion (inspiration),” and “Conspyrocy theories” and “Inspyrotional pictures” and “The respyrotory system.”
    • *pare* → *pyro*: As in, “In pyronthesis” and “It’s become appyront (apparent) that…” and “Appyrontly so, but…” and “Transpyroncy in business is important.”
    • *pire → *pyro: As in, “You inspyro me” and “Running the empyro (empire)” and “As it transpyro-ed” and “Expyrory date” and “Conspyro-ring with” and “Acting umpyro” and “Vampyro movies.”
    • Singapore → Singapyro
    • *pari* → *pyro*: As in, “Gender dispyroty (disparity)” and “In compyrosin with…” and “Cast out as a pyro-ah (pariah).” Notes: disparity means inequality. A pariah is someone who has been outcast from society.
    • *peri* → *pyro*: As in, “Around the pyrometer (perimeter)” and “In my pyropheral (peripheral) vision” and “In the pyrophery of” and “Impyro-al or metric?”
    • *piri* → *pyro*: As in, “A spyrotual experience” and “An inspyro-ing speech.”
  • Fool → Fuel: As in, “April Fuel!” and “Fuel around” and “A fuel and his money are soon parted” and “A fuel’s errand” and “Fuel’s gold” and “Fuel’s paradise” and “I pity the fuel” and “Make a fuel of yourself” and “Nobody’s fuel” and “Play the fuel” and “Shut up, fuel” and “Tom fuelery.”
  • Few → Fuel: As in, “A fuel bricks short of a full load” and “Fuel and far between” and “For a fuel dollars more” and “Had a fuel” and “Knock back a fuel” and “A person of fuel words” and “Say a fuel words” and “Take a fuel deep breaths” and “To name but a fuel.”
  • Full → Fuel: As in, “At fuel pelt” and “Fuel house” and “Come fuel circle” and “Fuel of holes” and “At fuel blast” and “Fuel of beans” and “Fuel of themselves” and “Fuel steam ahead!” and “In fuel swing” and “In the fuellness of time” and “You know fuel well” and “Fuel of misery” and “On a fuel stomach” and “Pick your battles carefuelly” and “Glass half fuel.”
  • *fel* → *fuel*: As in, “A fine fuellow” and “One fuel swoop” and “Felafuel kebab” and “Duffuel bag.” Other words you could use: fuelony (felony) and fuellowship (fellowship – like “Fuellowship of the Rings”)
  • *ful* → *fuel*: As in, “Fuelfil your side of the bargain” and “A beautifuel moment” and “Feeling gratefuel” and “An awfuel situation.” Other words that you could use: fuelfillment, wonderfuel, wistfuel, thoughtfuel, sucessfuel, dreadfuel, faithfuel and insightfuel.
  • *fle → *fuel: These ones are a bit of a stretch, but can still work in the right situation and with enough conviction: baffuel (baffle), waffuel (waffle), stifuel (stifle), trifuel, shuffuel, kerfuffuel, rifuel (rifle), ruffuel, scuffuel and raffuel.
  • Fuel: Some fuel-related phrases to add sparks to your wordplay: “Add fuel to the flames” and “Fuel for thought.”
  • Char: To char something is to burn it, so we’ve included char-related phrases and puns for you:
    • Chair → Char: As in, “Armchar critic” and “In the char” and “Musical chars” and “An empty char.”
    • Are → Char: As in, “Char you listening?” and “All bets char off” and “Chances char” and “Here you char” and “My lips char sealed” and “My hands char tied” and “You char what you eat.”
    • Car → Char: As in, “Drive my char” and “Happiness is a quick-starting char” and “Char insurance.”
    • Chore → Char: As in, “Fighting over the chars” and “Bathroom chars.”
    • Far → Char: As in, “A step too char” and “So char, so good” and “That’s as char as it goes” and “As char as the eye can see” and “Char away” and “A char cry from” and “You’ve got char to go.”
    • Jar → Char: As in, “Hand in the cookie char” and “Jam char.”
    • *cher* → *char*: As in, “Another bite of the charry” and “Charish you forever” and “Angelic charub” and “Loved and charished” and “Favourite teachar” and “Gift vouchar.” Other words that could work: pitchar (pitcher), archar (archer), catchar (catcher), preachar (preacher), stretchar (stretcher), treacharous (treacherous) and debauchary (debauchery).
    • Choreography → Chareography
    • Chiropractor → Charopractor
    • *chur* → *char*: As in, “A charlish expression” and “Stomach charning” and “Chocolate charros.”
    • *jar* → *char*: As in, “Internet chargon (jargon)” and “A charring (jarring) fact” and “Door left achar (ajar).”
    • *jer* → *char*: Charusalem (Jerusalem) and charsey (jersey).
    • *jor* → *char*: As in, “A machar project” and “Pecharative (pejorative) language” and “Macharity (majority) rules.”
    • *jur* → *char*: As in, “That’s not my charisdiction” and “Charassic Park” and “Conchar (conjure) up an excuse” and “Minor inchary” and “Commit perchary” and “You’ve inchared my feelings.”
    • *char*: We can simply emphasise the “char” that already exists in these words: charge, charter, chart, charity, discharge and charm.
  • Hot: The following puns are centred around the word “hot”:
    • *what* → *whot*: As in, “Do whot comes naturally” and “For whot it’s worth” and “Guess whot?” and “I’ll have whot they’re having” and “Yes, somewhot.
    • *hot*: Simply emphasise the “hot” that already exists in these words: hotel, hotspot, hotline, hotbed, hotdog, screenshot, snapshot, upshot and headshot.
  • Pyre: A pyre is a heap of flammable items that are intended to build a fire. Here are some pyre-related puns and phrases you can use as fire puns:
    • Prior → Pyre: As in, “It happened pyre to this” and “Have they got any pyres?”
    • Higher → Pyre: As in, “A pyre purpose” and “Answering to a pyre authority” and “Pyre than a kite.”
    • Pier → Pyre: Pier is pronounced a little different than pyre, so it’s a bit of a stretch but it can still work: “Take a long walk off a short pyre.”
    • Peer → Pyre: As in, “Pyre pressure” and “Famous amongst their pyres” and “Pyre-ing through the curtains.”
    • Pie → Pyre: As in, “Apple pyre” and “Easy as pyre” and “Sweet as pyre” and “Eat humble pyre” and “A finger in many pyres” and “A piece of the pyre.”
    • *pair → *pyre: As in, “Beyond repyre” and “A fresh pyre of eyes” and “A great pyre” and “Pyre off” and “A clean pyre of hands.”
    • Pear → Pyre: As in, “All gone pyre-shaped.”
    • *par* → *pyre*: As in, “Birthday pyrety” and “Not a pyretisan issue” and “Not in pyreticular” and “Do you pyretake of..?” Other words that could work: subpyre (subpar), dispyreate (disparate), apyrete (apart) and sepyreate (separate).
    • *per* → *pyre*: As in, “A fresh pyrespective” and “In pyreson (person)” and “A pyretinent point” and “Pyreoid of time” and “All down to your pyreception.” Other words that could work: pyrenicious (pernicious), pyreformance (performance), pyrefect (perfect), pyreseverance (perseverance), tempyre (temper), hampyre (hamper) and impyreative (imperative).
    • *pir* → *pyre*: pyre-ate (pirate), pyreanha (piranha), pyreouette (pirouette), pyreacy (piracy), empyreical (empirical), inspyre (inspire), aspyreation (aspiration), empyre (empire), inspyreation (inspiration), aspyre (aspire), conspyreacy (conspiracy), spyreal (spiral) and spyre-itual (spiritual).
    • Our son → Arson: As in, “I didn’t teach arson to do those things” and “Go ask arson.” (this one is obviously very specific!)
  • Flare: To flare is to blaze or be fired up, so we’ve got some flare-related puns for you here:
    • Fair → Flare: As in, “All’s flare in love and war” and “By flare means or foul” and “Flare trade” and “Flare and square” and “Flare enough” and “Flare market value” and “No flare!” and “You can’t say flarer than that.”
    • Fare → Flare: As in, “Class warflare” and “Psychological warflare” and “Standard flare” and “How are you flare-ing (faring)?”
    • Flair → Flare: As in, “A flare for the dramatic.”
    • Very → Flarey: As in, “Be flarey afraid” and “Before your flarey eyes” and “How flarey dare you” and “A flarey good year” and “Thank you flarey much” and “Flarey special” and “Flarey well” and “At the flarey least” and “Eflarey (every) inch.”
    • *far* → *flare*: flarewell (farewell), neflareious (nefarious), welflare (welfare), fanflare (fanfare) and airflare (airfare).
    • Ferocious → Flareocious
    • *fair* → *flare*: As in, “An afflare of the heart” and “Away with the flare-ies” and “Tooth flarey” and “Unflare-ly done” and “In all flareness” and “Flareytale wedding” and “Unflare situation.”
    • *var* → *flare*: As in, “Garden flare-iety” and “Your mileage may flarey” and “Flare-iety is the spice of life” and “Flare-ious opinions” and “Countless flare-iables.”
    • *pher* → *flare*: flare-omone (pheromone), photograflare (photographer), philosoflare (philosopher), periflare-al (peripheral), atmosflare (atmosphere), paraflare-nalia (paraphernalia) and periflarey (periphery).
    • *flir* → *flare*: As in, “A relentless flare-t (flirt)” and “A flare-tatious meeting.”
    • *flor* → *flare*: flare-ist (florist), flare-al (floral) and Flarence (Florence).
    • *flur* → *flare*: As in, “Flare-ies (flurries) of snow.”
  • Designate → Designite: As in, “Designited driver.” Note: just in case you missed it, this is a play on the word “ignite”.
  • *nition → *ignition: cignition (cognition) and recignition (recognition). (These are a bit of a stretch, but can still work!)
  • Spark: Since fires can emit sparks, we’ve got some spark-related phrases here for you to play with:
    • Park → Spark: As in, “Spark my car” and “At central spark” and “Hit it out of the spark” and “Nosy sparker” and “A walk in the spark.”
    • Bark → Spark: As in, “Spark at the moon” and “Sparking mad” and “Sparking up the wrong tree” and “Spark worse than your bite.” Other words that include “bark” – emspark (embark) and disemspark (disembark).
    • Pakistan → Sparkistan
    • Pakora → Sparkora (pakora is a dish where vegetables are deep fried in batter.)
    • *spok* → *spark*: As in, “Very outsparken” and “A bespark (bespoke) suit” and “I spark too soon” and “The sparksperson for…” and “Have you sparken to them?”
    • *park* → *spark*: As in, “Sparking my car” and “Within the ballspark” and “An expensive carspark” and “You double-sparked (double-parked) me!” Other words you could use: theme spark (theme park), sparka (parka) and sparkour (parkour).
    • *pec* → *spark*: As in, “From a different persparktive” and “Resparkt my wishes” and “A prosparktive (prospective) employee” and “The colour sparktrum” and “Just sparkulation (speculation)” and “Sparktacles (spectacles) wearer.”
    • *pic* → *spark*: Consparkuous (conspicuous) and desparkable (despicable).
    • *perc* → *spark*: As in, “The coffee’s sparkolating (percolating)” and “The sparkussion (percussion) section.”
    • Baklava → Sparklava (baklava is a type of Middle-Eastern sweet pastry.)
    • Spark: Some spark-related words and phrases that could be used as fire puns in the right context: “Bright spark” and “Creative spark” and “Put a sparkle in your eye” and “A spark of genius” and “Watch the sparks fly.”
  • Heart → Hearth: As in, “After my own hearth” and “Absence makes the hearth grow fonder” and “Affair of the hearth” and “Big hearthed” and “Break your hearth” and “A change of hearth” and “Childhood sweethearth” and “From the bottom of my hearth” and “The hearth of the matter” and “Got your hearth set on” and Half-hearthed” and “Have a hearth” and “Your best interests at hearth” and “A hearth of gold” and “My hearth and soul” and “Know it off by hearth” and “Light hearthed” and “A lonely hearth” and “Prolonged hearthache” and “My hearth missed a beat.”
  • Ash: Since ash is one of the byproducts of many types of fire, we’ve included some ash-related puns and phrases for you:
    • Ask → Ash: As in, “A big ash” and “Ash a silly question and get a silly answer” and “Ash and you shall receive” and “Ash around” and “What’s the ashing price?” and “Too afraid to ash” and “Frequently ashed questions” and “Funny you should ash” and “I’m glad you ashed” and “If you ash me” and “No questions ashed.”
    • *esh* → *ash*: We can sneak “ash” into words that have similar sounds to make ash-related puns: “Freash as a daisy” and “Mashing well with the others” and “Refrash the page” and “Over the thrashold.”
    • *ish* → *ash*: As in, “Establashing friendship” and “Near the finash line” and “With a flourash” and “Cherash and protect.” Other words that could work: accomplash (accomplish), accomplashments (accomplishments), Englash (English), admonash (admonish) and relash (relish).
    • *ach* → *ash*: As in, “Working to ashieve (achieve)” and “A stunning ashievement” and “A full stomash” and “Working like a mashine.”
    • *ass* → *ash*: As in, “Don’t just ashume” and “Shortsighted ashumptions” and “Business ashociates” and “Ashert yourself.” Other words that could work: ashess (assess), ashets (assets), ashuage (assuage), ashertive (assertive), ashure (assure), encompash (encompass) and pashion (passion).
    • *ess* → *ash*: As in, “Ashential (essential) oils” and “Yes, ashentially” and “History ashay (essay)” and “None of your businash.” Other words that could work: ashence (essence) and prashure (pressure).
    • *iss* → *ash*: As in, “A non-ashue (non-issue)” and “Sales commashion.”
    • *uss* → *ash*: As in, “Needs further discashion (discussion)” and “Suffering a concashion” and “The repercashions of your actions.”
    • *asch* → *ash*: Marashino (maraschino) cherry and Dashund (Daschund).
    • *atio* → *ash*: As in, “Storing rashions (rations)” and “Imbalanced rashio (ratio)” and “Informashion technology” and “Sex educashion” and “A tricky operashion.” Other words you could use: implicashion (implication), stashion (station), innovashion (innovation), stashionery (stationery), stashionary (stationary) and organisashion (organisation).
    • *atia* → *ash*: Croashia (Croatia), Dalmashian (Dalmatian), spashial (spatial) and insashiable (insatiable).
    • *ace* → *ash*: asherbic (acerbic), ashetate (acetate), exasherbate (exacerbate) and fashetious (facetious). Notes: if something is acerbic, then it’s bitter or sharp. To be facetious is to be flippant or inappropriately light-hearted (usually about serious topics).
    • *ash*: Simply emphasise the “ash” that already exists in these words: ashamed, dash, flash, crash, squash, wash, clash, brash, slash and fashion.
  • Soot: Soot is the residue left behind after burning coal, so we’ve included it in this list:
    • Suit → Soot: As in, “At a price to soot your pocket” and “Follow soot” and “In your birthday soot” and “Soot up!” and “Soot yourself” and “Soots you down to a tee” and “Soots you down to the ground.”
    • Sit → Soot: As in, “Sootting comfortably” and “Don’t just soot there” and “Soot on the fence” and “Soot tight” and “Sootting pretty” and “A sootting target” and “Soot back and relax.”
    • Set → Soot: As in, “Game, soot and match” and “Got your heart soot on” and “Soot eyes on” and “Soot foot in” and “Soot in motion” and “Soot the record straight” and “Soot your sights on” and “Soot yourself apart.”
    • *sat* → *soot*: As in, “Sootirical article” and “Sootellite TV” and “Enough to sootisfy” and “Sootisfied with the results.” Other words that could work: sootisfaction (satisfaction), versootile (versatile), compensoot (compensate), compensootion (compensation), conversootion (conversation) and sensootion (sensation).
    • *set* → *soot*: As in, Soottle down” and “A picturesque sootting” and “Numerous sootbacks.” Other words you could use: soottlement (settlement), upsoot (upset), assoot (asset), mindsoot (mindset) and closoot (closet).
    • *sit* → *soot*: As in, “A sticky sootuation” and “Bank deposoot” and “In transoot” and “A family visoot” and “Revisoot the past” and “Favourite babysootter” and “Sweet disposootion.” Other words that could work: posootion (position), transootion (transition), propensooty (propensity), posootive (positive) and exquisoot (exquisite).
    • Besotted → Besootted (Note: to be besotted is to be infatuated.)
    • Suture → Sooture (Note: to suture is to stitch things together.)
    • *suit*: Swap the “suit” in these words out for “soot”: As in, “A sootable outfit” and “A passionate sootor” and “In my sootcase” and “Well-sooted.” Other words you could use: sootability (suitability), sootably (suitably), pursoot (pursuit), lawsoot (lawsuit), wetsoot (wetsuit), jumpsoot (jumpsuit), swimsoot (swimsuit) and tracksoot (tracksuit).
    • Pharmaceutical → Pharmasootical
  • Would → Wood: As in, “As good luck wood have it,” and “Chance wood be a fine thing,” and “That wood be telling,” and “Woodn’t get out of bed for,” and “Woodn’t hurt a fly.”
  • Coal: Since coal is a very commonly used fuel for fire, we’ve included coal-related puns in this list:
    • Cold → Coal’d: As in, “Left out in the coal’d” and “Coal’d as ice” and “Hot and coal’d” and “Break out in a coal’d sweat” and “Catch a coal’d” and “Coal’d comfort” and “A coal’d day in hell” and “Stone coal’d sober.”
    • Goal → Coal: As in, “With a coal in mind” and “Moving the coalposts” and “Scored a coal.”
    • Gold → Coal’d: As in, “Pot of coal’d” and “All the glitters is not coal’d” and “Good as coal’d” and “Fool’s coal’d” and “Get a coal’d star” and “Go for coal’d” and “Your coal’den years” and “A coal’den opportunity” and “The coal’den rule” and “A heart of coal’d.”
    • *cal* → *coal*: As in, “A coallous (callous) reminder” and “Coalendar reminder” and “Quick mental coalculus” and “Radicoal views” and “Empiricoal evidence” and “A criticoal hit!” and “Cynicoal viewpoint” and “Through practicoal means.” Other words that could work: coalamity (calamity), physicoal (physical), whimsicoal (whimsical), rhetoricoal (rhetorical), escoalate (escalate), escoalation (escalation), escoalator (escalator), Coalifornia (California), specificoally (specifically), technicoally (technically) and intrinsicoally (intrinsically). Notes: to be callous is to be unfeeling and indifferent. If something is intrinsic, then it’s essential.
    • *col* → *coal*: As in, “Work coalleague” and “Off-coalour” and “In coallusion with” and “A vast coallection” and “Coallateral damage” and “Off to coallege” and “Photo coallage” and “A business coallaboration.” Other words that could work: coalon (colon), semicoalon (semicolon), coallaborate (collaborate), coallumn (column), protocoal (protocol) and chocoalate (chocolate).
    • *cul* → *coal*: As in, “A multicoaltural society” and “Part of a coalt” and “A coalinary genius.” Other words that could work: coaltivate (cultivate), coalprit (culprit), coalminate (culminate), coalpable (culpable), coalmination (culmination), articoalate (articulate), curricoalum (curriculum), vernacoalar (vernacular), particoalar (particular), pecoaliar (peculiar), meticoalus (meticulous) and facoalty (faculty). Note: a culmination is the highest peak or achievement of something.
    • Kaleidoscope → Coaleidoscope
    • *kel* → *coal*: nicoal (nickel), snorcoal (snorkel) and pumpernicoal (pumpernickel).
    • *gal* → *coal*: frucoal (frugal), lecoal (legal), recoal (regal), illecoal (illegal) and ecoalitarian (egalitarian). Notes: to be frugal is to be careful with money. If something is egalitarian, then it promotes social equality and rights.
    • *cle* → *coal*: As in, “Cycoaling (cycling) through” and “Come full circoal” and “News articoal” and “A messy debacoal (debacle)” and “The pinnacoal of my career” and “Overcome any obstacoal.” Other words that could work: vehicoal (vehicle), oracoal (oracle), chronicoal (chronicle), miracoal (miracle), spectacoal (spectacle), receptacoal (receptacle) and barnacoal (barnacle).
    • *kle* → *coal*: As in, “A flying tacoal” and “In a picoal” and “Bucoal under the pressure.” Other words you could use: ficoal (fickle), hecoal (heckle), sparcoal (sparkle), chucoal (chuckle), tricoal (trickle), shacoal (shackle) and sprincoal (sprinkle).
  • Gas: As gas is commonly used as fuel for fire, we’ve included gas-related puns and phrases in this list:
    • Guess → Gas: As in, “Anybody’s gas” and “Gas what?” and “Gassing game” and “Hazard a gas” and “Just lucky, I gas” and “Your gas is as good as mine” and “Second-gas yourself” and “You’ll never gas.”
    • Goes → Gas: As in, “The award gas to…” and “Anything gas” and “This is as far as it gas” and “As the saying gas” and “As time gas by” and “Here gas nothing” and “How gas it?” and “It gas without saying” and “What gas around comes around” and “My heart gas out to..”
    • *ges* → *gas*: As in, “A kind gasture” and “Gastation period” and “Gasticulating with annoyance.” Note: gestation refers to the period of development where a fetus develops inside the mother’s body. To gesticulate is to express meaning using gestures.
    • *gos* → *gas*: As in, “A relentless gassip” and “The gaspel truth.”
    • *gus* → *gas*: As in, “With gasto” and “In Augast.” Other words you could use: fungas (fungus), oesophagas (oesophagus), bogas (bogus) and disgast (disgust).
    • *gus* → *gas*: gasebo (gazebo), gaselle (gazelle), gasette (gazette), gasillion (gazillion) and magasine (magazine).
    • *gous* → *gas*: analogas (analogous) and humongas (humongous).
    • *gac* → *gas*: As in, “What sort of legasy will you leave behind?” and “Sagasious words” and “Considering surrogasy.” Note: To be sagacious is to be wise or to show good judgement.
  • Oil: As oil is commonly used as a fuel for fire, we’ve included oil-related phrases for you to use as fire puns:
    • I’ll → Oil: As in, “Well, oil be” and “Oil say!” and “Ask me no questions, oil tell you no lies” and “Oil be back” and “Oil never tell” and “You scratch my back and oil scratch yours.”
    • All → Oil: As in “Can’t we oil just get along?” and “Oil in a day’s work.” and “Oil part of life’s rich tapestry” and “It’s oil Greek to me.” and “It’s oil downhill form here” and “It’s oil fun and games until someone gets hurt” and “It’s oil gone pear shaped” and “It’s oil good” and “It’s oil good clean fun” and “It’s oil me me me” and “That’s oil well and good, but …” and “Oil kidding aside, …” and “Above oil, …” and “Against oil odds” and “Oil shapes and sizes” and “Oil that glitters is not gold” and “Oil the rage” and “Oil the world’s a stage” and “Oil things being equal” and “Oil thumbs” and “Oil’s well that ends well” and “At oil costs” and “By oil appearances” and “By oil accounts” and “Cover oil your bases” and “From oil corners of the globe” and “I haven’t got oil day” and “In oil honesty” and “In oil likelihood” and “It’s oil the same to me” and “Jack of oil trades” and “I don’t know oil the answers” and “Not oil it’s cracked up to be” and “He’s not oil there” and “Once and for oil” and “Don’t put oil your eggs in one basket” – And there are many more oil puns that can be made along these lines.
    • *oil*: Words which contain the “oil” sound (or similar) can be silly oil puns: spoiled, spoils, soiled, turmoil, toiletries, gargoil (gargoyle), foil, recoil.
    • Aisle → Oil: As in, “Walk down the oil” and “Cleanup on oil three.”
  • Wild → Wildfire: As in, “Call of the wildfire” and “Running wildfire” and “Where the wildfire things are.”
  • Fire → Wildfire: As in, “All wildfired up and ready to go” and “Ball of wildfire” and “Baptism of wildfire” and “Breathing wildfire” and “Come on baby, light my wildfire” and “Fight wildfire with wildfire.” Note: this would also work for campfire, as in “Come on baby, light my campfire” and for bonfire, as in “Baptism of bonfire.”
  • Place → Fireplace: As in, “A fireplace for everything and everything in its fireplace” and “All over the fireplace” and “Anytime, any fireplace” and “Between a rock and a hard fireplace” and “Click into fireplace” and “My happy fireplace” and “In the right fireplace at the right time.”
  • Worm → Warm: As in, “Book warm” and “Can of warms” and “Warm your way out of [something]” and “Warm’s eye view.”
  • Warm: Since fire can be used to keep warm, the next few puns are centred around the word “warm”:
    • *wim* → *warm*: As in, “Sink or swarm” and “Going swarmingly (swimmingly)” and “Warmbledon’s (Wimbledon’s) best matches.”
    • Wom* → Warm*: As in, “Feel like a warman (woman)” and “A creepy warmaniser” and “A cute warmbat (wombat).”
  • Steam: While steam isn’t directly related to fire, it still has a strong enough connection (like for something to be “steaming hot” after a fire, or “steaming mad”, showing a fiery temper) for us to include it in this list:
    • Seem → Steam: As in, “Not as bad as it steams” and “Can’t quite steam to…” and “Not as it steams” and “Steams out of place.”
    • Stem → Steam: As in, “Steam the tide” and “An issue steamming from…”
    • Esteem → Esteam: As in, “Self-esteam” and “Esteamed by their peers.”
    • Seam → Steam: As in, “Bulging at the steams” and “Come apart at the steams.”
    • Scheme → Steam: As in, “In the grand steam of things” and “Pyramid steam” and “The best laid steams” and “The overall steam of things.”
    • Scream → Steam: As in, “Dragged kicking and steaming” and “We all steam for ice-cream” and “Steam bloody murder” and “Steam your head off.”
    • Stream → Steam: As in, “Fresh as a mountain steam” and “Changing midsteam” and “Swim upsteam.”
    • Team → Steam: As in, “Dream steam” amd Take one for the steam” and “A steam player” and “Steam spirit” and “Tag steam” and “Steam up with” and “There’s no ‘i’ in steam.”
    • Teem → Steam: As in, “Steaming down with rain” and “Steaming with life.”
    • *stam* → *steam*: We can sneak “steam” into words that have similar sounds, like so: “A testeament to” and “Rushed by the crowded steampede.”
    • *stem* → *steam*: As in, “All systeams go!” and Get it out of your systeam” and “Solar systeam” and “Buck the systeam” and “Self-sustaining ecosysteam” and “Racism is a systeamic problem.” Note: if something is systemic, then it affects the entire involved group, body or system.
    • *stim* → *steam*: As in, “Steamulate your senses” and “Being oversteamulated” and “A mentally steamulating environment” and “By my esteamates” and “Valuable testeamony” and “Don’t underesteamate yourself” and “Company testeamonials.”
  • Furnish → Furnace: As in, “Furnace the apartment” and “Moody furnace-ings.”
  • Stuff → Stove: As in, “Don’t sweat the small stove” and “The stove of dreams” and “Strut your stove.”

Fire-Related Words

To help you come up with your own fire puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

fire, fiery, flame, flaming, pyro, fuel, burn, blaze, blazing, scorch, ember, inferno, fireball, kindle, tinder, smoulder, char, charred, sparks, wildfire, campfire, fireplace, bonfire, bushfire, pyre, flare, heat, light, hot, warm, ignite, ignition, alight, ash, soot, charcoal, coal, smoke, smoky, steam, flammable, conflagration, deflagration, oxidation, combustion, incinerate, pyromania, cremate, incendiary, oxygen, extinguish, gas, photon, oil, wood, temperature, lighter, match, torch, arson, arsonist, fire drill, explosion, hearth, furnace, stove, celcius, farenheit, degree

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Christmas Tree Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on Christmas tree puns! 🎄👼🏼🌟

Organising a Christmas tree is one of the more traditional ways to spend time with family and loved ones. Finding a suitable tree, bringing it home, decorating it – it’s a fairly intensive process when you really get down to it. Make the quality time spent even more painful for your loved ones with our terrible Christmas tree puns. We’ve lovingly curated this list to include different types of trees and the wide range of decorations used on them, and we hope that you find the Christmas tree pun that you’re looking for.

While we’ve made this list as comprehensive as possible, this list is specific to Christmas trees. We also have lists on tree punsleaf puns, reindeer puns and Santa puns and will have more Christmas-specific lists coming soon!

Christmas Tree Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about Christmas trees that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of Christmas tree puns:

  • Christmas tree: Make some extremely obvious Christmas tree puns by taking advantage of phrases that they’re already in – as in, “Done up like a Christmas tree,” and “Lit up like a Christmas tree,” and “Oh, Christmas tree..”
  • Three→ Tree: As in, “And baby makes tree,” and “Good things come in trees,” and “Tree strikes and you’re out!” and “Tree wise men,” and “Tree’s a charm.”
  • Free*→ Tree*: As in, “A symbol of treedom,” and “As tree as a bird,” and “Breathe treely,” and “Buy one, get one tree,” and “Tree for all,” and “Treedom of the press,” and “Get out of jail tree,” and “The best things in life are tree,” and “Land of the tree,” and “Leader of the tree world,” and “The truth will set you tree,” and “No such thing as a tree lunch,” and “When hell treezes over,” and “Think treely.”
  • For → Fir: Firs are another tree that are commonly used as Christmas trees, so they’ve made the list too. As in, “Asking fir a friend,” and “The most bang fir your buck,” and “At a loss fir words,” and “I’ve fallen fir you,” and “Food fir thought,” and “Fir a change,” and “Fir crying out loud,” and “Fir good measure,” and “A sight fir sore eyes.”
  • Leave → Leaf: “Take it or leaf it” and “Absent without leaf” and “You should leaf now.” and  “Leaf an impression” and “Leafed for dead” and “Leaf it at that” and “Leaf me alone!” and “Leaf of absence” and “Leaf out in the cold” and “Take leaf” and “Leafing so soon?”
  •  Wouldn’t→ Wooden: As in, “Nuttelex wooden melt in their mouth,” and “I wooden hurt a fly,” and “Wooden you know it?” and “I wooden touch it with a 10 ft pole.” Note: Nuttelex is a vegan substitute for butter.
  • *tri*→ *tree*: As in, “My hair needs a treem,” and “Full of nutree-ents,” and “What is your best attreebute?” and “How cool are golden retreevers?” and “It’s an intreensic (intrinsic) quality,” and “A new brand of vegan chicken streeps,” and “No streengs attached,” and “We’re going on a treep!” and “Pull the treegger,” and “Any more treecks up your sleeve?” and “A love treeangle,” and “A treevial problem,” and “We pay treebute to the fallen.”
  • *trea*→ *tree*: As in, “A real treet,” and “Medical treetment,” and “Royal treeson,” and “I treesure you,” and “Thick as treecle,” and “Swim upstreem,” and “A holiday retreet,” and “A winning streek,” and “A treecherous mountain path.”
  • *tee*→ *tree*: As in, “By the skin of your treeth,” and “The scene was treeming with people,” and “I guarantree it,” and “A welcoming committree,” and “A chunky manatree,” and “Self-estreem,” and “Charitable voluntreers,” and “My child’s school cantreen.”
  • *tary→ *tree: As in, “Proprietree cables,” and “Complimentree meals,” and “These colours are complementree,” and “Leave it with my secretree,” and “A sedentree life isn’t so healthy,” and “Dominion is a documentree you should watch,” and “It’s rudimentree addition,” and “But what’s the monetree value,” and “A solitree existence.” Notes: to be sedentary is to be inactive or seated. If something is rudimentary, then it’s basic.
  • *try*→ *tree*: As in, “Tree again,” and “A secret treest (tryst),” and “I’m tree-ing (trying)!” and “Meat is not an ethical industree,” and “Refugees should be welcomed to our countree,” and “Bigotree is still rampant,” and “Entree level,” and “A paltree sum,” and “Geometree is everywhere,” and “Chemistree lab,” and “What sultree weather.” Notes: if something is sultry, then it’s hot. A tryst is a private romantic meeting.
  • *ty*→ *tree*: As in, “Star qualitree,” and “Structural integritree,” and “The citree that never sleeps,” and “First-class facilitrees,” and “My dutrees come first,” and “Beautree isn’t everything,” and “A single entitree,” and “Maximum securitree.”
  • Tree→ Christmas tree: As in, “Difficult as nailing jelly to a Christmas tree,” and “Barking up the wrong Christmas tree,” and “Can’t see the wood for the Christmas trees,” and “Charm the birds out of the Christmas trees,” and “Legs like Christmas tree trunks,” and “Make like a Christmas tree and leave,” and “Money doesn’t grow on Christmas trees,” and “Christmas tree hugger,” and “You’re outta your Christmas tree.”
  • Angel: Since angels are commonly placed at the top of Christmas trees, we’ve included common phrases for them in this list: “Enough to make angels weep,” and “A fallen angel,” and “Guardian angel,” and “I believe in angels,” and “On the side of the angels,” and “The angel of death,” and “Angel’s advocate.” Note: an angel’s advocate is someone who sees the good in an idea and supports it.
  • *angle*→ *angel*: As in, “What are you angeling for?” and “Love triangel,” and “A committee is a cul-de-sac down which ideas are lured and quietly strangeled,” and “It takes two to tangel,” and “What a tangeled web.”
  • Star: Since stars are commonly used to decorate the tops of Christmas trees, we’ve included phrases for them in this list. As in, “A star is born,” and “Born under a lucky star,” and “Catch a falling star,” and “Get a gold star,” and “Guiding star,” and “Written in the stars,” and “Reach for the stars,” and “A rising star,” and “Star wars,” and “Star crossed lovers,” and “Star quality,” and “Starstruck,” and “Stars in your eyes,” and “When you wish upon a star,” and “My lucky star,” and “Seeing stars.”
  • *star*: As in, “Can we start?” and “In stark relief,” and “A new tech startup,” and “Stop staring,” and “I didn’t mean to startle you,” and “This pasta is very starchy,” and “A starter kit,” and “You bastard!” and “Doesn’t cut the mustard.” Notes: if something doesn’t cut the mustard, then it isn’t good enough. If something is in stark relief, then it’s been made very obvious.
  • *ster* → *star*: As in, “A starn attitude,” and “This area is starile,” and “Turn up the stareo,” and “Staroids are illegal in sports,” and “Aim for the starnum,” and “You monstar,” and “Addiction is a cruel mastar,” and “Fostar kids,” and “Am I on the registar?” and “A bolstaring attitude,” and “A sinistar presence,” and “Mustar the courage,” and “Work rostar,” and “A cocky roostar,” and “It’s unhealthy to judge people based on stareotypes.” Note: to bolster is to support or strengthen something.
  • Stir → Star: As in, “Cause a star,” and “Shaken, not starred,” and “Star the pot,” and “Star up trouble,” and “Star-crazy.”
  • Stir* → Star*: Starrup (stirrup) and starring (stirring).
  • *stor* → *star*: As in, “I need to go to the stare (store),” and “My favourite stary,” and “A starm brewing,” and “Put in starage,” and “A two-starey house,” and “A convoluted staryline,” and “We don’t have to live like our ancestars,” and “Impostar syndrome,” and “Seed investars,” and “Histarical fiction,” and “You’re distarting the truth.”
  • Sturdy → Stardy: As in, “A stardy table.”
  • Babble → Bauble: As in, “Baubling on and on.”
  • Bobble → Bauble: As in, “Bauble heads,” and “Bauble hat.”
  • Bubble → Bauble: “Bauble and squeak,” and “Bauble up,” and “Burst your bauble,” and “Bauble over,” and “Thought bauble.”
  • Light → Fairy lights: Since Christmas trees are commonly wrapped in blinking fairy lights for decoration, we’ve included the term here. As in, “Blinded by the fairy light,” and “Bring something to fairy light,” and “The cold fairy light of day,” and “First fairy light,” and “Friday night and the fairy lights are low,” and “Give it the green fairy light,” and “Go out like a fairy light,” and “My guiding fairy light,” and “The fairy light at the end of the tunnel.”
  • Very → Fairy: As in, “Be afraid, be fairy afraid,” and “Before your fairy eyes,” and “How fairy dare you,” and “Thank you fairy much,” and “At the fairy least,” and “Efairy bit,” and “Efairy nook and cranny,” and “Efairybody and their mother,” and “There for efairyone to see.”
  • Candy → Candy cane: As in, “Easy as taking a candy cane from a baby.”
  • Present: We put gifts and presents under Christmas trees, so we’ve included these words in this list too. As in, “All present and correct,” and “Present company excepted,” and “No time like the present.”
  • Percent → Present: As in, “A hundred and ten present,” and “Genius is one present inspiration and 99 present perspiration.”
  • Gift: As in, “Don’t look a gift horse in the mouth,” and “Gift of life,” and “A gift that keeps on giving,” and “A gift from above.”
  • Give → Gift: As in, “A dead giftaway,” and “Don’t gift up!” and “Don’t gift in,” and “Gift yourself a bad name,” and “Gift them a hand,” and “Gift and take,” and “Gift credit where credit is due,” and “Gift it a rest,” and “Gift it the green light,” and “Gift me a call,” and “Gift 110%”.
  • Gave → Gift: As in, “I gift my best.”
  • Pine: Pines are a common type of tree used as Christmas trees, so we’ve included them in this list. As in, “Pining away.”
  • Pain → Pine: As in, “A world of pine,” and “Doubled up in pine,” and “Drown the pine,” and “Feeling no pine,” and “Growing pines,” and “No pine, no gain,” and “On pine of death,” and “Pine in the butt,” and “Pine in the neck,” and “Pinefully slow,” and “A royal pine.”
  • Pain* → Pine*: As in, “A picture pinet-s a thousand words,” and “Pine-t with a broad brush,” and “Pine-t the town red.” Note: to paint with a broad brush is to describe a group of things in general terms.
  • Fine → Pine: As in, “A pine line,” and “Cut it pine,” and Damn pine coffee,” and “Pine and dandy,” and “Another pine mess you’ve gotten me into,” and “I feel pine,” and “Not to put too pine a point on it,” and “One pine day,” and “Treading a pine line,” and “Got it down to a pine art,” and “The devil is in the pine print,” and “Go through it with a pine-toothed comb.”
  • *pan* → *pine*: As in, “Three’s compiney,” and “Wild discrepinecys,” and “Judging pinel,” and “Expineding our business,” and “Run rampinet.” Note: a discrepancy is a difference between two things that should be equal.
  • *pen* → *pine*: As in, pinechant (penchant), pineguin (penguin), pinesieve (pensive), pineding (pending), pinenis (penis), pineinsula (peninsula), pinetrate (penetrate), pineance (penance), opine (open), pine (pen), happine (happen), dampine (dampen), deepine (deepen), sharpine (sharpen), ripine (ripen), propinesity (propensity), indispinesable (indispensable), appinedix (appendix), depinedent (dependent). Notes: a penchant is a fondness for something. To be pensive is to be thoughtful. A propensity is a habit for behaving in a particular way.
  • *pin* → *pine*: As in, “Tickled pinek (pink),” and “The pineacle of health,” and “In a pinech,” and “Can you pinepoint the location?” and “A pine-t of ice-cream,” and “Take him out for a spine (spin),” and “I didn’t ask for your opineon,” and “The pursuit of happine-ness.”
  • *pon* → *pine*: As in, “A one trick pineny,” and “Time to pineder (ponder),” and “Choose your weapine,” and “Discount coupine,” and “Once upine a time,” and “I’m waiting for your respinese,” and “A correspinedence course,” and “With great power comes great respinesibility,” and “Spinetaneous combustion.” Notes: a one trick pony is someone who is skilled in only one area.
  • *pun* → *pine*: As in, “Sucker pinech,” and “Be pinectual for the exam,” and “A pinegent smell.”
  • *ine* → *pine*: As in, pine-evitable (inevitable), pinertia (inertia), pinexorable (inexorable), pineffable (ineffable), pinept (inept), pinert (inert), pinexplicable (inexplicable), pinevitably (inevitably). Notes: if something is ineffable, then it causes an indescribable amount of emotion.
  • Corner → Conifer: Conifers are a type of tree commonly used as Christmas trees, so we’ve included them in this list. As in, “A tight conifer,” and “All conifers of the world,” and “Conifer the market,” and “Cut conifers,” and “Drive them into a conifer,” and “The naughty conifer,” and “Just around the conifer,” and “From the conifer of my eye.”
  • Spruce: As spruces are a commonly used as Christmas trees, we’ve included them in this list. You can easily make some bad puns with phrases that include the word spruce, like “Spruce up.”
  • Space → Spruce: As in, “In deep spruce,” and “In spruce, no one can hear you scream,” and “Personal spruce,” and “A waste of spruce,” and “Watch this spruce,” and “Taking up spruce.”
  • Four → Fir: As in, “Down on all firs,” and “Break the firth wall,” and “A fir leaf clover,’ and “A fir letter word,” and “Twenty fir seven.” Note: the fourth wall refers to the imaginary wall between viewers and actors during tv shows or plays.
  • Fair → Fir: As in, “All the fun of the fir,” and “All’s fir in love and war,” and “By fir means or foul,” and “Faint heart never fir lady,” and “Fir trade,” and “Fir and square,” and “Fir and aboveboard,” and “Fir enough,” and “Fir play,” and “Fir game,” and “Fir-haired,” and “Fir is fir.”
  • *far* → *fir*: As in, “A fond firwell (farewell),” and “Firther down,” and “Insofir as,” and “A nefirious villain,” and “Welfir reform.”
  • *fer* → *fir*: As in, “Firal (feral) behaviour,” and “A firvent belief,” and “He talked with firvour,” and “Firmented tofu,” and “A firocious effort,” and “Firtile land,” and “The local firry (ferry),” and “I defirred my enrolment,” and “Let me confir,” and “Do you have any refirences?” and “A kind offir,” and “I’ll transfir some money over,” and “A firm buffir,” and “I prefir tea over coffee,” and “What a diffirent attitude.”
  • *for* → *fir*: As in, “Pay it firward,” and “Have you firsaken me?” and “What’s the fircast look like?” and “So on and so firth,” and “I firbid you!” and “The infirmation desk,” and “The opening perfirmance.”
  • *fir*: Make some fir puns by emphasising words that have “fir” in them: first, affirm, confirm, firsthand and affirmative.
  • *fur* → *fir*: As in, firther (further), firniture (furniture), firtive (furtive), firthermore (furthermore), firnace (furnace), firnish (furnish), sulfir (sulfur). Note: to be furtive is to be secretive.
  • *fair* → *fir*: Firy (fairy), firly (fairly), firness (fairness), firytale (fairytale), firway (fairway).
  • Wood: Make some terrible Christmas tree puns by making wood references with these wood-related phrases: “Can’t see the wood for the trees,” and “Come out of the woodwork,” and “Cut out the dead wood,” and “Knock on wood,” and “Out of the woods,” and “This neck of the woods.” Notes: If you can’t see the wood for the trees, then you’re unable to see a situation clearly due to being too involved in it. To be out of the woods it to be out of a dangerous situation.
  • Would → Wood: As in, “As good luck wood have it,” and “Chance wood be a fine thing,” and “That wood be telling,” and “Woodn’t get out of bed for,” and “Woodn’t hurt a fly.”
  • Leaves: “It leaves a lot to be desired” and “It leaves a bad taste in your mouth”
  • *lease→ *leaf: As in, “A new leaf on life,” and “Releaf me!”
  • *lief→ *leaf: As in, Releaf (relief), beleaf (believe), disbeleaf (disbelieve).
  • *lif*→ *leaf*: As in, “A healthy leafstyle,” and “The end of the natural leafspan,” and “Would you like to use a leafline?” and “Eating meat is not a necessary part of the human leafcycle,” and “Call a leafguard!” and “You’re a leafsaver,” and “Their work is proleafic,” and “You exempleafy the best qualities,” and “You qualeafy for a scholarship.” Notes: to be prolific is to have a lot of; if your work is prolific, then you’ve produced a lot of work. To exemplify is to be a typical, normative example of something.
  • *leef*→ *leaf*: As in, gleaful (gleeful), gleafully and gleafulness.
  • *lef*→ *leaf*: As in, leaftover (leftover), cleaf (clef), leaft, and cleaft (cleft). Notes: A clef is a symbol in musical notation. A cleft is a split or opening.
  •  Needle: It’s normal for pine trees to molt their needles, so it’s a common Christmas scene and problem to have pine needles around the Christmas tree. To start off our pine puns, here are some needle-related phrases that you can slip into conversation: “Pins (or puns!) and needles,” and “Like looking for a needle in a haystack.”
  •  Need→ Needle: As in, “All you needle is love,” and “You needle your head examined,” and “On a needle to know basis,” and “With friends like that, who needles enemies?” and “We’re gonna needle a bigger boat,” and “I don’t needle this,” and “A friend in needle,” and “Needle I remind you..” and “We needle to talk.”
  •  Knee→ Kneedle: As in, “Go down on bended kneedle,” and “Go weak at the kneedles,” and “Kneedle deep,” and “A kneedle jerk reaction,” and “On your kneedles,” and “Shaking at the kneedles,” and “The bee’s kneedles,” and “A real kneedle slapper.” Note: if something is a knee-slapper, then it’s extremely, raucously funny.
  •  Sap→ Sapling: As in, “What a sapling.”
  •  Trunk: Make some Christmas tree puns with these trunk-related phrases: “Leg’s like tree trunks,” and “Junk in the trunk.” Note: be careful not to use the first phrase in a fat-shaming context.
  •  Chunk→ Trunk: As in, “Trunk of change,” and “Blow trunks.” Note: to blow chunks is to throw up.
  •  Drunk→ Trunk: As in, “Trunk as a lord,” and “Trunk as a skunk,” and “Blind trunk,” and “Falling down trunk,” and “Friends don’t let friends drive trunk,” and “Trunk and disorderly,” and “Roaring trunk.”
  •  Branch: Some branch-related phrases for you to make playful tree puns with: “Branch out,” and “Olive branch.” Note: an olive branch is a symbol of peace.
  •  Bench→ Branch: As in, “Branch warmer,” and “Branch jockey,” and “Meet at the park branch?” Note: a bench warmer is someone who isn’t called up to play in a game and have to sit through the entire play – thus warming the bench.
  •  Brunch→ Branch: As in, “Meet for branch?” and “A new branch place,” and “The perfect branch date.”
  • Log: Some log-related phrases for you to play with: “As easy as falling of a log,” and “Log off,” and “Sawing logs,” and “Sleep like a log,” and “Throw another log on the fire.” Note: to saw logs is to snore loudly.
  •  *log*: Emphasise the log in certain words: logistics, logic, login, logo, logical, analog, blog, catalog, slog, backlog, dialog, clog, flog, technology, analogy, etymology, psychology, analogous and ontology.
  •  *lag→ *log: As in, “Jet log,” and “Social jet log,” and “Flog down,” and “Fly the flog.”
  •  *lag*→ *log*: As in: logoon (lagoon), logging (lagging), plogue (plague), colloge (collage), camoufloge (camouflage), flogrant (flagrant).
  •  Leg→ Log: As in, “Break a log,” and “Fast as his logs could carry him,” and “Cost an arm and a log,” and “Give up a log up,” and “Logs like tree trunks,” and “On your last logs,” and “One log at a time,” and “Shake a log,” and “Show a little log,” and “Stretch your logs,” and “Tail between your logs,” and “Without a log to stand on,” and “You’re pulling my log.”
  •  *leg*→ *log*: As in, logacy (legacy), logend (legend), logitimate (legitimate), logal (legal), logible (legible), logion (legion), logislation (legislation), bootlog (bootleg), priviloge (privilege), allogory (allegory), delogate (delegate), elogant (elegant). Note: an allegory is a metaphor used in literature.
  •  *lig*→ *log*: As in, logament (ligament), logature (ligature), intellogence (intelligence), relogion (religion), elogible (eligible). Note: a ligature can mean a few different things, but it generally means something that joins two things together.
  •  *lug*→ *log*: As in, loggage (luggage), plog (plug), slog (slug), unplog (unplug), logubrious (lugubrious), sloggish (sluggish). Note: to be lugubrious is to be sad or dismal.
  • Bark: Since bark has two meanings – the hard “skin” of a tree, and a loud noise that dogs make – we can use the meanings interchangeably and make some bark puns with these bark-related phrases: “A barking dog never bites,” and “Bark at the moon,” and “Barking mad,” and “Barking up the wrong tree,” and “Bark worse than your bite.”
  •  Park→ Bark: As in, “All over the ballbark,” and “A ballbark figure,” and “Central bark,” and “Hit it out of the bark,” and “A nosey barker,” and “A walk in the bark,” and “A bright s-bark,” and “Bark that thought.”
  •  Pakistan→ Barkistan
  •  *bac*→ *bark*: As in, “You can’t barkslide (backslide) now,” and “Barkground music,” and “A barkterial (bacterial) infection,” and “Part of the barkdrop,” and “The barkchelor (bachelor),” and “Barkchelor pad,” and “No such thing as ethical barkon (bacon),” and “Valued feedbark,” and “A messy debarkle (debacle).”
  •  *bec*→ *bark*: As in, “What have we barkome (become)?” and “The food barkoned (beckoned) me,” and “Barkcause I said so,” and “That dress is very barkcoming (becoming),” and “Fire up the barbarkue!”
  •  *bic*→ *bark*: As in, barkering (bickering), barkultural (bicultural), acerbark (acerbic), aerobark (aerobic), xenophobark (xenophobic), Arabark (Arabic), claustrophobark (claustrophobic), cubarkle (cubicle).
  •  *buc*→ *bark*: As in, “Kick the barket,” and “Can’t carry a tune in a barket,” and “A drop in the barket,” and “Coming down in barkets,” and “One, two, barkle my shoe,” and “Barkwheat cereal.”
  •  *bak*→ *bark*: As in, “A vegan barkery,” and “An apprentice barker.”
  •  *bik*→ *bark*: As in, barkini (bikini), rubark‘s cube and motorbark (motorbike).
  •  September→ Septimber: As in, “Wake me up when Septimber ends.”
  •  Root: Some root-related phrases for you to play with: “Lay down roots,” and “Money is the root of all evil,” and “Root for,” and “Root of the matter,” and “Wanna root?”
  •  Root→ Route: As in, “Is your rooter (router) working?” and “Root 66,” and “You need to take a different root.”
  •  *rut*→ *root*: As in, “A rootless (ruthless) procedure,” and “Tell the trooth,” and “Under scrootiny,” and “An inscrootable expression,” and “Brootally honest,” and “A new recroot (recruit).”
  • Twig: Here are some twig-related phrases for you to mix into your Christmas tree wordplay: “Have you twigged on?” and “Looking a bit twiggy.” Notes: to twig onto something is to realise something. If something a looking twiggy, it’s looking thin.
  •  Trigger→ Twigger: As in, “Hair twigger,” and “Pull the twigger,” and “Twigger happy,” and “Whose finger do you want on the twigger?” Note: a hair trigger is a trigger that is extremely sensitive. Can also be used to describe an something which is very unstable.
  • Knot: We can use knot-related phrases as well since “knot” has two meanings – the circular imperfections in wood and a tied fastening: “Don’t get your shorts in a knot,” and “Tie the knot,” and “Tie yourself in knots.”
  •  Not→ Knot: As in, “And whatknot,” and “As often as knot,” and “Believe it or knot,” and “Down but knot out,” and “I’m knot joking,” and “Let’s knot and say we did,” and “Knot a chance,” and “Knot a minute too soon,” and “Knot a pretty sight,” and “Knot all it’s cracked up to be,” and “No, knot at all,” and “Knot have a leg to stand on,” and “Knot in a million years,” and “We’re knot in Kansas anymore,” and “Waste knot, want knot,” and “A house divided against itself canknot stand,” and “Rome was knot built in a day,” and “Last but knot least,” and “If it’s knot one thing, it’s another.”
  •  Nought→ Knot: As in, “Knots and crosses,” and “All for knot,” and “It’s come to knot.”
  •  Naughty→ Knotty: As in, “Knotty but nice,” and “Are you on the knotty list?” and “The knotty corner.”
  •  *nut*→ *knot*: As in, “A hazelknot in every bite,” and “Using a sledgehammer to crack a knot,” and “Sweet as a knot,” and “Do your knot,” and “In a knotshell,” and “That old chestknot,” and “A tough knot to crack,” and “Knots and bolts,” and “If you pay peaknots, you get monkeys.” Notes: if you’re using a sledgehammer to crack a nut, then you’re using more force than is necessary or appropriate. “That old chestnut” refers to a story that has been told too many times.
  •  *nat*→ *knot*: As in, “An inknot (innate) sense,” and “A healthy alterknotive,” and “You’re being obstin-knot,” and “I’ll need your sigknoture,” and “Their sigknoture dish.”
  •  *net*→ *knot*: As in, “The social knotwork,” and “An exclusive knotworking (networking) event,” and “The five teknots (tenets) are,” and “The interknot (internet),” and “Cabiknot maker,” and “Captain Plaknot,” and “Baby’s bonknot,” and “A peknotrating (penetrating) gaze.”
  •  *nit*→ *knot*: As in, “Stop knotpicking (nitpicking),” and “A single, cohesive u-knot,” and “Cogknotive (cognitive) dissonance,” and “Hallway moknotor (monitor),” and “A golden opportuknoty,” and “A tight-knit (or knot) commuknoty,” and “I have a special affiknoty for,” and “Leave with digknoty,” and “A part of the furknoture.” Note: cognitive dissonance is when two contradictory beliefs are held by the same person.
  •  *nut*→ *knot*: As in, knotrition (nutrition), knotrient (nutrient), knotmeg, walknot, cocoknot, butterknot, and miknot (minute).
  •  *not*→ *knot*: As in, “Knotwithstanding,” and “Two week’s knotice,” and “Turn it up a knotch,” and “A ridiculous knotion,” and “He’s knotorious for..” and “It all came to knothing,” and “Negative conknotations.” Note: a connotation is an associated (rather than literal) meaning.
  •  *naut* → *knot*: As in, knotical (nautical), juggerknot, astroknot, cyberknot, and aeroknotical. Notes: a cybernaut is someone who uses the internet on a regular basis. A juggernaut is a force that is generally considered to be unstoppable and destructive. An aeronaut is one who travels in hot-air ballons or airships.
  •  *sap*: Emphasise the “sap” in certain words to make sap-related tree puns: sapient, sappy, asap, disappointed, and disappear.
  •  *sep*→ *sap*: As in, “Comes saparetely,” and “Sapia-toned (sepia),” and “Saptum piercing,” and “Wake me up when Saptember ends,” and “Saptic tank.” Notes: a septum piercing is a type of nose piercing. Sepia is a shade of brown.
  •  *sip*→ *sap*: As in, “A relentless gossap,” and “An insapid tea,” and “My anger is dissapating.” Note: if something is insipid, then it’s weak.
  •  *sop*→ *sap*: As in, saporific (soporific), saprano (soprano), milksap (milksop), aesap (aesop), soursap (soursop).
  •  *sup*→ *sap*: As in, “Emotional sapport,” and “Saperceded,” and “Demand and sapply,” and “You’re being saperfluous,” and “Mother Saperior,” and “Saperiority complex,” and “Vitamin sapplements,” and “Sing for your sapper.”
  •  Axe: Use these axe-related phrases for some sneaky wordplay: “Take an axe to,” and “An axe to grind.” Notes: to take an axe to something is to destroy it. If you’ve got an axe to grind, then you’ve got a grievance or strong opinions.
  •  Ask→ Axe: As in, “A big axe,” and “Axe a silly question and get a silly answer,” and “Axe and you shall receive,” and “Axe around,” and “Axe me another one,” and “Axe no questions and hear no lies,” and “Axe-ing for trouble,” and “What’s the axe-ing price?” and “Everything you were too afraid to axe,” and “Frequently axed questions,” and “Funny you should axe,” and “No questions axed,” and “You gotta axe yourself,” and “Axe-ing for a friend.”
  •  *ax*→ *axe*: As in, “Nothing is certain but death and taxes,” and “Incorrect syntaxe,” and “Soy waxe,” and “Waxe and wane,” and “Mind your own beeswaxe,” and “Frankie says relaxe,” and “The rules are pretty laxe around here,” and “The axe-is of evil.”
  •  *ex*→ *axe*: As in, “A complaxe situation,” and “Body mass indaxe,” and “Better than saxe,” and “Flaxe your muscles,” and “The apaxe of the mountain,” and “Fast reflaxes,” and “There’s still so much saxeism (sexism) in today’s society,” and “Do I even axe-ist (exist) to you?” and “Axeplicit language warning,” and “A team-building axercise,” and “Axeistential crisis,” and “Axetract the essence,” and “In the right contaxe-t,” and “Axepress post,” and “A fair axechange,” and “Animal axeploitation.”
  •  *ix*→ *axe*: As in, matraxe (matrix), faxe (fix), appendaxe (appendix), maxe (mix), suffaxe (suffix), prefaxe (prefix), saxe (six), elaxe-ir (elixir), saxety (sixty).
  •  *ox*→ *axe*: As in, “Thinking outside the baxe,” and “Xeno’s paradaxe,” and “Fantastic Mr. Faxe,” and “Unorthodaxe thinking,” and “Flummaxed,” and “The term ‘happy marriage’ doesn’t have to be an axeymoron,” and “You’re as important as axeygen to me,” and “An obnaxeious attitude,” and “In close praxe-imity.” Notes: if something is unorthodox, then it doesn’t conform to normal social rules or traditions. An oxymoron is a phrase that is made up of contradictory parts (like “cruel to be kind”.) If you’re flummoxed, then you’re completely confused and/or perplexed.
  •  *ux*→ *axe*: As in, “Living in the lap of laxeury,” and “A cruel jaxetaposition.” Note: a juxtaposition is an act of comparison.

Christmas Tree-Related Words

To help you come up with your own Christmas tree puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

christmas tree, tree, christmas, fir, leaves, leaf, wood, wooden, angel, star, bauble, light, fairy light, tinsel, candy cane, present, gift, pine, conifer, spruce, needle, sap, sapling, trunk, branch, twig, log, bark, timber, root, knot, axe

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Tree Puns

Here’s a Punpedia entry all about tree puns, and as it turns out there are a lot of them! Our list of tree puns is composed of 3 main categories. Firstly, any word which has the “tree” sound in it (like pastry, forestry, Austria) is an automatic entry-level pun. Then there are a bunch of different tree species (like acacia, fir, pine) which offer many opportunities for wordplay, and finally there are a bunch of tree-related characteristics and concepts (like leaf, bough, lumber, stump) which add some nice variety.

There’s also a section for tree-related phrases, cliches and idioms after the puns list – these can be used for punning too. And if you’re looking for tree puns in images (memes, visual puns, jokes), then you’ll want to scroll towards the bottom of the page – there’s a section for those. You may also want to check out our leaf puns, nut puns or our Christmas tree puns entry.

As usual, if you have a tree pun that we don’t, we’d love for you to share it with us! There’s a comments section at the bottom of the page.

Tree Puns List

Here’s our ever-growing list of dreadful tree puns! Note that each item may represent either either a simple word-swap (e.g. Three → Tree) or it may be a general rule from which multiple puns can be made. In the case of general rules, the asterisks sign (*) represents one or more letters. If you’ve got a tree pun that we don’t, please share it with us in the comments!

  • Treason → Tree-son: “The dictator punished treeson severely.”
  • Treatment → Tree-tment: “It’s a water treetment plant.”
  • Treaty → Tree-ty: “Both countries signed the treety.”
  • Treat → Tree-t: “What a treet!”
  • Mainstream → Mains-tree-m: “Sorry if my puns are a bit mains-tree-m
  • Illustrious → Illus-tree-ous: “His illustreeous father.”
  • Industrial → Indus-tree-al: “Be careful, that stuff’s industreeal strength.”
  • Intriguing → In-tree-guing: “The organism’s behaviour was in-tree-guing.”
  • Montreal → Mon-tree-al: “I’m from Mon-tree-al too!”
  • Patriarchy → Pa-tree-archy: “Most human societies have pa-tree-archal structures.”
  • Pedestrian → Pedes-tree-an: “The pedes-tree-ans rushed.”
  • Retreat → Re-tree-t: “A wilderness retreet.”
  • Retrieve → Re-tree-ve: “Can you retreeve the lost amulet?”
  • Streak → S-tree-k: “I’m on a winning streek!” and “The streeker was caught and arrested.”
  • Terrestrial → Teres-tree-al: “The tree is a teres-tree-al organism.”
  • Trio → Tree-o: “The tree-o set off on another adventure.”
  • Street: “It bounced happily down the street.”
  • Tremendous → Tree-mendous: “I put in a tree-mendous amount of time on that project.”
  • *t re* → *-tree-*: Many tree puns can be created with this rule: If a word ends in “t” and the following word begins with the “ree” sound, then a tree pun can be made. Here are some examples of pairs of words that work – note that there are multiple ways of presenting “tree” in the pun, and some random examples are shown: might rely (might tree lie or might-tree-ly), best resource (best treesources or best tree sources), just read (just treed), cannot recall (cannotreecal or cannot tree call), it reads (it tree-ds), most refreshingly (most treefreshingly or most tree freshingly), brilliant reasoning (brilliant treesoning), must really (must treeally), not remain (not tree main), just return (just tree turn), can’t refuse (can tree fuse), but really (but treeally), most remarkable (mos-tree markable), not retaining (no tree-taining). There are obviously a very large number of these sort of tree puns to be made – far too many to list here.
  • Treachery → Tree-chery: “The tree-chery of the man has no bounds.”
  • Dream → Tree-m: “I had the weirdest tree-m last night”
  • Triangle → Tree-angle: “Tree-angles have three sides.”
  • Triumph → Tree-umph: “The allied countries were tree-umphant.”
  • Trillion → Tree-llion: “Humans kill more than one tree-llion sea animals each year.”
  • Trilogy → Tree-logy: “It’s the third book in the tree-logy.”
  • Triathalon → Tree-athalon : “She trained hard for the tree-athalon.”
  • Tribulations → Tree-bulations: “She went through many trials and treebulations when starting her business.”
  • Traditional → Tree-ditional: “Treeditional family values are outdated.”
  • Transformation → Tree-nsformation: “They underwent a radical treensformation.”
  • Transparency → Tree-nsparency: “An open and treensparent government is very important.”
  • Transexual → Tree-nsexual: “Yep, I’m a male to female treensexual.”
  • Be → Tree: “I’m trying to tree more compassionate.”
  • Free → Tree: “Buy one, get one tree.”
  • Thee → Tree: “Shall I compare tree to a summer’s day?”
  • Three → Tree: “Good things come in trees.”
  • T-shirt → Tree-shirt: “What size is your tree-shirt?”
  • Absentee → Absen-tree: “Only one absentree today.”
  • Amputee → Ampu-tree: “The amputree was lucky to have survived.”
  • Devotee → Devo-tree: “A devotree of the temple”
  • Manatee → Mana-tree: “Manatrees are mostly marine animals.”
  • Guarantee → Guaran-tree: “It comes with a lifetime guarantree.”
  • Deportee → Depor-tree: “The deportrees were being taken to another country.”
  • Repartee → Repar-tree: “All this word play and repartree is making me tired.”
  • Country → Coun-tree: “The countree is openly going against UN conventions”
  • Countries → Coun-trees: “The countrees formed a strong relationship.”
  • Industry → Indus-tree: “We need a stronger manufacturing industree.”
  • Industries → Indus-trees: “All three primary industrees are booming.”
  • Entries → En-trees: “We’ve have over seven thousand entrees.”
  • Ministry → Minis-tree: “The ministree of international relations.”
  • Ministries → Minis-trees: “All of the ministrees are happy with the decision.”
  • Tapestry → Tapes-tree: “A beautifully embroidered tapestree.”
  • Pleasantry → Pleasan-tree: “A pleasantree is a polite part of a normal conversation.”
  • Pleasantries → Pleasan-trees: “We don’t have time to exchange pleasantrees.”
  • Toiletries → Toile-trees: “We packed the toiletrees in the other suitcase.”
  • Pastry → Pas-tree: “Most pastrees are quite unhealthy.”
  • Sentry → Sen-tree: “Put another sentree on that building, corporal.”
  • Poetry → Poe-tree: “Reading poetree helps me relax.”
  • Chemistry → Chemis-tree: “Chemistree is my second major.”
  • Infantry → Infan-tree: “Their heavy infantree are retreating.”
  • Symmetry → Symme-tree: “A square has 4 lines of symmetree.”
  • Registry → Regis-tree: “The registree is processing more licenses than ever.”
  • Geometry → Geome-tree: “It has a strange, curvy geometree.”
  • Forestry → Fores-tree: “The forestree department is finally getting more funding.”
  • Poultry → Poul-tree: “The poultree industry is a cruel one.”
  • Ancestry → Ances-tree: “My ancestree is primarily Aboriginal.”
  • Sultry → Sul-tree: “The sultree glances were unmistakable.” and “I’m hoping this sultree weather won’t last long”.
  • Gallantry → Galan-tree: “The captain’s gallantree won her team the title.” and “His humble gallantry has made him famous in the town.”
  • Carpentry → Carpe-tree: “The carpentree profession has changed over the years.”
  • Bigotry → Bigo-tree: “The bigotree of a racist past still exists in the corners of society.”
  • Circuitry → Circui-tree: “The circuitree is too hot.”
  • Pantry → Pan-tree: “This pantree is larger than my room!”
  • Dentistry → Dentis-tree: “She’s been studying dentistree for 6 years now.”
  • Extremism → Ex-tree-mism: “Religious extreemism is an inherent problem of religion itself.”
  • Austria → Aus-tree-a: “Aus-tree-a is a lovely country.”
  • Bloodstream → Bloods-tree-m: “The bloodstreem carries oxygen and nutrients to cells.”
  • Compatriot → Compa-tree-ot: “The two compa-tree-ots were competing for gold.”
  • Countryside → Coun-tree-side: “A walk in the coun-tree-side is what I need.”
  • Equestrian → Eques-tree-an: “The eques-tree-ian sports industry can be quite cruel.”
  • History → His-tree: “His-tree was made this day.”
  • Victory → Vic-tree: “Vic-tree is ours!”
  • Factory → Fac-tree: “The fac-tree produces all sorts of plastic goods.”
  • Territory → Terri-tree: “The aggressor country lost terri-tree after the war.”
  • Laboratory → Labora-tree: “The labora-tree of Dr. Frankenstein.”
  • Statutory → Statu-tree: “A Statu-tree declaration.”
  • Directory → Direc-tree: “A direc-tree of phone numbers.”
  • Satisfactory → Satisfac-tree: “Your behaviour has been satisfac-tree.”
  • Lavatory → Lava-tree: “Please, may I use your lava-tree?”
  • Inventory → Inven-tree: “While taking an inven-tree of our goods I noticed a deficit.”
  • Regulatory → Regula-tree: “Please consult the regula-tree body responsible for this.”
  • Mandatory → Manda-tree: “Wearing socks in manda-tree.”
  • Inflammatory → Inflamma-tree: “Those are inflama-tree comments.”
  • Contradictory → Contradic-tree: “Your statements are contradic-tree.”
  • Repository → Reposi-tree: “A vast reposi-tree of data.”
  • Obligatory → Obliga-tree: “Thid event is obligi-tree for new members.”
  • Discriminatory → Discrimina-tree: “The new rules were a bit discrimina-tree.”
  • Perfunctory → Perfunc-tree: “I had a perfunctree look over the manuscript.”
  • Derogatory → Deroga-tree: “The minister’s comments were undeniably derogatree.”
  • Mystery → Mys-tree: “Where my pride went is a bit of a mys-tree.”
  • Battery → Batree: “The new batree powered candles.”
  • Pottery → Pot-tree: “I practice pottery for relaxation.”
  • Cemetery → Ceme-tree: “This cemetree contains the body of my great grandmother.”
  • Lottery → Lotree: “The lottree often preys on the minorities.”
  • Monastery → Monas-tree: “Not far from here is the ruins of an old monas-tree.”
  • Adultery → Adultree: “In some conservative countries adul-tree is still illegal.”
  • Flattery → Flattree: “Oh enough with the flat-tree!”
  • Military → Mili-tree: “The ents have a powerful mili-tree.” Note: ents are a race of living trees in The Lord of the Rings.
  • Parliamentary → Parliamen-tree: “The parlimen-tree proceedings were slow.”
  • Voluntary → Volun-tree: “A volun-tree worker.”
  • Monetary → Monet-tree: “This old vase has a high monet-tree value.”
  • Commentary → Commen-tree: “We don’t need your commen-tree.”
  • Documentary → Documen-tree: “A documen-tree about Polynesian rainforests.”
  • Solitary → Soli-tree: “I prefer a soli-tree existence.”
  • Complimentary → Complimen-tree: “It comes with a complimen-tree gift card.”
  • Dietary → Diet-tree: “Diet-tree experts recommend a mostly plant-based diet.”
  • Elementary → Elemen-tree: “We had to bow to teachers in my elemen-tree school.”
  • Proprietary → Propriet-tree: “This software isn’t open-source, it’s propriet-tree.”
  • Hereditary → Heredit-tree: “I think my corny puns are heredit-tree.”
  • Sanitary → Sani-tree: “The hospital was sani-tree by necessity.”
  • Planetary → Planet-tree: “These planet-tree bodies have unusual orbits.”
  • Sedentary → Sedentree: “I’m too sedentree – I want to get a stand-up desk.”
  • Momentary → Momentree: “A momentree lapse of concentration was all it took.”
  • Century → Centree: “It’s been more than a centree since the war.”
  • Belief → Beleaf: “Beleaf in magic spiritual beings is outdated.”
  • Disbelief → Disbeleaf: “I had to suspend my disbeleaf.”
  • Gleeful → Gleaful: “His gleaful expression was the cutest.”
  • Gleefully → Gleafully: “They gleafully accepted the gifts.”
  • *ly F* → *-leaf f*: Thousands or perhaps millions of leaf puns can be made with this simple rule: If a word ends in the “ly” sound and if followed by a word starting with “f”, then a leaf pun can be made. Here are some examples of pairs of words that work – note that there are multiple ways of presenting “leaf” in the pun, and some random examples are shown: heartily for (hearti-leaf-or or hearty leaf for), closely from (close-leaf-rom or close-leaf from), nearly five (near-leaf-ive or near-leaf five), practically finished (practica-leaf-inished or practical-leaf finished), truly formidable (tru-leaf-ormidable or true leaf formidable), perfectly familiar (perfect-leaf-amiliar or perfect leaf familiar), nearly fifteen (near-leaf-ifteen or near leaf fifteen), possibly find (possib-leaf find), ghastly face (ghast-leaf-ace or ghast-leaf face), continually from (continua-leaf-rom), carefully fastened (carefu-leaf-astened), slowly from (slow-leaf from), rapidly formed (rapid-leaf-ormed), principally for (principal leaf for), plainly furnished (plain-leaf-urnished), hardly found (hard-leaf-ound), entirely free (entire leaf fresh), perfectly fresh, fiercely forward, nearly fallen, expressly for, terribly frightened, loudly for, swiftly forward. There’s obviously a huuuge number of different pairs of word for which this works. You could also use leaf puns as one or more of those words to create more densely leaf-punned phrases: “She gleaful-leaf frolicked through the meadow.”
  • Jellyfish → Jel-leaf-ish: “The je-leaf fish glided gently upwards.”
  • Relief → Releaf: “What a releaf!”
  • Cauliflower → Cau-leaf-lower: “Cau-leaf flower is a great source of vitamins.”
  • Amplification → Amp-leaf-ication: “We’ll need more ampleafication to reach the back seats.”
  • California → Caleafornia: “I’m from Caleafornia.”
  • Cliff → Cleaf: “It’s an extremely flat cleaf-face.”
  • Elephant → Eleafant: “Eleafants are herbivores.”
  • Exemplify → Exampleafy: “This exempleafies a terrible leaf pun.”
  • Facelift → Faceleaft: “Face-leafts are becoming cheaper by the day.”
  • Left → Leaf-t: “Turn leaft at Khalin St.”
  • Lift → Leaf-t: “Take the leaft to the 45th floor.”
  • Oversimplification → Oversimpleafication: “Your oversimpleafication of the issue is not helpful.”
  • Shoplifting → Shopleafting: “Shopleafting is still a major problem in many countries.”
  • Telephone → Teleafone: “You used to call me on the teleafphone.”
  • Qualification → Qua-leaf-ication: “Do you have the qua-leaf-ications for that?”
  • Proliferate → Pro-leaf-erate: “Critical thinking skills are proleaferating in many societies.”
  • Root: “We need to get to the root of this problem.”
  • Rooting: “I’m rooting for you!”
  • Route → Root: “We’ll take the short root.”
  • Are boring→ Arboring: “Your tree puns arboring.” The term “arbor” refers to an area surrounded and shaded by trees and vines, especially where they are trained over a framework for the purpose of creating such an area. The term can also refer to someone who trims, fells, or cares for trees as a profession.
  • Facepalm: “His complete ignorance and overconfidence made me want to face-palm, but I remained polite.”
  • A corny → Acorny: “That was acorny tree pun.”
  • May pull → Maple: “I maple an all-nighter to get it done.”
  • Pine: “I’ve been pine-ing for you all week.” Here we’re using the “miss and long for the return of” definition of “pine”.
  • Opine → O-pine: “She often opined at our meetings.” To “opine” is to “speak up” and declare one’s opinion openly.
  • Pain → Pine: As in, “A world of pine,” and “Doubled up in pine,” and “Drown the pine,” and “Feeling no pine,” and “Growing pines,” and “No pine, no gain,” and “On pine of death,” and “Pine in the butt,” and “Pine in the neck,” and “Pinefully slow,” and “A royal pine.”
  • Pain* → Pine*: As in, “A picture pinet-s a thousand words,” and “Pine-t with a broad brush,” and “Pine-t the town red.” Note: to paint with a broad brush is to describe a group of things in general terms.
  • Fine → Pine: As in, “A pine line,” and “Cut it pine,” and Damn pine coffee,” and “Pine and dandy,” and “Another pine mess you’ve gotten me into,” and “I feel pine,” and “Not to put too pine a point on it,” and “One pine day,” and “Treading a pine line,” and “Got it down to a pine art,” and “The devil is in the pine print,” and “Go through it with a pine-toothed comb.”
  • *pan* → *pine*: As in, “Three’s compiney,” and “Wild discrepinecys,” and “Judging pinel,” and “Expineding our business,” and “Run rampinet.” Note: a discrepancy is a difference between two things that should be equal.
  • *pen* → *pine*: As in, pinechant (penchant), pineguin (penguin), pinesieve (pensive), pineding (pending), pinenis (penis), pineinsula (peninsula), pinetrate (penetrate), pineance (penance), opine (open), pine (pen), happine (happen), dampine (dampen), deepine (deepen), sharpine (sharpen), ripine (ripen), propinesity (propensity), indispinesable (indispensable), appinedix (appendix), depinedent (dependent). Notes: a penchant is a fondness for something. To be pensive is to be thoughtful. A propensity is a habit for behaving in a particular way.
  • *pun* → *pine*: As in, “Sucker pinech,” and “Be pinectual for the exam,” and “A pinegent smell.”
  • *ine* → *pine*: As in, pine-evitable (inevitable), pinertia (inertia), pinexorable (inexorable), pineffable (ineffable), pinept (inept), pinert (inert), pinexplicable (inexplicable), pinevitably (inevitably). Notes: if something is ineffable, then it causes an indescribable amount of emotion.
  • Will not → Walnut: “I walnut stand for this!”
  • Leaves: “She leaves here on Tuesday.”
  • Leaf: “You should leaf now.”
  • Stumped: “I’m completely stumped.”
  • Stomp → Stump: “He was stumping the ground in anger.”
  • Beach→ Beech: “A lovely summer day at the beech.” A “beech” tree is a type of large deciduous tree.
  • Okay → Oak-ay: “Oakay, you’re right.”
  • *oak*: If a word contains “oak” or the “oak” sound, then we can make a simple partial pun of the word: awoak (awoke), bloak (bloke), buroakratic (bureaucratic), choak (choke), coakaine (cocaine), coakonut (coconut), croak, evoak (evoke), foak (folk), hoaks (hoax), joakingly (jokingly), loakated (located), Oaklahoma (Oklahoma), outspoaken (outspoken), poaker (poker), poak (poke), proaklaim (proclaim), revoak (revoke), smoaker (smoker), soak, voakal (vocal).
  • Sap: “He fell for it! What a sap!” The term “sap” can be slang for “a foolish and gullible person.”
  • Zap → Sap: “I got a small sap from the electrical switch.”
  • Slap → Sap: “He sapped me gently on my right cheek.”
  • Ent*: The “Ents” are a fictional race of large anthropomorphic trees in the Lord of the Rings series. Words starting with “ent” can thus be corny tree puns. Here are a few examples: enter, entry, enterprise, entirely, entrance, entered, entitled, entertainment, entity, enterprise, entailed, entertainer, entwine.
  • Bitch → Birch: “Yeah, people are a bit birchy at my work.”
  • Asked → Axed: “Axe, and you shall receive.”
  • Will owe → Willow: “After this I willow you even more money.”
  • Saw → Seed: “I seed it with my own eyes!”
  • Knot: “Can you help me tie this knot?”
  • Not → Knot: “I will knot put up with this anymore.”
  • For → Fir: “Fir only a second.” A “fir” tree is an evergreen coniferous tree with needle-shaped leaves, commonly used for timber and resin.
  • You → Yew: “Yew and me.” A “yew” tree is a coniferous tree that has red berrylike fruits. It can live to a very old age, is poisonous, and is often used for cabinet making.
  • Popular → Poplar: “Yes, vegan restaurants are becoming very poplar.” A poplar is a species of tall, fast-growing tree.
  • See the → Cedar: “Cedar forest for the trees.” A “cedar” is any of a number of conifer species which yield fragrant and durable timber.
  • Wouldn’t → Wooden: “Wooden you think?”
  • Would → Wood: “Wood you help me out for a while?”
  • Shady: “There’s some shady character following me.”
  • Drunk → Trunk: “A bunch of trunk idiots.”
  • Cops → Copse: “We should call the copse.” A “copse” is a small group of trees (a “thicket” or “grove”).
  • Chop: “We’ve been chopping and changing trying to make a decision.”
  • Shrunk → Shtrunk: “My shirt shtrunk in the wash.”
  • Bark: “All bark and no bite.”
  • Saw: “After she explained it, I saw her point”.
  • Saw dust → Sawdust: “These puns are so old I sawdust on them.”
  • Palm: “You’ll have to grease their palms.” Note: to grease someone’s palm is to bribe them.
  • Ask → Ashk: “I’ll ashk if it’s okay.”
  • Friends → Fronds: “Me and my best fronds.”
  • Friendly → Frondly: “He has such a frondly air about him.”
  • A case of → Acacia: “I’ve come down with acacia winter flu.”
  • Stick: “Stick with me, you’ll be all right.”
  • Sticking: “We’re at a bit of a sticking point.”
  • Sticky: “Eww, it’s all sticky.”
  • Schtick → Stick: “Okay, you’ve worn out the tree puns schtick now, it’s not funny anymore.”
  • Can offer → Conifer: “I conifer you a 30% discount if you buy now.”
  • Carnivorous → Coniferous: “Cats are coniferous animals.”
  • Spruce: “We need to spruce you up a bit.” A spruce is the type of conifer that’s often used for Christmas.
  • Space → Spruce: As in, “In deep spruce,” and “In spruce, no one can hear you scream,” and “Personal spruce,” and “A waste of spruce,” and “Watch this spruce,” and “Taking up spruce.”
  • Sick of mor* → Sycamore-*: Words beginning with the “more” sound can be made into sycamore puns when preceded by “sick of”, for example: “I’m sycamorning TV shows” (I’m sick of morning TV shows), “I getting sycamore tree puns.” (I’m getting sick of more tree puns).
  • Alternate → Alder-nate: “It alder-nates between black and white.” An “alder” is a tree of the birch family.
  • Tapped: “I tapped him on the shoulder.” Some trees (like rubber trees) are “tapped”, meaning they have their sap extracted via a hole in the trunk.
  • Log: “Make sure to log your hours on the time sheet.”
  • Limb: “I’m going to go out on a limb here.” and “My limbs feel so heavy.”
  • Bow → Bough: “Boughing to visitors is polite in my culture.” A “bough” is any of the larger branches of a tree.
  • Bowl → Bole: “I’ll need a bigger bole.” The “bole” is another term for the trunk of a tree.
  • Burly: “I saw a burly figure come out of the shadows.” A “burl” or “bur” is deformation or “knot” in the growth of a tree.
  • Fell: “I fell victim to an online scam.” The term “fell” is a word for “to cut down” when referring to a tree, as in “She felled the tree with her axe.”
  • I’m → Elm: “Elm not sure if it’s the right thing to do.”
  • Confer → Conifer: “I need to conifer with my advisers before making a decision.”
  • Lumber: “He clumsily lumbered over to greet me.” The term “lumber” can refer to slow, heavy, awkward movement.
  • Can of pee → Canopy: “That thing’s worth less than a can-o’-py.”
  • Grave → Grove: “You must leave – you are in grove danger.”
  • Gum: “Stop flapping your gums and get back to work.” and “Chewing gum isn’t allowed here.” The term “gum” can refer to a viscous secretion of some trees that hardens on drying. It may also refer to a tree which has secretes this substance.
  • Phlegm → Phloem: “I’ve got a cold and a phloemy throat.” The term “phloem” refers to the plant tissue tubes that conduct nutrients around the plant.
  • Gall: Refers to an abnormal growth on plants and trees, especially in response to the presence of insects or mites. It also mean “bold and impudent behaviour”: “He had the gall to make more tree puns even after I shouted at him to stop.”
  • Branch: “We need to branch out into other sectors.” and “We’re opening another branch in this town.”
  • Lifeless → Leafless: “A seemingly leafless figure lay on the beach.”
  • Life → Leaf: “Well, that’s just leaf I guess.”
  • Plant: “She planted her feet firmly on the ground, ready to fight.”
  • Decision → Deciduous: This one is very corny! “Finally, we’ve arrived at a deciduous!”
  • Shoot: “Shooting animals for sport is cowardly.” Note that a “shoot” in the leafy context refers to a young branch or leaf springing from a stem.

Tree-Related Words

No doubt there are many more puns to be made, so we’ve gathered together a list of tree-related words to help you come up with your own tree puns. If you come up with any good ones, please share them in the comments and we’ll add them to our list!

limb, bough, bole, burl, arbor, sumac, teak, fell, elm, twig, alder, azalea, log, heath, spruce, conifer, stick, saw, sawdust, acacia, tree house, frond, palm, palm tree, chop, copse, cecar, poplar, yew, yew tree, fir, fir tree, ash, knot, seed, willow, axe, birch, bush, bark, trunk, stump, ent, sap, oak, leaf, leaves, leave, walnut, pine, maple, acorn, root, tree, forest, wood, wooden, shrub, eucalyptus, beech, deciduous, evergreen, bamboo, grove, banyan, hornbeam, baobab, bonsai, canopy, rainforest, casuarina, unga, puka, yukka, linden, souari, lumber, poon, bayberry, gum tree, chestnut, mangrove, photosynthesis, fern, cypress, sapwood, heartwood, botanist, xylem, phloem, sapling, cycad, perennial, hazel, fig tree, pear tree, orchard, ginkgo, tannin, botany, banana tree, sequoia, aboreal, hickory, silva, ironwood, aspen, lumberjack, hardwood, pollard, hemlock, taproot, graft, grafting, flowering, sandalwood, foliage, underbrush, tea tree, vegetation, redwood, growth rings, softwood, lignin, mahogany, timber, rosewood, beechwood, thicket, cellulose, sawmill, plywood, forestry, kauri, plank, oaken, wooded, mulch, branch, barky, cinnamon, gum, greenery, larch, juniper, girdle, knar, filbert, gall, treetops, tree huggers, elderberry, pine cone, cone, haw, olive tree, rubber tree, sassafras, yellowwood

Tree-Related Phrases

Cliches, idioms and common phrases can often be used to make some subtle puns about the subject of your wordplay. Tree puns are no exception, and so we’ve included a list of all the tree-related phrases that we could find. If you know any more, please share them in the comments!

  • Bark is worse than its bite
  • Barking up the wrong tree
  • See the forest for the trees
  • The root of the problem
  • Grease one’s palm
  • Go out on a limb
  • Branch out
  • Grass roots movement
  • Log off / log on
  • Don’t take any wooden nickels
  • Little strokes fell great oaks
  • Must have learned to whisper in a sawmill
  • Knock on wood
  • Touch wood
  • A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush
  • Make like a tree and leave
  • Mighty oaks from little acorns grow
  • Put on the wooden overcoat
  • Shiver me timbers
  • An apple doesn’t fall far from the tree
  • Bust in the chops
  • By your leave
  • Don’t be a stick in the mud
  • Don’t keep a dog and bark yourself
  • Better than a poke in the eye with a sharp stick
  • Dumb as a stump
  • Even a blind squirrel finds an acorn sometimes
  • Had me stumped
  • Have an axe to grind
  • How much wood can a woodchuck chuck?
  • In limbo
  • In the sticks
  • Let’s tie the knot
  • Money doesn’t grow on trees
  • More cliches than you can shake a stick at
  • Old chestnut
  • Sleep like a log
  • Take a leaf out of your book
  • Turn over a new leaf
  • Take it or leave it
  • The short end of the stick
  • This neck of the woods
  • Beat the bushes
  • Beat around the bush
  • Walk the plank

Tree Pun Images

We’ve collected all the visual tree puns and meme-type puns that we could find and put them all in one place for you. If you’ve found or made another one, please share a link to it in the comments!

Tree Pun Conversations

Pun battles and pun-filled conversations are a common occurrence on the internet, and particularly so for tree puns for some reason. Here we’ve collected some of those iMessage/Messenger/chatroom pun battles for you to do with as you would:

Did this Punpedia entry help you?

That’s all the tree pun material we have for you! Was it helpful? Did you find what you were looking for? If so, great! We’re happy we were able to help. If not, we’d love for you to tell us how this entry could be improved. More visual tree puns? More word play around a certain concept? Punpedia is driven by community suggestions, so we really appreciate your feedback. Thanks for visiting Punpedia 🙂