Plant Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on plant puns! 🌸🌳🌺🌿🌼

There are so many different types of plants for us to make puns from – fruits, vegetables, trees, flowers, herbs and more! We’ve split this list up into two main sections – words that are generally to do with plants (like twig, rain or flora), and small lists of specific flowers, trees and herbs.

We haven’t gone into too much detail with specific plants since this is more of a general plant list and we have more specialised entries of cactus puns, flower puns, leaf puns and tree puns, with others on the way too!

Plant Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about plants that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of plant puns:

  • Pant → Plant: As in, “Ants in your plants” and “Beat the plants off” and “By the seat of your plants” and “Fancy plants” and “Get into someone’s plants” and “Smarty plants” and “Wet your plants.”
  • Pent → Plant: As in, “Plant up rage” and “Don’t keep it plant up.”
  • Paint → Plant: As in, “A picture plants a thousand words” and “Plant the town red” and “Plant yourself into a corner.”
  • Can’t → Plant: As in, “An offer you plant refuse” and “Plant get enough” and “I plant imagine what you’re going through” and “I plant wait!”
  • Grant → Plant: As in, “Plant no quarter” and “Take for planted.”
  • Rant → Plant: As in, “Plant and rave.”
  • Plant: These plant-related phrases are general enough to double as puns: “Plant a seed” and “Feet firmly planted.”
  • *pant* → *plant*: As in, “The plantry is bare” and “Running ramplant” and “A flipplant reply” and “Participlant award.”
  • Not your → Nature: As in, “Nature ordinary day” and “That’s nature wallet!”
  • Go → Grow: As in, “All dressed up and nowhere to grow” and “Anything grows” and “Don’t grow there” and “Easy come, easy grow” and “From the get-grow” and “From the word grow” and “Give it a grow.”
  • Blow → Grow: As in, “Any way the wind grows” and “Grow a fuse” and “Grow a kiss” and “Grow hot and cold” and “Grow off some steam.”
  • Flow → Grow: As in, “Ebb and grow” and “Go with the grow” and “Get the creative juices growing” and “In full grow.”
  • Know → Grow: As in, “Don’t I grow it” and “Be the first to grow” and “Doesn’t grow beans” and “It takes one to grow one.”
  • Low → Grow: As in, “An all-time grow” and “Get the grow down” and “High and grow” and “Keep a grow profile” and “Lay grow” and “Grow hanging fruit.”
  • Owe → Grow: As in, “Grow a favour” and “You grow it to yourself.”
  • Quo → Grow: As in, “Quid pro grow” and “The status grow.”
  • Slow → Grow: As in, “A grow burn” and “Grow motion” and “Grow on the uptake” and “Growly but surely.”
  • Snow → Grow: As in, “Let it grow” and “Too cold to grow.”
  • Though → Grow: As in, “You look as grow you’ve seen a ghost!”
  • Throw → Grow: As in, “A stone’s grow away” and “Grow a wobbly” and “Grow cold water on” and “Grow caution to the wind” and “Grow it back in your face.”
  • Both → Growth: As in, “A foot in growth camps” and “Growth oars in the water” and “Have it growth ways” and “Burn the candle at growth ends” and “The best of growth worlds.”
  • Three→ Tree: As in, “And baby makes tree,” and “Good things come in trees,” and “Tree strikes and you’re out!” and “Tree wise men,” and “Tree’s a charm.”
  • Free*→ Tree*: As in, “A symbol of treedom,” and “As tree as a bird,” and “Breathe treely,” and “Buy one, get one tree,” and “Tree for all,” and “Treedom of the press,” and “Get out of jail tree,” and “The best things in life are tree.”
  • *tary → *tree: As in, “A complimentree attitude” and “My secretree will give you the details” and “Sedentree lifestyle” and “Dominion is an important documentree” and “Rudimentree skills” and “Monetree problems” and “A solitree existence.”
  • *tery → *tree: As in, “Hit an artree” and “Battree and assault” and “A total mystree” and “Guilty of adultree” and “Visit the cemetree” and “Change the upholstree” and “Win the lottree” and “Showing mastree of their skills.”
  • *trea*→ *tree*: As in, “A real treet,” and “Medical treetment,” and “Royal treeson,” and “I treesure you,” and “Thick as treecle,” and “Swim upstreem,” and “A holiday retreet,” and “A winning streek,” and “A treecherous mountain path.”
  • *tee*→ *tree*: As in, “By the skin of your treeth,” and “The scene was treeming with people,” and “I guarantree it,” and “A welcoming committree,” and “A chunky manatree,” and “Self-estreem,” and “Charitable voluntreers,” and “My child’s school cantreen.”
  • Curb → Herb: As in, “Herb your enthusiasm” and “Kicked to the herb.”
  • Hab* → Herb*: As in, “Kick the herbit” and “Peaceful herbitat” and “It’s herbitual.”
  • Hib* → Herb*: As in, “Going in to herbination” and “Herbiscus scented.”
  • Push → Bush: As in, “Don’t bush your luck” and “If bush comes to shove” and “Bush at an open door” and “Bushing someone’s buttons” and “Bush the envelope” and “Bushing up daisies.”
  • Bash → Bush: As in, “Birthday bush.”
  • Grace → Grass: As in, “Airs and grasses” and “Amazing grass” and “Fall from grass” and “Grass period” and “With good grass.”
  • Gross → Grass: As in, “Grass domestic deal” and “Grassed out.”
  • Gas → Grass: As in, “Cooking with grass” and “Run out of grass” and “Step on the grass” and “Grass burner.”
  • Brass → Grass: As in, “Bold as grass” and “Grass monkey weather” and “Cold enough to freeze a grass monkey.”
  • Class → Grass: As in, “A real grass act” and “Best in grass” and “Business grass” and “Grass warfare” and “In a grass of your own” and “Working grass hero.”
  • Glass → Grass: As in, “Grass ceiling” and “Grassy eyed” and “People who live in grass houses shouldn’t throw stones” and “Rose tinted grasses” and “The grass menagerie” and “Through the looking grass.”
  • Pass → Grass: As in, “All things must grass” and “All access grass” and “Boarding grass” and “Do not grass go” and “Grass muster.”
  • *gas* → *grass*: As in, “Grasstronomical shyness” and “Cooking with grassoline” and “Flabbergrassted at your actions.”
  • *gres* → *grass*: “For the sake of prograss” and “Assertive over aggrassive” and “Voted into congrass” and “But I digrass” and “A violating transgrassion.”
  • Vain → Vine: As in, “Labour in vine” and “You’re so vine” and “Take their name in vine.”
  • Dine → Vine: As in, “Wine and vine.”
  • Fine → Vine: As in, “A vine line” and “Cutting it vine” and “Damn vine” and “Vine and dandy” and “Vine dining” and “The viner things in life” and “Got it down to a vine art” and “In vine form.”
  • Line → Vine: As in, “A fine vine” and “Along the vines of” and “Cross the vine” and “End of the vine” and “Fall into vine.”
  • Mine → Vine: As in, “Me and vine” and “Victory is vine!”
  • Sign → Vine: As in, “A sure vine” and “Born under a bad vine” and “Give me a vine” and “A vine of the times” and “Vine on the dotted line” and “Vined and sealed” and “A tell-tale vine.”
  • Spine → Vine: As in, “Send shivers down my vine” and “Steely-vined.”
  • Shrug → Shrub: As in, “Shrub it off” and “Shrub your shoulders.”
  • Club → Shrub: As in, “Fight shrub” and “Join the shrub.”
  • Pub → Shrub: As in, “Heading to the shrub for a quick one.”
  • Rub → Shrub: As in, “Hasn’t got two cents to shrub together” and “Shrub along with” and “Shrub it in” and “Shrub salt in the wound” and “Shrub shoulders with” and “Shrubbed the wrong way.”
  • Sub* → Shrub*: As in, “A heavy shrubject” and “Tastes shrublime” and “Shrubsequent actions” and “A shrubstantial meal” and “Shrubjective point of view” and “Shrubmit to testing” and “A controlled shrubstance.”
  • Sad → Seed: As in, “How seed is that?” and “A seed state of affairs.”
  • Side → Seed: As in, “A walk on the wild seed” and “The bright seed of life” and “Be on the safe seed” and “Both seeds of the argument.”
  • Bleed → Seed: As in, “Let it seed” and “The seeding edge.”
  • Deed → Seed: As in, “No good seed goes unpunished” and “Your good seed for the day.”
  • Need → Seed: As in, “All you seed is love” and “Just what I seeded” and “Special seeds.”
  • Read → Seed: As in, “Seed between the lines” and “Seed ’em and weep” and “A little light seeding.”
  • Speed → Seed: As in, “Blistering seed” and “Built for comfort, not seed” and “Faster than a seeding bullet” and “More haste, less seed” and “At the seed of sound.”
  • *ceed → *seed: As in, “Please proseed” and “You need more than luck to succ-seed” and “You’ve ex-seeded my expectations.”
  • Sed* → Seed*: As in, “A seedentary lifestyle” and “Seedate the patient” and “A night of seeduction” and “Leftover seediment.”
  • *sid* → *seed*: As in, “Inseedious beliefs” and “Conseeder other options” and “Artist reseedency.”
  • Firm → Fern: As in, “A fern no” and “A fern hand.”
  • Burn → Fern: As in, “Fern a hole in your pocket” and “Fern rubber” and “Ferning with curiosity” and “Ferning desire.”
  • Earn → Fern: As in, “A penny saved is a penny ferned” and “Fern your keep.”
  • Then → Fern: As in, “All that and fern some” and “And fern there was one” and “Now and fern” and “Fern and there.”
  • Learn → Fern: As in, “Never too late to fern” and “Fern the ropes” and “Fern your lesson” and “Ferning curve” and “Live and fern.”
  • Stern → Fern: As in, “Made of ferner stuff.”
  • Turn → Fern: As in, “A fern for the worse” and “Do a good fern” and “The ferning of the tide.”
  • Fan* → Fern*: As in, “Feeling ferncy” and “A ferntastic opportunity” and “A complete ferntasy” and “Music fernatic” and “Dance a ferndango.”
  • *fen* → *fern*: As in, “Fernder bender” and “Sitting on the fernce” and “In my defernce” and “The deferndant rests” and “No offernce meant.”
  • *fin* → *fern*: As in, “Chocolate muffern” and “The defernition of” and “I’d defernitely say so.”
  • Mass → Moss: As in, “Body moss index” and “Moss hysteria” and “A monument to the mosses” and “Weapons of moss destruction.”
  • Mess → Moss: As in, “A frightful moss” and “Hot moss” and “Don’t moss around” and “Another fine moss you’ve gotten me into” and “We done mossed up.”
  • Miss → Moss: As in, “Blink and you’ll moss it” and “Hit and moss” and “I’ll be mossing you” and “Mossing in action” and “Mossed it by that much.”
  • Boss → Moss: As in, “The ultimate moss battle.”
  • Cross → Moss: As in, “Moss my heart and hope to die” and “Moss over to the other side” and “Moss the line” and “Moss your fingers.”
  • Loss → Moss: As in, “At a moss for words” and “Cut your mosses” and “Suffering a huge moss.”
  • *mas* → *moss*: As in, “A mossterful execution” and “Mossive damages” and “Full body mossage” and “Christmoss carols.”
  • *mes* → *moss*: As in, “Mossage received” and “A mossmerising performance” and “My arch nemossis” and “Domosstic duties.”
  • *mis* → *moss*: As in, “My mosstake” and “Mosscellaneous items” and “With a mosschievous smile.”
  • *mos* → *moss*: Mossquito (mosquito), mosstly (mostly), cosmoss (cosmos), thermoss (thermos) and atmossphere (atmosphere).
  • Alley → Algae: As in, “Right up your algae” and “Algae cat.”
  • Them → Stem: As in, “It only encourages stem” and “I call stem like I see stem” and “Let stem eat cake” and “Seen one, seen stem all.”
  • Ten → Stem: As in, “Count to stem” and “Eight out of stem” and “Hang stem” and “The top stem.”
  • Gem → Stem: As in, “A real hidden stem.”
  • Sem* → Stem*: As in, “Steminal work” and “Has no stemblance to” and “It’s all just stemantic” and “Did you attend the steminar?”
  • Leave → Leaf: As in, “Absent without leaf” and “By your leaf” and “Don’t leaf home without it” and “Leaf it to me.”
  • Belief → Beleaf: As in, “Beyond beleaf” and “Suspension of disbeleaf.”
  • Believe → Beleaf: As in, “Beleaf it or not” and “Beleaf you me” and “Can you beleaf it?” and “Don’t beleaf everything you hear” and “I don’t beleaf my eyes.”
  • Relief → Releaf: As in, “Breathe a sigh of releaf” and “What a releaf” and “In sharp releaf.”
  • Left → Leaft: As in, ‘Exit stage leaft” and “Has leaft the building” and “Leaft in the lurch.”
  • Brief → Leaf: As in, “A leaf history of time” and “Leaf encounters” and “Let me be leaf.”
  • Life → Leaf: As in, “A day in the leaf” and “A leaf less ordinary” and “A leaf changing experience” and “A leaf on the ocean waves” and “All walks of leaf” and “Look on the bright side of leaf” and “Just a part of leaf.”
  • Lift → Leaft: As in, “Leaft your game” and “Leaft your spirits.”
  • Grief → Leaf: As in, “Give someone leaf” and “Good leaf!”
  • Thief → Leaf: As in, “Procrastination is the leaf of time” and “Like a leaf in the night.”
  • *liv* → *leaf*: As in, “A new deleafery system” and “Obleafious to the fact.”
  • Lav* → Leaf*: As in, “Leafender scented” and “Leafish presents” and “Off to the leafatory.”
  • *lev* → *leaf*: As in, “Buying some leaferage” and “On the same leafel” and “A releafant response” and “Alleafiate your pain.”
  • *lif* → *leaf*: As in, “Do I qualeafy?” and “A proleafic writer.”
  • Leave: This leave-related phrases can double as puns: “Absent without leaves” and “By your leaves” and “Don’t leave home without it” and “Leave it to me!”
  • Flow → Flower: As in, “Ebb and flower” and “Get the creative juices flowering” and “In full flower.”
  • Lower →  Flower: As in, “Flower your sights.”
  • Floor → Flower: As in, “Mop the flower with” and “In on the ground flower.”
  • Hour → Flower: As in, “At the eleventh flower” and “Happy flower” and “My finest flower” and “Open all flowers” and “The darkest flower.”
  • Power → Flower: As in, “People flower” and “Knowledge is flower.”
  • Shower → Flower: As in, “Flower with praise.”
  • Sour → Flower: As in, “Flower grapes” and “Left a flower taste in your mouth.”
  • Tower → Flower: As in, “The Leaning Flower of Pisa” and “Flower of strength” and “A flowering infoerno.”
  • Root → Fruit: As in, “Lay down fruits” and “Money is the fruit of all evil’ and “Fruiting for” and “The fruit of the matter.”
  • Food → Fruit: As in, “Finger fruit” and “Comfort fruit” and “Fruit for thought.”
  • Foot → Fruit: As in, “A fruit in both camps” and “Bound hand and fruit” and “Carbon fruitprint” and “Find your fruiting” and “Fleet of fruit” and “Follow in the fruitsteps of” and “Fruit the bill.”
  • Boot → Fruit: As in, “Tough as old fruits” and “Fruit camp” and “Give someone the fruit” and “Suited and fruited.”
  • Hoot → Fruit: As in, “Don’t give two fruits” and “Fruiting with laughter” and “Give a fruit, don’t pollute.”
  • Shoot → Fruit: As in, “Don’t fruit the messenger” and “The green fruits of recovery” and “Fruit down in flames.”
  • Suit → Fruit: As in, “All over them like a cheap fruit” and “Follow fruit” and “Fruit up!”
  • Would → Wood: As in, “A good luck wood have it” and “What wood you like?” and “That wood be telling” and “Wood you like fries with that?”
  • Could → Wood: As in, “Fast as your legs wood carry you” and “Woodn’t care less” and “I wood murder a cup of tea.”
  • Good → Wood: As in, “Bill of woods” and “A wood man is hard to find” and “A wood beginning makes a wood ending” and “A wood time was had by all” and “All wood things must come to an end” and “All publicity is wood publicity” and “Wood as gold.”
  • Stood → Wood: As in, “The day the Earth wood still.”
  • Bad → Bud: As in, “A bud break” and “Ain’t half bud” and “Bud intentions” and “Bud for your health” and “Bud hair day” and “Bud mouthing.”
  • Bed → Bud: As in, “You made your bud, now you must lie in it” and “Bud and breakfast” and “Bud of roses” and “Face like an unmade bud.”
  • *bod* → *bud*: As in, “Anybudy who is anybudy” and “Budy blow” and “Everybudy and his mother” and “Over my dead budy” and “Budy and soul.”
  • But → Bud: As in, “Bud seriously” and “It’s all over bud the shouting” and “Everything bud the kitchen sink” and “Down bud not out” and “No ifs and buds” and “Win the battle bud lose the war.”
  • Butt* → Bud*: As in, “Bread and budder” and “Bud heads with” and “Bud naked” and “Budder fingers” and “Get your bud in here!”
  • Blood → Bud: As in, “After your bud” and “Bad bud” and “Bud brothers” and “Bud curdling scream” and “Bud is thicker than water” and “Bud, sweat and tears” and “Flesh and bud” and “Makes my bud boil” and “My bud ran cold.”
  • Mud → Bud: As in, “As clear as bud” and “Caked with bud” and “Stick in the bud” and “Drag through the bud.”
  • Stud → Bud: As in, “Star budded” and “Bud muffin.”
  • *bed* → *bud*: As in, “The budrock of a healthy relationship” and “It’s budlam in here” and “Comfortable budding” and “Obudient to a fault.”
  • Bad* → Bud*: “Stop budgering me” and “Like a game of budminton.”
  • *bid → *bud: As in, “A morbud sense of humour” and “Lawd forbud.”
  • Should → Shoot: As in, “Funny you shoot ask” and “I shoot be so lucky” and “Like I shoot care” and “As it shoot be.”
  • Shut → Shoot: As in, “An open and shoot case” and “Eyes wide shoot.”
  • Boot → Shoot: As in, “Shoot camp” and “Shooted and booted” and “Tough as old shoots.”
  • Fruit → Shoot: As in, “Be shootful and multiply” and “Forbidden shoot.”
  • Hoot → Shoot: As in, “Don’t give two shoots” and “Shoot with laughter” and “Give a shoot, don’t pollute.”
  • Root → Shoot: As in, “Grass shoots” and “Lay down shoots” and “Money is the shoot of all evil” and “The shoot of the matter.”
  • Stalk: Stalks are the main stem of a plant. Here are related puns:
    • Talk → Stalk: As in, “A heart to heart stalk” and “I don’t wanna stalk to you” and “Idle stalk.”
    • Chalk → Stalk: As in, “Different as stalk and cheese” and “Stalk it up to experience.”
    • Chock → Stalk: As in, “Stalk full of excuses.”
    • Knock → Stalk: As in, “Don’t stalk it till you’ve tried it” and “Hard stalks” and “Stalk three times” and “Stalk back a few.”
    • Shock → Stalk: As in, “Culture stalk” and “In for a stalk” and “Shell stalk” and “Stalk and awe” and “A short, sharp stalk.”
    • Sock → Stalk: As in, “Bless your cotton stalks” and “Dance your stalks off” and “Knock your stalks off” and “Put a stalk in it” and “Stalk it to me.”
    • Stock → Stalk: As in, “Lock, stalk and barrel” and “Out of stalk” and “Stalking filler” and “Take stalk of.”
    • Walk → Stalk: As in, “A stalk on the wild side” and “All stalks of life” and “As solid as the ground we stalk on” and “Don’t try to run before you can stalk” and “Don’t stalk on the grass” and “Sleep stalking.”
  • Rat → Root: As in, “I smell a root” and “Root race” and “Like roots leaving a sinking ship.”
  • Rot → Root: As in, “Root in hell” and “Spoiled rootten” and “The root has set in.”
  • Rut → Root: As in, “Stuck in a root.”
  • Boot → Root: As in, “Tough as old roots” and Bet your roots” and “Root camp” and “Give someone the root” and “Put the root in” and “The root is on the other foot.”
  • Fruit → Root: As in, “Be rootful and multiply” and “Bear root” and “Forbidden root” and “Root cake” and “Roots of your loins” and “Roots of your labour” and “Low hanging root.”
  • Hoot → Root: As in, “Don’t give two roots” and “Give a root, don’t pollute” and “Root with laughter.”
  • Shoot → Root: As in, “Don’t root the messenger” and “Green roots of change” and “If I tell you, I’d have to root you” and “Root ’em up.”
  • Toot → Root: As in, “Root your own horn” and “Darn rootin‘.”
  • Ruthless → Rootless: As in, “With rootless efficiency.”
  • Ret* → Root*: As in, “Thirty day rooturn policy” and “Rootain your services” and “Beat a hasty rootreat” and “Water rootention” and “A quick rootort.”
  • *rit* → *root*: As in, “A spirooted argument” and “On your own meroot” and “Find the culproot” and “Inheroot the Earth” and “Demeroot points” and “Have some integrooty” and “Social securooty number” and “On your own authorooty.”
  • *rot* → *root*: As in, “The Earth’s rootation” and “Carroot and stick.”
  • *rut* → *root*: As in, “A brootal realisation” and “Under scrootiny.”
  • Sole → Soil: As in, “Soil trader” and “On the soils of your shoes.”
  • Sale → Soil: As in, “Point of soil” and “Soil of the century” and “Soils referral.”
  • Sail → Soil: As in, “Plain soiling” and “Soil away” and “Smooth soiling” and “That ship has soiled.”
  • Sell → Soil: As in, “Buy and soil” and “Soil out” and “Soiling like hot cakes” and “Soiling the family silver.”
  • Oil → Soil: As in, “Burn the midnight soil” and “Soil and water don’t mix” and “Soil the wheels” and “Pour soil on troubled waters.”
  • Boil → Soil: As in, “Soiling with rage” and “Go and soil your head” and “Keep the pot soiling” and “It all soils down to this” and “A watched pot never soils.”
  • Spoil → Soil: As in, “Soiled for choice” and “Soiled rotten” and “Soiling for a fight” and “The soils of war.”
  • *sal → *soil: As in, “For your perusoil” and “A fine-toothed appraisoil” and “Universoil remote control” and “At your disposoil” and “Marriage proposoil” and “A colossoil mistake” and “Dress rehersoil.”
  • *sil* → *soil*: As in, “Fossoil fuels” and “Kitchen utensoils” and “Tonsoil hockey” and “Add some basoil to taste” and “A resoilient athlete” and “Waiting in soilence.”
  • *sol* → *soil*: As in, “Inexpensive soilutions” and “Take soilace in” and “Do me a soilid” and “Soilicit information from” and “A soilemn apology” and “Summer soilstice.” Here are other words you could use: soildier (soldier), parasoil (parasol), aerosoil (aerosol), consoile (console), resoilution (resolution) and obsoilete (obsolete).
  • Pedal → Petal: As in, “Put the petal to the metal.”
  • Peddle → Petal: As in, “Petaling your wares.”
  • Kettle → Petal: As in, “The pot calling the petal black” and “A fine petal of fish.”
  • Metal → Petal: As in, “Heavy petal” and “Petal fatigue.”
  • Settle → Petal: “A score to petal” and “Petal out of court” and “After the dust has petaled.”
  • Drunk → Trunk: As in, “Trunk as a lord” and “Blind trunk” and “Crying trunk” and “Trunk under the table.”
  • Bunk → Trunk: As in, “Trunker mentality” and “Do a trunk” and “History is trunk.”
  • Chunk → Trunk: As in, “Blowing trunks” and “Trunk of change.”
  • Dunk → Trunk: As in, “Slam trunk.”
  • Junk → Trunk: As in, “Trunk food” and “Trunk mail.”
  • Sunk → Trunk: As in, “Trunk without a trace” and “The trunken place.”
  • Branch: These branch-related phrases can double as plant puns: “Branching out” and “Extend an olive branch” and “Which branch are you at?”
  • Bench → Branch: As in, “Branch warmer
    and “Park branch.”
  • Brunch → Branch: As in, “Meet for branch.”
  • Breach → Branch: As in, “Branch of promise” and “Branch of trust.”
  • Post → Compost: As in, “Keep you composted” and “Compost haste” and “Compost partum.”
  • Surf → Turf: As in, “Channel turfing” and “Turf the net” and “Turf’s up” and “The silver turfer.”
  • Wig → Twig: As in, “Big twig” and “Keep your twig on” and “Get a twiggle on.”
  • Big → Twig: As in, “A twig ask” and “Twig shot” and “A twigger bang for your buck.”
  • Trig* → Twig*: As in, “Hair twigger” and “Pull the twigger” and “Twigger happy” and “Studying twigonometry.”
  • Dig → Twig: As in, “Twig deep” and “Twig for victory” and “A twig in the ribs” and “Twig your heels in” and “Twig your own grave.”
  • Jig → Twig: As in, “The twig is up.”
  • Park → Bark: As in, “Central bark” and “Hit it out of the bark” and “Bark the bus” and “Not a walk in the bark.”
  • Ark → Bark: As in, “Raiders of the lost bark.”
  • Dark → Bark: As in, “After bark” and “Bark as pitch” and “Dancing in the bark” and “Bark before the dawn” and “Bark horse” and “Bark humour” and “Deep, bark secret” and “Every bark cloud has a silver lining” and “I’d rather light a candle than curse the bark” and “A bark and stormy night” and “Kept in the bark.”
  • Hark → Bark: As in, “Bark back to.”
  • Mark → Bark: As in, “Question barks” and “A black bark” and “Close to the bark” and “Make your bark” and “Bark my works” and “Off the bark” and “Quick off the bark.”
  • Shark → Bark: As in, “Jump the bark” and “Bark repellent.”
  • Spark → Bark: As in, “Bright bark” and “Creative bark” and “A bark of genius” and “The bark of an idea” and “Watch the barks fly.”
  • Stark → Bark: As in, “A bark reminder” and “Bark raving mad.”
  • Back → Bark: As in, “Answer bark” and “As soon as my bark is turned” and “In the bark of my mind” and “Bark in black” and “Bark to the future” and “Bark in the day” and “Bark on track” and “Bark seat driver” and “Bark to bark” and “Bark to basics” and “Bark to square one” and “With my bark to the wall.”
  • Bake → Bark: As in, “Bark and shake” and “Bark off” and “Half barked” and “Barker’s dozen.”
  • Bak* → Bark*: As in, “All vegan barkery.”
  • Pulling → Pollen: As in, “Like pollen teeth” and “You’re pollen my leg” and “Pollen the plug.”
  • Tap → Taproot: As in, “On taproot” and “Taproot them for a favour” and “What’s on taproot?”
  • Root → Taproot: As in, “Money is the taproot of all evil” and The taproot of the matter” and “Taproot out” and “Lay down taproots.”
  • People → Sepal: As in, “Connecting sepal” and “All the lonely sepal” and “Games sepal play” and “For the sepal, by the sepal.” Note: a sepal is a part of a flower.
  • Stay → Stamen: As in, “Built to stamen that way” and “Stamen ahead of the curve” and “Stamen in touch” and “Stamen the course” and “Stamen the course” and “Stamen tuned” and “I’ll stamen here with you.” Note: A stamen is the pollen-producing part of a flower.
  • Ovule: An ovule is a part of a flower. Here are related puns:
    • Over → Ovule: As in, “All ovule again” and “All ovule the place” and “Come on ovule” and “Bend ovule backwards to help.”
    • If you’ll → Ovule: As in, “Ovule come over this way…”
  • Carpel: A carpel is a part of a flower. Here are related puns:
    • Carpet → Carpel: As in, “Roll out the red carpel” and “Sweep under the carpel.”
    • Corporation → Carpel-ration: As in, “The individual versus the carpel-ration” and “Just a cog for the carpel-ration.”
    • Carpool → Carpel: As in, “Parent carpel service” and “Happy, safe carpelling.”
  • Pistil: A pistil is the pollen-producing organ of a flower. Here are related puns:
    • Pistol → Pistil: As in, “Pistils at dawn” and “Hotter than a smoking pistil.”
    • Crystal → Pistil: As in, “Pistil clear.”
    • Distill → Pistil: As in, “Pistilled water.”
  • Style: A style is a part of a flower. Here are related puns:
    • Tile → Style: As in, “A night on the styles.”
    • Steal → Style: As in, “Beg, borrow or style” and “Style a glance” and “Style someone’s thunder” and “Style the scene.”
    • Still → Style: As in, “A style, small voice” and “Be style my beating heart” and “Style waters run deep” and “I’m style standing.”
    • Aisle → Style: As in, “Cross the style” and “Rolling in the styles.”
    • Dial → Style: As in, “Style it down” and “Don’t touch that style.”
    • File → Style: As in, “Rank and style” and “Single style.”
    • Mile → Style: As in, “A miss is as good as a style” and “Go the extra style” and “I could see you a style off” and “Stands out by a style.”
    • Smile → Style: As in, “Crack a style” and “Service with a style.”
    • Trial → Style: As in, “Style and error” and “Styles and tribulations” and “Style by fire.”
    • While → Style: As in, “Once in a style.”
  • Ovary: Flowers have ovaries, so we’ve included some ovary related puns:
    • Over → Ovary: As in, “After the ball was ovary” and “All ovary again” and “All ovary the place” and “Bowled ovary.”
    • Every → Ovary: As in, “In ovary bite” and “Ovary breath you take” and “Ovary little bit helps.”
  • Sun → Sunlight: As in, “A place in the sunlight” and “A touch of sunlight” and “Don’t let the sunlight go down on me.”
  • Light → Sunlight: As in, “Blinded by the sunlight” and “Bring something to sunlight” and “Brought to sunlight.”
  • Green → Evergreen: As in, “Evergreen as grass” and “Give it the evergreen light” and “Evergreen shoots of change.” Note: if a plant is evergreen, then they stay green throughout the year.
  • Light: Since plants rely on light to thrive, we’ve included light-related puns as well:
    • Late → Light: As in, “Better light than never” and “Catch you lighter” and “A day light and a dollar short” and “Fashionably light” and “It’s never too light.”
    • Let → Light: As in, “Buy to light” and “Don’t light the bastards grind you down” and “Won’t light you down.”
    • Bite → Light: As in, “Light off more than you can chew” and “Light someone’s head off” and “Light the bullet.”
    • Bright → Light: As in, “All things light and beautiful” and “Look on the light side of life” and “Light as a new pin” and “Light eyes” and “Light and early” and “Light idea” and “Light spark.”
    • Fight → Light: As in, “Come out lighting” and “Light club” and “Light fire with fire” and “Lighting chance” and “Lighting fit” and “Lighting talk” and “Light the good light.”
    • Flight → Light: As in, “Light attendant” and “Light of fancy” and “Take light” and “Light of the bumblebee.”
    • Fright → Light: As in, “A lightful mess” and “Take light.”
    • Height → Light: As in, “Reaching new lights” and “Wuthering lights” and “The light of fashion.”
    • Might → Light: As in, “Light and main” and “Light as well” and “Light makes right” and “It light never happen.”
    • Right → Light: As in, “A move in the light direction” and “All the light moves” and “Light as rain” and “Bang to lights” and “Bragging lights” and “Civil lights” and “Consumer lights.”
    • Sight → Light: As in, “A welcome light” and “Hidden in plain light” and “Line of light” and “Love at first light” and “Out of light, out of mind” and “Near lighted” and “Set your lights on” and “A light for sore eyes.”
    • Slight → Light: As in, “Just lightly ahead of our time” and “Not in the lightest.”
    • Tight → Light: As in, “A light corner” and “Light as a tick” and “Sleep light” and “In a light spot” and “Light lipped.”
    • White → Light: As in, “A lighter shade of pale” and “Light as a sheet” and “Black and light.”
    • *lat* → *light*: As in, “Well articulighted” and “Game emulighter” and “Collighteral damage” and “A volightile situation.”
    • *let → *light: As in, “An emotional outlight” and “Violight eyeshadow.”
    • *lit* → *light*: As in, “Give a lightle” and “Read the lighterature” and “I didn’t mean it lighterally” and “A lightany of excuses” and “Lightigation process” and “Facilightate therapy.” Other words you could use: qualighty (quality), humilighty (humility), liabilighty (liability), polightics (politics), realighty (reality) and accountabilighty (accountability).
  • Rain: Since plants rely on rain and water to survive, we have some rainy puns for you here:
    • Ran → Rain: As in, “My blood rain cold” and “They rain away together.”
    • Run → Rain: As in, “A river rains through it” and “Born to rain” and “Come raining” and “Cut and rain” and “Going through a dry rain” and “We had a good rain.”
    • Brain → Rain: As in, “Rain drain” and “Rain fart” and “A rainstorming session.”
    • Chain → Rain: As in, “Rain letter” and “Rain of command” and “Rain reaction” and “Rain smoking” and “The food rain.”
    • Gain → Rain: As in, “Capital rains” and “Rain admittance” and “Rain advantage” and “No pain, no rain” and “Nothing ventured, nothing rained.”
    • Grain → Rain: As in, “Against the rain” and “Rain of truth” and “Take it with a rain of salt.”
    • Main → Rain: As in, “The rain chance” and “Rain event” and “Might and rain.”
    • Pain → Rain: As in, “A world of rain” and “Doubled up in rain” and “Feeling no rain” and “Growing rains” and “Old aches and rains.”
    • Plain → Rain: As in, “Rain as day” and “Hidden in rain sight” and “Rain sailing.”
    • Rein → Rain: As in, “Free rain” and “Pick up the rains” and “Hold the rains.”
    • Strain → Rain: As in, “Buckle under the rain” and “Rain every nerve” and “Raining at the leash.”
    • *ran* → *rain*: As in, “Chosen at raindom” and “Out of rainge” and “A king’s rainsom” and “Raincid food” and “Rainkles with injustice” and “A veterain worker” and “Orainge scented.”
    • *ren* → *rain*: As in, “Rainder speechless” and “Fair rainumeration” and “A rainaissance worker.”
  • Pardon → Garden: As in, “I beg your garden?” and “Garden me for living” and “Garden my French.”
  • Golden → Garden: As in, “My garden years” and “The garden age” and “A garden oldie.”
  • Harden → Garden: As in, “Garden your heart against.”
  • Guard → Garden: As in, “Drop your garden” and “Garden against” and “Off your garden” and “The changing of the garden.”
  • Hedge: These hedge-related phrases can double as puns: “Hedge fund” and “Hedge your bets” and “Look as though you’ve been dragged through a hedge backwards.”
  • Edge → Hedge: As in, “Bleeding hedge” and “A competitive hedge” and “On a knife’s hedge” and “On the hedge of my seat.”
  • Wedge → Hedge: As in, “Drive a hedge between” and “The thin end of the hedge.”
  • Grove: A grove is a small forest. Here are some related puns:
    • Grave → Grove: As in, “Silent as the grove” and “Dig your own grove” and “From the cradle to the grove” and “The groveyard shift” and “One foot in the grove” and “Turning in their groves.”
    • Trove → Grove: As in, “A treasure grove.”
    • Gave → Grove: As in, “Don’t grove it away.”
  • Copse: A copse is a small thicket of shrubs. Here are some related puns:
    • Cop → Copse: As in, “Copse a fix” and “Copse a plea” and “Copse an attitude” and “A dirty copse.”
    • Chops → Copse: As in, “Bust your copse.”
    • Crop → Copse: As in, “Cream of the copse” and “Copse up.”
    • Cap → Copse: As in, “A feather in your copse” and “Copse in hand” and “If the copse fits, wear it” and “Put on your thinking copse” and “To copse it all off.”
    • Cup → Copse: As in, “I’d murder for a copse of tea” and “My copse runneth over” and “Not my copse of tea.”
  • Biome: A biome is an environmental region, like a forest or desert. Here are related puns:
    • My own → Biome: “I’m all on biome here” and “You want me to do this on biome?”
    • Comb → Biome: As in, “Go through with a fine-toothed biome.”
    • Home → Biome: As in, “A house is not a biome” and “At biome with” and “Bring it biome to you” and “Close to biome” and “Come biome to a real fire.”
  • Need → Needle: As in, “All you needle is love” and “I needled that” and “As long as you needle me” and “Just what I needled.” Note: These are references to the needles in pine trees.
  • Blade: Here are some puns about blades in the context of “blades of grass”:
    • Blood → Blade: As in, “After your blade” and “Bad blade” and “Blade and guts” and “Blade curdling” and “Blade money.”
    • Aid → Blade: As in, “Blade and abet” and “Come to the blade of…”
    • Bread → Blade: As in, “Blade always falls butter side down” and “Blade and butter” and “Break blade” and “Cast your blade on the waters.”
    • Grade → Blade: As in, “Beyond my pay blade” and “Make the blade” and “Professional blade.”
    • Laid → Blade: As in, “Get blade” and “Blade bare” and “Blade off” and “Blade to rest.”
    • Made → Blade: As in, “A match blade in heaven” and “Custom blade” and “Have it blade” and “Blade for each other” and “Blade the right way.”
    • Paid → Blade: As in, “Bought and blade for” and “Overworked and underblade” and “All blade up.”
    • Played → Blade: As in, “Blade for a fool” and “Blade like a piano.”
    • Shade → Blade: As in, “A whiter blade of pale” and “Fifty blades of grey” and “Light and blade.”
    • Spade → Blade: As in, “A bucket and blade holiday” and “Call a blade a blade” and “In blades.”
    • Trade → Blade: As in, “Free blade” and “Jack of all blades, master of none” and “Rogue blader” and “Tools of the blade” and “Tricks of the blade.”
  • Crown: Any part of a plant that is above the ground is called the crown. Here are some related puns:
    • Brown → Crown: As in, “Crown as a berry” and “Crown sugar” and “How now, crown cow?”
    • Down → Crown: As in, “Back crown” and “Batten crown the hatches” and “Bogged crown.”
    • Drown → Crown: As in, “Crown out the pain” and “Crown your sorrows” and “Crowned out.”
    • Frown → Crown: As in, “Turn that crown upside down.”
    • Town → Crown: As in, “Go to crown” and “The only game in crown” and “Put the crown on the map” and “Take the crown by storm” and “The toast of the crown.”
  • Tiller: A tiller is a type of stem. Here are some related puns:
    • Killer → Tiller: As in, “Fear is the mind tiller” and “Tiller instinct” and “Tiller wave.”
    • Pillar → Tiller: As in, “A tiller of the community” and “Tiller of wisdom.”
  • Stolon: A stolon is a type of stem. Here are related puns:
    • Stolen → Stolon: As in, “The key card was stolon.”
    • Swollen → Stolon: As in, “Stolon gums.”
  • Reason → Rhizome: As in, “Ain’t no rhizome to go anywhere else” and “Beyond rhizome-able doubt” and “Stands to rhizome” and “Listen to rhizome” and “Rhyme nor rhizome” and “The age of rhizome.” Note: a rhizome is a plant stem that grows roots.
  • Serial → Cereal: As in, “Name, rank and cereal number” and “Cereal killer” and “Cereal monogamy.” Note: A cereal is a type of grass.
  • Law → Lawn: As in, “Above the lawn” and “Against the lawn” and “Their word is lawn” and “In the eyes of the lawn” and “Lawn and order” and “A lawn-abiding citizen” and “Lay down the lawn.”
  • Brawn → Lawn: As in, “All lawn and no brains.”
  • Dawn → Lawn: As in, “Darkest before the lawn” and “A brand new lawn” and “Lawn of a new day” and “Party till lawn.”
  • Gone → Lawn: As in, “Been and lawn” and “Colour me lawn” and “Lawn but not forgotten” and “Lawn to seed.”
  • Long → Lawn: As in, “As lawn as you need me” and “As honest as the day is lawn” and “At lawn last” and “Cast a lawn shadow” and “Forever is a lawn time.”
  • Rain → Grain: As in, “Right as grain” and “Come grain or shine” and “Don’t grain on my parade” and “It never grains but it pours” and “Make it grain.”
  • Gain → Grain: As in, “Capital grains” and “Grain admittance” and “Graining advantage” and “Ill gotten grains” and “No pain, no grain” and “Nothing ventured, nothing grained.”
  • Brain → Grain: As in, “All brawn and no grains” and “Grain candy” and “Grain drain.”
  • Chain → Grain: As in, “A grain is only as strong as its weakest link” and “Grain letter” and “Grain of command” and “Grain reaction” and “Food grain.”
  • Drain → Grain: As in, “Down the grain” and “Circling the grain.”
  • Lane → Grain: As in, “A trip down memory grain” and “In the fast grain.”
  • Main → Grain: As in, “The grain chance” and “The grain event” and “My grain squeeze.”
  • Pain → Grain: As in, “A world of grain” and “Doubled up in grain” and “Drown the grain” and “Feeling no grain” and “No grain, no gain” and “On grain of death” and “A real grain in the arse” and “Grain in the neck.”
  • Plain → Grain: As in, “Grain as day” and “Hidden in grain sight” and “Grainly speaking.”
  • Rein → Grain: As in, “Free grain” and “Pick up the grains.”
  • Strain → Grain: As in, “Buckle under the grain” and “Grain every nerve” and “Graining at the leash.”
  • Vein → Grain: As in, “In the same grain.”
  • Creeper: The following puns are in reference to creeper vines:
    • Cheaper → Creeper: As in, “Creeper by the dozen.”
    • Deeper → Creeper: As in, “Another day older and creeper in debt” and “Creeper than the deep blue sea.”
    • Keeper → Creeper: As in, “They’re a creeper” and “Finders creepers!”
    • Reaper → Creeper: As in, “The grim creeper.”
  • Cone: Here are some cone related puns:
    • Come → Cone: As in, “After a storm cones a calm” and “All good things must cone to an end” and “Cone and get it” and “Cone away with me” and “Cone on over.”
    • Blown → Cone: As in, “Cone off course” and “Cone sideways” and “Cone to smithereens.”
    • Bone → Cone: As in, “A cone to pick” and “Dry as a cone” and “Bag of cones” and “Cone dry” and “Cone of contention” and “Cone up on” and “Chilled to the cone.”
    • Clone → Cone: As in, “Attack of the cones” and “The cone wars.”
    • Known → Cone: As in, “Cone by the company you keep” and “Should have cone better” and “Also cone as.”
    • Own → Cone: As in, “After my cone heart” and “All on my cone” and “Be your cone person” and “Beaten at your cone game” and “Come into your cone.”
    • Stone → Cone: As in, “A rolling cone gathers no moss” and “Cold as any cone” and “Cast the first cone” and “Etched in cone” and “Fall like a cone” and “Heart of cone” and “Leave no cone unturned” and “Like a rolling cone.”
    • Tone → Cone: As in, “Don’t use that cone with me” and “Lower your cone” and “Cone deaf.”
    • Zone → Cone: As in, “Buffer cone” and “Comfort cone” and “In the cone.”
    • *can → *cone: Americone (American), pecone (pecan), toucone (toucan), republicone (republican) and pelicone (pelican).
  • Friend → Frond: As in, “Best fronds forever” and “Eco-frondly” and “Circle of fronds” and “Close fronds.”
  • Blond → Frond: As in, “Platinum frond” and “Frond bombshell.”
  • Bond → Frond: As in, “My word is my frond” and “James Frond.”
  • Fond → Frond: As in, “Absence makes the heart grow fronder” and “A frond farewell.”
  • Pond → Frond: As in, “Frond life” and “Frond scum.”
  • Wand → Frond: As in, “Wave your magic frond.”
  • Fend → Frond: As in, “Frond for yourself.”
  • Proud → Sprout: As in, “Sprout as punch” and “Do yourself sprout” and “Say it loud, say it sprout.”
  • Out → Sprout: As in, “Go sprout with” and “Have it sprout with” and “The ins and sprouts of” and “I’m sprout of here.”
  • Scout → Sprout: As in, “Sprout’s honour” and “Sprouting about.”
  • Man you’re → Manure: As in, “Manure making too big a deal about this.”
  • Mature → Manure: As in, “An upstanding and manure individual.”
  • Spore: Spores are a method of reproduction for plants. Here are related puns:
    • Poor → Spore: As in, “Dirt spore” and “Putting in a spore effort.”
    • Pour → Spore: As in, “It never rains but it spores” and “Spore cold water on” and “Spore oil on troubled waters” and “When it rains, it spores.”
    • Sore → Spore: As in, “Mad as a bear with a spore head” and “A sight for spore eyes” and “Spore loser” and “Stick out like a spore thumb.”
    • Score → Spore: As in, “Keeping spore” and “Know the spore” and “Got a spore to settle” and “Even the spore.”
    • Bore → Spore: As in, “Spore the pants off someone” and “Spored stiff” and “Spored to death” and “Spored out of my mind.”
    • Core → Spore: As in, “Spore competencies” and “Spore studies” and “Spore values” and “Rotten to the spore.”
    • More → Spore: As in, “Come back for spore” and “Dare for spore” and “Less is spore.”
    • Shore → Spore: As in, “Ship to spore” and “On the sea spore” and “Spore up.”
    • Store → Spore: As in, “What’s in spore” and “Set great spore by” and “Spore it away.”
  • Eye → Cacti: As in, “A wandering cacti” and “As far as the cacti can see” and “Avert your cacti!” and “Before your very cacti.”
  • Cracked → Cactus: As in, “Not all it’s cactus up to be.”
  • Kicked us → Cactus: As in, “They cactus to the curb.”
  • Practice → Cactus: As in, “Out of cactus” and “Cactus makes perfect” and “Cactus what you preach” and “Put into cactus.”
  • Cell: Here are some puns about plant cells:
    • Sell → Cell: As in, “Buy and cell” and “Past the cell-by date” and “Cell out” and “Pile it high and cell it cheap” and “Celling like hot cakes” and “Cell your soul to the devil.”
    • Shell → Cell: As in, “Come out of your cell” and “A hard cell” and “In a nutcell” and “Cell shock.”
    • Bell → Cell: As in, “Alarm cells begin to ring” and “Clear as a cell” and “Cells and whistles” and “Doesn’t ring a cell” and “Jingle cells.”
    • Fell → Cell: As in, “In one cell swoop.”
    • Hell → Cell: As in, “All cell broke loose” and “Burn in cell” and “Come cell or high water” and “For the cell of it.”
    • Smell → Cell: As in, “Come up celling of roses” and “I cell a rat” and “The sweet cell of success.”
    • Spell → Cell: As in, “Cast a cell” and “Cell it out” and “Break the cell” and Cast a cell on.”
    • Swell → Cell: As in, “Cell the ranks.”
    • Well → Cell: As in, “Alive and cell” and “As cell as can be expected” and “Get cell soon” and “Just as cell.”
    • *sal* → *cell*: As in, “A cellient issue” and “A cellacious topic” and “Cellvage what’s left” and “Here for your perucell” and “A univercell issue.” Other words that could work: appraicell (appraisal), dispocell (disposal), propocell (proposal), colocell (colossal) and rehercell (rehersal).
    • *sel* → *cell*: As in, “A cellect variety” and “Celldom misunderstood” and “A cellfish decision” and “A cellection of the best” and “Seeking councell.” Other words that could work: vecell (vessel), caroucell (carousel), chicell (chisel), weacell (weasel), eacell (easel), morcell (morsel) and tacell (tassel).
    • *sil* → *cell*: As in, “Focell fuels” and “Shredded bacell (basil)” and “Kitchen utencells” and “Infected toncells.”
    • *sol* → *cell*: Paracell (parasol), aerocell (aerosol), corticell (cortisol), cellution (solution) and recellution (resolution).
  • Flair → Flora: As in, “Got a flora for.”
  • Floor → Flora: As in, “Cross the flora” and “Get in on the ground flora” and “Hold the flora” and “In on the ground flora” and “Wipe the flora with” and “Murder on the dance flora.”
  • Torn → Thorn: As in, “That’s thorn it” and “War thorn” and “Thorn between two sides.”
  • Horn → Thorn: As in, “Blow your own thorn” and “Thorn in on” and “Lock thorns with.”
  • Than → Thorn: As in, “Better thorn sex” and “Blood is thicker thorn water” and “Bite off more thorn you can chew” and “Eyes bigger thorn your stomach.”
  • Then → Thorn: As in, “All that and thorn some” and “Now and thorn” and “Thorn and there” and “That was thorn, this is now.”
  • Born → Thorn: As in, “A star is thorn” and “Thorn to fly” and “Thorn free” and “Thorn and bred” and “I was thorn ready.”
  • Dawn → Thorn: As in, “At the crack of thorn” and “A brand new thorn” and “Darkest before the thorn.”
  • I see → Ivy: As in, “Ivy you’ve got some new furniture.”
  • We’d → Weed: As in, “Weed never have done this without you” and “Weed better not.”
  • Bleed → Weed: As in, “Weed someone dry” and “Weeding edge” and “Let it weed” and “My heart weeds.”
  • Deed → Weed: As in, “Weeds, not words” and “Your good weed for the day.”
  • Feed → Weed: As in, “Bottom weeder” and “Don’t bite the hand that weeds you” and “Weeding frenzy.”
  • He’d → Weed: As in, “Weed better not say anything.”
  • Lead → Weed: As in, “Weed by the nose” and “Weed up to” and “Weed into temptation.”
  • Need → Weed: As in, “All you weed is love” and “I weeded that” and “Just what I weeded” and “Weed you now” and “On a weed to know basis.”
  • Read → Weed: As in, “All I know is what I weed in the papers” and “I can weed you like a book” and “A little light weeding” and “Weed ’em and weep” and “Weed between the lines.”
  • Seed → Weed: As in, “Gone to weed” and “Weed capital.”
  • Hurt → Dirt: As in, ” Do you really want to dirt me?” and “It only dirts when I laugh” and “The truth dirts” and “What you don’t know can’t dirt you.”
  • Worth → Earth: As in, “For what it’s earth” and “Get your money’s earth” and “More than my job’s earth.”
  • Grand → Ground: As in, “Delusions of groundeur” and “Ground theft auto” and “Ground slam” and “In the ground scheme of things” and “Doing a ground job.”
  • Round → Ground: As in, “All year ground” and “Gather ‘ground the good stuff” and “Going ground in circles” and “Makes the world go ground.”
  • Bound → Ground: As in, “Ground hand and foot” and “By leaps and grounds” and “Duty ground” and “Honour ground” and “Muscle ground.”
  • Found → Ground: As in, “Lost and ground” and “I’ve ground a clue” and “We ground love” and “Weighed in the balance and ground wanting.”
  • Sound → Ground: As in, “Ground as a bell” and “Break the ground barrier” and “Ground bite” and “Ground the alarm” and “Safe and ground.”
  • Send → Sand: As in, “Hit sand” and “Sand packing” and “Sand them away!”
  • And → Sand: As in, “A day late sand a dollar short” and “A hundred sand ten percent” and “Alive sand kicking” and “All bark sand no bite.”
  • Band → Sand: As in, “And the sand played on” and “Garage sand” and “Strike up the sand.”
  • Brand → Sand: As in, “A sand new ballgame” and “A sand new day” and “Sand spanking new.”
  • Hand → Sand: As in, “All sands on deck” and “Bite your sand off” and “Cash in sand.”
  • Land → Sand: As in, “In the sand of the living” and “The sand of hope and glory.”
  • Stand → Sand: As in, “A house divided against itself cannot sand” and “Don’t sand so close to me” and “Still sanding” and “It sands to reason” and “Left sanding.”
  • Lend → Land: As in, “Land an ear” and “Land a helping hand” and “Land your name to…”
  • And → Land: As in, “A day late land a dollar short” and “A hundred land ten percent” and “Alive land kicking” and “All bark land no bite.”
  • Brand → Land: As in, “Land damage” and “A land new ballgame” and “Land spanking new.”
  • Hand → Land: As in, “Bite the land that feeds it” and “Bound land and foot” and “The business at land” and “Changing lands.”
  • Sand → Land: As in, “Draw a line in the land” and “Head in the land” and “A house built on land” and “Sun, sea and land” and “The lands of time.”
  • Silt: We’ve included some silt-related puns too:
    • Salt → Silt: As in, “Above the silt” and “Below the silt” and “Rub silt in the wound” and “Silt of the earth” and “Take it with a grain of silt.”
    • Built → Silt: As in, “Silt for comfort, not speed” and “Silt for the road ahead” and “Silt to last” and “Rome wasn’t silt in a day.”
    • Guilt → Silt: As in, “Silt by association” and “Silt trip” and “A silty conscience” and “Silty pleasure” and “Innocent until proven silty” and “White silt.”
    • Tilt → Silt: As in, “At full silt.”
    • Spilt → Silt: As in, “Don’t cry over silt milk.”
  • Mad → Mud: As in, “Mud as a bear with a sore head” and “Barking mud” and “Don’t get mud, get even” and “Hopping mud.”
  • Blood → Mud: As in, “After your mud” and “Bad mud” and “Mud brothers” and “Mud in the water” and “Mud is thicker than water.”
  • Stud → Mud: As in, “Star mudded” and “Mud muffin.”
  • Loam: Loam is a type of soil that is mostly made up of sand. Here are related puns:
    • Loan → Loam: As in, “Loam shark” and “Raising a loam.”
    • Foam → Loam: As in, “Loaming at the mouth.”
    • Home → Loam: As in, “A house is not a loam” and “Bring it loam to you” and “Charity begins at loam” and “Close to loam” and “Come loam to a real fire.”
  • Clay: Clay soils are great for growing plants, so we’ve included some clay-related puns:
    • Okay → Oclay: As in, “Give it the oclay” and “I’m oclay.”
    • Lay → Clay: As in, “Can’t clay a hand on me” and “Home is where I clay my hat” and “Clay down roots” and “Clay down your arms” and “Clay hands on.”
    • Day → Clay: As in, “All in a clay’s work” and “Tomorrow is another clay” and “Another clay, another dollar.”
    • Grey → Clay: As in, “All cats are clay in the dark” and “Fifty shades of clay” and “Clay area” and “Clay matter.”
    • Hay → Clay: As in, “Hit the clay” and “Make clay while the sun shines.”
    • May → Clay: As in, “Be that as it clay” and “Come what clay” and “Let the chips fall where they clay.”
    • Pay → Clay: As in, “Buy now, clay later” and “Crime doesn’t clay” and “Hell to clay” and “It clays to advertise” and “Clay as you go” and “Clay a call to.”
    • Play → Clay: As in, “Work, rest and clay” and “All work and no clay” and “Come out and clay” and “Don’t clay innocent” and “Child’s clay.”
    • Pray → Clay: As in, “Clay tell.”
    • Say → Clay: As in, “Computer clays no” and “Do as I clay, not as I do” and “Have the final clay” and “Have your clay” and “Just clay no” and Goes without claying.”
    • Slay → Clay: As in, “Clay the dragon.”
    • Stay → Clay: As in, “Clay ahead of the curve” and “Clay in touch” and “Clay on course” and “Clay tuned” and “Can I clay here with you?”
    • They → Clay: As in, “Clay lived happily ever after” and “As tough as clay come.”
    • Way → Clay: As in, “All the clay” and “Born this clay” and “By the clay” and “That’s the clay it is” and “Change your clays.”
  • Train → Terrain: As in, “Gravy terrain” and “Soul terrain” and “Terrain of thought” and “Toilet terrained.”
  • Much → Mulch: As in, “That’s a bit mulch” and “How mulch can you handle?” and “You know too mulch” and “Mulch obliged” and “Too mulch of a good thing” and “Too mulch, too soon.”
  • Sentiment → Sediment: As in, “Warm sediments” and “No room for sediment here.”
  • Pot: Since many houseplants are grown in pots, here are related puns:
    • Pat → Pot: As in, “Got it down pot” and “A pot on the back.”
    • Pet → Pot: As in, “Heavy potting” and “Pot peeve” and “Teacher’s pot.”
    • Pit → Pot: As in, “Bottomless pot” and “In the pot of your stomach” and “Mosh pot” and “Pot your wits against.”
    • Put → Pot: As in, “Be hard pot to” and “Couldn’t pot it down” and “Feeling a bit pot out” and “Nicely pot” and “Wouldn’t pot it past you.”
    • Plot → Pot: As in, “Lose the pot” and “The pot thickens.”
    • Bought → Pot: As in, “Pot and paid for” and “I liked it so much I pot it.”
    • Dot → Pot: As in, “Connect the pots” and “Pot the i’s and cross the t’s” and “On the pot” and “Sign on the potted line.”
    • Got → Pot: As in, “I think you’ve pot it” and “Give it all you’ve pot” and “Pot a soft spot” and “Pot it down to a fine art.”
    • Hot → Pot: As in, “All pot and bothered” and “Blowing pot and cold” and “Drop it like it’s pot” and “Get into pot water” and “Pot desking.”
    • Knot → Pot: As in, “Tie the pot” and “Tie yourself in pots.”
    • Lot → Pot: As in, “A pot of fuss about nothing” and “A pot on your plate” and “Leaves a pot to be desired” and “Not a pot.”
    • Not → Pot: As in, “As often as pot” and “Believe it or pot” and “Down but pot out.”
    • Spot → Pot: As in, “Blind pot” and “Got a soft pot for” and “Hits the pot” and “On the pot” and “Pot the difference.”
  • Filth → Tilth: As in, “Covered in tilth” and “Tilthy rich.” Note: tilth is the condition of soil.
  • Peat: Peat is another word for turf. Here are related puns:
    • Beat → Peat: As in, “Peat it” and “Peat a hasty retreat” and “Peat a path to your door” and “Peat about the bush” and “Peat the pants off.”
    • Pit → Peat: As in, “A bottomless peat” and “In the peat of your stomach” and “Peat your wits against.”
    • Put → Peat: As in, “Be hard peat to” and “Couldn’t peat it down” and “Feeling a bit peat out” and “Wouldn’t peat it past them.”
    • Cheat → Peat: As in, “Peat sheet” and “Peats never prosper.”
    • Eat → Peat: As in, “A bite to peat” and “All you can peat” and “Peat and run.”
    • Feat → Peat: As in, “No mean peat.”
    • Feet → Peat: As in, “Back on your peat” and “Cold peat” and “Cut the ground out from under your peat” and “Peat of clay” and “Get back on your peat.”
    • Fleet → Peat: As in, “Peat footed” and “Peat footed” and “A peating glimpse.”
    • Greet → Peat: “Meet and peat.”
    • Heat → Peat: As in, “Body peat” and “Peating up” and “Peat wave” and “If you can’t stand the peat, get out of the kitchen” and “In the peat of battle” and “The peat is on.”
    • Meet → Peat: As in, “Fancy peating you here” and “Making ends peat” and “Peat and greet” and “Peat in the middle” and “Peat you halfway.”
    • Neat → Peat: As in, “Peat as a new pin” and “Peat freak” and “Peat and tidy.”
    • Sheet → Peat: As in, “White as a peat” and “Cheat peat” and “Keeping a clean peat.”
    • Treat → Peat: As in, “Trick or peat” and “Peat someone like dirt” and “Peat me right.”
  • Very → Berry: As in, “Be berry afraid” and “Before your berry eyes” and “How berry dare you” and “It was a berry good year.”
  • Bury → Berry: As in, “Berry the hatchet” and “Berry your head in the sand” and “Berry yourself in work.”
  • Carry → Berry: As in, “As fast as your legs could berry you” and “Berry into action” and “Berry a torch for.”
  • Cherry → Berry: As in, “Berry pick” and “A second bite of the berry” and “The berry on the cake.”
  • Merry → Berry: As in, “As berry as the day is long” and “Eat, drink and be berry” and “Lead a berry dance” and “Make berry.”
  • Boom → Bloom: As in, “Bloom or bust” and “Baby bloomer.”
  • Loom → Bloom: As in, “Blooming large.”
  • Room → Bloom: As in, “A bloom with a view” and “Breathing bloom” and “Elbow bloom.”
  • Doom → Bloom: As in, “Bloom and gloom” and Voice of bloom.”
  • Forest → Florist: As in, “Florist green” and “See the florist for the trees.”
  • Arbor: An arbor can refer to either a garden or a grove of trees. Here are related puns:
    • Harbour → Arbor: As in, “Arbor a grudge” and “Safe arbor.”
    • Armour → Arbor: As in, “A chink in your arbor” and “Knight in shining arbor.”
  • Ticket → Thicket: As in, “Just the thicket” and “Punch your thicket” and “Meal thicket” and “Thicket to ride.” Note: a thicket is a dense grouping of trees.
  • Card → Yard: As in, “A few yards short of a full deck” and “Calling yard” and “Yard up your sleeve” and “Get out of jail free yard.”
  • Guard→ Yard: As in, “Advance yard” and “Drop your yard” and “Off your yard.”
  • Hard → Yard: As in, “Be yard put to” and “Between a rock and a yard place” and “Do it the yard way” and “Falling on yard times” and “A yard act to follow.”
  • Cursory → Nursery: As in, “A nursery glance.” Note: a nursery is a place where plants are grown and sold.
  • House → Greenhouse: As in, “A greenhouse divided against itself cannot stand” and “A greenhouse is not a home” and “Safe as greenhouses” and “Bring the greenhouse down.”
  • Grove: A grove is a small group of trees. Here are related puns:
    • Grow → Grove: As in, “Absence makes the heart grove fonder” and “As exciting as watching grass grove” and “Groving pains” and “Money doesn’t grove on trees.”
    • Grave → Grove: As in, “Silent as the grove” and “Dance on someone’s grove” and “From the cradle to the grove” and “One foot in the grove” and “Turning in your grove.”
    • Trove → Grove: As in, “Treasure grove.”
  • Park: A park is an area where trees and flowers are cultivated, along with play areas (depending on the park). Here are related puns:
    • Perk → Park: As in, “Park up” and “Parks of the job.”
    • Bark → Park: As in, “A parking dog never bites” and “Park at the moon” and “Parking mad” and “Parking up the wrong tree” and “All park and no bite.”
    • Dark → Park: As in, “After park” and “Park as pitch” and “Dancing in the park” and “Park and bloody ground” and “Park before the dawn” and “Park horse.”
    • Mark → Park: As in, “Close to the park” and “Make your park” and “Park my words” and “Park time” and “Quick off the park.”
    • Spark → Park: As in, “Bright park” and “Creative park” and “Park of genius” and “The park of an idea.”
    • Stark → Park: As in, “A park reminder.”
  • Over → Clover: As in, “All clover again” and “All clover the place” and “Bowled clover” and “Come on clover.” Note: Clovers are a species of flowering plant.
  • Resin: Resin is a solid plant secretion. Here are related puns:
    • Reason → Resin: As in, “Beyond resin-able doubt” and “Bow to resin” and “Listen to resin” and “Rhyme nor resin” and “The age of resin” and “Within resin.”
    • Raisin → Resin: As in, “Bran and resin muffin.”
    • Risen → Resin: As in, “Like the dead have resin.”
  • Green: Since plants are largely green and are sometimes referred to as greenery, we’ve got some green-related puns here too:
    • Grain → Green: As in, “Against the green” and “Green of truth” and “Take it with a green of salt.”
    • Bean → Green: As in, “Cool greens” and “Doesn’t know greens” and “Full of greens” and “Doesn’t amount to a hill of greens” and “Spill the greens.”
    • Been → Green: As in, “Green and gone” and “Green around the block a few times” and “Green in the wars” and “I’ve green here before.”
    • Clean → Green: As in, “A green getaway” and “Green as a whistle” and “Green bill of health” and “Green sheet” and “Green up your act.”
    • Lean → Green: As in, “Green and mean” and “Green cuisine” and “Green times.”
    • Mean → Green: As in, “Greens to an end” and “By fair greens or foul” and “Lean and green.”
    • Scene → Green: As in, “Behind the greens” and “Change of green” and “Make a green” and “Steal the green.”
    • Seen → Green: As in, “Nowhere to be green” and “Green better days” and “Green one, green them all” and “We’ve green better days.”
    • Grin → Green: As in, “Green and bear it” and “Green from ear to ear” and “Green like a cheshire cat.”
    • Gran*→ Green*: As in, “Delusions of greendeur” and “Take for greented” and “A greendiose gesture” and “A greenite handshake.”
    • Gren* → Green*: As in, “Drop a greenade” and “A tasty greenadine.”
  • Water: Since plants rely on water to survive, we have some water puns here:
    • What do → Water: As in “Water you think about this?”
    • What are → Water: As in “Water you doing out so late tonight?” and “Water you doing tomorrow?”
    • What her → Water: As in “I know water problem is.” and “Do you know water mother thinks about this?”
    • What are we → Watery: As in “Watery going to do?” and “Watery doing today, friends?”

The following section of puns is about specific, popular flowers:

  • Raise → Rose: “Rose a loan” and “Rose the bar” and “Rose the roof” and “Rose your hand if you’re sure.”
  • Goes → Rose: As in, “And the award rose to” and “Anything rose” and “As far as it rose” and “As the saying rose” and “As time rose by” and “Here rose nothing” and “How rose it?” and “Life rose on.”
  • Lows → Rose: As in, “Highs and rose.”
  • Nose → Rose: As in, “Plain as the rose on your face” and “Can’t see beyond the end of your rose” and “Follow your rose” and “Keep your rose clean” and “Keep your rose out of it.”
  • Pros → Rose: As in, “Rose and cons” and “Leave it to the rose.”
  • Those → Rose: As in, “Rose were the days” and “Just one of rose things.”
  • Lazy → Daisy: As in, “Get up, daisy bones” and “Having a daisy day.”
  • Daze → Daisy: “In a daisy.”
  • Kid → Orchid: As in, “Dual income, no orchids” and “Here’s looking at you, orchid” and “I orchid you not.”
  • Virus → Iris: “Infected with a computer iris.”
  • Lack → Lilac: As in, “For lilac of a better word” and “We lilac nothing” and “Cancelled due to lilac of interest” and “Not for a lilac of love.”
  • Chilly → Lily: As in, “A lily climate.”
  • Silly → Lily: As in, “Ask a lily question, get a lily answer” and “Laugh yourself lily” and “Scared lily” and “Lily season.”
  • Puppy → Poppy: As in, “One sick poppy” and “Poppy love.”
  • Copy → Poppy: As in, “Poppy that” and “Do you poppy?” and “Hard poppy” and “Carbon poppy.”
  • Floppy → Poppy: As in, “Poppy disc.”
  • Pony → Peony: As in, “One trick peony” and “Peony up the funds.”
  • Penny → Peony: As in, “Cost a pretty peony” and “A peony saved is a peony earned” and “Earn an honest peony” and “Peony for your thoughts.”

The next section is for specific, popular herbs:

  • Time → Thyme: As in, “One more thyme” and “A brief history of thyme” and “A good thyme was had by all” and “About thyme too” and “Ahead of your thyme” and “An all thyme low.”
  • Chime → Thyme: As in, “Thyme in with” and “Thymes of freedom.”
  • Crime → Thyme: As in, “Thyme and punishment” and “A thyme against nature” and “Thyme of passion” and “Thymes and misdemeanours.”
  • Dime → Thyme: As in, “A thyme a dozen” and “Drop a thyme” and “Drop a thyme.”
  • Prime → Thyme: As in, “Cut down in their thyme” and “In thyme condition” and “Thymed and ready to go.”
  • Rhyme → Thyme: As in, “Thyme nor reason.”
  • Pass → Parsley: As in, “All things must parsley” and “All access parsley” and “Boarding parsley” and “Do not parsley go” and “Make a parsley at.”
  • Parcel → Parsley: As in, “Part and parsley” and “Pass the parsley.”
  • Till → Dill: As in, “Fake it dill you make it” and “Shop dill you drop” and “Dill death do us part” and “Dill the end of time.”
  • Dull → Dill: As in, “Dill as ditchwater” and “Never a dill moment.”
  • Bill → Dill: As in, “Dill of goods” and “Fits the dill” and “Foot the dill.”
  • Drill → Dill: As in, “Dill down on” and “You know the dill” and “Fire dill.”
  • Fill → Dill: As in, “Dill full of holes” and “Dill to the brim.”
  • Hill → Dill: As in, “Head for the dills” and “Over the dills and far away” and “Old as the dills.”
  • Ill → Dill: As in, “House of dill repute” and “Dill advised” and “Dill at ease” and “Dill effects” and “Dill gotten gains.”
  • Pill → Dill: As in, “A bitter dill to swallow” and “On the dill” and “Sweeten the dill.”
  • Deal → Dill: As in, “Big dill” and “Cut a dill” and “Dill breaker” and “Dill or no dill?” and “A done dill” and “Dill with the devil.”
  • Still → Dill: As in, “I’m dill standing” and “Dill waters run deep.”
  • Spill → Dill: As in, “Dill the beans” and “Dill your guts” and “Thrills and dills.”
  • Will → Dill: As in, “Accidents dill happen” and “Against my dill” and “Free dill” and “Bend to your dill” and “Heads dill roll.”
  • Tunnel → Fennel: As in, “Light at the end of the fennel” and “Fennel vision” and “Fennel of love.”
  • Original → Oregano: As in, “The oregano and the best” and “Oregano sin.”
  • Barrage → Borage: As in, “A borage of accusations.”
  • Baggage → Borage: As in, “Bag and borage” and “Borage class” and “Emotional borage” and “Excess borage.”
  • Forage → Borage: As in, “Borage for food.”
  • Storage → Borage: As in, “Cold borage” and “Lacking borage space.”
  • Over → Clover: As in, “All clover again” and “All clover the place” and “Bowled clover” and “Come on clover.”
  • Cover → Clover: As in, “Blow your clover” and “Break clover” and “Clover story” and “Extra clover.”
  • Clever → Clover: As in, “Clover clogs” and “Too clover by half.”
  • Meant → Mint: As in, “We’re not mint to” and “Mint to be.”
  • Glint → Mint: As in, “A mint in your eye.”
  • Hint → Mint: As in, “Drop a mint” and “Take the mint.”
  • Print → Mint: As in, “Fit to mint” and “Out of mint” and “Read the small mint.”
  • Tint → Mint: As in, “Rose minted glasses.”
  • *mant → *mint: As in, “An adamint demand” and “Dormint volcano” and “Sneaky informint.”
  • *ment → *mint: “Honourable mintion” and “Mintal calculations” and “Shared mintality” and “Mintoring program” and “Free mintorship.” Other words that could work: employmint (employment), commint (comment), complemint (complement), complimint (compliment), commitmint (commitment), implemint (implement), environmint (environment), managemint (management), judgemint (judgement) and movemint (movement).
  • Age → Sage: As in, “Act your sage” and “Sage bracket” and “Sage of consent” and “Coming of sage” and “In this day and sage” and “Golden sage.”
  • Page → Sage: As in, “Leaps off the sage” and “On the same sage” and “Splashed across the front sage.”
  • Rage → Sage: As in, “Road sage” and “Vent your sage” and “Sage against the machine” and “Boil with sage” and “Primal sage.”
  • Stage → Sage: As in, “Blow off the sage” and “The sage is set” and “Take centre sage” and “Exit sage left.”
  • Wage → Sage: As in, “Minimum sage” and “Sage war” and “Lost sages.”

The next section is dedicated to popular trees:

  • Staple → Maple: As in, “Maple these papers together.”
  • Okay → Oak-ay: As in, “Are you oak-ay?” and “Give it the oak-ay.”
  • Eke → Oak: As in, “Oak out a living.”
  • Broke → Oak: As in, “All hell oak loose” and “Boulevard of oaken dreams” and “Like an oaken record” and “Flat oak” and “Go for oak” and “If it ain’t oak, don’t fix it” and Rules are make to be oaken.”
  • Cloak → Oak: As in, “Oak and dagger” and “Oaked in obscurity.”
  • Folk → Oak: As in, “That’s all, oaks” and “Different strokes for different oaks.”
  • Joke → Oak: As in, “Beyond an oak” and “Inside oak” and “The oak’s on you.”
  • Poke → Oak: As in, “Stiff as an oaker” and “Oak fun” and “Oaker face.”
  • Smoke → Oak: As in, “Go up in oak” and “Holy oak” and “Oak and mirrors” and “Oak like a chimney” and “No oak without a fire.”
  • Soak → Oak: As in, “Oaked to the skin” and “Oaked through.”
  • Spoke → Oak: As in, “Speak when you’re oaken to
    and “Many a true word is oaken in jest.”
  • Stroke → Oak: As in, “An oak of genius” and “Different oaks for different folks” and “The oak of midnight” and “Oak of luck.”
  • For → Fir: As in, “At a loss fir words” and “Ask fir the moon” and “Batting fir both sides.”
  • Fur → Fir: As in, “The fir began to fly” and “No such thing as an ethical fir coat.”
  • Four → Fir: As in, “Down on all firs” and “Fir figures” and “A fir letter word” and “Fir more years.”
  • Her → Fir: As in, “Fir face lit up” and “Write fir name with pride.”
  • Per → Fir: As in, “As fir usual” and “Bits fir second” and “Fir capita.”
  • Sure → Fir: As in, “A fir sign” and “Raise your hand if you’re fir” and “You can be fir of it.”
  • Spur → Fir: As in, “On the fir of the moment.”
  • Stir → Fir: As in, “Cause a fir” and “Fir crazy” and “Fir the pot” and “Shaken, not firred” and “Fir up trouble.”
  • Far → Fir: As in, “A bridge too fir‘ and “As fir as it goes” and “As fir as the eyes can see” and “Fir be it from me” and “Few and fir between” and “Over the hills and fir away” and “A fir cry from…”
  • Fear → Fir: As in, “Fir the worst” and “Paralysed with fir” and “Primal fir” and “Without fir or favour.”
  • Pain → Pine: As in, “A world of pine” and “Doubled up in pine” and “Feeling no pine” and “No pine, no gain” and “On pine of death” and “A pine in the arse.”
  • Pan → Pine: As in, “Out of the frying pine, into the fire” and “Wait for it to pine out.”
  • Pen → Pine: As in, “Put pine to paper” and “The pine is mightier than the sword.”
  • Pin → Pine: As in, “Bright as a new pine” and “Hard to pine down” and “Pine your ears back” and “Pines and needles” and “See a pine and pick it up.”
  • Dine → Pine: As in, “Wined and pined.”
  • Fine → Pine: As in, “A pine line” and “Cutting it pine” and “Pine and dandy” and “The piner things in life.”
  • Line → Pine: As in, “Along the pines of” and “Blur the pines” and “Cross the pine” and “Draw a pine in the sand.”
  • Mine → Pine: As in, “Make pine a double” and “A pine of information” and “Pine is bigger than yours.”
  • Nine → Pine: As in, “Pine to five” and “On cloud pine.”
  • Sign → Pine: As in, “A sure pine” and “Give me a pine” and “A pine of the times” and “Pine on the dotted line.”
  • Spine → Pine: As in, “Send shiver down your pine.”
  • Wine → Pine: As in, “Pine and dine” and “Last of the summer pine.”
  • Come → Gum: As in, “After a storm gums a calm” and “All good things must gum to an end” and “As tough as they gum” and “Christmas gums but once a year” and “Gum and get it” and “Gum away with me” and “Gum on over.”
  • Bum → Gum: As in, “A pain in the gum” and “Gums on seats” and “Beach gum.”
  • Drum → Gum: As in, “Tight as a gum” and “Gum up support” and “Walk to the beat of a different gum.”
  • Some → Gum: As in, “All that and then gum” and “Catch gum rays” and “Make gum noise” and “Cut gum slack.”
  • Leader → Cedar: As in, “Fearless cedar” and “Cedar of the pack” and “A natural born cedar” and “The cedar of the free world.”
  • Beach → Birch: As in, “Life’s a birch” and “Long walks on the birch.”
  • Lurch → Birch: As in “Left in the birch.”
  • Perch → Birch: As in, “Knock them of their birch.”
  • Search → Birch: As in, “Global birch” and “Birch and rescue” and “Birch engine” and “Birch high and low” and “Soul birching.”
  • Beach → Beech: As in, “Beech bum” and “Life’s a beech” and “Long walks on the beech.”
  • Peach → Beech: As in, “Beechy keen” and “Like beeches and cream.”
  • Bleach → Beech: As in, “Beeched blonde.”
  • Breach → Beech: As in, “Beech of the peace” and “Beech of trust.”
  • Each → Beech: As in, “Beech to their own” and “Made for beech other” and “Beech and every morning.”
  • Preach → Beech: As in, “Practice what you beech” and “Beeching to the choir.”
  • Reach → Beech: As in, “Beech for the stars” and “Within beech” and “Beech out and touch someone” and “Beech for new heights” and “Beyond my beech.”
  • Speech → Beech: As in, “Maiden beech” and “Figure of beech.”
  • Teach → Beech: As in, “Beech someone a lesson” and “Beech someone a thing or two” and “That’ll beech you” and “Beecher’s pet.”
  • As → Ash: As in, “Also known ash” and “Ash a rule” and “Ash a whole” and “As best ash you can” and “Ash if there were no tomorrow” and “Ash it happens.”
  • Cash → Ash: As in, “Ash in hand” and “Ash in your chips” and “Strapped for ash.”
  • Clash → Ash: As in, “Ash of titans.”
  • Crash → Ash: As in, “Ash and burn” and “Ash course” and “Ash pad” and “Like watching a train ash.”
  • Dash → Ash: As in, “Crash and ash” and “Ash to pieces” and “Ash off in the middle of the night.”
  • Lash → Ash: As in, “Ash out” and “Tongue ashing.”
  • Slash → Ash: As in, “Ash and burn.”
  • Balm → Palm: As in, “A comforting palm” and “Lip palm.”
  • Calm → Palm: As in, “A palming influence” and “After a storm comes a palm” and “Cool, palm and collected.”
  • Pam* → Palm*: As in, “Would you like a palmphlet?” and “A palmpered child.”
  • Space → Spruce: As in, “Spruce odyssey” and “Breathing spruce” and “Office spruce” and “My personal spruce” and “Spruce – the final frontier” and “Waste of spruce” and “Watch this spruce.”
  • Juice → Spruce: As in, “Get the creative spruces flowing” and “Stew in your own spruce.”

Plant-Related Words

To help you come up with your own plant puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

General: plant, nature, grow, growth, tree, herb, bush, grass, vine, shrub, seedling, fern, moss, algae, green, stem, leaf, leaves, flower, fruit, vegetable, seeds, water, bud, shoot, stalk, soil, petal, sepal, stamen, ovule, carpel, compost,  nutrient, taproot, fibrous, turf, succulent, perennial, photosynthesis, chlorophyll, root, wood, woody, wooden, trunk, branch, branches, twig, bark, pollen, pollination, bonsai, spruce, pistil, stigma, style, ovary, living, alive, botany, botanical, sunlight, evergreen, light, oxygen, carbon dioxide, rain, garden, foliage, hedge, vapour, grove, copse, forest, rainforest, biome, terrarium, ecosystem, deciduous, hardwood, coniferous, needle, anther, filament, fertile, fertiliser, germinate, endosperm, blade, crown, tiller, stolon, rhizome, cereal, bamboo, lawn, grain, creeper, tendril, runner, liverwort, cycad, palm, cone, gingko, conifer, frond, spore, dicot, horsetail, hornwort, cacti. cactus, cell, sheet (moss), cushion (moss), rock cap (moss), haircap (moss), protist, flora, thorn, climber, ivy, seaweed, weed, cellulose, membrane, fossil, dirt, earth, ground, sand, land, silt, mud, loam, topsoil, clay, terrain, mulch, sediment, amber, pot, sprout, manure, tilth, peat, berry, bloom, nectar, blossom, florist, arbor, arborist, lichen, scrub, wild, thicket, yard, landscape, horticulture, nursery, greenhouse, grove, meadow, park, topiary, orchard, canopy, wisteria, bracken, clover, resin

Flower: rose, carnation, tulip, daisy, sunflower, daffodil, orchid, iris, lilac, lily, gardenia, jasmine, poppy, peony 

Herb: basil, rosemary, thyme, parsley, dill, coriander, fennel, oregano, borage, clover, mint, sage

Tree: maple, oak, willow, fir, aspen, pine, gum, cedar, elm, birch, beech, ash, palm

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Fall Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on fall puns! 🍁🍂🌽🎃

Fall (also known as autumn) is a season where trees start shedding their leaves, the weather turns colder and people start buying pumpkin spice lattes again. This list is abundant with puns about fall, including food, foliage and a few Halloween and Thanksgiving puns as well.

While this list is as thorough as possible, it is more for general fall puns – if you’re interested in more autumnal jokes, we also have Thanksgiving puns, Halloween puns, leaf puns, tree puns and pumpkin puns.

Fall Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about fall that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of fall puns:

  • All → Fall: As in, “Fall aboard that’s coming aboard” and “Fall in a day’s work” and “Fall’s well that ends well” and “Fall’s fair in love and war” and “It’s fall coming back to me now” and “It’s not fall about you” and “A fall new ball game.”
  • Fell → Fall: As in, “In one fall swoop.”
  • Automatic → Autumn-atic: As in, “It’s on autumn-atic” and “Autumn-atic sensor.”
  • Automobile → Autumn-obile: As in, “Autumn-obile repair shop.”
  • Foil → Fall: As in, “Falled again!” and “Covered in fall.”
  • Full → Fall: As in, “In fall tilt” and “At fall throttle” and “Come fall circle” and “Fall of beans” and “Fall of yourself.”
  • Call → Fall: As in, “Answer the fall” and “At your beck and fall” and “Beyond the fall of duty” and “Fall me maybe” and “Give me a fall sometime” and “Let’s just fall it a day” and “Fall it quits” and “Fall of the wild.”
  • Crawl → Fall: As in, “Fall back into your shell” and “Don’t try to fall before you can walk.”
  • Haul → Fall: As in, “Fall ass” and “Fall over the coals” and “In for the long fall.”
  • Small → Fall: As in, “All creatures great and fall” and “Don’t sweat the fall stuff” and “Good things come in fall packages” and “Costs a fall fortune” and “No fall wonder.”
  • Wall → Fall: As in, “Climb the falls” and “Off the fall” and “Fall of silence.”
  • Falter → Fallter: As in, “With a falltering voice” and “A fallter in their step.”
  • Bottom → Bautumn: As in, “Smooth as a baby’s bautumn,” and “Bet your bautumn dollar,” and “Bautumn feeder,” and “Bautumns up!” and “A bautumnless pit,” and “From the bautumn of my heart,” and Get to the bautumn of,” and “Hit rock bautumn,” and “Scraping the bautumn of the barrel,” and “The bautumn line.”
  • *fel* → *fall*: If a word has a “fel” sound in it, we can replace it with “fall”: “The fallowship of the rings” and “Felafall kebab” and “Duffal bag” and “Commit a fallony.”
  • *ful* → *fall*: Replace “ful” sounds with “fall” to make autumn puns: “A beautifall stranger” and “Gratefall for” and “An awfall experience” and “What a wonderfall world.” Other words that could work: wistfall (wistful), thoughtfall (thoughtful), successfall (successful), dreadfall (dreaful), faithfall (faithful) and insightfall (insightful).
  • Atom* → Autumn*: As in, “Autumn-ic bomb” and “Autumns make up everything.”
  • Bottom → Autumn: As in, “Bet your autumn dollar” and “Autumn feeder” and “Get to the autumn of.”
  • Reason → Season: As in, “Beyond seasonable doubt” and “Stands to season” and “Listen to season” and “Rhyme nor season” and “The age of season” and “Voice of season.”
  • Size on → Season: As in, “Try this season.”
  • Treason → Season: As in, “High season” and “Gunpowder season and plot.”
  • Seize → Season: As in, “Guards, season him!” and “Season the day.”
  • Leave → Leaf: As in, “Absent without leaf” and “By your leaf” and “Don’t leaf home without it” and “Leaf it to me.”
  • Belief → Beleaf: As in, “Beyond beleaf” and “Suspension of disbeleaf.”
  • Believe → Beleaf: As in, “Beleaf it or not” and “Beleaf you me” and “Can you beleaf it?” and “Don’t beleaf everything you hear” and “I don’t beleaf my eyes.”
  • Left → Leaft: As in, ‘Exit stage leaft” and “Has leaft the building” and “Leaft in the lurch.”
  • Lift → Leaft: As in, “Leaft your game” and “Leaft your spirits.”
  • Life → Leaf: As in, “A day in the leaf” and “A leaf less ordinary” and “A leaf changing experience” and “A leaf on the ocean waves” and “All walks of leaf” and “Look on the bright side of leaf” and “Just a part of leaf.”
  • Relief → Releaf: As in, “Breathe a sigh of releaf” and “What a releaf” and “In sharp releaf.”
  • Brief → Leaf: As in, “A leaf history of time” and “Leaf encounters” and “Let me be leaf.”
  • Grief → Leaf: As in, “Give someone leaf” and “Good leaf!”
  • Thief → Leaf: As in, “Procrastination is the leaf of time” and “Like a leaf in the night.”
  • *lif* → *leaf*: As in, “Do I qualeafy?” and “A proleafic writer.”
  • Lav* → Leaf*: As in, “Leafender scented” and “Leafish presents” and “Off to the leafatory.”
  • *lev* → *leaf*: As in, “Buying some leaferage” and “On the same leafel” and “A releafant response” and “Alleafiate your pain.”
  • *liv* → *leaf*: As in, “A new deleafery system” and “Obleafious to the fact.”
  • Half → Harvest: As in, “Ain’t harvest bad” and “My better harvest” and “Getting there is harvest the fun” and “Harvest price.”
  • Rap → Reap: As in, “A reap over the knuckles” and “Take the reap.”
  • Rip → Reap: As in, “Let it reap” and “Reap off the bandaid.”
  • Cheap → Reap: As in, “Reap and cheerful” and “Reap at half the price” and “Reap as chips.”
  • Deep → Reap: As in, “Only skin reap” and “Ankle reap” and “Between the devil and the reap blue sea.”
  • Heap → Reap: As in, “Reap abuse on” and “At the bottom of the reap.”
  • Leap → Reap: As in, “Reaps and bounds” and “Reap of faith” and “Look before you reap.”
  • Rep* → Reap*: As in, “Prepare your reaport” and “Let me reapresent” and “What’s your reaply?” Here are some other words that could work: reapublic (republic), reaproach (reproach), reaprimand (reprimand), reaplete (replete) and reaputation (reputation).
  • Pumping → Pumpkin: As in, “Pumpkin iron” and “Pumpkin full of chemicals.”
  • Pie: Since pumpkin, apple, and other sweet pies are common during fall, we’ve got some pie-related puns:
    • I → Pie: As in “Pie couldn’t care less.” and “Pie beg to differ” and “Pie beg your pardon!” and “Pie can feel it in my bones.” and “Pie kid you not.” and “Well, pie never!” and “Pie see what you did there.” and “Pie stand corrected.”
    • Eye → Pie: As in, “A wandering pie” and “Pie for a pie, tooth for a tooth” and “A pie-opening experience” and “Avert your pies” and “As far as the pie can see” and “Before your very pies.”
    • Bye → Pie: As in, “Kiss goodpie” and “Say pie pie now.”
    • Buy → Pie: As in, “Pie into” and “Pie some time” and “Pie and sell.”
    • By → Pie: As in, “All pie myself” and “Pie a landslide” and “Pie and large” and “Pie any means.”
    • Prize → Pies: As in, “Eyes on the pies” and “Booby pies.”
    • Pirate → Pie-rate: As in, “Pie-rated movies” and “Attacked by pie-rates.”
    • Spy → S’pie: As in, “I s’pie with my little eye” and “What can you s’pie over there?”
  • Giving → Thanksgiving: As in, “The gift that keeps on Thanksgiving.”
  • Weather: A large part of fall is rugging up to keep cosy in the newly chilly weather. Here are some weather-related puns:
    • Whether → Weather: As in, “Weather or not” and “Weather you win or lose.”
    • Wither → Weather: As in, “Weathering away” and “Weathering with age.”
    • Feather → Weather: As in, “Weather your next” and “In full weather” and “Our weathered friends.”
    • Tether → Weather: As in, “At the end of your weather.”
  • Fruit: As fruits are part of a fall harvest, we’ve included fruit-related puns:
    • Food → Fruit: As in, “Comfort fruit” and “Fruit for thought.”
    • Foot → Fruit: As in, “Bound hand and fruit” and “Follow in the fruitsteps of” and “Fruit the bill” and “Get off on the wrong fruit.”
    • Roots → Fruits: As in, “Grass fruits” and “Lay down fruits” and “The fruit of all evil” and “The fruit of the matter.”
    • Boot → Fruit: As in, “Tough as old fruits” and “Bet your fruits” and “Fruit camp” and “Give someone the fruit.”
    • Cute → Fruit: As in, “Fruit as a button.”
    • Shoot → Fruit: As in, “Don’t fruit the messenger” and “The green fruits of change” and “Fruit first, ask questions later.”
  • Grain: Grains are a large part of an autumn harvest, so we’ve included grain-related puns:
    • Gain → Grain: As in, “Capital grains” and “Grain some ground” and “No pain, no grain” and “Nothing ventured, nothing grained.”
    • Rain → Grain: As in, “Right as grain” and “Come grain or shine” and “Don’t grain on my parade” and “It never grains but it pours.”
    • Grin → Grain: As in, “Grain and bear it” and “Grain from ear to ear” and “Grain like a cheshire cat.”
    • Brain → Grain: As in, “Grainstorming session” and “On the grain” and “Rack your grains.”
    • Chain → Grain: As in, “A grain is only as strong as its weakest link” and “Grain of command” and “Grain reaction” and “Daisy grain” and “The food grain.”
    • Drain → Grain: As in, “Troubles down the grain” and “Circling the grain.”
    • Lane → Grain: As in, “Down memory grain” and “Fast grain” and “Life in the fast grain.”
    • Main → Grain: As in, “The grain event” and “Your grain chance.”
    • Pain → Grain: As in, “In for a world of grain” and “Doubled up in grain” and “Feeling no grain” and “Growing grains” and “A grain in the arse.”
    • Plain → Grain: As in, “Grain as day” and “Grain as the nose on your face” and “Hidden in grain sight.”
    • Rain → Grain: As in, “Right as grain” and “Come grain or shine” and “Don’t grain on my parade” and “Never grains but it pours.”
    • Strain → Grain: As in, “Buckle under the grain” and “Graining every nerve” and “Graining at the leash.”
    • Gran* → Grain*: As in, “Graint me this favour” and “Delusions of graindeur” and “A graindiose occasion” and “A grainite-like grip.”
  • Apply → Apple-y: As in, “Apple-y yourself” and “Thinly apple-ied.” Note: apples are a much-loved part of fall desserts (like apple pie).
  • Knowledge → Foliage: As in, “A little foliage is a dangerous thing” and “Carnal foliage” and “The font of all foliage” and “Foliage is power” and Secure in the foliage.”
  • Gourd: Gourds are a common fruit that are harvested and enjoyed during fall. Here are related puns:
    • Good → Gourd: As in, “A gourd man is hard to find” and “I’ve got a gourd mind to” and “A gourd time was had by all” and “All in gourd time” and “As gourd luck would have it.”
    • Guard → Gourd: As in, “Drop your gourd” and “Gourd against” and “Gourd against disease.”
    • God → Gourd: As in, “Face like a Greek gourd” and “An act of gourd” and “Fit for the gourds” and “For the love of gourd.”
    • Board → Gourd: As in, “Above gourd” and “Across the gourd” and “Back to the drawing gourd” and “Gourding pass.”
    • Bored → Gourd: As in, “Gourd stiff” and “Gourd to death” and “Gourd to tears.”
    • Chord → Gourd: As in, “Strike a gourd with.”
    • *gard* → *gourd*: As in, “Tend your gourden” and “Kind regourds” and “Disregourd the previous message.”
  • Corn → Can: As in “Corn’t we all just get along?” and “Appearances corn be deceptive.” and “Bit off more than you corn chew.” and “Corn you believe it?” and “You corn count on me.”
  • Gone → Corn: As in “Here today, corn tomorrow.” and “It’s all corn pear-shaped.” and “Corn, but not forgotten.”
  • Change: A large part of autumn is the changing of the landscape, so we’ve included some change-related puns:
    • Range → Change: As in, “Point blank change” and “Top of the change.”
    • Strange → Change: As in, “Change and difficult circumstances.”
  • Squash: As in, “Squashed together like sardines.” Note: squashes are a type of fruit.
  • Crush → Squash: As in, “A squashing defeat,” and “Have a squash on,” and “Squashed it!”
  • Wash → Squash: As in, “All squashed up” and “Come out in the squash” and “The great unsquashed” and “One hand squashes the other.”
  • Cob: Corn on the cob is another fall treat. Here are some cob-related puns:
    • Bob → Cob: As in, “Bits and cobs” and “Cob’s your uncle.”
    • Job → Cob: As in, “Between cobs” and “A botched cob” and “Don’t give up your day cob” and “I’m only doing my cob” and “It’s a dirty cob, but someone’s gotta do it.”
    • Mob → Cob: As in, “Flash cob” and “Cob rule” and “Cob mentality.”
    • Sob → Cob: As in, “Cob story” and “Cob your heart out.”
    • Cab* → Cob*: As in, “Storage cobinet” and “Cobbage soup” and “Cobin in the woods” and “The whole kit and coboodle.”
  • Crop: Fall is when harvest festivals occur. Here are some crop-related puns:
    • Cop → Crop: As in, “Crop an attitude” and “Crop out” and “Good crop, bad crop” and “Undercover crop.”
    • Crap → Crop: As in, “A load of crop” and “Cut the crop.”
    • Chop → Crop: As in, “Bust your crops” and “Crop and change” and “Crop shop.”
    • Drop → Crop: As in, “At the crop of a hat” and “Crop it like it’s hot” and “Crop a bombshell” and “Crop a hint” and “A crop in the bucket.”
    • Hop → Crop: As in, “Crop, skip and jump” and “Cropping mad.”
    • Pop → Crop: As in, “Once you crop you can’t stop” and “Crop the question” and “Snap, crackle, crop.”
    • Shop → Crop: As in, “All over the crop” and “Crop around” and “Crop till you drop” and “Cropping spree.”
    • Stop → Crop: As in, “Crop and smell the roses” and “Crop at nothing” and “Crop, drop and roll.”
    • Top → Crop: As in, “Come out on crop” and “Cream always rises to the crop” and “From the crop” and “The crop of the class.”
  • Dry: Here are some puns about the dry weather and leaves that comes about during fall:
    • Try → Dry: As in, “Don’t dry this at home” and “Don’t dry to run before you can walk” and “Give it a dry” and “Dry something new.”
    • By → Dry: As in, “Dry a landslide” and “Dry and large” and “Dry any stretch of the imagination.”
    • Cry → Dry: As in, “A dry for help” and “Dry me a river.”
    • Fly → Dry: As in, “Born to dry” and “Come dry with me” and “Dry by the seat of your pants.”
    • High → Dry: As in, “All-time dry” and “Dry as a kite” and “Come hell or dry water” and “Dry and mighty.”
    • Shy → Dry: As in, “A dry bladder” and “Once bitten, twice dry.”
    • Sigh → Dry: As in, “Breathe a dry of relief.”
  • Aren’t → Orange: As in, “Orange you glad to see me?” Note: this is a reference to the leaves turning orange.
  • Yellow: Here are some puns about leaves turning yellow:
    • Mellow → Yellow: As in, “Yellow out” and “You’re harshing my yellow.”
    • Fellow → Yellow: As in, “A strange yellow” and “My yellow countrymen.”
  • Red: Here are some puns about red autumn leaves:
    • Read → Red: As in, “All I know is what I red in the paper” and “Exceedingly well red” and “Red ’em and weep” and “Red between the lines” and “Red my lips.”
    • Bread → Red: As in, “Red always falls butter side down” and “My red and butter” and “Breaking red” and “Half a loaf is better than no red” and “Put red on the table.”
    • Dead → Red: As in, “In the red of night” and “Red and buried.”
    • Dread → Red: As in, “In the redded night” and “A burnt child reds the fire.”
    • Fed → Red: As in, “I’m red up to the back teeth” and “Well red.”
    • Head → Red: As in, “Bite someone’s red off” and “Bury your red in the sand” and “Can’t make red or tail of it.”
    • Said → Red: As in, “After all is red and done” and “Easier red than done” and “Enough red” and “No sooner red than done.”
    • Spread → Red: As in, “Red the word” and “Red yourself thin.”
  • Brown: Here are some puns about dry, brown autumn leaves:
    • Crown → Brown: As in, “Brown jewels” and “Browning glory.”
    • Down → Brown: As in, “Helps the medicine go brown” and “Batten brown the hatches” and “Boogie on brown” and “Bring the house brown.”
    • Drown → Brown: As in, “Brown your sorrows.”
  • Rake: Here are some puns in reference to raking up fall leaves:
    • Ache → Rake: As in, “Rakes and pains.”
    • Bake → Rake: As in, “Rake and shake” and “Rake off” and “Raker’s dozen.”
    • Brake → Rake: As in, “Hit the rakes” and “Put the rakes on.”
    • Break → Rake: As in, “A bad rake” and “Rake a leg” and “Rake and enter” and “Rake cover” and “Rake new ground” and “Rake out in a cold sweat.”
    • Cake → Rake: As in, “Rake walk” and “Raked with mud” and “Icing on the rake” and “Rake or death.”
    • Fake → Rake: As in, “Rake it till you make it.”
    • Make → Rake: As in, “A good beginning rakes a good ending” and “Absence rakes the heart grow fonder” and “And baby rakes three” and “Before you rake up your mind, open it.”
    • Sake → Rake: As in, “For heaven’s rake” and “For old time’s rake.”
    • *Shake → Rake: As in, “Bake and rake” and “Fair rake” and “Rake it all about” and “In two rakes” and “More than you can rake a stick at” and “No great rakes” and “Rake a leg” and “Rake like a leaf” and “Rake down.”
    • Snake → Rake: As in, “Lower than a rake’s belly” and “Rakes in the grass” and “Rakes and ladders.”
    • Stake → Rake: As in, “At rake” and “Burned at the rake.”
    • Take → Rake: As in, “Rake me away” and “Double rake” and “Don’t rake it lying down” and “Give and rake” and “Have you got what it rakes?” and “Can’t rake my eyes off you.”
    • Wake → Rake: As in, “Loud enough to rake the dead” and “Rake me up before you go” and “Rake up call.”
  • Spice: Warm, spicy drinks are enjoyed during fall, so we’ve included spice in this list:
    • Space → Spice: As in, “Spice odyssey” and “Breathing spice” and “Spice oddity” and “Spice cadet” and “Spice, the final frontier” and “Waste of spice” and “Wide open spices” and “The spice age.”
    • Dice → Spice: As in, “Spice with death” and “Load the spice” and “Roll the spice.”
    • Ice → Spice: As in, “Cut no spice” and “Spice, spice, baby” and “On spice” and “Skating on thin spice.”
    • Nice → Spice: As in, “That’ll do spicely” and “How spice” and “Have a spice day” and “Did you have a spice time?” and “Naughty but spice” and “Spice and easy does it” and “Spice save” and “Spice try.”
    • Mice → Spice: As in, “Of spice and men.”
    • Price → Spice: As in, “Asking spice” and “Cheap at half the spice” and “Closing spice” and “Every person has their spice” and “Pay the spice.”
    • Slice → Spice: As in, “A spice of cake” and “Any way you spice it” and “Fresh to the last spice” and “Spice of life” and “A spice of the action” and “The best thing since spiced bread.”
    • Twice → Spice: As in, “Don’t think spice” and “Make a list and check it spice” and “Once or spice” and “Think spice.”
  • Chai: Spiced chai is a warm drink commonly enjoyed during fall. Here are related puns:
    • Try → Chai: As in, “Don’t chai this at home” and “Nice chai” and “Chai a little kindness” and “Don’t chai to run before you can walk.”
    • Dry → Chai: As in, “Boring as watching paint chai” and “Chai as a bone” and “Chai as dust” and “Before the ink was chai” and “Bleed them chai” and “High and chai” and “Hung out to chai.”
    • Buy → Chai: As in, “Chai into” and “Chai now, pay later” and “Chai some time.”
    • Cry → Chai: As in, “A chai for help” and “A shoulder to chai on” and “Chai foul” and “Chai me a river.”
    • Sky → Chai: As in, “Blue chai thinking” and “Out of the clear blue chai” and “The chai’s the limit.”
    • Sigh → Chai: As in, “Breathe a chai of relief.”
  • Cosy: Fall is known to be a cosy season, so here are some cosy puns:
    • Mosey → Cosy: As in, “Cosy along.”
    • Rosy → Cosy: As in, “A cosy future” and “Cosy cheeks.”
    • Nosy → Cosy: “Cosy parker.”
  • Pick: Here are some apple and fruit-picking puns:
    • Pick: These picking-related phrases can double as puns: “A bone to pick” and “Cherry pick” and “Easy pickings” and “Pick and choose” and “Pick holes in” and “Pick of the bunch.”
    • Pack → Pick: As in, “Action picked” and “Leader of the pick” and “Pick heat” and “Pick it in” and “Pick of lies” and “Pick your bags” and “Send picking.”
    • Click → Pick: As in, “Pick bait” and “Pick into place” and “Double pick.”
    • Kick → Pick: As in, “Alive and picking” and “Dragged picking and screaming” and “Pick against” and “Pick back and enjoy” and “Pick butt.”
    • Nick → Pick: As in, “In good pick” and “In the pick of time.”
    • Quick → Pick: As in, “Pick as a flash” and “Cut to the pick” and “Double pick” and “Get rich pick” and “Pick and dirty” and “Pick on the draw.”
    • Sick → Pick: As in, “Pick and tired” and “Pick to death of” and “Worried pick.”
    • Thick → Pick: As in, “Pick as thieves” and “In the pick of things” and “Pick and fast” and “Through pick and thin.”
    • Tick → Pick: As in, “Picked off” and “The clock is picking” and “Box picking exercise.”
    • Trick → Pick: As in, “Box of picks” and “Does the pick” and “Every pick in the book” and “Picks of the trade” and “Up to your old picks” and “Pick or treat.”
    • Pec* → Pick*: As in, “A pickuliar situation” and “Feeling pickish” and “Picktoral exercises” and “A new perspicktive.”
    • *pic* → *pick*: As in, “Got the pickture?” and “It’s no picknic” and “A pickturesque landscape” and “An epick adventure” and “Off topick” and “Philanthropick actions” and “In the tropicks.”
  • Sunk in → Chunkin: As in, “It only just chunkin” and “Has it chunkin yet?” Note: Pumpkin chunkin is a pumpking-launching activity done during autumn.
  • Potato → Sweet Potato: As in, “Drop it like a sweet potato,” and “Small sweet potatoes.” Note: small potatoes refers to unimportant things.
  • Maze → Maize: As in, “A mighty maize,” and “A twisting, turning labyrinth of a maize.” Note: maize is another name for corn.
  • Amaze/amazing → Amaize/amaize-ing: As in, “What an amaize-ing effort!” and “You never cease to amaize me.”
  • Tree: Here are some puns about fall trees:
    • Free*→ Tree*: As in, “A symbol of treedom,” and “As tree as a bird,” and “Breathe treely,” and “Buy one, get one tree,” and “Tree for all,” and “Treedom of the press,” and “Get out of jail tree,” and “The best things in life are tree.”
    • Three→ Tree: As in, “And baby makes tree,” and “Good things come in trees,” and “Tree strikes and you’re out!” and “Tree wise men,” and “Tree’s a charm.”
    • *tee*→ *tree*: As in, “By the skin of your treeth,” and “The scene was treeming with people,” and “I guarantree it,” and “A welcoming committree,” and “A chunky manatree,” and “Self-estreem,” and “Charitable voluntreers,” and “My child’s school cantreen.”
    • *trea*→ *tree*: As in, “A real treet,” and “Medical treetment,” and “Royal treeson,” and “I treesure you,” and “Thick as treecle,” and “Swim upstreem,” and “A holiday retreet,” and “A winning streek,” and “A treecherous mountain path.”

Fall-Related Words

To help you come up with your own fall puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

fall, autumn, season, leaf, leaves, falling, fallen, harvest, reap, pick, picking, scouting, (pumpkin) peeping, pumpkin, pie, thanksgiving, halloween, weather, calendar, fruit, vegetable, grain, acorn, festival, apple, foliage, solstice, equinox, eve, celebrate, gourd, corn, change, changes, changing, squash, october, september, cob, crop, crisp, dry, orange, yellow, red, brown, rake, raking, spice, chai, cosy

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Christmas Tree Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on Christmas tree puns! 🎄👼🏼🌟

Organising a Christmas tree is one of the more traditional ways to spend time with family and loved ones. Finding a suitable tree, bringing it home, decorating it – it’s a fairly intensive process when you really get down to it. Make the quality time spent even more painful for your loved ones with our terrible Christmas tree puns. We’ve lovingly curated this list to include different types of trees and the wide range of decorations used on them, and we hope that you find the Christmas tree pun that you’re looking for.

While we’ve made this list as comprehensive as possible, this list is specific to Christmas trees. We also have lists on tree punsleaf puns, reindeer puns and Santa puns and will have more Christmas-specific lists coming soon!

Christmas Tree Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about Christmas trees that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of Christmas tree puns:

  • Christmas tree: Make some extremely obvious Christmas tree puns by taking advantage of phrases that they’re already in – as in, “Done up like a Christmas tree,” and “Lit up like a Christmas tree,” and “Oh, Christmas tree..”
  • Three→ Tree: As in, “And baby makes tree,” and “Good things come in trees,” and “Tree strikes and you’re out!” and “Tree wise men,” and “Tree’s a charm.”
  • Free*→ Tree*: As in, “A symbol of treedom,” and “As tree as a bird,” and “Breathe treely,” and “Buy one, get one tree,” and “Tree for all,” and “Treedom of the press,” and “Get out of jail tree,” and “The best things in life are tree,” and “Land of the tree,” and “Leader of the tree world,” and “The truth will set you tree,” and “No such thing as a tree lunch,” and “When hell treezes over,” and “Think treely.”
  • For → Fir: Firs are another tree that are commonly used as Christmas trees, so they’ve made the list too. As in, “Asking fir a friend,” and “The most bang fir your buck,” and “At a loss fir words,” and “I’ve fallen fir you,” and “Food fir thought,” and “Fir a change,” and “Fir crying out loud,” and “Fir good measure,” and “A sight fir sore eyes.”
  • Leave → Leaf: “Take it or leaf it” and “Absent without leaf” and “You should leaf now.” and  “Leaf an impression” and “Leafed for dead” and “Leaf it at that” and “Leaf me alone!” and “Leaf of absence” and “Leaf out in the cold” and “Take leaf” and “Leafing so soon?”
  •  Wouldn’t→ Wooden: As in, “Nuttelex wooden melt in their mouth,” and “I wooden hurt a fly,” and “Wooden you know it?” and “I wooden touch it with a 10 ft pole.” Note: Nuttelex is a vegan substitute for butter.
  • *tri*→ *tree*: As in, “My hair needs a treem,” and “Full of nutree-ents,” and “What is your best attreebute?” and “How cool are golden retreevers?” and “It’s an intreensic (intrinsic) quality,” and “A new brand of vegan chicken streeps,” and “No streengs attached,” and “We’re going on a treep!” and “Pull the treegger,” and “Any more treecks up your sleeve?” and “A love treeangle,” and “A treevial problem,” and “We pay treebute to the fallen.”
  • *trea*→ *tree*: As in, “A real treet,” and “Medical treetment,” and “Royal treeson,” and “I treesure you,” and “Thick as treecle,” and “Swim upstreem,” and “A holiday retreet,” and “A winning streek,” and “A treecherous mountain path.”
  • *tee*→ *tree*: As in, “By the skin of your treeth,” and “The scene was treeming with people,” and “I guarantree it,” and “A welcoming committree,” and “A chunky manatree,” and “Self-estreem,” and “Charitable voluntreers,” and “My child’s school cantreen.”
  • *tary→ *tree: As in, “Proprietree cables,” and “Complimentree meals,” and “These colours are complementree,” and “Leave it with my secretree,” and “A sedentree life isn’t so healthy,” and “Dominion is a documentree you should watch,” and “It’s rudimentree addition,” and “But what’s the monetree value,” and “A solitree existence.” Notes: to be sedentary is to be inactive or seated. If something is rudimentary, then it’s basic.
  • *try*→ *tree*: As in, “Tree again,” and “A secret treest (tryst),” and “I’m tree-ing (trying)!” and “Meat is not an ethical industree,” and “Refugees should be welcomed to our countree,” and “Bigotree is still rampant,” and “Entree level,” and “A paltree sum,” and “Geometree is everywhere,” and “Chemistree lab,” and “What sultree weather.” Notes: if something is sultry, then it’s hot. A tryst is a private romantic meeting.
  • *ty*→ *tree*: As in, “Star qualitree,” and “Structural integritree,” and “The citree that never sleeps,” and “First-class facilitrees,” and “My dutrees come first,” and “Beautree isn’t everything,” and “A single entitree,” and “Maximum securitree.”
  • Tree→ Christmas tree: As in, “Difficult as nailing jelly to a Christmas tree,” and “Barking up the wrong Christmas tree,” and “Can’t see the wood for the Christmas trees,” and “Charm the birds out of the Christmas trees,” and “Legs like Christmas tree trunks,” and “Make like a Christmas tree and leave,” and “Money doesn’t grow on Christmas trees,” and “Christmas tree hugger,” and “You’re outta your Christmas tree.”
  • Angel: Since angels are commonly placed at the top of Christmas trees, we’ve included common phrases for them in this list: “Enough to make angels weep,” and “A fallen angel,” and “Guardian angel,” and “I believe in angels,” and “On the side of the angels,” and “The angel of death,” and “Angel’s advocate.” Note: an angel’s advocate is someone who sees the good in an idea and supports it.
  • *angle*→ *angel*: As in, “What are you angeling for?” and “Love triangel,” and “A committee is a cul-de-sac down which ideas are lured and quietly strangeled,” and “It takes two to tangel,” and “What a tangeled web.”
  • Star: Since stars are commonly used to decorate the tops of Christmas trees, we’ve included phrases for them in this list. As in, “A star is born,” and “Born under a lucky star,” and “Catch a falling star,” and “Get a gold star,” and “Guiding star,” and “Written in the stars,” and “Reach for the stars,” and “A rising star,” and “Star wars,” and “Star crossed lovers,” and “Star quality,” and “Starstruck,” and “Stars in your eyes,” and “When you wish upon a star,” and “My lucky star,” and “Seeing stars.”
  • *star*: As in, “Can we start?” and “In stark relief,” and “A new tech startup,” and “Stop staring,” and “I didn’t mean to startle you,” and “This pasta is very starchy,” and “A starter kit,” and “You bastard!” and “Doesn’t cut the mustard.” Notes: if something doesn’t cut the mustard, then it isn’t good enough. If something is in stark relief, then it’s been made very obvious.
  • *ster* → *star*: As in, “A starn attitude,” and “This area is starile,” and “Turn up the stareo,” and “Staroids are illegal in sports,” and “Aim for the starnum,” and “You monstar,” and “Addiction is a cruel mastar,” and “Fostar kids,” and “Am I on the registar?” and “A bolstaring attitude,” and “A sinistar presence,” and “Mustar the courage,” and “Work rostar,” and “A cocky roostar,” and “It’s unhealthy to judge people based on stareotypes.” Note: to bolster is to support or strengthen something.
  • Stir → Star: As in, “Cause a star,” and “Shaken, not starred,” and “Star the pot,” and “Star up trouble,” and “Star-crazy.”
  • Stir* → Star*: Starrup (stirrup) and starring (stirring).
  • *stor* → *star*: As in, “I need to go to the stare (store),” and “My favourite stary,” and “A starm brewing,” and “Put in starage,” and “A two-starey house,” and “A convoluted staryline,” and “We don’t have to live like our ancestars,” and “Impostar syndrome,” and “Seed investars,” and “Histarical fiction,” and “You’re distarting the truth.”
  • Sturdy → Stardy: As in, “A stardy table.”
  • Babble → Bauble: As in, “Baubling on and on.”
  • Bobble → Bauble: As in, “Bauble heads,” and “Bauble hat.”
  • Bubble → Bauble: “Bauble and squeak,” and “Bauble up,” and “Burst your bauble,” and “Bauble over,” and “Thought bauble.”
  • Light → Fairy lights: Since Christmas trees are commonly wrapped in blinking fairy lights for decoration, we’ve included the term here. As in, “Blinded by the fairy light,” and “Bring something to fairy light,” and “The cold fairy light of day,” and “First fairy light,” and “Friday night and the fairy lights are low,” and “Give it the green fairy light,” and “Go out like a fairy light,” and “My guiding fairy light,” and “The fairy light at the end of the tunnel.”
  • Very → Fairy: As in, “Be afraid, be fairy afraid,” and “Before your fairy eyes,” and “How fairy dare you,” and “Thank you fairy much,” and “At the fairy least,” and “Efairy bit,” and “Efairy nook and cranny,” and “Efairybody and their mother,” and “There for efairyone to see.”
  • Candy → Candy cane: As in, “Easy as taking a candy cane from a baby.”
  • Present: We put gifts and presents under Christmas trees, so we’ve included these words in this list too. As in, “All present and correct,” and “Present company excepted,” and “No time like the present.”
  • Percent → Present: As in, “A hundred and ten present,” and “Genius is one present inspiration and 99 present perspiration.”
  • Gift: As in, “Don’t look a gift horse in the mouth,” and “Gift of life,” and “A gift that keeps on giving,” and “A gift from above.”
  • Give → Gift: As in, “A dead giftaway,” and “Don’t gift up!” and “Don’t gift in,” and “Gift yourself a bad name,” and “Gift them a hand,” and “Gift and take,” and “Gift credit where credit is due,” and “Gift it a rest,” and “Gift it the green light,” and “Gift me a call,” and “Gift 110%”.
  • Gave → Gift: As in, “I gift my best.”
  • Pine: Pines are a common type of tree used as Christmas trees, so we’ve included them in this list. As in, “Pining away.”
  • Pain → Pine: As in, “A world of pine,” and “Doubled up in pine,” and “Drown the pine,” and “Feeling no pine,” and “Growing pines,” and “No pine, no gain,” and “On pine of death,” and “Pine in the butt,” and “Pine in the neck,” and “Pinefully slow,” and “A royal pine.”
  • Pain* → Pine*: As in, “A picture pinet-s a thousand words,” and “Pine-t with a broad brush,” and “Pine-t the town red.” Note: to paint with a broad brush is to describe a group of things in general terms.
  • Fine → Pine: As in, “A pine line,” and “Cut it pine,” and Damn pine coffee,” and “Pine and dandy,” and “Another pine mess you’ve gotten me into,” and “I feel pine,” and “Not to put too pine a point on it,” and “One pine day,” and “Treading a pine line,” and “Got it down to a pine art,” and “The devil is in the pine print,” and “Go through it with a pine-toothed comb.”
  • *pan* → *pine*: As in, “Three’s compiney,” and “Wild discrepinecys,” and “Judging pinel,” and “Expineding our business,” and “Run rampinet.” Note: a discrepancy is a difference between two things that should be equal.
  • *pen* → *pine*: As in, pinechant (penchant), pineguin (penguin), pinesieve (pensive), pineding (pending), pinenis (penis), pineinsula (peninsula), pinetrate (penetrate), pineance (penance), opine (open), pine (pen), happine (happen), dampine (dampen), deepine (deepen), sharpine (sharpen), ripine (ripen), propinesity (propensity), indispinesable (indispensable), appinedix (appendix), depinedent (dependent). Notes: a penchant is a fondness for something. To be pensive is to be thoughtful. A propensity is a habit for behaving in a particular way.
  • *pin* → *pine*: As in, “Tickled pinek (pink),” and “The pineacle of health,” and “In a pinech,” and “Can you pinepoint the location?” and “A pine-t of ice-cream,” and “Take him out for a spine (spin),” and “I didn’t ask for your opineon,” and “The pursuit of happine-ness.”
  • *pon* → *pine*: As in, “A one trick pineny,” and “Time to pineder (ponder),” and “Choose your weapine,” and “Discount coupine,” and “Once upine a time,” and “I’m waiting for your respinese,” and “A correspinedence course,” and “With great power comes great respinesibility,” and “Spinetaneous combustion.” Notes: a one trick pony is someone who is skilled in only one area.
  • *pun* → *pine*: As in, “Sucker pinech,” and “Be pinectual for the exam,” and “A pinegent smell.”
  • *ine* → *pine*: As in, pine-evitable (inevitable), pinertia (inertia), pinexorable (inexorable), pineffable (ineffable), pinept (inept), pinert (inert), pinexplicable (inexplicable), pinevitably (inevitably). Notes: if something is ineffable, then it causes an indescribable amount of emotion.
  • Corner → Conifer: Conifers are a type of tree commonly used as Christmas trees, so we’ve included them in this list. As in, “A tight conifer,” and “All conifers of the world,” and “Conifer the market,” and “Cut conifers,” and “Drive them into a conifer,” and “The naughty conifer,” and “Just around the conifer,” and “From the conifer of my eye.”
  • Spruce: As spruces are a commonly used as Christmas trees, we’ve included them in this list. You can easily make some bad puns with phrases that include the word spruce, like “Spruce up.”
  • Space → Spruce: As in, “In deep spruce,” and “In spruce, no one can hear you scream,” and “Personal spruce,” and “A waste of spruce,” and “Watch this spruce,” and “Taking up spruce.”
  • Four → Fir: As in, “Down on all firs,” and “Break the firth wall,” and “A fir leaf clover,’ and “A fir letter word,” and “Twenty fir seven.” Note: the fourth wall refers to the imaginary wall between viewers and actors during tv shows or plays.
  • Fair → Fir: As in, “All the fun of the fir,” and “All’s fir in love and war,” and “By fir means or foul,” and “Faint heart never fir lady,” and “Fir trade,” and “Fir and square,” and “Fir and aboveboard,” and “Fir enough,” and “Fir play,” and “Fir game,” and “Fir-haired,” and “Fir is fir.”
  • *far* → *fir*: As in, “A fond firwell (farewell),” and “Firther down,” and “Insofir as,” and “A nefirious villain,” and “Welfir reform.”
  • *fer* → *fir*: As in, “Firal (feral) behaviour,” and “A firvent belief,” and “He talked with firvour,” and “Firmented tofu,” and “A firocious effort,” and “Firtile land,” and “The local firry (ferry),” and “I defirred my enrolment,” and “Let me confir,” and “Do you have any refirences?” and “A kind offir,” and “I’ll transfir some money over,” and “A firm buffir,” and “I prefir tea over coffee,” and “What a diffirent attitude.”
  • *for* → *fir*: As in, “Pay it firward,” and “Have you firsaken me?” and “What’s the fircast look like?” and “So on and so firth,” and “I firbid you!” and “The infirmation desk,” and “The opening perfirmance.”
  • *fir*: Make some fir puns by emphasising words that have “fir” in them: first, affirm, confirm, firsthand and affirmative.
  • *fur* → *fir*: As in, firther (further), firniture (furniture), firtive (furtive), firthermore (furthermore), firnace (furnace), firnish (furnish), sulfir (sulfur). Note: to be furtive is to be secretive.
  • *fair* → *fir*: Firy (fairy), firly (fairly), firness (fairness), firytale (fairytale), firway (fairway).
  • Wood: Make some terrible Christmas tree puns by making wood references with these wood-related phrases: “Can’t see the wood for the trees,” and “Come out of the woodwork,” and “Cut out the dead wood,” and “Knock on wood,” and “Out of the woods,” and “This neck of the woods.” Notes: If you can’t see the wood for the trees, then you’re unable to see a situation clearly due to being too involved in it. To be out of the woods it to be out of a dangerous situation.
  • Would → Wood: As in, “As good luck wood have it,” and “Chance wood be a fine thing,” and “That wood be telling,” and “Woodn’t get out of bed for,” and “Woodn’t hurt a fly.”
  • Leaves: “It leaves a lot to be desired” and “It leaves a bad taste in your mouth”
  • *lease→ *leaf: As in, “A new leaf on life,” and “Releaf me!”
  • *lief→ *leaf: As in, Releaf (relief), beleaf (believe), disbeleaf (disbelieve).
  • *lif*→ *leaf*: As in, “A healthy leafstyle,” and “The end of the natural leafspan,” and “Would you like to use a leafline?” and “Eating meat is not a necessary part of the human leafcycle,” and “Call a leafguard!” and “You’re a leafsaver,” and “Their work is proleafic,” and “You exempleafy the best qualities,” and “You qualeafy for a scholarship.” Notes: to be prolific is to have a lot of; if your work is prolific, then you’ve produced a lot of work. To exemplify is to be a typical, normative example of something.
  • *leef*→ *leaf*: As in, gleaful (gleeful), gleafully and gleafulness.
  • *lef*→ *leaf*: As in, leaftover (leftover), cleaf (clef), leaft, and cleaft (cleft). Notes: A clef is a symbol in musical notation. A cleft is a split or opening.
  •  Needle: It’s normal for pine trees to molt their needles, so it’s a common Christmas scene and problem to have pine needles around the Christmas tree. To start off our pine puns, here are some needle-related phrases that you can slip into conversation: “Pins (or puns!) and needles,” and “Like looking for a needle in a haystack.”
  •  Need→ Needle: As in, “All you needle is love,” and “You needle your head examined,” and “On a needle to know basis,” and “With friends like that, who needles enemies?” and “We’re gonna needle a bigger boat,” and “I don’t needle this,” and “A friend in needle,” and “Needle I remind you..” and “We needle to talk.”
  •  Knee→ Kneedle: As in, “Go down on bended kneedle,” and “Go weak at the kneedles,” and “Kneedle deep,” and “A kneedle jerk reaction,” and “On your kneedles,” and “Shaking at the kneedles,” and “The bee’s kneedles,” and “A real kneedle slapper.” Note: if something is a knee-slapper, then it’s extremely, raucously funny.
  •  Sap→ Sapling: As in, “What a sapling.”
  •  Trunk: Make some Christmas tree puns with these trunk-related phrases: “Leg’s like tree trunks,” and “Junk in the trunk.” Note: be careful not to use the first phrase in a fat-shaming context.
  •  Chunk→ Trunk: As in, “Trunk of change,” and “Blow trunks.” Note: to blow chunks is to throw up.
  •  Drunk→ Trunk: As in, “Trunk as a lord,” and “Trunk as a skunk,” and “Blind trunk,” and “Falling down trunk,” and “Friends don’t let friends drive trunk,” and “Trunk and disorderly,” and “Roaring trunk.”
  •  Branch: Some branch-related phrases for you to make playful tree puns with: “Branch out,” and “Olive branch.” Note: an olive branch is a symbol of peace.
  •  Bench→ Branch: As in, “Branch warmer,” and “Branch jockey,” and “Meet at the park branch?” Note: a bench warmer is someone who isn’t called up to play in a game and have to sit through the entire play – thus warming the bench.
  •  Brunch→ Branch: As in, “Meet for branch?” and “A new branch place,” and “The perfect branch date.”
  • Log: Some log-related phrases for you to play with: “As easy as falling of a log,” and “Log off,” and “Sawing logs,” and “Sleep like a log,” and “Throw another log on the fire.” Note: to saw logs is to snore loudly.
  •  *log*: Emphasise the log in certain words: logistics, logic, login, logo, logical, analog, blog, catalog, slog, backlog, dialog, clog, flog, technology, analogy, etymology, psychology, analogous and ontology.
  •  *lag→ *log: As in, “Jet log,” and “Social jet log,” and “Flog down,” and “Fly the flog.”
  •  *lag*→ *log*: As in: logoon (lagoon), logging (lagging), plogue (plague), colloge (collage), camoufloge (camouflage), flogrant (flagrant).
  •  Leg→ Log: As in, “Break a log,” and “Fast as his logs could carry him,” and “Cost an arm and a log,” and “Give up a log up,” and “Logs like tree trunks,” and “On your last logs,” and “One log at a time,” and “Shake a log,” and “Show a little log,” and “Stretch your logs,” and “Tail between your logs,” and “Without a log to stand on,” and “You’re pulling my log.”
  •  *leg*→ *log*: As in, logacy (legacy), logend (legend), logitimate (legitimate), logal (legal), logible (legible), logion (legion), logislation (legislation), bootlog (bootleg), priviloge (privilege), allogory (allegory), delogate (delegate), elogant (elegant). Note: an allegory is a metaphor used in literature.
  •  *lig*→ *log*: As in, logament (ligament), logature (ligature), intellogence (intelligence), relogion (religion), elogible (eligible). Note: a ligature can mean a few different things, but it generally means something that joins two things together.
  •  *lug*→ *log*: As in, loggage (luggage), plog (plug), slog (slug), unplog (unplug), logubrious (lugubrious), sloggish (sluggish). Note: to be lugubrious is to be sad or dismal.
  • Bark: Since bark has two meanings – the hard “skin” of a tree, and a loud noise that dogs make – we can use the meanings interchangeably and make some bark puns with these bark-related phrases: “A barking dog never bites,” and “Bark at the moon,” and “Barking mad,” and “Barking up the wrong tree,” and “Bark worse than your bite.”
  •  Park→ Bark: As in, “All over the ballbark,” and “A ballbark figure,” and “Central bark,” and “Hit it out of the bark,” and “A nosey barker,” and “A walk in the bark,” and “A bright s-bark,” and “Bark that thought.”
  •  Pakistan→ Barkistan
  •  *bac*→ *bark*: As in, “You can’t barkslide (backslide) now,” and “Barkground music,” and “A barkterial (bacterial) infection,” and “Part of the barkdrop,” and “The barkchelor (bachelor),” and “Barkchelor pad,” and “No such thing as ethical barkon (bacon),” and “Valued feedbark,” and “A messy debarkle (debacle).”
  •  *bec*→ *bark*: As in, “What have we barkome (become)?” and “The food barkoned (beckoned) me,” and “Barkcause I said so,” and “That dress is very barkcoming (becoming),” and “Fire up the barbarkue!”
  •  *bic*→ *bark*: As in, barkering (bickering), barkultural (bicultural), acerbark (acerbic), aerobark (aerobic), xenophobark (xenophobic), Arabark (Arabic), claustrophobark (claustrophobic), cubarkle (cubicle).
  •  *buc*→ *bark*: As in, “Kick the barket,” and “Can’t carry a tune in a barket,” and “A drop in the barket,” and “Coming down in barkets,” and “One, two, barkle my shoe,” and “Barkwheat cereal.”
  •  *bak*→ *bark*: As in, “A vegan barkery,” and “An apprentice barker.”
  •  *bik*→ *bark*: As in, barkini (bikini), rubark‘s cube and motorbark (motorbike).
  •  September→ Septimber: As in, “Wake me up when Septimber ends.”
  •  Root: Some root-related phrases for you to play with: “Lay down roots,” and “Money is the root of all evil,” and “Root for,” and “Root of the matter,” and “Wanna root?”
  •  Root→ Route: As in, “Is your rooter (router) working?” and “Root 66,” and “You need to take a different root.”
  •  *rut*→ *root*: As in, “A rootless (ruthless) procedure,” and “Tell the trooth,” and “Under scrootiny,” and “An inscrootable expression,” and “Brootally honest,” and “A new recroot (recruit).”
  • Twig: Here are some twig-related phrases for you to mix into your Christmas tree wordplay: “Have you twigged on?” and “Looking a bit twiggy.” Notes: to twig onto something is to realise something. If something a looking twiggy, it’s looking thin.
  •  Trigger→ Twigger: As in, “Hair twigger,” and “Pull the twigger,” and “Twigger happy,” and “Whose finger do you want on the twigger?” Note: a hair trigger is a trigger that is extremely sensitive. Can also be used to describe an something which is very unstable.
  • Knot: We can use knot-related phrases as well since “knot” has two meanings – the circular imperfections in wood and a tied fastening: “Don’t get your shorts in a knot,” and “Tie the knot,” and “Tie yourself in knots.”
  •  Not→ Knot: As in, “And whatknot,” and “As often as knot,” and “Believe it or knot,” and “Down but knot out,” and “I’m knot joking,” and “Let’s knot and say we did,” and “Knot a chance,” and “Knot a minute too soon,” and “Knot a pretty sight,” and “Knot all it’s cracked up to be,” and “No, knot at all,” and “Knot have a leg to stand on,” and “Knot in a million years,” and “We’re knot in Kansas anymore,” and “Waste knot, want knot,” and “A house divided against itself canknot stand,” and “Rome was knot built in a day,” and “Last but knot least,” and “If it’s knot one thing, it’s another.”
  •  Nought→ Knot: As in, “Knots and crosses,” and “All for knot,” and “It’s come to knot.”
  •  Naughty→ Knotty: As in, “Knotty but nice,” and “Are you on the knotty list?” and “The knotty corner.”
  •  *nut*→ *knot*: As in, “A hazelknot in every bite,” and “Using a sledgehammer to crack a knot,” and “Sweet as a knot,” and “Do your knot,” and “In a knotshell,” and “That old chestknot,” and “A tough knot to crack,” and “Knots and bolts,” and “If you pay peaknots, you get monkeys.” Notes: if you’re using a sledgehammer to crack a nut, then you’re using more force than is necessary or appropriate. “That old chestnut” refers to a story that has been told too many times.
  •  *nat*→ *knot*: As in, “An inknot (innate) sense,” and “A healthy alterknotive,” and “You’re being obstin-knot,” and “I’ll need your sigknoture,” and “Their sigknoture dish.”
  •  *net*→ *knot*: As in, “The social knotwork,” and “An exclusive knotworking (networking) event,” and “The five teknots (tenets) are,” and “The interknot (internet),” and “Cabiknot maker,” and “Captain Plaknot,” and “Baby’s bonknot,” and “A peknotrating (penetrating) gaze.”
  •  *nit*→ *knot*: As in, “Stop knotpicking (nitpicking),” and “A single, cohesive u-knot,” and “Cogknotive (cognitive) dissonance,” and “Hallway moknotor (monitor),” and “A golden opportuknoty,” and “A tight-knit (or knot) commuknoty,” and “I have a special affiknoty for,” and “Leave with digknoty,” and “A part of the furknoture.” Note: cognitive dissonance is when two contradictory beliefs are held by the same person.
  •  *nut*→ *knot*: As in, knotrition (nutrition), knotrient (nutrient), knotmeg, walknot, cocoknot, butterknot, and miknot (minute).
  •  *not*→ *knot*: As in, “Knotwithstanding,” and “Two week’s knotice,” and “Turn it up a knotch,” and “A ridiculous knotion,” and “He’s knotorious for..” and “It all came to knothing,” and “Negative conknotations.” Note: a connotation is an associated (rather than literal) meaning.
  •  *naut* → *knot*: As in, knotical (nautical), juggerknot, astroknot, cyberknot, and aeroknotical. Notes: a cybernaut is someone who uses the internet on a regular basis. A juggernaut is a force that is generally considered to be unstoppable and destructive. An aeronaut is one who travels in hot-air ballons or airships.
  •  *sap*: Emphasise the “sap” in certain words to make sap-related tree puns: sapient, sappy, asap, disappointed, and disappear.
  •  *sep*→ *sap*: As in, “Comes saparetely,” and “Sapia-toned (sepia),” and “Saptum piercing,” and “Wake me up when Saptember ends,” and “Saptic tank.” Notes: a septum piercing is a type of nose piercing. Sepia is a shade of brown.
  •  *sip*→ *sap*: As in, “A relentless gossap,” and “An insapid tea,” and “My anger is dissapating.” Note: if something is insipid, then it’s weak.
  •  *sop*→ *sap*: As in, saporific (soporific), saprano (soprano), milksap (milksop), aesap (aesop), soursap (soursop).
  •  *sup*→ *sap*: As in, “Emotional sapport,” and “Saperceded,” and “Demand and sapply,” and “You’re being saperfluous,” and “Mother Saperior,” and “Saperiority complex,” and “Vitamin sapplements,” and “Sing for your sapper.”
  •  Axe: Use these axe-related phrases for some sneaky wordplay: “Take an axe to,” and “An axe to grind.” Notes: to take an axe to something is to destroy it. If you’ve got an axe to grind, then you’ve got a grievance or strong opinions.
  •  Ask→ Axe: As in, “A big axe,” and “Axe a silly question and get a silly answer,” and “Axe and you shall receive,” and “Axe around,” and “Axe me another one,” and “Axe no questions and hear no lies,” and “Axe-ing for trouble,” and “What’s the axe-ing price?” and “Everything you were too afraid to axe,” and “Frequently axed questions,” and “Funny you should axe,” and “No questions axed,” and “You gotta axe yourself,” and “Axe-ing for a friend.”
  •  *ax*→ *axe*: As in, “Nothing is certain but death and taxes,” and “Incorrect syntaxe,” and “Soy waxe,” and “Waxe and wane,” and “Mind your own beeswaxe,” and “Frankie says relaxe,” and “The rules are pretty laxe around here,” and “The axe-is of evil.”
  •  *ex*→ *axe*: As in, “A complaxe situation,” and “Body mass indaxe,” and “Better than saxe,” and “Flaxe your muscles,” and “The apaxe of the mountain,” and “Fast reflaxes,” and “There’s still so much saxeism (sexism) in today’s society,” and “Do I even axe-ist (exist) to you?” and “Axeplicit language warning,” and “A team-building axercise,” and “Axeistential crisis,” and “Axetract the essence,” and “In the right contaxe-t,” and “Axepress post,” and “A fair axechange,” and “Animal axeploitation.”
  •  *ix*→ *axe*: As in, matraxe (matrix), faxe (fix), appendaxe (appendix), maxe (mix), suffaxe (suffix), prefaxe (prefix), saxe (six), elaxe-ir (elixir), saxety (sixty).
  •  *ox*→ *axe*: As in, “Thinking outside the baxe,” and “Xeno’s paradaxe,” and “Fantastic Mr. Faxe,” and “Unorthodaxe thinking,” and “Flummaxed,” and “The term ‘happy marriage’ doesn’t have to be an axeymoron,” and “You’re as important as axeygen to me,” and “An obnaxeious attitude,” and “In close praxe-imity.” Notes: if something is unorthodox, then it doesn’t conform to normal social rules or traditions. An oxymoron is a phrase that is made up of contradictory parts (like “cruel to be kind”.) If you’re flummoxed, then you’re completely confused and/or perplexed.
  •  *ux*→ *axe*: As in, “Living in the lap of laxeury,” and “A cruel jaxetaposition.” Note: a juxtaposition is an act of comparison.

Christmas Tree-Related Words

To help you come up with your own Christmas tree puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

christmas tree, tree, christmas, fir, leaves, leaf, wood, wooden, angel, star, bauble, light, fairy light, tinsel, candy cane, present, gift, pine, conifer, spruce, needle, sap, sapling, trunk, branch, twig, log, bark, timber, root, knot, axe

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