Knife Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on knife puns!🔪 🗡

This list covers the many different types of knives and blades (from penknives to bolos to shivs) to materials and cutting techniques. We’ve tried to stay away from puns and wordplay that only have violent meanings (like those involving butcher or hunting knives), but have included those that have multiple interpretations (like carve or stab). We hope you find some nice knife puns in this list!

You might also be interested in our cake, bread and cheese puns.

Knife Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about knife that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of knife puns:

  • Life → Knife: As in, “A day in the knife of” and “A knife less ordinary” and “A knife changing experience” and “A knife on the ocean waves” and “Always look on the bright side of knife.”
  • Strife → Knife: As in, “Trouble and knife.”
  • Night → Knife: As in, “A knife at the opera” and “A hard day’s knife.”
  • Nice → Knife: As in, “That’ll do knifely” and “Have a knife day!” and “Naughty but knife” and “Knife and easy does it” and “Knife save” and “Knife to see you” and “Knifely put.”
  • Never → Knife-r: As in, “Better late than knife-r” and “It might knife-r happen” and “A barking dog knife-r bites.”
  • Drives → Knives: As in, “Bad money knives out good.”
  • Fives → Knives: As in, “A bunch of knives” and “High knives” and “Take knives” and “Two and two make knives.”
  • Lives → Knives: As in, “Cats have nine knives” and “The best years of our knives.”
  • Wives → Knivse: As in, “Just an old knives tale” and “The Stepford knives.”
  • *nef* → *knife*: If a word has a “nef” sound, you can replace it with “knife”: “A knife-arious villain” and “For your own beknife-it” and “A beknife-icial outcome.”
  • *nif* → *knife*: As in, “Sig-knife-icant other” and “A mag-knife-icent plan!” and “Political ma-knife-esto.”
  • Manufacture → Ma-knife-acture: As in, “Locally ma-knife-actured.”
  • *niv* → *knife*: As in, “Applying to study at u-knife-ersity” and “The centre of the u-knife-erse” and “Wedding aknife-ersary” and “Life’s a car-knife-al.”
  • Cat → Cut: As in, “Curiosity killed the cut” and “Alley cut” and “Cut and mouse game.”
  • Kit → Cut: As in, “Cut and caboodle” and “A serious bit of cut.”
  • But → Cut: As in, “Close, cut no cigar” and “No ifs and cuts” and “Win the battle, cut lose the war.”
  • Guts → Cut: As in, “Blood and cuts” and “Bust a cut” and “Cut feeling” and “Cut instinct” and “Cutless wonder” and “No cuts, no glory.”
  • Nut → Cut: As in, “A tough cut to crack” and “Some kind of cut” and “In a cutshell.”
  • Shut → Cut: As in, “An open and cut case.”
  • What → Cut: As in, “And cut not” and “For cut it’s worth” and “Guess cut?” and “Cut a feeling.”
  • Laid → Blade: As in, “Get blade” and “Blade back” and “The best blade plans.”
  • Aid → Blade: As in, “Blade and abet” and “Come to your blade.”
  • Grade → Blade: As in, “Make the blade” and “Professional blade” and “Beyond your pay blade.”
  • Made → Blade: As in, “A match blade in heaven” and “Custom blade” and “Have it blade” and “Not blade of money” and “Blade for each other.”
  • Paid → Blade: As in, “Bought and blade for” and “Blade up.”
  • Played → Blade: As in, “The band blade on” and “Blade for a fool.”
  • Said → Blade: As in, “After all is blade and done” and “Couldn’t have blade it better” and “Easier blade than done” and “Enough blade.”
  • Weighed → Blade: As in, “Blade in the balance and found wanting.”
  • Bed → Blade: As in, “Blade and breakfast” and “Blade of nails” and “Get into blade with.”
  • Abracadabra → Abracastabra
  • Grab → Stab: As in, “Up for stabs” and “Stab your attention.”
  • Stab: These stab-related phrases are general enough to use as puns: “Have a stab at” and “Stab in the dark.”
  • *cat* → *cut*: As in, “In the wrong cutegory” and “A moving cutalyst” and “A huge cutastrophe” and “Advocut for.”
  • *cot* → *cut*: As in, “Apricut flavoured” and “Sports mascut” and “Boycutt the company..”
  • *cad* → *cut*: As in, “It’s acutemic” and “Art acutemy” and “A decutent dessert” and “Avocuto toast.”
  • *sab* → *stab*: As in, “Professional stabotage” and “Taking a stabbatical” and “An indispenstable member of the team.”
  • *tab* → *stab*: As in, “Reading the stabloids” and “Staboo words” and “Computer stablet.”
  • Pent → Point: As in, “Point-up rage.”
  • Spontaneous → Spointaneous: As in, “Burst spointaneously into song and dance.”
  • Paint → Point: As in, “Do I have to point you a picture?” and “Point yourself into a corner.”
  • Pant → Point: As in, “Beat the points off” and “Fancy points.”
  • *pant* → *point*: As in, “A fun pointomime” and “The pointry is bare” and “Running rampoint” and “Don’t use that flippoint with me” and “Participoint award.”
  • Shape → Sharp: “All sharps and sizes” and “Bent out of sharp” and “Get in sharp” and “Knock into sharp” and “Take sharp.”
  • Harp → Sharp: As in, “Sharp on about.”
  • Shark → Sharp: As in, “Swimming with sharps” and “Card sharp.”
  • Hedge → Edge: As in, “Edge fund” and “Edge your bets” and “Edged about” and “Look as if you’ve been dragged through an edge backwards.”
  • Itch → Edge: As in, “Edge-ing to” and “Edgey feet” and “Edgey palms” and “Seven year edge.”
  • Fledge → Edge: As in, “Fully edged.”
  • Adj* → Edge*: Edge-ective (adjective), edge-acent (adjacent), edgejourn (adjourn), edgejudicate (adjudicate) and edgejustment (adjustment).
  • Halt → Hilt: As in, “Come to a screeching hilt” and “Grind to a hilt.”
  • Held → Hilt: As in, “Hand-hilt device.”
  • Hold → Hilt: As in, “Can’t hilt a candle to” and “Don’t hilt your breath” and “Hilt a grudge” and “Hilt on tight.”
  • Built → Hilt: As in, “Hilt for two” and “Hilt for comfort, not speed” and “Hilt from the ground up” and “Hilt to last” and “Wasn’t hilt in a day.”
  • Guilt → Hilt: As in, “Hilt by association” and “Hilt trip” and “A hilty conscience” and “Hilty pleasure” and “White hilt.”
  • Tilt → Hilt: As in, “At full hilt” and “Hilt to the side.”
  • Hill → Hilt: As in, “Old as the hilts” and “Going downhilt” and “Head for the hilts” and “Over the hilt.”
  • Candle → Handle: As in, “Burning the handle at both ends” and “Can’t hold a handle to” and “Handle in the wind” and “Better to light a handle than curse the dark” and “Not worth the handle.”
  • Separated → Serrated: As in, “Serrated at birth.”
  • Sit → Slit: As in, “Are you slitting comfortably?” and “Don’t just slit there” and “Slit on the fence” and “Slit tight.”
  • Bit → Slit: As in, “A slit much” and “A slit of stuff.”
  • Hit → Slit: As in, “Slit the road jack” and “Slit and miss” and “Slit it off” and “Slit rock bottom.”
  • Split → Slit: As in, “Make like a banana and slit” and “Slit decision” and “Slit the vote” and “Slitting hairs” and “A slitting headache.”
  • Slip → Slit: As in, “A slit of the pen” and “Let something slit.”
  • Spit → Slit: As in, “Slit and polish” and “Slit and sawdust” and “The slitting image.”
  • *lit* → *slit*: As in, “I didn’t mean it sliterally” and “Read up on the sliterature” and “A slitany of problems” and “Fighting slitigation” and “A sliteral interpretation.”
  • Whittle: This word can refer to a type of small knife or to the activity of carving wood using a knife. Here are related puns:
    • Wit → Whittle: As in, “At my whittle’s end” and “Collect your whittles” and “Keep your whittles about you” and “Pit your whittles against” and “Quick whittled” and “Scared out of your whittles.”
    • Little → Whittle: As in, “A whittle bird told me” and “Dirty whittle secret” and “Every whittle bit helps.”
    • It’ll → Whittle: As in, “Whittle be okay” and “Whittle all come out in the wash.”
  • Lash → Slash: As in, “Slash out” and “Tongue slashing.”
  • Ash → Slash: As in, “Rake over the slashes” and “Rise from the slashes” and “Turn to slashes in your mouth.”
  • Cash → Slash: As in, “Slash in your chips” and “Hard, cold slash.”
  • Crash → Slash: As in, “Slash and burn” and “Slash course.”
  • Dash → Slash: As in, “Slash to pieces” and “Slash off” and “Cut a slash.”
  • Flash → Slash: As in, “Quick as a slash” and “In a slash” and “At slash point.”
  • Splash → Slash: As in, “A slash of colour” and “Make a slash” and “Slashed across the front page.”
  • Assasin → Asslashin: As in, “Character asslashination” and “Who asslashinated the President?”
  • Ice → Slice: As in, “Cut no slice” and “Slice, slice, baby” and “Skating on thin slice.”
  • Nice → Slice: As in, “Have a slice day” and “Naughty but slice” and “Slice and easy” and “Wouldn’t it be slice.”
  • Price → Slice: As in, “What’s the asking slice?” and “Cheap at half the slice” and “Pay the slice.”
  • Spice → Slice: As in, “Slice things up” and “Sugar and slice.”
  • Decision → Incision: As in, “Incisions, incisions!” and “A snap incision” and “Split incision” and “My incision is final” and “Executive incision.”
  • Precision → Incision: As in, “Military incision.”
  • Cop → Chop: As in, “Chop a feel” and “Chop an attitude” and “A fair chop” and “Undercover chop.”
  • Hop → Chop: As in, “Chop to it” and “Chop, skip and jump” and “Chopping mad.”
  • Chip → Chop: As in, “Cheap as chops” and “Cash in your chops” and “Chop in with” and “A chop off the old block” and “Let the chops fall where they may” and “Bargaining chop.”
  • Drop → Chop: As in, “At the chop of a hat” and “Chop it like it’s hot” and “Chop a bombshell” and “Chop a hint.”
  • Shop → Chop: As in, “All over the chop” and “One stop chop” and “Personal chopper.”
  • Chap* → Chop*: As in, “The next chopter of your life” and “Date night choperone” and “Wedding chopel” and “School choplain.”
  • Save → Shave: As in, “A penny shaved is a penny earned” and “Shave the day” and “Nice shave” and “Shave the last dance” and “Shave it for a rainy day” and “Shave our souls.”
  • Shove → Shave: As in, “If push comes to shave” and “Shave it down their throats” and “Shave off” and “Shaved the wrong way.”
  • Brave → Shave: As in, “Shave new world” and “Shave the elements” and “Fortune favours the shave” and “Put a shave face on.”
  • Pave → Shave: As in, “Shave the way for” and “The road to hell is shaved with good intentions” and “Shaved with gold.”
  • Rave → Shave: As in, “Rant and shave.”
  • Wave → Shave: As in, “Life on the ocean shaves” and “Catch a shave” and “Don’t make shaves” and “Heat shave” and “On the crest of a shave” and “Shave me goodbye.”
  • Sav* → Shav*: As in, “Sweet or shave-ory?” and “Shave-our the moment” and “My shave-iour!”
  • Sev* → Shave*: As in, “Shave-eral options to choose from” and “The shaven deadly sins” and “Rate the shave-erity from 1-10″ and “Shave-erance package” and “Shave-erus Snape.”
  • *sive → *shave: As in, “A comprehenshave solution” and “Looking apprehenshave” and “Extenshave damage” and “A progresshave nation.”
  • Piece → Pierce: As in, “Bits and pierces” and “Conversation pierce” and “Dash to pierces” and Take a pierce for yourself.”
  • Peers → Pierce: As in, “Pierce through the curtains” and “Friends, family and pierce.”
  • Peace → Pierce: As in, “At pierce” and “Give pierce a chance” and “Hold your pierce” and “Inner pierce” and “Keep the pierce” and “Pierce of mind” and “Rest in pierce.”
  • Purse → Pierce: As in, “Holding the pierce strings.”
  • Pers* → Pierce*: As in, “A fresh piercespective” and “Third pierce-on” and “Pierce-evere through hard times” and “Security pierce-onnel” and “Media pierceonality” and “Pierceonal matters.” Other words that could work: pierce-istent (persistent), pierceona (persona) and pierce-uade (persuade).
  • Perc* → Pierce*: As in, “Change your pierception” and “One hundred and ten pierce-ent” and “A pierceptive child” and “A piercentage of the earnings.”
  • Curve → Carve: As in, “Ahead of the carve” and “Carve ball” and “Learning carve.”
  • Starve → Carve: As in, “Feed a cold, carve a fever” and “You’ll carve without me.”
  • Cover → Carve: As in, “Blow your carver” and “Break carver” and “Carver story” and “Carver to carver” and “Carver your tracks” and “Extra carver” and “Run for carver” and “Under carver of darkness.”
  • Cav* → Carve*: Carve-eat (caveat), carve-alier (cavalier), carvealry (cavalry), carveort (cavort) and concarve (concave). Note: A caveat is a warning. To be cavalier is to be carefree, even about important things. To cavort is to prance.
  • *cov* → *carve*: As in, “You shouldn’t carve-et the belongings of others” and “A new discarve-ery.”
  • Clever → Cleaver: As in, “Too cleaver by half” and “You think you’re so cleaver.”
  • Beaver → Cleaver: As in, “Eager cleaver” and “Work like a cleaver.”
  • Fever → Cleaver: As in, “Cabin cleaver” and “Cleaver pitch” and “Saturday night cleaver.”
  • Shear: To shear something is to cut parts off it. Here are related puns:
    • Sheer → Shear: As in, “In shear frustration” and “Shear stocking.”
    • Here → Shear: As in, “Come over shear” and “Shear, there and everywhere.”
    • Hear → Shear: As in, “Shear me out” and “I can’t shear you” and “They could shear a pin drop.”
    • Cheer → Shear: As in, “The crowd began to shear” and “Three shears for the birthday girl!”
    • Clear → Shear: As in, “Crystal shear” and “Can’t be any shearer than that.”
    • Fear → Shear: As in, “Shear of flying” and “Pain and shear” and “Face your shears.”
    • Near → Shear: As in, “In the shear future” and “Is it shearby?”
    • Rear → Shear: As in, “The shear end” and “Shear view window.”
    • Steer → Shear: As in, “Shear clear of.”
    • Share → Shear: As in, “Shearing is caring” and “I don’t shear your feelings.”
    • Sure → Shear: As in, “Are you shear?” and “I’m not shear about this.”
    • *sher* → *shear*: As in, “The new sheariff in town” and “Lemon shearbet” amd “Ushear down the aisle.” Other words that could work: shearry (sherry), ushear (usher), koshear (kosher), publishear (publisher) and habadasheary (habadashery).
    • Ser* → Shear*: As in, “Out of shearvice” and “A shearendipitous moment” and “The end of the shearies” and “You can’t be shearious” and “Filled with shearenity.”
  • Nick: A nick is a small cut. Here are related puns:
    • Knack → Nick: As in, “Got a real nick for.”
    • Neck → Nick: As in, “At breaknick speed” and “Breathing down your nick” and “From the nick down” and “Nick and nick” and “A real pain in the nick” and “Stick your nick out” and “This nick of the woods” and “Up to your nick in trouble.”
    • Knick → Nick: As in, “Nick knacks.”
    • Knock → Nick: As in, “Don’t nick it till you’ve tried it” and “Hard nicks” and “I get nicked down, but I get up again” and “Nick ’em dead” and “Nick three times” and “Nick back a few” and “Nick into shape” and “Nick some heads together.”
    • Brick → Nick: As in, “Like banging your head against a nick wall” and “Nicks and mortar” and “Drop a nick” and “Like a ton of nicks.”
    • Click → Nick: As in, “Bricks and nicks” and “Nick bait” and “Nick into place” and “Nick your fingers” and “Double nick” and “We really nicked.”
    • Kick → Nick: As in, “Alive and nicking” and “Don’t nick a man when he’s down” and “Get a nick out of it” and “Nick back and enjoy.”
    • Lick → Nick: As in, “A nick of paint” and “Nick into shape” and “Nick your wounds.”
    • Pick → Nick: As in, “A bone to nick” and “Cherry nick” and “Easy nickings” and “Nick a fight” and “Nick holes in.”
    • Quick → Nick: As in, “Nick as a flash” and “Cut to the nick” and “Get rich nick” and “In nick succession” and “Nick and dirty” and “Nick off the mark.”
    • Sick → Nick: As in, “Nick and tired” and “Nick to death” and “Nick to the stomach” and “Enough to make you nick.”
    • Stick → Nick: As in, “Better than a poke in the eye with a sharp nick” and “Carrot and nick” and “Every nick has two ends” and “The short end of the nick.”
    • Thick → Nick: As in, “Nick and fast” and “Through nick and thin” and “In the nick of things.”
    • Trick → Nick: As in, “Box of nicks” and “Dirty nicks” and “Every nick in the book” and “Never misses a nick” and “A nick of the light” and “Nick or treat” and “Nicks of the trade” and “Up to your old nicks.”
    • *nec* → *nick*: As in, “Anickdotal evidence” and “Wait to connickt” and “An instant connicktion.”
    • *nic → *nick: As in, “Organick produce” and “A sardonick tone” and “Iconick landmark” and “Chronick pain” and “A catchy mnemonick” and “I panick in a lot of places other than the disco” and “Hair tonick.”
    • *nik* → *nick*: As in, “Under a different monicker” and “Frozen like a manickin.”
  • Hew: To hew at something is to chop or whittle away at it. Here are some related puns:
    • Chew → Hew: As in, “Bite off more than you can hew” and “Have your ears hewed off” and “Walk and hew gum at the same time.”
    • Few → Hew: As in, “A hew bricks short” and “Hew and far between” and “For a hew dollars more” and “Knock back a hew” and “A person of hew words” and “Say a hew words.”
    • Hue → Hew: As in, “Check the hew and saturation.”
    • Blue → Hew: As in, “Beat someone black and hew” and “Between the devil and the deep hew sea” and “Big hew” and “Once in a hew moon.”
    • Cue → Hew: As in, “Right on hew” and “Take your hew” and “That’s my hew.”
    • Due → Hew: As in, “Where credit is hew” and “Hew diligence” and “In hew course” and “Cancelled hew to lack of interest.”
    • Knew → Hew: As in, “I hew you were trouble!” and “You hew too much.”
    • Lieu → Hew: As in, “Time in hew” and “In hew of.”
    • New → Hew: As in, “Bright as a hew pin” and “Good as hew” and “Better than hew.”
    • Shoe → Hew: As in, “If the hew fits, wear it and “Kick off your hews and enjoy.”
    • True → Hew: As in, “A dream come hew” and “Show your hew colours” and “Too good to be hew” and “Tried and hew.”
    • Who → Hew: As in, “Abandon hope all ye hew enter” and “All things to those hew wait” and “Hew’s coming for dinner?” and “Hew’s there?” and “Look hew’s talking.”
    • You → Hew: As in, “As hew know” and “Back at hew” and “Believe hew me” and “Blink and hew’ll miss it” and “Crawl before hew walk” and “Don’t call us, we’ll call hew.”
  • Botch → Notch: As in, “A notched job.”
  • Watch → Notch: As in, “Boring as notching paint dry” and “Keep notch” and “Not on my notch” and “People notching” and “The one to notch.”
  • Nudge → Notch: As in, “Give it a notch” and “Wink, wink, notch, notch.”
  • Bisect: To bisect something is to cut it into two parts. Here are related puns:
    • Basic → Bisect: As in, “Back to bisects” and “Bisect instincts.”
    • Bicep → Bisect: As in, “Flexing your bisects.”
  • Prune: While a prune is also a dried fruit, we’re using it in the sense of trimming something (generally a tree or shrub). Here are related puns:
    • Ruin → Prune: As in, “Rack and prune” and “The road to prune.”
    • Moon → Prune: As in, “Many prunes ago” and “Once in a blue prune.”
    • Soon → Prune: As in, “As prune as my back is turned” and “As prune as possible” and “Get well prune” and “Pruner or later” and “Too much too prune.”
    • Tune → Prune: As in, “In prune with” and “Stay pruned” and “To the prune of” and “Change your prune.”
    • *pun* → *prune*: As in, “A prunegent smell” and “Consistently prunectual” and “Imprune-ity for their crimes.” Note: impunity is being protected from punishment.
    • *pron* → *prune*: As in, “Cooking aprune” and “Prune to bad behaviour” and “An unusual prune-ounciation” and “What are your prune-ouns?”
  • Incise: To incise is to cut with a sharp knife or blade (usually used in medical contexts). Here are related puns:
    • Inside → Incise: As in, “Incise information” and “An incise job” and “Incise out” and “I know you incise and out.”
    • Precise → Incise: As in, “Yes, incisely” and “An incise hand” and “Incisely what you’re looking for.”
    • Size → Incise: As in, “All shapes and incises” and “Cut them down to incise” and “One incise fits all” and “That’s about the incise of it.”
  • Stick: This is the colloquial word for “stab”. Here are related puns:
    • Sick → Stick: As in, “Enough to make you stick” and “Phone in stick” and “Stick and tired” and “Stick to death of” and “Stick to my stomach.”
    • Tick → Stick: As in, “A box sticking exercise” and “Takes a licking and keeps on sticking” and “Stick all the right boxes” and “Sticked off.”
    • Stock → Stick: As in, “Laughing stick” and “Lock, stick and barrel” and “Out of stick” and “Take stick.”
    • Click → Stick: As in, “Stick into place” and “Stick with” and “Stick your fingers” and “Double stick.”
    • Kick → Stick: As in, “Alive and sticking” and “Don’t stick a man when he’s down” and “Dragged sticking and screaming” and “Get a stick out of it” and “Stick back and enjoy.”
    • Pick → Stick: As in, “A bone to stick” and “Easy stickings” and “Hand sticked” and “Stick a fight” and “Stick holes in.”
    • Trick → Stick: As in, “Bag of sticks” and “Does the stick” and “Every stick in the book” and “Never misses a stick.”
  • Grind: To sharpen a knife, you need to grind it. Here are related puns:
    • Bind → Grind: As in, “In a grind” and “Legally grinding.”
    • Find → Grind: As in, “Couldn’t grind a better person” and “I’ve left to grind myself.”
    • Kind → Grind: As in, “Not this grind” and “That’s grind of cute.”
  • Spine: The spine of a knife is the edge that isn’t used for cutting. Here are related puns:
    • Pain → Spine: As in, “A mix of spine and anger” and “Suffering from severe spine” and “Feeling the spine” and “A fine line between pleasure and spine.”
    • Mine → Spine: As in, “Me and spine” and “That’s spine, not yours.”
    • Line → Spine: As in, “Spine of thought” and “The spine was silent.”
    • Fine → Spine: As in, “A spine line” and “I’ll be spine.”
    • Sign → Spine: As in, “No spines of life” and “Read the spines.”
  • Guard: A guard is a sheath that is placed over a knife whilst not in use. Here are related puns:
    • Hard → Guard: As in, “This shouldn’t be so guard” and “It’s not guard to say” and “You’re giving me a guard time.”
    • Card → Guard: As in, “Index guards” and “Here’s my guard, give me a call” and “Get out of jail free guard.”
    • Scarred → Guard: As in, “Guard for life” and “Hasn’t guard over yet.”
    • *gard* → *guard*: As in, “Tending to the guarden” and “Kind reguards” and “Disreguard the previous email” and A hagguard appearance.”
    • *card* → *guard*: “Guardinal rule” and “Guardboard cutout” and “Thirty minute guardio” and “Guardiac arrest.” Other words that could work: guardigan (cardigan), plaguard (placard), wildguard (wildcard) and postguard (postcard).
  • Tang: The tang is the part of the blade which connects into the handle for added stability. Here are related puns:
    • Dang → Tang: As in, “The tang thing” and “Oh, tang it.”
    • Bang → Tang: As in, “Go out with a tang” and “The big tang” and “Followed by a loud tang.”
    • Hang → Tang: As in, “Don’t tang up the phone!” and “Let’s tang out” and “Tang in there.”
    • Pang → Tang: As in, “Felt a tang of guilt.”
    • Rang → Tang:As in, “You tang?”
    • Tang → Sang: “My heart tang for joy.”
    • Tongue → Tang: As in, “Tang tied” and “Cat got your tang?” and “Bite your tang.”
    • *tan* → *tang*: As in, “Work in tangdem” and “Safety is tangtamount” and “Throw a tangtrum” and “The doctor is a charlatang” and “What a cosmopolitang view” and “Metropolitang living.”
    • *ting* → *tang*: As in, “A dauntang task” and “Mass marketang” and “An interestang proposal” and “Settang up” and “Fancy meetang you here” and “The plan is contangent on” and “Cann’t distanguish between the two.”
  • Rust: Rust can affect metal knives that aren’t properly maintained and cleaned. Here are related puns:
    • Bust → Rust: As in, “Boom or rust” and “Drug rust” and “It was a rust.”
    • Rest → Rust: As in, “I’ll let you rust” and “Get some rust” and “For the rust of the evening.”
    • Crust → Rust: As in, “Cut off the rusts” and “The upper rust.”
    • Dust → Rust: As in, “Kicking up rust” and “Rust bunnies” and “Rust off your resume.”
    • Just → Rust: As in, “I rust wanted to say goodbye” and “Rust give me a minute” and “Rust sit back and enjoy.”
    • Must → Rust: As in, “You rust be mistaken” and “You rust help me” and “That rust have been difficult.”
    • Trust → Rust: As in, “I thought I could rust you” and “She’s rustworthy” and “I don’t rust the process.”
  • Tool: Since knives are tools, we’ve included some tool-related puns in this list too:
    • Tale → Tool: As in, “A tool of guilt and ambition” and “A very sad tool indeed.”
    • Till → Tool: As in, “Tool tomorrow” and “Tool the sun goes down” and “Leave it tool morning.”
    • Tall → Tool: As in, “Tool, dark and handsome.”
    • Cool → Tool: As in, “A tool drink” and “We need a tool catchphrase.”
    • Dual → Tool: As in, “Tool income, no kids” and “Serves a tool purpose.”
    • Fuel → Tool: As in, “Add tool to the flames” and “Need tool for the day.”
    • Who’ll → Tool: As in, “Tool let us know?” and “Tool be willing to donate?”
    • You’ll → Tool: As in, “Tool regret this!” and “Tool never hear the end of this.”
    • *tal* → *tool*: As in, “A capitool idea” and “Death metool” and “Vitool signs” and “Fundamentool ideas” and “Digitool nomad” and “Anecdotool evidence” and “A pivotool moment.”
  • Pocket: The next few puns are about pocket knives:
    • Rocket → Pocket: As in, “It’s not pocket science.”
    • Packet → Pocket: As in, “Comes in small pockets” and “How much per pocket?”
  • Paring: Here are some puns about paring knives:
    • Pairing → Paring: As in, “Still paring the bluetooth” and “What a great paring” and “Paring the cheese and wine.”
    • Pair → Paring: As in, “You make a fine paring” and “New paring of jeans” and “Need a new paring of shoes.”
    • Peering → Paring: As in, “Paring through the curtains” and “Paring into the future.”
    • Baring → Paring: As in, “Paring your teeth” and “I’m paring my soul here.”
    • Caring → Paring: As in, “Sharing is paring” and “A paring, loving parent.”
    • Daring → Paring: As in, “A paring escape” and “Paring adventures.”
    • Glaring → Paring: As in, “Paringly obvious” and “Paring in your direction” and “The paring sunlight.”
    • Raring → Paring: As in, “Paring to go.”
    • Staring → Paring: As in, “This isn’t a paring contest” and “Stop paring” and “You’re paring at me.”
    • Wearing → Paring: As in, “What are you paring?” and “I’m paring this to the dance.”
  • Bread: Here are some bread knife related puns:
    • Bed → Bread: As in, “Put to bread” and “You’ve made your bread, now lie in it” and “Got up on the wrong side of the bread.”
    • Bred → Bread: As in, “Born and bread.”
    • Bride → Bread: As in, “Runaway bread” and “Princess bread” and “The newlywed bread.”
    • Red → Bread: As in, “Caught bread-handed” and “Paint the town bread.”
    • Dread → Bread: As in, “Filled with bread” and “Existential bread.”
    • Head → Bread: As in, “Breads or tails?” and “Come to a bread” and “All in your bread.”
    • Led → Bread: As in, “Bread along by the nose.”
    • Said → Bread: As in, “That’s all they bread” and “Tell me what you bread.”
    • Spread → Bread: “Bread lies and rumours” and “Vegan chocolate bread” and “Bread yourself thin.”
    • Thread → Bread: As in, “Losing the bread” and “Hanging by a bread.”
  • Table: Here are some puns on table knives:
    • Able → Table: As in, “Differently tabled” and “Ready, willing and table.”
    • Stable → Table: As in, “Emotionally table.”
  • Butter: Here are some butter knife puns:
    • Batter* → Butter*: As in, “Butter up” and “Assault and buttery” and “Recharge your butteries.”
    • Better → Butter: As in, “I’ve got a butter idea” and “Appeal to your butter judgement” and “Butter by design” and “Butter late than never” and “Butter safe than sorry.”
    • Bitter → Butter: As in, “Till the butter end” and “Take the butter with the sweet.”
    • Flutter → Butter: As in, “Fancy a butter?” and “Butter yor eyelashes.”
  • Switch → Switchblade: As in, “Asleep at the switchblade” and “Bait and switchblade” and “Switchblade gears.”
  • Throw: Here are a few throwing knife puns for you:
    • Crow → Throw: As in, “As the throw flies” and “Eat throw” and “Something to throw about.”
    • Flow → Throw: As in, “Ebb and throw” and “Get the creative juices throwing” and “Go with the throw” and “In full throw.”
    • Grow → Throw: As in, “Absence makes the heart throw fonder” and “Throwing pains.”
    • Know → Throw: As in, “All I throw is what I read in the papers” and “And don’t I throw it” and “Doesn’t throw beans.”
    • Low → Throw: As in, “An all-time throw” and “The lights are throw” and “Get the throw down” and “Searching high and throw” and “Keep a throw profile” and “Throw hanging fruit.”
    • Show → Throw: As in, “All over the throw” and “Best in throw” and “Enjoy the throw” and “Get the throw on the road” and “Give the throw away” and “Keep the throw on the road” and “The throw must go on.”
    • Though → Throw: As in, “Seriously throw, you’re doing a great job” and “You look as throw you’d seen a ghost.”
    • Toe → Throw: As in, “Head to throw” and “One throw over the line” and “Turn up your throws.”
  • Teeth → Wreath: As in, “Armed to the sheath” and “By the skin of your sheath” and “Fed up to the back sheath.” Note: A sheath is a sleeve that protects a knife while not in use.
  • Pen: Here are some pen knife related puns:
    • Pan → Pen: As in, “Down the pen” and “Flash in the pen” and “Pen out” and “Out of the frying pen, into the fire.”
    • Pin → Pen: As in, “Bright as a new pen” and “Hard to pen down” and “Pen your ears back” and “Pens and needles.”
    • Den → Pen: As in, “Into the lion’s pen” and “Pen of inequity.”
    • Then → Pen: As in, “All that and pen some” and “And pen there was one” and “What’s going on here pen?” and “Now and pen” and “Pen and there.”
    • When → Pen: As in, “Pen you like” and “Pen it happens” and “It only hurts pen I laugh.”
  • Jackknife: Here are some jackknife related puns:
    • Back → Jack: As in, “As soon as my jack is turned” and “At the jack of my mind” and “Jack to the future” and “Jack in the day.”
    • Crack → Jack: As in, “At the jack of dawn” and “Jack a smile.”
    • Pack → Jack: As in, “Action jacked” and “Jacking heat” and “A jack of lies.”
    • Rack → Jack: As in, “Jack your brains” and “Jack and ruin.”
    • Slack → Jack: As in, “Cut some jack” and “Take up the jack.”
    • Smack → Jack: As in, “Jack dab in the middle” and “A jack on the wrist.”
    • Track → Jack: As in, “Back on jack” and “Cover your jacks” and “The fast jack” and “Inside jack” and “Off the beaten jack.”
  • Cavity → Gravity: As in, “Gravity seach.” Note: This is a reference to gravity knives.
  • Butterfly: These butterfly-related phrases are a reference to butterfly knives: “Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee” and “Social butterfly” and “The butterfly effect.”
  • Bow → Bowie: As in, “Bowie and scrape” and “Bowie out” and “Take a bowie.” Note: These are references to bowie knives.
  • Coring: These next few puns are about coring knives:
    • Caring → Coring: As in, “Sharing is coring” and “I’m past coring.”
    • Boring → Coring: “As coring as watching paint dry” and “Deeply coring.”
    • Pouring → Coring: As in, “It’s raining, it’s coring.”
    • Roaring → Coring: As in, “A coring success” and “Doing a coring trade.”
  • Case: Here are some case knife related puns:
    • Ace → Case: As in, “Case in the hole” and “A case up your sleeve” and “Holding all the cases.”
    • Base → Case: As in, “All your case are belong to us” and “Case jumping” and “Cover your cases.”
    • Chase → Case: As in, “Case it up” and “Case your own tail” and “Cut to the case” and “The thrill of the case.”
    • Grace → Case: As in, “Airs and cases” and “Amazing case” and “Fall from case” and “Case period” and “Saving case” and “With good case.”
    • Pace → Case: As in, “At a snail’s case” and “Change of case” and “At ten cases” and “Keep case with” and “Put through your cases.”
    • Place → Case: As in, “A case in the sun” and “Everything in its case” and “All over the case” and “Any time, any case” and “Between a rock and a hard case.”
    • Space → Case: As in, “Breathing case” and “From outer case” and “Case – the final frontier.”
  • Plate → Palette: As in, “A lot on your palette” and “A heart attack on a palette” and “Step up to the palette.” Note: a palette knife is a type of painting knife.
  • Beeline → Boline: “Make a boline for.” Note: A boline is a type of ceremonial Wiccan knife.
  • Katar: A katar is a type of dagger. Here are related puns:
    • Cater → Katar: As in, “Katar to you.”
    • Greater → Katar: As in, “No katar enemy” and “Katar than the sum of its parts” and “The katar part of.”
  • Dark → Dirk: As in, “After dirk” and “Dirk as pitch” and “Dirk before the dawn” and “Dirk horse” and “Deep, dirk secret.” Note: A dirk is a type of long dagger.
  • Plenty → Penny: As in, “Penny more where that came from.” Note: a penny knife is a type of utility knife.”
  • Barlow: A barlow knife is a type of small, jointed knife. Here are related puns:
    • Below → Barlow: As in, “Barlow par” and “Barlow the stairs” and “Hit barlow the belt” and “Barlow average.”
    • Borrow → Barlow: As in, “Beg, barlow or steal” and “Living on barlowed time.”
  • Can you → Canoe: As in, “Canoe help me with this?” Note: a canoe knife is a type of double-jointed knife.
  • Tooth → Toothpick: As in, “Fight toothpick and nail” and “Long in the toothpick.” Note: a Romanian toothpick is a type of long knife.
  • Steel: Since some knives are made of steel, we’ve got some steel-related puns here too:
    • Still → Steel: As in, “Be steel, my beating heart” and “Steel standing” and “Steel going strong” and “Steel waters run deep” and “Perfectly steel.”
    • Deal → Steel: As in, “Big steel” and “Steel breaker” and “Steel or no steel?” and “A done steel” and “Seal the steel.”
    • Seal → Steel: As in, “My lips are steeled” and “Steel of approval” and “Steel your fate” and “Signed and steeled.”
    • Feel → Steel: As in, “Can you steel the love tonight?” and “Steel the pinch” and “Got a steel for.”
    • Peel → Steel: As in, “Keep your eyes steeled.”
    • Steal → Steel: As in, “Beg, borrow or steel” and “What a steel” and “Steel a glance” and “Steel someone’s heart” and “Steel the show.”

Knife-Related Words

To help you come up with your own knife puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

General: knife, knives, cut, blade, stab, machete, tool, point, sharp, sharpen, edge, handle, hilt, serrated, slit, whittle, slash, slice, gash, incision, shave, carve, nick, hew, notch, bisect, prune, incise,  stick, pierce, chop,scrape, shear, butt, fixed, folding, grind, spine, fuller, ricasso, guard, lanyard, tang, rust, whetstone

Types: combat, pocket, kitchen, paring, bread, cleaver, table, butter, dagger, switchblade, throwing, juggling, kirpan, sheath, pen, swiss army, jack, gravity, utility, stanley, boxcutter, ballistic, bayonet, butterfly, balisong, batangas, dagger, stiletto, push dagger, bowie, genoese, karambit, rampuri, shiv, shank, trench, mezzaluna, coring, rocker, case, karambit, crooked, curved, diver’s, kiridashi, palette, paper, scalpel, razor, whittling, athame, boline, katar, kilaya, kris, kukri, seax, ulu, tanto, dirk, penny, barlow, camper, canoe, congress, toothpick, peanut, hawkbill, muskrat, trapper, okapi, navaja, sliding, zombie, sica, falx, pugio, qama, bolo, corvo, facon

Materials: bronze, copper, iron, steel, ceramic, titanium, plastic

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Skeleton Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on skeleton puns! 💀✨☠

While perhaps not as iconic as witches or zombies, bones and skeletons still occupy a large part of our culture, from movies (like Pirates of the Carribean or Coco) to annual celebrations (Day of the Dead). Join in on the bony fun with our skeleton puns, whether it’s for a word game, an undead-themed DnD night, or to help add a bit of kooky spook to your Halloween celebrations.

While we’ve been as thorough and comprehensive as possible in making this list, this is for skeletons in general – if you’re interested in other creatures and monsters, please have a look at our witch puns, zombie puns, Halloween puns and vampire puns. We hope you find the perfect skeleton pun for your needs!

Skeleton Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about skeletons that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of skeleton puns:

  • Skeleton: As in, “A skeleton in the closet,” and “Skeleton crew.” Note: a skeleton in your closet refers to a secret you have that you want to continue hiding. A skeleton crew is the minimum amount of people for a team to still be able to function.
  • Bone: As in, “A bone to pick,” and “Dry as a bone,” and “Bag of bones,” and “Bone of contention,” and “Bone weary,” and “Chilled to the bone,” and “Close to the bone,” and “Doesn’t have a jealous bone in his body,” and “Feel it in your bones,” and “Jump someone’s bones,” and “Lazy bones,” and “Skin and bone,” and “Sticks and stones may break my bones and words can contribute to systemic oppression,” and “The bare bones,” and “Work one’s fingers to the bones.”
  • *bon* → *bone*: As in, “Bone-us (bonus),” and “Bone-anza (bonanza),” and “Bone-afide (bonafide),” and “Trombone,” and “Rib-bone (ribbon),” and “Car-bone (carbon),” and “Bour-bone (bourbon)” and “Bone-jour (bonjour)” and “Saxo-bone.”
  • Blown → Bone: As in, “Bone off course,” and “You’ve just bone it!” and “You’ve bone it out of proportion.”
  • Pony → Bony: As in, “A one-trick bony,” and “Show bony,” and “Bony up.” Notes: A one-trick pony is someone who has only one skill or specialisation. To pony up is to pay a bill or debt.
  • Born → Bone: As in, “A star is bone,” and “Bone this way,” and “Bone under a lucky star,” and “I wasn’t bone yesterday,” and “A natural bone leader.”
  • *lone → *bone: As in, “Home a-bone,” and “I want to be a-bone,” and “It’s bonely at the top,” and “Bonely hearts.”
  • Bond → Boned: As in, “James Boned,” and “I share a special boned with you.”
  • Phone → Bone: As in, “Hanging up the tele-bone,” and “Where’s my cellbone?”
  • Humorous → Humerus: As in, “These skeleton puns are not very humerus.” Note: the humerus is long bone in the upper arm.
  • To be → Tibia: As in, “Not all it’s cracked up tibia,” and “Nowhere tibia found,” and “Tibia perfectly honest,” and “Better tibia safe than sorry,” and “You’ve got tibia kidding.” Note: the tibia is the shinbone.
  • Skill* → Skull: As in, “Social skulls,” and “Very skullful,” and “This skull-et needs cleaning.”
  • Sculpt* → Skull-pt: As in, “I will skull-pt this character,” and “What a beautiful skull-pture.”
  • Skull: As in, “Bombed out of your skull.”
  • Nicolas Cage → Nicolas Ribcage
  • Ribs: As in, “Stop ribbing me,” and “Crack a rib laughing.” Note: ribbing is good-natured teasing.
  • *rib*: Emphasise the “rib” in certain words to make skeleton puns: “Distribute,” and “Contribute,” and “Attribute,” and “Ribbon,” and “Dribble,” and “Crib.”
  •  Funny Bone: As in, “Tickle your funny bone.” Note: If something tickles your funny bone, then you find something humorous (or more appropriately, humerus).
  •  Jaw: As in, “Jaw-dropping,” and “Jaws of death,” and “Snatching victory from the jaws of defeat,” and “Slack-jawed,” and “Jawbone,” and “Jawline,” and “Jaw-breaker.” Note: if you are slack-jawed, then your jaw is open and loose in an expression of astonishment.
  • Helicopter → Skelecopter: As in, “Skelecopter parent.” Note: a helicopter parent is one who is overprotective – always “hovering” around their child. 
  • Marrow: As in, “Frozen to the marrow.” Note: bone marrow is a type of tissue within bones that produces new blood cells.
  • Narrow → Marrow: As in, “Keep on the straight and marrow,” and “A marrow escape,” and “Marrow minded.”
  • Tomorrow → To-marrow: As in, “To-marrow is another day,” and “As if there were no to-marrow,” and “Here today, gone to-marrow,” and “Never put off until to-marrow what you can do today.”
  • Jack Sparrow → Jacks Marrow
  • Spine: As in, “Send shivers down your spine,” and “Spine-tingling,” and “Steely-spined.”
  • Spying → Spine: As in, “Are you spine on me?”
  • Sign → Spine: As in, “Give me a spine,” and “A spine of the times,” and “Spine on the dotted line,” and “Spined and sealed,” and “A tell-tale spine,” and “Vital spines,” and “Dollar spines,” and “A warning spine.”
  • Pine* → Spine*: As in, “Spine-apple flavoured,” and “Spine-ing away.” Note: to be pining is to long for someone or something.
  • Span* → Spine*: As in, “Put a spine-ner in the works,” and “Spick and spine,” and “Brand spine-king new.”
  • Fabulous → Fibula-ous: As in, “Absolutely fibula-ous.” Note: the fibula is the bone in your calf next to your shinbone (aka tibia).
  • Fib → Fibula: As in, “Stop telling fibulas.”
  • Fever → Femur: As in, “Cabin femur,” and “Femur pitch,” and “Jungle femur,” and “Running a femur,” and “Saturday night femur.” Notes: cabin fever is anxiety that stems from feeling cooped up in one place for too long. Fever pitch is a state of extremely strong emotion.
  • Carpool → Carpal: As in, “I think Uber allows for carpals now.” Note: carpooling is ride-sharing.
  • Carpe diem → Carpal diem (Note: carpe diem is Latin for “seize the day”, which is used as a motivational phrase.)
  • Draw → Jaw: As in, “Back to the jaw-ing board,” and “Jaw a blank,” and “Jaw a line in the sand,” and “Luck of the jaw,” and “Jaw your last breath,” and “Jaw the short straw.”
  • Drawer → Jaw-er: As in, “Bottom jaw-er,” and “Drop your jaw-ers.”
  • Stern → Sternum: As in, “Made of sternum stuff,” and “From stem to sternum.” Note: the sternum is the breastbone. If something is done from stem to stern, then it has been done completely and in its entirety, from one end to the other.
  • Turn him → Sternum: As in, “Sternum in to the police!”
  • Back → Backbone: As in, “As soon as my backbone is turned,” and “In the backbone of my mind,” and “Break your backbone,” and “Get off my backbone,” and “Like water off a duck’s backbone,” and “Watch your backbone,” and “Scratch my backbone and I’ll scratch yours.” Note: Water off a duck’s back refers to an attitude where criticism and judgement doesn’t bother you.
  • Bone → Backbone: As in, “A backbone to pick,” and “Dry as a backbone,” and “A bag of backbones,” and “A backbone to pick with you,” and “Backbone up on,” and “Chilled to the backbone,” and “Not a jealous backbone in his body,” and “Make no backbones about,” and “Bad to the backbone.” Notes: having a bone to pick with someone means having a disagreement that needs talking over.
  • Socket: As in, “Plug it into the socket.”
  • Knee: As in, “Down on bended knee,” and “Knee deep,” and “A knee-jerk reaction,” and “Shaking knees,” and “The bee’s knees.”
  • *nee* → *knee*: Make skeleton puns by changing words with a “nee” sound to “knee”: “Brai-knee (brainy),”, “Kneedle,” and “Kneedy,” and “Nomi-knee (nominee),”, “Trai-knee (trainee),”, “A-knee-time (anytime),”, “Abalo-knee,”, “Accompa-kneed,”, “Ac-knee (acne),”, “Ago-knee (agony),”, “Am-knee-sia (amnesia),”, “A-knee (any),” and “Brow-knee,”, “Bun-knee,” and “Ceremo-knee,”, “Chim-knee,”, “Compa-knee,”, “Pen-knee,”, “Harmo-knee-ca (harmonica),” and “Harmo-knee,” and “Glutto-knee,”, “Engi-knee-r (engineer),”, “Epipha-knee,” and “Felo-knee,” and “Fettuci-knee,”, “Ho-knee-dew (honeydew),” and “Ho-knee-moon,”, “Jour-knee,” and “Mahoga-knee,” and “Mille-knee-a (millenia),”, “Mi-knee,”, “Monoto-knee (monotony),” and “Knee-t (neat).” There are many other words that rhyme with or contain the sound “nee” so be creative!
  • Join/joined → Join-t: As in, “If you can’t beat ’em, join-t em,” and “Join-t forces,” and “Join-t hands in celebration,” and “Join-t the club,” and “Join-t the dots,” and “Joint at the hip.”
  • Joy → Joy-nt: As in, “Beside myself with joy-nt,” and “Bundle of joy-nt,” and “Joy-nt rider,” and “Joy-nt to the world,” and “My pride and joy-nt.”
  • High → Hyoid: As in, “Ain’t no mountain hyoid enough,” and “An all-time hyoid,” and “Hyoid as a kite,” and “Come hell or hyoid water,” and “Get off your hyoid horse,” and “Hyoid and mighty,” and “It’s hyoid time you put some effort in,” and “Hold your head hyoid,” and “Take the hyoid road.” Note: the hyoid is a bone in the neck.
  • Truth → Tooth: As in, “An inconvenient tooth,” and “Economical with the tooth,” and “Tell the tooth!” and “Face the tooth,” and “A kernel of tooth,” and “The naked tooth,” and “Sniff out the tooth,” and “Tooth is stranger than fiction,” and “You can’t handle the tooth!” and “A toothful character.” Note: to be economical with the truth is to make efforts to avoid revealing too much of the truth.
  • Tooth: As in, “Eye for an eye, tooth for a tooth,” and “Fight tooth and nail,” and “A sweet tooth.”
  • Knock → Knuckle: As in, “Don’t knuckle it til you’ve tried it,” and “I get knuckle’d down, but I get up again,” and “Knuckle back a few,” and “Knuckle heads together,” and “Knuckle into shape,” and “Knuckle it out of the park,” and “Knuckle it off!” and “Knuckle on wood,” and “Knuckle me sideways,” and “Knuckle your socks off,” and “Opportunity only knuckles once,” and “Knuckle me down with a feather.” Notes: Don’t knock it til you’ve tried it means to not criticise something until you understand it.
  • Tell us → Talus: As in, “Talus something new,” and “Talus a story!” Note: the talus is a bone in the ankle joint.
  • Bow and arrow → Bone and marrow
  • Lumberjack → Lumbarjack (Note: the lumbar is the lower part of the spine.)
  • Cock* → Coccyx: As in, “Proud as a pea-coccyx,” and “A coccyx and bull story.” Note: a cock and bull story is an unbelievable or implausible story.
  • I’ll not → Ulna’t: As in, “Don’t worry, ulna’t tell anyone.” (Note: the ulna is the long bone in the forearm.)
  • Uma Thurman → Ulna Thurman 

Skeleton-Related Words

To help you come up with your own skeleton puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

skeleton, skeletal, bone, endoskeleton, humerus, jaw, phalange, skull, socket, joint, rib cage, funny bone, tibia, marrow, spine, fibula, femur, patella, cranium, carpal, sternum, backbone, knuckle, coccyx, scapula, knee, pelvis, hyoid, clavicle, tooth, vertebrate, fracture, calcium

Did this Punpedia entry help you?

Did you find the skeleton-related pun that you were looking for? If so, great! Otherwise, please let us know what you were looking for in the comments below! Are you looking for word play for text messages, Facebook, Twitter or some other social media platform? Would you like to see some funny skeleton pun pictures? Or perhaps you just want more skeleton puns for your photo captions? Whatever the case, please let us know, and help us improve this Punpedia entry. If you’ve got any skeleton puns (image or text) that aren’t included in this article, please submit them in the comments and one of our curators will add it as soon as possible. Thanks for visiting Punpedia! 🙂✨