Snowman Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on snowman puns! ⛄❄🥕

Snowmen are a popular way to spend time with loved ones over the holidays – whether you’re watching horror movies about them, uplifting cartoons, or actually making one, you can make the time more cringeworthy with our list of snowman puns.

While we’ve made this list as comprehensive as possible, this list is specific to snowmen. We also have lists on reindeer puns, snow puns and Santa puns and will have more Christmas-specific lists coming soon!

Snowman Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about snowmen that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of snowman puns:

  • No man→ Snowman: As in, “Boldly go where snowman has gone before,” and “Snowman is an island,” and “Time waits for snowman.” Note: to say that no man is an island is to say that no person is truly separate from others.
  • No way, man→ Snow way, man
  • Nobody→ Snowbody: As in, “Dance like snowbody’s watching,” and “Like snowbody’s business,” and “Snowbody does it better,” and “Snowbody’s perfect.”
  • No→ Snow: As in, “All bark and snow bite,” and “All dressed up and snowhere to go,” and “In snow time,” and “In snow uncertain terms,” and “Snow buts,” and “Snow holds barred,” and “Snow love lost,” and “Snow matter how you slice it,” and “Snow prizes for guessing,” and “Snow two ways about it.”
  • So→ Snow: As in, “Snow on and snow forth,” and “And snow on,” and “Snow?” and “You think you’re snow clever,” and “I wouldn’t go snow far as..” and “How snow?” and “If I do say snow myself,” and “Not snow fast!” and “Snow be it,” and “Snow far, snow good,” and “Snow long as,” and “Snow there,” and “Why is it snow quiet?” and “You little snow-and-snow.”
  • Know*→ Snow*: As in, “A little snowledge is a dangerous thing,” and “A person is snown (known) by the company they keep,” and “Don’t I snow it,” and “Be the first to snow,” and “Better the devil you snow,” and “Do you want to snow?” and “Everybody snows,” and “For all I snow,” and “It’s general snowledge,” and “Goodness snows,” and “I should have snown better,” and “You don’t snow anything,” and “It takes one to snow one,” and “Snow all the answers,” and “Snow by heart,” and “I snow for a fact,” and “You snow full well,” and “Snowledge is power,” and “A snowledgeable person.”
  • Show→ Snow: As in, “All over the snow,” and “Best in snow,” and “Enjoy the snow,” and “Get this snow on the road,” and “A one-man snow,” and “Snow and tell,” and “Snow me the money,” and “Snow pony,” and “Snow some appreciation,” and “I’m snowing you the door,” and “Snow up,” and “Snow your true colours,” and “Steal the snow,” and “Stop the snow,” and “The greatest snow on Earth,” and “The snow must go on,” and “There’s no business like snow business,” and “The only snow in town.”
  • *show*→ *snow*: As in, snowcase (showcase), snowdown, snowboat (showboat), snowroom, slidesnow, and peepsnow.
  • Slow→ Snow: As in, “Snow as molasses in January,” and “Can’t snow down,” and “Painfully snowly,” and “A snow burn,” and “Snow, but sure,” and “In snow motion,” and “Snow on the uptake,” and “A snow news day.” Note: if something is slow as molasses in January, then it’s extremely slow.
  • Stow→ Snow: As in, “A hidden snowaway.”
  • No*→ Snow*: As in, “Make a snowte (note),” and “Going snowhere fast,” and “Snowbody knows,” and “Did you snowtice?” and “What a snowvel (novel) idea,” and “On the snowse (nose),” and “Snowble intentions,” and “Snowcturnal (nocturnal) sleeping habits.”
  • Now→ Snow: This one is a bit tricky as “snow” and “now” have different pronunciations, but it definitely works visually and is easy to figure out. As in, “And snow for something completely different,” and “Can you hear me snow?” and “I can see clearly snow,” and “I’ll be leaving you snow,” and “It’s all coming back to me snow,” and “It’s snow or never,” and “I need you snow,” and “Snow and again,” and “Snow is the winter of our discontent!” and “Snow you’re talking.” Note: “Now is the winter of our discontent” is a quote from Shakespeare.
  • Snow: Use snow-related phrases as terrible snowman puns in the right context: “Pure as the driven snow,” and “White as snow,” and “Let it snow,” and “Snow job,” and “A snowball in hell’s chance,” and “Snowed under.”
  • For he’s→ Freeze: As in, “Freeze a jolly good fellow!”
  • For his→ Freeze: As in, “Freeze own sake.”
  • Ball→ Snowball: As in, “Break your snowballs,” and “Snowballs to the wall,” and “Bust your snowballs,” and “A different snowball game,” and “Dropped the snowball,” and “Get the snowball rolling,” and “Got you by the snowballs,” and “Have a snowball,” and “The snowball is in your court.”
  • Man→ Snowman: As in, “A snowman for all seasons,” and “A dog is a snowman’s best friend,” and “A drowning snowman will clutch at a straw,” and “A good snowman is hard to find,” and “A snowman after my own heart,” and “A snowman among men,” and “A snowman’s got to do what a snowman’s got to do,” and “I’m not half the snowman I used to be.”
  • Care at→ Carrot: As in, “I couldn’t carrot all.”
  • Care about→ Carrot bout: As in, “Why should I carrot ’bout that?”
  • Carat→ Carrot: As in, “24 carrot gold.”
  • Rot→ Carrot: As in, “Carrot in hell!” and “Spoiled carrotten.”
  • Carrot: Use a couple of carrot-related phrases in your snowman wordplay: “Carrot and stick,” and “Dangle the carrot.”
  • Knows→ Nose: As in, “Mother nose best,” and “Goodness nose,” and “As far as she nose,” and “A man who nose everything.”
  • *nos*→ *nose*: As in, nosetalgia (nostalgia), sopranose, dominose, agnosetic, diagnosesis, prognosesis and dinosesaur.
  • Nice→ Ice: As in, “Have an ice day,” and “Make ice,” and “Ice and easy,” and “Did you have an ice time?” and “Ice save,” and “Ice try,” and “Ice work if you can get it,” and “No more Mr. Ice Guy,” and “Wouldn’t it be ice?” and “Couldn’t happen to an icer..” Note: to make nice is to be pleasant to someone you dislike or have issues with.
  • Eyes→ Ice: As in, “Avert your ice,” and “Bat your ice,” and “Bedroom ice,” and “Before your very ice,” and “Bright ice,” and “Brings tears to my ice,” and “Cried my ice out,” and “Do my ice deceive me?” and “Easy on the ice,” and “Ice in the back of your head,” and “Ice like saucers,” and “Feast your ice on this!” and “I can’t take my ice off you,” and “In the ice of the law,” and “Keep your ice on the prize,” and “Keep your ice peeled.”
  • Ice: These ice-related phrases could serve as some bad snowman puns in the right context: “Cold as ice,” and “Break the ice,” and “Ice up,” and “Ice, ice baby,” and “On ice,” and “Skating on thin ice,” and “Tip of the iceberg.” Some ice-related words that could also work: iceberg, ice-cream and icebreaker.
  • *ice: Emphasise the “ice” in certain words: “Thank you for your service,” and “Needs practice,” and “Pride and Prejudice,” and “Running for office,” and “I need your advice,” and “Where is the justice?” and “Left to your own devices,” and “Not that you’d notice.” Note: Pride and Prejudice is a classic romance novel.
  • Eyes*→ Ice*: As in, “You’re an ice-sore,” and “Poor icesight,” and “Sultry iceshadow.”
  • *is*→ *ice*: As in, “A thorough analysice,” and “A groundbreaking hypothesice,” and “Arch nemesice (nemesis),” and “What’s the basice for your belief?” and “All down to logicestics,” and “Sophicestication at its finest,” and “You never told me otherwice.”
  • *ise→ *ice: As in, “Should any problems arice,” and “An exciting premice,” and “Adviceory board,” and “No promices,” and “Exercice your discretion,” and “An enterprice-ing individual,” and “I require your expertice.”
  • *ize→ *ice: A quick note that these words would have originally been spelled with “ize” using American spelling, and would have been spelled with “ise” using the British/Australian system: “I didn’t realice,” and “Do you recognice me?” and “I apologice,” and “Don’t patronice me,” and “One sice fits all,” and “Eyes on the price,” and “Galvaniced into action.” Note: to galvanise is to shock or stimulate into action.
  • I see→ Icy: As in, “I call ’em as icy ’em,” and “Icy what you did there.”
  • *icy*: Emphasise the “icy” in some words to make some punny snowman jokes: “Open-door policy,” and “Honesty is the best policy,” and “Not too spicy,” and “Like a fish needs a bicycle.”
  • Internet→ Winternet: As in, “Empowering the winternet generation,” and “Surfing the winternet,” and “The winternet of things.”
  • Intern→ Wintern: As in, “Looking for winterns,” and “I’m winterning this summer.”
  • Winner→ Winter: As in, “Winter takes all,” and “Everyone’s a winter!” and “A real winter’s attitude.”
  • Winter: We’ve included some winter-related phrases to help mix up your snowy wordplay: “Dead of winter,” and “Now is the winter of our discontent,” and “A winter warmer.” Note: “Now is the winter of our discontent” is a quote from Shakespeare which is still used as a joke in some memes. A winter warmer is a type of alcohol that’s used for warmth in the cold of winter.
  • First→ Frost: As in, “A world frost,” and “At frost blush,” and “Be the frost to know,” and “Cast the frost stone,” and “Frost blood,” and “Frost come, frost served,” and “Frost impressions last,” and “Frost rate,” and “Frost things frost,” and “Head frost,” and “Love at frost sight,” and “Safety frost.”
  • *first*→ *frost*: Frosthand, frostly (firstly), frostborn, frost-rate, frost aid, headfrost, feet frost.
  • Frost*: Emphasise the “frost” in certain words in your chilly jokes: frostbite (as in, “What do you get when you cross a snowman with a vampire? Frostbite!”), frosty, frosted and frostily.
  • Cruel→ Cool: As in, “Cool and unusual punishment,” and “Don’t be cool,” and “Cool to be kind.”
  • *cal*→ *cool*: As in, “Advent coolendar,” and “Counting coolories,” and “Mental calcoolations,” and “A certain coolibre,” and “Natural coolamities.” Other words that could work: empiricool, radicool, criticool, cynicool, practicool, physicool, whimsicool and reciprocool. Notes: a calibre is a measure of quality or ability.
  • *col*→ *cool*: As in, “Work coolleague,” and “In coollusion with,” and “Added to my coollection,” and “Coollateral damage.” Other words that would work: coolon (colon), coollege, coollaberate, coolumn (column), protocool, coolour and chocoolate. Note: a collusion is a secret agreement or cooperation.
  • *cul*→ *cool*: As in, “3rd coolture kid,” and “Who’s the coolprit?” and “The coolinary world,” and “Pecooliar (peculiar) behaviour.” Other words that could work: cooltivate (cultivate), cooll (cull), coolpable (culpable), coolminate (culminate), articoolate (articulate), secoolar (secular), curricoolum, vernacoolar (vernacular), particoolar and meticoolous. Notes: a 3rd culture kid is someone raised in a culture other than their own. If something is secular, then it’s unconnected to religion.
  • *kel*→ *cool*: As in, nicool (nickel), snorcool (snorkel), pumpernicool (pumpernickel) and coolp (kelp).
  • Cool: Use some cool-related phrases to make some terrible snowman puns: “Cool as a cucumber,” and “Cool as a mountain stream,” and “Cool beans,” and “A cool million,” and “Cool your heels,” and “Keep a cool head,” and “Lose your cool,” and “Play it cool.”
  • *col*→ *cold*: As in, “An extensive cold-lection,” and “Cold-lateral damage,” and “Going to cold-lege,” and “A cold-laborative effort,” and “Newspaper cold-lumnist,” and “Standard protocold,” and “Smooth as chocoldlate.”
  • *cul*→ *cold*: As in, coldture (culture), coldtivate (cultivate), coldprit (culprit), coldinary (culinary), coldpable (culpable), coldminate (culminate).
  • Cold: We’ve included some phrases related to cold in this list: “Cold as blue blazes,” and “Cold as ice,” and “Break out in a cold sweat,” and “A cold heart,” and “Going cold turkey,” and “Cold comfort,” and “A cold day in hell,” and “Cold feet,” and “The cold light of day,” and “The cold shoulder,” and “Stone cold sober,” and “In cold blood,” and “Leave out in the cold,” and “Out cold.”
  • Bicycle→ Icicle: As in, “Like a fish needs an icicle.”
  • Icy cool→ Icicle
  • Free→ Freeze: As in, “A symbol of freezedom,” and “Freeze as a bird,” and “Breathe freezely,” and “Buy one, get one freeze,” and “Freezedom fighter,” and “Get out of jail freeze card,” and “The best things in life are freeze,” and “No such thing as a freeze lunch,” and “Walk freeze,” and “Leader of the freeze world.” Some free-related words: freezelance, freezeloader, carefreeze, scot-freeze, painfreeze and fancy-freeze. Note: to get off scot-free is to get away without penalty or punishment.
  • Freeze: Some freeze-related phrases for you to play with: “Freeze frame,” and “Freeze someone out,” and “Freeze up,” and “Until hell freezes over.”
  • *phrase→ *freeze: As in, parafreeze, catchfreeze and refreeze (rephrase).
  • *fee*→ *freeze*: As in, freeze‘d (feed), freezedback, freezeling (feeling), freezeble (feeble), coffreeze, toffreeze.
  • Foe→ Froze: As in, “Friend or froze?”
  • Flow*→ Froze*: As in, “Ebb and froze,” and “Get the creative juices froze-ing,” and “Go with the froze.”
  • Ferocious→ Frozecious: As in, “A frozecious facial expression.”
  • *ber*→ *brr*: As in, “Brry flavoured,” and “Stop brrr-ating (berating) me,” and “A wide brrth (berth),” and “Going brrrserk (berserk).” Other words that would work: brreft (bereft), brreavement (bereavement), numbrr, chambrr, ubrr (uber), sobrr (sober), fibrr (fiber), ambrr (amber), membrr, calibrr, remembrr, delibrrate, librral (liberal), librrty (liberty), abrration (aberration), cumbrrsome.
  • *bir*→ *brr*: As in, “A little brrdy (birdy) told me,” and “Give brrth (birth),” and “Happy brrthday,” and “What’s your brrthdate?”
  • *bor* → *brr*: As in, “Beg, steal or brrow (borrow),” and “Dying from brredom,” and “Unpaid labrr,” and “Harbrring (harbouring) a fugitive,” and “Good neighbrrs,” and “An elabrrate plan.” Other words that could be used: corrobrrate (corroborate), collabrrate (collaborate), stubbrrn (stubborn).
  • *bur*→ *brr*: As in, “Brrst my bubble,” and “Brrning the midnight oil,” and “A heavy brrden (burden),” and “Brry (bury) the hatchet.” Other words that could work: reimbrrsement, brrrow (burrow), brrgeoning (burgeoning), brr (burr), excalibrr (excalibur), brrito (burrito).
  • *br*→ *brrr*: As in, “A clean brreak,” and “A brreach of trust,” and “A warm embrrace,” and “Breaking brread,” and “Trouble brreathing,” and “Brranching out,” and “The brravest warrior.” Other words you could use: brracket, brrain, brrand, brrace, brreath, brreed, ombrr (ombre), macabrr (macabre), timbrr (timbre), fibrr (fibre) and sombrr (sombre).
  • *per*→ *brr*: As in, “A fresh brrspective (perspective),” and “Brrson (person) of interest,” and “The brrception of beauty is a moral test.” Other words you could use: brrtinent (pertinent), brrformance (performance), brrfect (perfect), brrseverance (perseverance), imbrrative (imperative).
  • *pir*→ *brr*: As in, brrahna (pirahna), asbrration (aspiration) and insbrration (inspiration).
  • *por*→ *brr*: As in, contembrrary (contemporary) and obrrtunity (opportunity).
  • *pur*→ *brr*: As in, “My life’s brrpose (purpose),” and “Impulse brrchases (purchases),” and “Quick brrsuit (pursuit),” and “Hold my brrse (purse).”
  • *pr*→ *brr*: As in, “Due brrocess (process),” and “On brrinciple,” and “Out of brractice (practice),” and “No time like the brresent (present).” Other words that could be used: brrotocol (protocol), brremise (premise), brrogram (program), brragmatic (pragmatic), brrovide (provide) and brractitioner (practitioner).
  • Melt: As all snowmen are doomed to melt eventually, we’ve included some melt-related words and phrases for you to play with: “Butter wouldn’t melt in her mouth (this one would be particularly good if you’re talking about a snowlady – since butter/Nuttelex literally wouldn’t melt in “her” mouth),” and “In the melting pot,” and “Melt into thin air,” and “Melting my heart,” and “Don’t have a meltdown,” and “Whoever s-melt it, dealt it.” Note: if you’re saying that butter (or vegan equivalent) wouldn’t melt in someone’s mouth, it means that someone is being overly cool.
  • *chal*→ *chill*: As in, “Take up the chillenge (challenge),” and “A chillenging game,” and “A patriarchill (patriarchal) society.” Other words that could work: chillice (chalice), matriarchill (matriarchal) and nonchillant (nonchalant). Note: to be nonchalant is to be calm or relaxed. Patriarchal refers to a system that is controlled by men, while matriarchal is controlled by women.
  • Chelsea→ Chillsea
  • *chel*→ *chill*: As in, “A new satchill (satchel),” and “The upper echillons (echelons),” and “The Bachillor.” Note: “The Bachelor” is a reality show based around dating. An echelon is a level or status within a system/organisation.
  • Chil*→ Chill*: As in, “Lost chilld,” and “Will somebody please think of the chill-dren!” and “Award-winning chilli,” and “Chilldcare centre,” and “Chill-dish behaviour,” and “A happy chill-dhood,” and “Chilling tales.”
  • *chol*→ *chill*: As in, “High chillesterol (cholesterol),” and “Love in the Time of Chillera (cholera),” and “A melanchilly (melancholy) expression,” and “Studying psychillogy (psychology),” and “A psychillogical thriller.” Note: “Love in the Time of Cholera” is a famous novel.
  • Jel*→ Chill*: As in, chilly (jelly), chillyfish and chillybaby (jellybaby).
  • Jealous→ Chillous: As in, “Stop being so chillous.”
  • *gel*→ *chill*: As in, “Chocolate chillato (gelato),” and “There are ethical alternatives to chillatin (gelatin),” and “My guiding anchill (angel).”
  • Child→ Chilled: As in, “Chilled’s play,” and “Chilledhood friend,” and “Chilledhood memories,” and “Heavy with chilled,” and “Love chilled,” and “Leave no chilled behind,” and “A problem chilled,” and “Sunday’s chilled is full of grace.”
  • Chill: Some chill-related phrases for you to use as snowman puns in the right context: “Chill out,” and “Chilled to the bone,” and “A chilling account,” and “Take a chill pill,” and “Netflix and chill,” and “No chill.”
  • *hat*: Emphasise the “hat” in certain words in your snowy wordplay: “Down the hatch,” and “Full of hate,” and “My hatred for…” and “What about that?” and “Free for a chat?” and “They were very emphatic.” Note: to be emphatic is to be forceful in the way you express or do something.
  • Hat: Since hats and scarves are the traditional decorations/clothing for a snowman, we’ve included hat-related phrases in this entry: “Mad as a hatter,” and “At the drop of a hat,” and “Hats off to,” and “I’ll eat my hat,” and “Tip your hat.” Note: if something happens at the drop of a hat, then it happens at once.
  • *het*→ *hat*: As in, haterosexual (heterosexual), epithat (epithet), ratchat (ratchet), prophat (prophet), ricochat (ricochet), rhatoric (rhetoric), aesthatic (aesthetic), pathatic (pathetic), archatype (archetype). Note: an epithet is a characteristic quality or attribute. An archetype is a typical example of something.
  • *hit*→ *hat*: As in, hatherto (hitherto), hatman (hitman) and archatecture (architecture). Note: “hitherto” means “at this time”.
  • *hot*→ *hat*: As in, hatel (hotel), hatspot (hotspot), hatline (hotline), hatshot (hotshot), hatbed (hotbed), hatdog (hotdog), dichatomy (dichotomy), phato (photo) and phatosynthesis (photosynthesis).
  • Scarf: As hats and scarves are typical snowman attire, we’ve included some scarf-related phrases: “Don’t forget your scarf,” and “He’s really scarfing it down.”
  • Stick: Sticks are commonly used as arms for snowmen, so we’ve included stick-related phrases and puns for you to use: “Cross as two sticks,” and “Better than a poke in the eye with a sharp stick,” and “Carrot and stick (this would work particularly well, since carrots are also used on snowmen to make their nose),” and “The wrong end of the stick,” and “More than you can shake a stick at (this would be quite good since a snowman’s stick is their arm – so “shaking a stick” would be shaking their fist),” and “Stick in the mud,” and “Come to a sticky end.”
  • Stick*: Some stick-related words to add to your repertoire: yardstick, slapstick, broomstick, candlestick, drumstick and joystick.
  • Stick→ Stock: As in, “Laughing stick” and “Sticking filler,” and “Take stick,” and “Stick-still.” Other words that could work: stickade (stockade), stickpile (stockpile) and stickbroker (stockbroker).
  • *stac*→ *stick*: As in, “A stickato (staccato) voice,” and “Numerous obstickals (obstacles).” Note: if something is staccato, then it’s made up of short, separate sounds.
  • *stic*→ *stick*: As in, “A holistick treatment,” and “I’m agnostick,” and “How characteristick.” Other words you could use: heuristick (heuristic), altruistick and enthusiastick, optimistick, fantastick, bombastick, narcissistick and sophistickated. Notes: if something is holistic, then it’s relating to an entire system rather than just a part of it. A heuristic is a method of teaching. If something is bombastic, then it’s unnecessarily long and difficult.
  • *stak*→ *stick*: As in, “This was a mistick,” and “Painstickingly difficult,” and “It was unmistickable.”
  • *sec*→ *stick*: As in, stickular (secular), stickurity (security), sticktion (section), stickure (secure), stickond (second), stickret (secret), constickutive (consecutive).
  • *sic*→ *stick*: As in, “How stickening,” and “Make sweet mustick,” and “A classtick movie,” and “It’s only phystickal.” Other words you could use: whimstickal (whimsical), extrinstick (extrinsic), analgestick (analgesic), forenstick (forensic), bastick (basic), intrinstick (intrinsic), stickly (sickly) and stickle (sickle). Notes: “Extrinsic” refers to the outer qualities or attributes of something.
  • *tic*→ *stick*: As in, “That’s the sticket,” and “Eclecstick taste,” and “Authenstick art.” Other words you could use: arstickulate (articulate), aesthestick (aesthetic), sticklish (ticklish). If something is eclectic then it’s a collection from various sources. Aesthetic refers to things that are nice to look at.
  • *tec*→ *stick*: “Cutting-edge sticknology,” and “Good sticknique,” and “To get sticknical,” and “Sticktonic plates.”
  • Stone: Stones are commonly used as eyes and a mouth for snowmen, so we’ve included stone-related phrases in this list: “A rolling stone gathers no moss,” and “Cold as any stone,” and “Carved in stone,” and “Cast the first stone,” and “Drop like a stone,” and “Etched in stone,” and “Heart of stone,” and “Leave no stone unturned,” and “Sink like a stone,” and “Stone cold sober,” and “A stone’s throw.”
  • Jack: Refer to one of the most famous snowmen of our time, Jack Frost, with these Jack-related phrases: “All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy,” and “Hit the road, Jack,” and “Hit the jackpot,” and “Jack of all trades,” and “Jack the Ripper (a melting snowman could be referred to as “Jack the Dripper, perhaps).”
  • Oh, laugh→ Olaf: As in, “Olaf it off.” Note: Olaf is the living snowman in the movie Frozen.

Snowman-Related Words

To help you come up with your own snowman puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

snowman, snow, snowy, snowball, carrot, hat, scarf, head, torso, body, sticks, stones, ice, winter, snowflake, frost/frosty, cool, cold, icicle, freeze, brrr, melt, melting, frosty the snowman, jack frost, olaf, frozen, abominable snowman

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Beer Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on beer puns! 🍻 🍺 Whether you need a name for your latest craft brew, a tagline for your beer-related business, a beer pun team name, or just some beer puns for their own sake, I hope you find this entry useful!

There’s a lot of depth to beer culture and so some of the puns in this entry may go over your head if you’re not a brewer or beer fanatic. I’ve tried to order the pun list so that it starts with general beer puns that most people will understand, and then as you go down the puns should get more obscure. That said, I have not done a perfect job of it, so apologies if there are some confusing ones here and there near the top.

A quick side note: Drinking alcohol gives your brain a reward that it didn’t earn. If you drink too often then your brain learns that the best (easiest) way to feel good is to drink more alcohol, rather than do the normal things that make you feel good (work hard, accomplish things, help others, etc.). Be careful messing with your neurotransmitters! 🙂

You might also like to visit the Punpedia entries on coffee puns, tea puns, party puns and food puns.

Beer Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about beer that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page!

  • All → Ale: As in “Ale in a day’s work.” and “She went ale out.” and “Ale’s well that ends well” and “It’s ale downhill from here.” and “It’s ale gone pear shaped.” and “It’s ale good.” and “It’s ale grist to the mill.” and “It’s ale me, me, me.” and “Not ale it’s cracked up to be.” and “That’s ale well and good”.
  • Stout: As in “He’s a stout young man.”
  • Larger → Lager: As in “Lager than life”.
  • Six-pack: As in “Check out my six-pack.”
  • Bar: As in “You’ve raised the bar.” and “Bar none.”
  • *pub*: If a word contains the “pub” sound (or similar) you may be able to make a terrible pub pun: capubility, capuble, palpuble, public, publicity, publication, publisher, republican, republic, unstoppuble, unpublishedinescapubly, hypubole, pubble (pebble).
  • You → Brew: As in “Brew can do it!” and “Brew silly goose!” and “I’m so glad to see brew!” and “Before brew know it”.
  • Bro → Brew: As in “What’s up, brew?” and “Cool story, brew.”
  • *brew*: If a word contains the “brew” sound (or similar) we can sometimes make a brewing pun: brewmstick (broomstick), brews (bruise), brewnette (brunette), brewtal (brutal), brewtalize (brutalize), brewtish, (brutish), Hebrew.
  • *byoo*: If a word contains the “byoo” sound (or similar) we can sometimes make a terrible beer brewing pun: brewtiful (beautiful), abrews (abuse), attribrewts (attributes), contribrewted, distribrewtion, rebrewke (rebuke), debrew (debut), retribrewtion, tribrewnal (tribunal).
  • *proo*: If a word contains the “proo” sound (or similar) we can sometimes make a terrible brewing pun: abrewval (approval), bulletbrewf, dissabrewve, foolbrewf, imbrewvements, disbrewve, brewdent (prudent), brewdence (prudence), waterbrewf.
  • Déjà vu → Déjà brew: As in “I’m getting déjà brew – have we been to this pub before?”
  • Hop: As in “Just a hop, skip and jump.” and “Take 3 hops to the left.” and “Hop to it!” and “Bunny hop” and “Hip hop“.
  • Hope → Hop: As in “I have high hops.” and “A glimmer of hop.” and “Cross your fingers and hop for the best.” and “Keep hop alive.” and “There there’s life, there’s hop.” and “Cross my heart and hop to die.”
  • Hop*: If a word begins with the “hop” sound (or anything vaguely similar) then there may be an opportunity for a terrible beer pun: “Health, wealth and hoppiness.” and “Life, liberty and the pursuit of hoppiness.”  and “As it hoppens” and “Shit hoppens.” and “See what hoppens?” and “Hopatitis is an inflammation of the liver.”
  • Op* → Hop*: If a word begins with “op” it can often be turned into a silly hops pun: hopportunity, hoperation, hopposition, hopinion, hoption, hoperate, hopposite, hoperations, hoperating, hopportunities, hopera, hopponent, hoperator, hoppose, hoptions, hopposed, hopt, hoperated, hopinions, hoperational, hoptimism, hopponents, hoperates, hoperators, hoppression, hoptimistic, hoptional, hopposing, hoptical, hoptimal, hop, hoperative, hopted, hoptimum, hoppressive, hopenness, hopting, hoppressed, hopenings, hoperand, hopioid, hoptimist, hoptimise, hopaque, hoperatichopposites, hoptician, hopportunist, hoptic, hopposes, hoptimisation, hopacity, hoppress, hoperatives, hopine, hoptimality, hoptics, hoppressors, hoptimised, hopiate, hoptimists, hoptimistically, hoppressor, hopulence, hoptimize, hoppositions, hopportunistic, hopportunism, hopulent, hopportune.
  • *op* → *hop*: There are also quite a few words with the “op” sound (or similar) in them that can be turned into silly beer puns. There are a few here which have the full “hop” sound in them already. Here’s the list: acrhopolis, adhopt, adhopted, authopsy, bihopsy, bookshop, cohoperation, cohoperative, c-hop-yright, cr-hop, drhoplet, drhoppings, drhopped, flhoppy, eavesdrhopping, helic-hop-ter, imprhoper, imprhoperly, inapprhopiately, microschopic, monhopoly, philanthrhopic, photoc-hop-ier, p-hop-corn, p-hop-ularity, p-hop-ulation, prhopaganda, prhopagation, pr-hop-erly, p-hop-ulist, prhopositions, prhopped, p-hop-ulation, raindrhops, shopkeeper, st-hop, st-hop-er, synhopsis, tr-hop-ical, unst-hop-able, whopping.
  • Vain → Vine: As in “I worked so hard but it was all in vine.”
  • Vein → Vine: As in “My vines are bulging.” and “In the same vine …”
  • Fine → Vine: As in “It’s a vine day for a beer.” and “It’s a vine line.” and “You’re cutting it vine.” and “That’s a damn vine beer.” and “One vine day …” and “Treading a vine line.”
  • Van* → Vine*: As in, “Vine Gogh,” and “Vine-ish into thin air.” 
  • *ven* → *vine*: As in, “Sixes and sevines,” and “Blessed evine-t,” and “Break evine,” and “The elevineth hour,” and “Evine the score,” and “Heavine forbid,” and “A match made in heavine,” and “With a vine-geance,” and “Bun in the ovine,” and “Pure as the drivine snow,” and “Nothing vine-tured, nothing gained,” and “Revine-ge is a dish best served cold,” and “Innocent until provine guilty,” and “Lavineder (lavender) scented,” and “Twenty four sevine.”
  • *vin* → *vine*: As in, “Full of vinegar,” and “Get movine,” and “The gift that keeps on givine,” and “In livine memory,” and “In the drivine seat,” and “Knock the livine daylights out of,” and “Livine proof,” and “Livine on borrowed time,” and “Time flies when you’re havine fun,” and “Vinetage,” and “Vinedicate,” and “Vinedictive.”
  • Stain → Stein: As in “There’s a stein on your shirt.” (See beer stein)
  • Sign → Stein: As in “Give me a stein, lord!” and “Stein the pledge.” and “Stein up.” and “Stein of the times.” and “A sure stein.” and “A tell tale stein.” (See beer stein)
  • Sooner → Schooner: As in “Schooner or later.” and “The schooner the better.” and “No schooner said than done.” and “Schooner rather than later.” (A schooner is a type of glass cup.)
  • Tinkered → Tankard: As in “I tankard with this all day but I couldn’t get it working.” (A tankard is a big drinking vessel)
  • Sidle → Seidel: As in “I seideled up to her apologetically.”
  • Picture → Pitcher: As in “A pitcher is worth  thousand words.” and “See the big pitcher.” and “Motion pitcher.” and “Do I have to paint you a pitcher?” and “Pitcher perfect” (Pitcher is a synonym of “jug” – commonly used to serve beer.)
  • Pitcher: There is the potential for a pun here using the baseball meaning of this word.
  • Cling → Clink: As in “Clink on tight!”
  • Kink → Clink: As in “C’mon, be honest. Everyone has a clink or two.”
  • Blink → Clink: As in “In the clink of an eye.” and “Clink and you’ll miss it!”
  • Suds: This refers to the froth made from soap and water, but is also slang for “beer”. By using it in the original “soap and water” context you could potentially make a pun: “I got in the bath and sudsed up.” (Here we’re using the verb-form of “suds” with means “lather”)
  • Sides → Suds: As in “There are two suds to every question.” and “You’ve got to see the issue from both suds.”
  • Plastered: This means “very drunk”, but in the right context we could use its original definition as a pun: “The whole house is plastered.”
  • Wasted: As in “It’s so sad, seeing all these all wasted lives.” and “Youth is wasted on the young.”
  • Sloshed: Another one meaning “very drunk” – perhaps an opportunity to make a pun on its literal meaning: “We all sloshed around in the swimming pool for a while.”
  • Smashed, Hammered, Bombed, Legless, Messed up, Trousered, Trolleyed: Some more terms meaning “very drunk”. Each of them may have contexts in which there’s an opportunity to make a pun on its literal meaning – though these contexts may be quite specific.
  • Hang over → Hangover: As in “Mind if I hang over at your place this morning?”
  • Chug: As well as meaning “to drink fast or without pausing”, this term can refer to “The chug of a motor boat” or “The little train chugged up the hill.”
  • Hug → Chug: As in “Let’s have a group chug.” and “Chug it out.” and “Bro chug.”
  • Toast: When someone raises their beer in honour of something or someone and encourages everyone to do the same, that’s called a toast. There may be some context in which the other (normal) definition of “toast” could be punned upon.
  • Tears → Cheers: As in “Bored to cheers.” and “Burst into cheers.” and “Moved to cheers.” and “Reduced to cheers.” and “Fight back the cheers.” and “It will all end in cheers.” and “Blood, sweat and cheers.”
  • Cheers: This word also has the “the cheers of the crowd were deafening” definition which might be a viable opportunity for a pun in some contexts.
  • Tippy-toes → Tipsy-toes: As in “I snuck in on my tipsy-toes.”
  • Cough → Quaff: As in “I was quaffing all night, so I took the day off work.” (A “quaff” is an alcoholic drink and to “quaff” is to drink an alcoholic quickly or heartily)
  • Lick or → Liquor: As in “Are you going to have a liqu, or?” (Depending on your accent/pronunciation it may more like “lick her”. Please keep your puns respectful!)
  • Stubby: Refers to a beer bottle that is short and fat. This slang is taken directly from the actual definition of “stubby” so it’s an easy pun if the context is right.
  • Growler: A “growler” is a type of jug used to transport draft beer. The term has a bunch of other meanings which could be played upon in the right context.
  • Draught / Draft: Besides the beer-related meaning (beer served from barrel or tank), this term has several others: “He was drafted in 1942″ and “I drafted the letter of resignation.” and “The use of draft horses is outdated and cruel.” and “There was a nice draught coming through the window.” and “She was drafted for the national team at age 23.”
  • Dear → Beer: As in “Oh beer me” and “Hang on for beer life” and “Near and beer to my heart” and “Elementary, my beer Watson.”
  • Ear → Beer: As in “Grin from beer to beer.” and “Let’s play it by beer.” and “Lend a beer” and “In one beer and out the other.”
  • Peer → Beer: As in “Beer pressure” and “It’s like she was beering into my soul.”
  • Pier → Beer: As in “Take a long walk off a short beer.”
  • Bear → Beer: As in “Grizzly beer” and “Beer a resemblance” and “The right to beer arms” and “Beer down upon” and “Bear witness to …” and “Beer false witness” and “Beer fruit” and “Beer in mind that …” and “Bring to beer
  • Bare → Beer: As in “The beer necessities” and “Beer one’s teeth” and “Laid beer” and “The beer bones” and “The cupboard was beer
  • Buyer → Beer: As in “She’s a regular beer at our shop.” (Bit of a stretch!)
  • Beard → Beerd: As in “Neck beerd” and “His beerd was as white as snow.”
  • *ber* → *beer*: Words that contains the “ber” sound (or similar) are often opportunities for terrible beer puns: collabeerate, dismembeermentbeereavement, beereaved, beerds (birds), beerthplace (birthplace), beerglary (burglary), beergeoning (burgeoning), cumbeersome, delibeeration, decembeer, cucumbeer, exubeerant, libeerties (liberties), libeerals, libeertarian, libeeration, novembeer, numbeers, pubeerty, membeership, reimbeers (reimburse), remembeer, reverbeeration, robbeeries, robbeery, slumbeer, sobeer (sober).
  • Be* → Beer*: More terrible beer puns can be made using words that start with the “be” sound: beerwilderment, beerlongings, beerbliography, beerseiged, beerstowed, beermused, beerwitched, beergotry, beertersweetbeerllionair.
  • *pear* → *beer*: As in, “A beerlescent (pearlescent) glow” and “Abeer (appear) from thin air” and “Watch me disabeer” and “Make an abeerance.” Other words you could use: s’beerhead (spearhead), re-abeer (reappear).
  • Shakespeare → Shakesbeer
  • Pier → Beer: As in “Take a long walk off a short beer” and “Ear beercing” and “Never been habbeer (happier).”
  • Bare → Beer: As in “The beer necessities” and “Beer one’s teeth” and “Laid beer” and “The beer bones” and “The cupboard was beer“. You can also replace the “bare” in these words: barely (“beerly there”), threadbare (“A threadbeer toy”), cabaret (cabeeret), barefoot (beerfoot).
  • *bier* → *beer*: As in, grubbeer (grubbier), stubbeer (stubbier), tubbeer, scabbeer and chubbeer.
  • *pare* → *beer*: As in, “Beerent-teacher meeting” and “In beerenthesis” and “Like combeering apples and oranges” and “Be prebeered (prepared)” and “Abbeerently (apparently) so.” Other words you could use: abbeerel (apparel) and transbeerent (transparent).
  • *bar* → *beer*: As in, “Beer none” and “Behind beers” and “Language beerier” and “Raise the beer” and “Beerrelling (barreling) in” and “Beergain basement.” Other words you could use: beeren (barren), beerista (barista) and sidebeer (sidebar).
  • *ber* → *beer*: As in, “Strawbeery flavoured” and “Going beerserk” and “Got your numbeer” and “Sobeer up (this one’s a bit ironic)” and “A membeer of..” Other words you could use: beereft (bereft), beerate (berate), beerth (berth), beereavement (bereavement), chambeer (chamber), ambeer (amber), membeer, cybeer, remembeer, delibeerate, libeeral, libeerty, abeerration (aberration) and cumbeersome. Notes: to be bereft is to be deprived of something.
  • *bir* → *beer*: As in, “A little beerd told me” and “Beerthday suit” and “The early beerd.”
  • *bor* → *beer*: As in, “Beered out of your mind” and “Labeer of love” and “Harbeer a grudge” and “Good neighbeers” and “Please elabeerate” and “Collabeerate with.”
  • *bur* → *beer*: As in, “A heavy beerden.” Other words you could use: beereaucracy (bureaucracy), beergeoning (burgeoning) and excalibeer (excalibur).
  • *per* → *beer*: As in, “A different beerspective” and “Third beerson” and “Motivation and beerseverance.” Other words you could use: beertinent (pertinent), beeriod (period), beerception (perception), beernicious (pernicious), beercieve (perceive), beerformance (performance), beerfect (perfect), imbeerative (imperative) and obeeration (operation).
  • Egs* → Kegs*: Some words which start with the “egs” sound (or similar) can be turned into very bad beer puns: kegs-istence (existence), kegs-iled (exiled), kegs-istential (existential), kegs-it (exit).
  • Tap: This has at least two beer-related meanings: “to tap a barrel” and “what’s on tap?”. It also has several non-beer related meanings which might be pun opportunities in the right context: “He tapped the window gently.” and “We’ve tapped all his phone calls.”
  • Head: The “head” is the frothy foam on top of a beer. Potential puns about: “Air head” and “Don’t mess with my head.” and “Above my head” and “Over my head” and “Bite someone’s head off” and “Be it on your head” and “Couldn’t make head or tail of it” and “It’ll do your head in” and “Get it into your head” and “Get your head together” and “Got your head screwed on” and “Hanging over your head” and “You need to get your head examined.” and “Head and shoulders above the rest” and “Head count” and “Head honcho” and “Head in the sand” and “Head to head” and “Hit the nail on the head” and “I could do that standing on my head” and “Head wind” and “Hold a gun to his head” and “In over your head” and “Laugh your head off” and “Level-headed” and “Lose your head” and “Make your head spin” and “Price on his head” and “Pull your head in” and “Sleepy head” and “Upon your head be it”.
  • Bruise → Booze: As in, “A boozed ego” and “You can’t protect your kids from every bump and booze.”
  • *bas* → *booze*: As in, “On a first-name boozeis (basis)” and “Back to boozeics (basics)” and “Yes, boozeically” and “The boozelisk in the Chamber of Secrets (I’m sure many people will find ways to make boozy pickup lines out of this one…so use it and similar puns with your best judgement).”
  • *bes* → *booze*: As in, “All the boozet (best)” and “Boozet (best) friends forever” and “Boozet of all” and “Boozepoke suit” and “Boozetow your wisdom” and “Sit boozeside me.” Other words you could use: booze-seech (beseech), booze-sotted (besotted), booze-siege (besiege). Notes: to beseech is to beg.
  • *bos* → *booze*: As in, booze-om (bosom), rooibooze (rooibos) and verbooze (verbose). Note: rooibos is a type of tea.
  • *bus* → *booze*: As in, “Thrown under the booze” and “Walk or take the booze” and “None of your boozeiness” and “Boozey bee” and “Course syllabooze.” Other words you could use: nimbooze (nimbus), omnibooze (omnibus) and abooze (abuse). Notes: a nimbus is a circle of light, or a halo.
  • *baz* → *booze*: As in, boozear (bazaar), booze-ooka (bazooka), booze-illion (bazillion).
  • *biz* → *booze*: As in, “Boozear (bizarre) circumstances,” and “That’s showbooze.”
  • *buz* → *booze*: As in, “Booze me in” and “Booze off” and “Booze-ing with excitement” and “Boozewords.” Other words you could use: booze-ard (buzzard), booze-ing (boozing) and boozer (buzzer).
  • *bows* → *booze*: As in, “Chasing rainbooze” and “Rainbooze and unicorns” and “Rub elbooze with.”
  • *eth’ll → *ethyl: “Ethyl” alcohol is the type of alcohol that is in alcoholic beverages like beer. Pun examples: “My brethyl smell really bad if I drink this.” and “At least my dethyl go down in history.”
  • Moult → Malt: As in “I started malting as I got older.”
  • Mould → Malt: As in “There’s malt all over my food!” and “Malty sandwiches don’t taste great.”
  • Tiny → Tinnie / Tinny: As in “The patter of tinny feet.” (“Tinny” is slang for a can of beer)
  • Krikey! → Krieky!: As in “Krieky! That’s a big croc!”
  • Coarse / course → Coors: As in “Of coors!” and “Off coors” and “University coors” and “Blown off coors” and “Crash coors” and “In due coors” and “Let nature take its coors” and “On a collision coors” and “Stay on coors” and “He had a coors voice from drinking too much.”
  • Bro, my → Brah, ma: As in “Brah, ma beer puns are great, hey?” (Brahma is a beer brand)
  • Heinie can → Heineken: As in “Get off your heineken you? We’ve got work to do!” (“Heinie” is slang for bottom)
  • Bud wiser → Budweiser: As in “I’ve got a budweiser than all you uneducated chumps.”
  • Wiser → Weiser: As in “None the weiser” and “Older and weiser
  • Bud: As in “We’re best buds” and “Nip in the bud
  • Too bored → Tuborg: As in “I didn’t stay at the party long – I was Tuborg.”
  • Leffe → Left: Note that “Leffe” has two pronunciations. The French pronunciation sounds like “leff” and the Flemish pronunciation sounds like “leffer”. Here we’re punning with the French pronunciation. Examples: “Exist stage Leffe” and “Keep Leffe” and “Leffe for dead” and “Leffe in the lurch” and “Leffe out in the cold” and “Leffe wing” and “Leffe to your own devices” and “Out of Leffe field”.
  • Leave her → Leffe: (Here we’re using the Flemish pronunciation, see above) As in “Leffe alone!” and “Are you going to Leffe anything in your will?”
  • A lesion → Elysian: As in “What happened to your leg? Is that Elysian?”
  • A legion → Elysian: As in “She has Elysian of fans following her wherever she goes.”
  • Stellar → Stella: As in “A Stella cast has been assembled.” and “The pub received Stella ratings in the guides.” (Wikipedia)
  • Bass: This refers to the famous brewery. If you’re punning with text (rather than speaking it out loud), you can play on the audio-meaning of “bass”: “I like clubs that have good Bass.” but since this has a different pronunciation, the only exact phonetic pun is on the fish of the same name.
  • Basically → Bassically: As in “I drink Bassically the same thing all the time.”
  • Millimeter → Millermeter: As in “A millermeter more and it would have been long enough!” We can do the same thing with other units of measurement too: “The can holds 375 millerliters.” and “We just needed one millersecond longer!” and “This cable is rated to 25 millervolts.” and “A millergram of this is enough to kill a person.”
  • Million → Milleron: As in “Not in a miller-on years.” and “One in a milleron.”
  • Meantime: As in “In the meantime, we should look for a new place.” (Meantime is a brewery)
  • Foster: As in “Foster a sense of confidence in the people.” and “A bar owner must Foster a happy, friendly atmosphere.” (Foster’s is a beer company)
  • Four peeks → Four Peaks: As in “It took me about four peaks to finally read the text.”
  • For Pete’s → Four Peak’s: As in “Four peak’s sake!”
  • Car owner → Corona: As in “All coronas must pay annual car registration fees.”
  • “Youngling” → Yuengling: As in “Youth is wasted on yuenglings” and “He’s a yuengling at heart.”
  • Pills → Pils: As in “I had to pop some pils to help with this headache.”
  • Pills and → Pilsen: As in “Pilsen booze are a fast track to a ruined life.” and “It’s up to parents to keep their kids away from pilsen booze.”
  • Back’s → Beck’s: As in “My beck’s really sort today for some reason.” and “Ow! My beck!”
  • Slits → Schlitz: As in “The surgeon has to make two schlitz in the intestinal wall.”
  • Shits → Schlitz: As in “He did it for schlitz and giggles.” and “You know what gives me the schiltz?”
  • Bitter: As in “He came to a bitter end.” and “That’s a bitter pill to swallow.” and “No need to be bitter! (resentful)”
  • Least→ Yeast: As in “Last, but not yeast.” and “Yeast common denominator.” and “It’s the yeast I could do.”
  • East→ Yeast: As in “I’m heading over yeast for a holiday.”
  • Grain: As in “I’m going to go against the grain here and say …” and “There’s a grain of truth in what he’s saying.” and “I’d take it with a grain of salt.”
  • Grainy: Other than referring to grain (some varieties of which are used to make beer), this can refer to a texture or to a low resolution photograph: “Your profile picture is a bit grainy.”
  • Ingrained: As in “It was ingrained in me from a young age.”
  • Again → A grain: As in “Come a grain?” and “Never a grain.” and “Time and time a grain.” and “Now and a grain.”
  • Wait → Wheat: As in “Wheat a second…” and “I am lying in wheat.” and “Wheat and see.” (See wheat beer)
  • We t* → Wheat: As in “Wheat talked about this last night.” and “Wheat took our time.”
  • We’d → Wheat: As in “Wheat love for you to join us!”
  • What → Wheat: As in “Wheatever, man.” and “Wheat are you up to today?”
  • Why → Rye: “Rye do you ask?” and “Rye do beer puns make me giggle?” and “Rye hast thou forsaken me?” and “Rye are you doing this to me?”
  • Wry → Rye: “A rye smile.” and “With rye Scottish wit.” (Rye is a type of grain used to make beer)
  • Rye: Words that contain the “rye” sound can be made into terribly silly beer puns (Since some beers are made with rye): alryete, bryete, Brydal, b-rye-testcircumscryebed, compryesed, contryeved, copyryete, cryesis, cryeterion, cryeme, dryevers, descryebe, enterpryese, depryeved, fryeday, fryed, fryetened, pryeceless, pryemarily, pryevacy, pryeority, pryez, ryenocerous, ryeteous, ryetfully, ryevalries, samurye, subscryebed, surpryesingly, tryeangle, ryeting, tryeumph, rye-fle.
  • Riled up→ Rye-led up: As in “Jeez, calm down. No need to get rye-led up!”
  • Barely → Barley: As in “I’m barley getting by.” and “That barley passes as a beer pun.”
  • Ought → Oat: As in “You oat to say sorry.” and “Five minutes oat to be enough time.”
  • Its / It’s → Oats / Oat’s: As in “Oat’s just a matter of time.” and “Oat’s a shame.” and “Oat’s nothing personal” and “Oat’s worth oats weight in gold.” and “Takes oats toll.” and “A life of oats own.”
  • Sore gum → Sorghum: As in “I’ve got sorgums because my toothbrush bristles are too hard.” (Sorghum is a grain crop often used to create alcoholic beverages)
  • *sip*: If a word contains the “sip” sound, it’s an opportunity for a terrible pun on “sip” as in “to sip your beer” (so long as you emphasise the “sip” part somehow): Mississipi, disiplinarian, munisipality, presipitate, partisiples, presipitated, prinsipally, resipient, resiprocity.
  • *sep*: If a word contains the “sep” sound it’s a chance to make a terribly corny “sip” pun (perhaps emphasise with hyphens or underline/bold): ac-sip-tability (acceptability), bisips (biceps), consiption (conception), consipt (concept), desiptive, impersiptable, desiptive, misconsiption, persiptive, resiption, resiptionist, resiptivity, resiptors, siparatists (seperatists), siparation, siparate, susiptability, intersipt.
  • Dry: As in “These tea puns are very dry.” and “Dry humour” and “Hung out to dry” and “Keep your powder dry” and “As dry as dust”.
  • Will → Swill: As in “Against your own swill.” and “Bend to my swill” and “Love swill find a way.” and “Swill do.” and “Where there’s a swill, there’s a way.” and “Time swill tell.”
  • Back → Bock / Beck: As in “As soon as my bock is turned” and “At the bock of my mind” and “Bock to the Future” and “Bock from the dead” and “Bock in business” and “Bock in the day” and “Bock on your feet” and “He bocked out of the deal” and “Bock to bock” and “Cast your mind bock” and “Get off my bock” and “Fight bock the tears” and “Get bock on your feet” and “Get bock together” and “Hark bock to” and “Kick bock and enjoy” and “Laid bock” and “Money bock guarantee” and “On the bock burner” and “Never look bock” and “One step forward, two steps bock.” and “Put your bock into it!” and “Right bock at ya” and “Turn bock the clock” and “Watch your bock” and “You scratch my bock, I’ll scratch yours.” (Bock is a strong German lager, and the above examples can be replaced with “Beck” to play on the famous Beck’s brewery)
  • Back* → Bock* / Beck*: Words that begin with the “back” sound can also be silly beer puns: bockache, bockdrop, bockbone, bockground, bocklash, bocklog, bockside, bockroom, bockstage, bockward, bockyard, bockteria (bacteria), bockterium. (These examples can have “bock” replaced with “beck” to play on the famous Beck’s brewery)
  • Handy → Shandy: As in “This is a very shandy tool.”
  • Sandy → Shandy: As in “My towel is all shandy from the beach.”
  • Pass it → Posset: As in “Can you please posset over here?”
  • Spruce: As in “Make sure you leave some time to spruce yourself for the ball.” and “I’m all spruced up.” (See Spruce beer on Wikipedia)
  • Arrogant bastard: A simple pun on the brewing company.
  • I’m a real oldy → Amarilloldy: As in “Amarillo-ldy when it comes to my taste in beer.”
  • Citra → Sit ya: As in “Citra ass down!” – The name of a brew from Against the Grain. “Citra” is a variety of hops.
  • Nugget: As in “Nugget of wisdom” and “Nugget of truth” (Nugget is a hop variety)
  • Soz → Saaz: As in “Oh saaz! I didn’t mean to!”
  • Sim card → Simcoed: As in “I lost my phone so I need a new simcoed
  • Put her → Porter: As in “Porter down!” and “She porter hand to learning coding in her spare time.”
  • Fruity: Other than referring to the fruity taste or aroma of a brew, this term also has several slang definitions including being flamboyant or “bouncy”. It may also refer to someone who is considered crazy in some respect.
  • Noble: As in “That was very noble of you.” and “The four noble truths.” (“Noble hops” are traditionally hops which are low in bitterness and high in aroma, like Saaz)
  • Great → Gruit: As in “All creatures gruit and small.” and “I went to gruit lengths” and “Gruit minds think alike” and “The gruit outdoors” and “No challenge too gruit.” (Very corny! Gruit is an old-fashined herb mixture used for bittering and flavouring beer)
  • Asked → Oast: As in “Frequently oast questions” and “No questions oast” and “I took my harp to the party but no one oast me to play.”
  • Killin’ → Kiln: As in “She’s making a kiln!” and “Stop it, you’re kiln me!”
  • Nipple → Tipple: A tipple can refer to an alcoholic drink, or as a verb to “drink alcohol, especially habitually”.
  • Long neck → Longneck: A longneck is a common type of beer bottle.
  • Mouth feel → Mouthfeel: As in “It makes my mouthfeel funny, but it’s not too bad.” (See Wikipedia entry, Mouthfeel)
  • After taste → Aftertaste: As in “Aftertasting that beer, I’m not going back for seconds.” (See Wikipedia entry, Aftertaste)
  • Stupid → Stube-d: As in “Keep it simple, stube-d” and “Terminally stube-d” and “There’s no such thing as a stube-d question.”
  • Hey for → Hefe: As in “Hefe god’s sake could you cut it out?” (“Hefe” means “yeast” in German and sounds like “hay-fa”)
  • Goes up → Gose-p: As in “Right before it gose-p in flames.”
  • Say, son → Saison: As in “Saison, could you fetch me that spanner?”
  • Worth → Wort: As in “It’s wort it’s weight in gold.” and “For what it’s wort …” and “Get your money’s wort” and “Milk it for all it’s wort” and “Not wort a hill of beans” and “That’s my two cents wort
  • Ton / Tonne → Tun: As in “Came down like a tun of bricks.” and “That’s a tun of beer.”
  • Troop / Troupe → Trub: As in “A comedy trub is performing here tonight.” and “The trubs marched through the town.”
  • Least → Lees: As in “Last but not lees” and “Lees common denominator” and “Not in the lees” and “Line of lees resistance.”
  • Law to → Lauter: As in “There should be a lauter prevent people form making terrible beer puns.”
  • Lautering → Loitering: As in “There’s always a few shady people lautering around there at night.”
  • Spargin’ → Spare gin: As in “There wasn’t any spargin’ so I happily drank beer instead”
  • Tanning → Tannin: As in “Welcome to my tannin salon.”
  • For men t* → Ferment: As in “What we need is fermen to realise that catcalling isn’t friendly.”

Beer-Related Phrases

Common phrases, idioms and cliches which are related to beer can be used for some subtle and witty word play. Here is a list of the beer themed phrases that we’ve found so far:

  • (h)opposites attract
  • process of eliminating (h)options
  • a golden (h)opportunity
  • once in a lifetime (h)opportunity
  • window of (h)opportunity
  • contrary to popular (h)opinion
  • Adam’s ale
  • amber nectar
  • as drunk as a lord
  • as drunk as a skunk
  • as mild as milk
  • barrel of laughs
  • came to a bitter end
  • take the bitter with sweet
  • a bitter pill to swallow
  • bring out your best (a Bud Light slogan)
  • crack a tinnie
  • crack/bust some suds
  • slam a drink
  • drink like a fish
  • driven to drink
  • drink up
  • drink someone under the table
  • full of hops
  • given to drink
  • life’s not all beer and skittles
  • pint sized
  • on the piss
  • rolling drunk
  • six pack
  • slave to drink
  • stout fellow
  • you can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make her drink
  • slam some beers
  • egg in your beer
  • small beer
  • knock one back
  • social drinker
  • bottoms up!
  • here’s to [someone/something]!
  • drink to excess
  • drown your sorrows
  • on a bender
  • on the rocks
  • make it a double
  • down the hatch
  • hair of the dog
  • happy hour
  • liquid courage
  • pub crawl
  • another round
  • two/three/four sheets in the wind
  • under full sail
  • under the influence
  • take the edge off
  • chin chin! (cheers!)
  • off their head
  • roll out the barrel
  • BYOB
  • on tap
  • Dutch courage
  • sudsing up
  • beer belly
  • trouble is brewing
  • a hop, skip and a jump
  • hip hop
  • clouded judgement
  • get you over a barrel
  • seperate the wheat from the chaff
  • barrel of laughs
  • belt down some liquor
  • as slow as molasses in january
  • cakes and ale
  • eat, drink and be merry
  • full head of steam
  • head in the clouds
  • hit the nail on the head
  • i’d lose my head if it wasn’t attached
  • i need it like a hole in the head
  • in over your head
  • my head is swimming
  • off the top of my head
  • off with his head
  • put a price on his head
  • two heads are better than one
  • keep your head above water
  • it’s all grist to the mill
  • walk like a drunken sailor

Beer-Related Words

There are many more puns to be made than could be documented in this Punpedia entry, and so we’ve compiled a list of beer-related concepts for you to use when creating your own puns. If you come up with a new pun, please share it in the comments!

brew, brewery, brewski, stein, schooner, tankard, seidel, pitcher, clink, suds, plastered, wasted, sloshed, smashed, hammered, bombed, messed up, hangover, hungover, chug, chugalug, sober, toast, cheers, drunkard, drunk, drunkenness, legless, tipsy, blotto, trousered, trolleyed, inebriated, quaff, sip, numb, corked, stubby, stubbies, ale, cask, cask ale, growler, draught beer, draft beer, draft, draught, keg, nitrokeg, tap, beer tap, head, prohibition, alcohol, alcoholic, alcoholism, ethyl alcohol, malt, hops, noble hops, beverage, liquor, liqueur, pub crawl, drink, wheat, rye, sorghum, barley, oats, millet, brewpub, rotgut, hooch, alcopop, tipple, tippler, intoxication, homebrew, beery, long neck, mouthfeel, aftertaste, imbibe, pub, bar, saloon, brasserie, vine, six-pack, tinnie, chaser, rathskeller, cellar, porter, cerveza, froth, frothie, coldie, swill, alehouse, stube, biergarten, beer garden, Oktoberfest, barrel, full-bodied, thin-bodied, publican, yeast, Ninkasi, palate, punt, chill, binge

bock, maibock, doppelbock, eisbock, weizenbock, altbier, berliner weisse, dortmunder export, dunkel, gose, helles, kellerbier, kolsch, marzen, pale lager, roggenbier, schwarzbier, smoked beer, wheat beer, zoigl, dubbel, Flanders red ale, lambicger, framboise, gueuze, kriek, oud bruin, quadrupel, saison, tripel, witbier, brown ale, Indian pale ale, mild ale, old ale, porter, Scotch ale, stout, amber ale, American pale ale, American wild ale, cream ale, ice lager, Kentucky common beer, pumpkin ale, steam beer, baltic porter, biere de garde, copper ale, corn beer, grodziskie, gratzer, hard soda, Irish red ale, light beer, malt beer, millet beer, pale ale, pilsner, rye beer, sahti, small beer, sour beer, Vienna lager, trappist, sommelier, root beer, apple beer, birch beer, ginger beer, horehound beer, oatmeal stout, sake, shandy, brown ale, posset, schankbier, spruce beer, weissbier, weizen beer, hefe, hefeweizen, Lowenbrau, Hamm, Arrogant Bastard, Fat Tire, Haffenreffer, Pabst Blue Ribbon, Nastro Azzurro

amarillo, cascade, centennial, chinook, citra, crystal, CTZ, fuggle, Golding, lambic, magnum, mosaic, Mt. Hood, Northern Brewer, nugget, Perle, Saaz, Simcoe, Tardif De Bourgogne, Williamette, cluster

Coors, Brahma, Harbin, Heineken, Yanjing, Skol, Budweiser, Bud, Bud Light, Tsingtao, Snow, Carlsberg, Tuborg, Leffe, Elysian, Stella Artois, Bass, Miller, Peroni, Meantime, Radegast, Foster’s, Molson Coors, Labatt, Bintang, Goose Island, Tecate, Amstel, Birra Moretti, Four Peaks, Kronenbourg 1664, Corona, Sam Adams, Guinness, Yuengling, Efes Pilsen, Dogfish Head, San Miguel, Becks, Heady Topper, Kingfisher, Harveys, Hoegaarden, Dos Equis, Sierra Nevada, Theakston, Mikkeller, Schlitz

steep, wort, mashout, lautering, lauter, lauter tun, mash tun, tun, mash, ferment, fermentation, turbidimeter, nephelometer, sparge, sparging, tannin, pH, chaff, husk, starch, starches, sugar, enzymes, dry hopping, sprouted, molasses, carbon dioxide, carbonation, grist, gluten, microbrewery, kegger, barm, leavening, barrelage, all-malt, amber, anaerobic, black malt, bung, caramel, dextrin, ester, filter, fining, malt-extract, priming, tart, milling, nitrogen, phenols, gruit, mugwort, oast house, kiln

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