Music Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on music puns! 🎵 🎹 🎼 🎶

Music is a huge and deeply ingrained part of our culture. We hear music not only in songs, but also in advertisments, movies, stories and tv shows (even wrestlers have theme songs!). We’ve done our best to cover this broad scope with music puns that span from composers to musicians to musical terminology.

While we’ve made this list as thorough as possible, it is specific to music. You might also be interested in our party puns.

Music Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about music that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of music puns:

  • Soon → Tune: As in, “A fool and their money are tune parted” and “As tune as my back is turned” and “As tune as possible” and “Get well tune” and “Tuner or later” and “Too much too tune.”
  • Bend → Band: As in, “Band over backwards” and “Band the rules” and “Band your ear.”
  • Land → Band: As in, “Band ahoy!” and “Band of hope and glory” and “Band of make believe” and “In the band of the living.”
  • Sand → Band: As in, “Draw a line in the band” and “The bands of time.”
  • Brand → Band: As in, “Band new” and “A band new ballgame” and “A band new day” and “Band spanking new.”
  • Grand → Band: As in, “Delusions of bandeur” and “Band theft auto” and “Band slam” and “A band slam” and “The band canyon.”
  • Hand → Band: As in, “Bands on deck” and “Bite your band off” and “Bound band and foot.”
  • Tenner → Tenor: As in, “That’ll cost you a tenor.”
  • Apparatus → Opera-tus: As in, “A complicated opera-tus.”
  • Can you → Kanye: As in, “Kanye get it done by 5pm?” and “Kanye think about it?” Note: This is a reference to Kanye West, a famous rapper.
  • Hop → Hip Hop: As in, “Hip hop to it” and “Hip hop, skip and jump” and “Hip hopping mad.” Note: hip hop is a popular music genre.
  • Spot → Spotify: As in, “A blind spotify” and “Got a soft spotify for” and “That really hit the spotify” and “In a tight spotify” and “Spotify the difference.” Note: Spotify is a music provider.
  • Big → Gig: As in, “A gig ask” and “Gig shot” and “Earning gig bucks” and “Look at the gig picture” and “Bright lights, gig city” and “Make it gig” and “No gig deal” and “Open your gig mouth.”
  • Dig → Gig: As in, “Gig your own grave” and “Gig your heels in” and “Gig up the dirt” and “A gig for victory.”
  • Rock: Rock is a mainstream music genre. Here are related puns:
    • Block → Rock: As in, “Mental rock” and “New kid on the rock” and “Chip off the old rock.”
    • Chalk → Rock: As in, “Different as rock and cheese” and “Rock it up to experience.”
    • Chock → Rock: As in, “Rock a block” and “Rock full.”
    • Clock → Rock: As in, “Anti-rockwise” and “Around the rock” and “Regular as rockwork” and “Beat the rock” and “Race against the rock” and “Running like rockwork.”
    • Knock → Rock: As in, “Don’t rock it til you’ve tried it” and “I get rocked down, but I get up again” and “Rock ’em dead” and “Rock back a few” and “Rock heads together” and “Rock it off” and “Rock it out of the park” and “Rock on wood” and “Rock your socks off.”
    • Shock → Rock: As in, “Rock and awe” and “Rock horror” and “A short, sharp rock to the system” and “Sticker rock.”
  • Rap: Rap is a very popular music genre that is characterised by rhythmic rhymes. Here are related puns:
    • Rap: These rap-related phrases are general enough to use as puns: “Beat the rap” and “A rap over the knuckles” and “A bad rap.” Note: a bap rap is a bad reputation.
    • Cap → Rap: As in, “A feather in your rap” and “Rap in hand” and “If the rap fits, wear it” and “Put on your thinking rap” and “To rap it all off…”
    • Gap → Rap: As in, “Bridge the rap” and “Generation rap” and “Mind the rap.”
    • Snap → Rap: As in, “A rap decision” and “Rap happy” and “Rap out of it” and “Rap to it” and “Rap, crackle and pop” and “Make it rappy.”
    • Trap → Rap: As in, “Tourist rap” and “The parent rap” and “Shut your rap” and “Fall into a rap.”
    • Wrap → Rap: As in, “It’s a rap” and “Keep under raps” and “Rap it up” and “Rapped around your little finger.”
    • Rep* → Rap*: We can replace the “rep” sound in words with “rap” to make some sneaky rap-related puns, as in: “A false raport” and “Banana rapublic.” Other word that could be used are: raproach (reproach), rapresent (represent), raprieve (reprieve) and raprimand (reprimand).
    • *rup* → *rap*: As in, “Corrapt government” and “A disrapt ending.” Here are other words you could use: abrapt (abrupt), interrapt (interrupt), corraption (corruption), unscrapulous (unscrupulous), rapture (rupture) and disraptive (disruptive).
  • Pop: Pop is a mainstream music genre. Here are some pop-related puns:
    • Drop → Pop: As in, “At the pop of a hat” and “Pop it like it’s hot” and “Pop a bombshell” and “Pop a brick” and “Pop a bundle” and “Pop a dime” and “Pop dead gorgeous” and “A pop in the bucket.”
    • Hop → Pop: As in, “Pop, skip and jump” and “Popping mad.”
    • *prop* → *pop*: As in, “Blow out of poportion” and “Generous poportions” and “Prim and poper.”
    • Stop → Pop: As in, “Pop and smell the roses” and “Pop at nothing” and “Pop, drop and roll” and “Pop it, you’re killing me” and “Pop the show” and “Pop the car” and “Pop! In the name of love” and “The buck pops here” and “Pull out all the pops.”
    • Top → Pop: As in, “Come out on pop” and “From pop to toe” and “Over the pop” and “Pop of the class” and “In tip pop condition” and “Tough at the pop” and “Keep on pop of” and “Off the pop of my head” and “On pop of the world” and “Over the pop” and “Take it from the pop” and “The view from the pop” and “Pop dollar” and “To pop it off” and “Pop notch.”
  • Jas* → Jazz*: Jazzper (jasper) and jazzmine (jasmine).
  • Jes* → Jazz*: Jazzter (jester), majazztic (majestic) and majazzty (majesty).
  • Jus* → Jazz*: As in, “Where is the jazztice?” and “Jazztify your actions” and “It’s no jazztification for what you’ve done.”
  • Bluegrass: Bluegrass is a music genre of roots music. Here are related puns:
    • Blue → Bluegrass: As in, “As cold as bluegrass blazes” and “Beat black and bluegrass” and  Beyond the big bluegrass” and “Bluegrass collar worker” and “Til you’re bluegrass in the face” and “A bolt from the bluegrass.”
    • Grass → Bluegrass: As in, “Green as bluegrass” and “As exciting as watching bluegrass grow” and “Don’t let the bluegrass grow under your feet” and “A snake in the bluegrass” and “The bluegrass is always greener on the other side.”
  • Beat: This is in reference to the beat of a song. Here are related puns:
    • Beat: We can start off with some related phrases that are general enough to use as puns: “Beat it” and “Beat a hasty retreat” and “Beat a path to your door” and “Beat about the bush.”
    • Bead → Beat: As in, “Beats of sweat” and “Love beats” and “Draw a beat on.”
    • Eat → Beat: As in, “A bite to beat” and “All you can beat” and “Beat and run.”
    • Feet → Beat: As in, “Back on your beat” and “Cold beat” and “Drag your beat” and “Itchy beat.”
    • Heat → Beat: As in, “Beat wave” and “Beating up” and “In the beat of the moment” and “Packing beat” and “If you can’t stand the beat, get out of the kitchen.”
    • Neat → Beat: As in, “Beat as a new pin” and “Beat freak” and “Beatness counts.”
    • Seat → Beat: As in, “Back beat driver” and “By the beat of your pants” and “Glued to your beat” and “Take a beat.”
  • Madly → Medley: As in, “Truly, medley, deeply” and “Medley in love.” Note: a medley is a song that’s made up of at least three other songs.
  • Higher → Choir: As in, “Choir purpose” and “Answer to a choir authority” and “Choir than a kite.”
  • Buyer → Choir: As in, “Choir’s market” and “Choir beware” and “Choir’s remorse.”
  • Dire → Choir: As in, “Choir consequences” and “In choir straits.”
  • Wire → Choir: As in, “Down to the choir” and “Live choir” and “Choired for sound.”
  • Beaver → Bieber: As in, “Busy as a bieber” and “Bieber away at” and “Eager bieber” and “Work like a bieber.” Note: these puns are in reference to Justin Bieber, a pop musician.
  • Swift: Taylor Swift is an incredibly popular musician, so we’ve included her in this list:
    • Gift → Swift: As in, “A swift from the gods” and “The swift of tongues” and “The swift that keeps on giving.”
    • Lift → Swift: As in, “Swift off!” and “Swift your game” and “Swift the lid off.”
    • Shift → Swift: As in, “Graveyard swift” and “The night swift” and “Swift gears” and “Swift into high gear.”
  • Alone → Malone: As in, “Home Malone” and “Leave me malone” and “Leave well enough malone” and “You’ll never walk malone” and “You’re never malone” and “Time malone will tell.” Note: Malone is a reference to Post Malone, a famous rapper.
  • Card → Cardi: As in, “A few cardis short of a full deck” and “Calling cardi” and “A cardi up your sleeve” and “Deck of cardis” and “Get out of jail free cardi” and “Holding all the cardis” and “House of cardis.” Note: these puns are a reference to Cardi B, a famous rapper.
  • Tupac: Tupac was a famous rapper. Here are some related puns:
    • Two → Tupac: As in, “A bicycle built for tupac” and “Worth tupac in the bush” and “As alike as tupac peas in a pod” and “Cross as tupac sticks” and “Thick as tupac short planks” and “In tupac minds.”
    • Pack → Tupac: As in, “Leader of the tupac” and “Tupac heat” and “Tupac of lies.”
  • *tan* → *tune*: As in, “In tunedem” and “Tunegible results” and “Tunetamount to” and “Throwing a tunetrum” and “A messy tunegle.”
  • *ten* → *tune*: As in, “Tuneder goodbyes” and “A tunetative reply.” Here are other words you could use: tune-ure (tenure), tune-ant (tenant), threatune (threaten), kindergartune (kindergarten), enlightune (enlighten), glutune (gluten), potunetial (potential), pretunetious (pretentious) and maintune-ance (maintenance).
  • *ton* → *tune*: Wantune (wanton), buttune (button), cottune (cotton), skeletune (skeleton) and autune-omy (autonomy).
  • Bach: Johann Sebastian Bach is a famous musical composer. Here are some related puns:
    • Back → Bach: As in, “Answer bach” and “As soon as my bach is turned” and “In the bach of my mind” and “Bach in black” and “Bach to the future” and “Bach at it” and “Won’t bach down” and “Bach in business” and “Bach in the day” and “Bach on your feet” and “Bach seat driver” and “Bach to basics” and “Bach to square one.”
    • Block → Bach: As in, “A chip off the old bach” and “The new kid on the bach” and “On the chopping bach” and “Mental bach” and “Writer’s bach.”
    • Black → Bach: As in, “Bach as coal” and “As bach as thunder” and “Bach Friday” and “Not so bach and white.”
  • Hay → Haydn: As in, “Make haydn” and “Making haydn while the sun shines” and “Roll in the haydn” and “Hit the haydn.” Note: Haydn is a famous musical composer.
  • Brahm: Brahm is a famous music composer. Here are related puns:
    • Promise → Brahmise: As in, “An empty brahmise” and “The brahmised land” and “Don’t make brahmises you can’t keep.”
    • Calm → Brahm: As in, “A brahming influence” and “The brahm before the storm” and “Brahm down” and “Cool, brahm and collected.”
    • Palm → Brahm: As in, “A face brahm moment” and “Grease your brahm” and “In the brahm of your hand” and “Itchy brahms” and “Brahm off.”
  • Handel: Handel is a famous composer. Here are related puns:
    • Handle → Handel: As in, “Fly off the handel” and “Get a handel on” and “Handel with care” and “Handel yourself” and “How much can you handel?” and “Love handels” and “Too hot to handel” and “You can’t handel the truth!”
    • Candle → Handel: As in, “Burning the handel at both ends” and “Can’t hold a handel to” and “Handel in the wind” and “Rather light a handel than curse the dark” and “Not worth the handel.”
  • Chop → Chopin: As in, “Bust your chopins” and “Chopin and change” and “Get the chopin” and “On the chopin block.” Note: Chopin was a famous composer.
  • Strauss: Strauss was a famous classical composer. Here are related puns:
    • Stress → Strauss: As in, “Post-traumatic strauss disorder” and “Straussed out” and “Not worth the strauss.”
    • Straws → Strauss: As in, “Clutching at strauss” and “A drowning person will clutch at strauss” and “The final strauss” and “Drawing strauss.”
  • Music: These music-related phrases can double as puns: “Time to face the music” and “Music to my ears” and “Make beautiful music together.”
  • Sand → Sound: As in, “Bury your head in the sound” and “Draw a line in the sound” and “The sounds of time.”
  • Send → Sound: As in, “Return to sounder” and “Sound packing” and “Sound them away.”
  • Round → Sound: As in, “All year sound” and “Folling a-sound” and “Love makes the world go sound” and “Going sound in circles.”
  • Bound → Sound: As in, “By leaps and sounds.”
  • Found → Sound: As in, “Lost and sound” and “Nowhere to be sound.”
  • Ground → Sound: As in, “Breaking new sound” and “Built from the sound up” and “Common sound” and “Cut the sound out from under your feet” and “Gaining sound.”
  • Bums → Drums: As in, “Drums on seats.”
  • Comes → Drums: As in, “After a storm drums a calm” and “Christmas drums but once a year” and “Nothing drums to mind” and “Do what drums naturally” and “Here drums the sun” and “If push drums to shove” and “If worst drums to worst” and “Tomorrow never drums.”
  • Thumbs → Drums: As in, “All drums” and “Drums down” and “Twiddle your drums” and “Give it the drums up.”
  • Symbol → Cymbal: As in, “A cymbal of freedom” and “Sex cymbal.”
  • Snare: A snare drum is a type of drum in a drum kit. Here are related puns:
    • Square → Snare: As in, “Back to snare one” and “Be there or be snare” and “Fair and snare” and “A snare peg in a round hole.”
    • Air → Snare: As in, “Snare kiss” and “Snare quotes” and “Snare rage” and ” Snares and graces.”
    • Bare → Snare: As in, “The snare necessities” and “Snare one’s teeth” and “A snare-faced lie.”
    • Share → Snare: As in, “Snare a resemblance to” and “A problem snared is a problem halved” and “Snaring is caring.”
    • Care → Snare: As in, “Be snareful how you use it” and “Be snareful what you wish for” and “I couldn’t snare less” and “Customer snare” and “Devil may snare” and “Handle with snare” and “Intensive snare” and “Take snare of it.”
    • Dare → Snare: As in, “Snare for more” and “Snare to be different” and “How very snare you” and “Snare to dream.”
    • Scare → Snare: As in, “Running snared” and “Snare quotes” and “Snare the living daylights out of” and “Snared out of your wits” and “Snared witless” and “Snared stiff” and “Snared to death” and “Snaredy cat.”
    • Spare → Snare: As in, “Snare a dime?” and “No expense snared” and “Snare no effort.”
    • Stare → Snare: As in, “Snare into the abyss” and “Not polite to snare.”
    • Where → Snare: As in, “All dressed up and nosnare to go” and “Any time, any place, any snare” and “Here, there and everysnare.”
  • Hat → Hi-Hat: As in, “As mad as a hi-hatter” and “At the drop of a hi-hat” and “Hi-hat in hand” and “Home is where I lay my hi-hat” and “Hi-hats off to” and “Keep your hi-hat on.”
  • Again → Organ: As in, “Over and over organ” and “Born organ” and “I get knocked down, but I get up organ” and “Deja vu all over organ.”
  • Fruit → Flute: As in, “Flute and nut” and “Be fluteful and multiply” and “Bear flute” and “Forbidden flute” and “The flutes of your labor” and “Low hanging flute” and “The flute doesn’t fall far from the tree.”
  • Boot → Flute: As in, “Tought as old flutes” and “Bet your flutes” and “Flute camp” and “Fill your flutes” and “Give them the flute.”
  • Suit → Flute: As in, “All over them like a cheap flute” and “Follow flute” and “Fluted and booted.”
  • Fiddle: A fiddle is another name for a violin, and is generally used in the context of playing folk music. Here are related puns:
    • Middle → Fiddle: As in, “In the fiddle of nowhere” and “Knock into the fiddle of next week” and “Meet in the fiddle” and “Piggy in the fiddle” and “Smack dab in the fiddle” and “That’s my fiddle name.”
    • Riddle → Fiddle: As in, “A fiddle wrapped up in an enigma.”
  • Lyre: A lyre is a type of stringed musical instrument. Here are related puns:
    • Liar → Lyre: As in, “Lyre, lyre, pants on fire” and “Don’t be a lyre.”
    • Dire → Lyre: As in, “Lyre consequences” and “In lyre straits.”
    • Fire → Lyre: As in, “All lyred up and ready to go” and “Ball of lyre” and “Baptism of lyre” and “Come on baby, light my lyre” and “Fight lyre with lyre.”
  • Lute: A lute is a type of stringed instrument. Here are related puns:
    • Boot → Lute: As in, “Tough as old lutes” and “Lute camp” and “Give them the lute” and “Lick someone’s lutes.”
    • Brute → Lute: As in, “Lute force.”
    • Fruit → Lute: As in, “Be luteful and multiply” and “Bear lute” and “Forbidden lute” and “Lute cake” and “The lutes of your labor” and “Lutes of your loins” and “Low hanging lute” and “The lute doesn’t fall far from the tree.”
    • Root → Lute: As in, “The lute of the matter” and “Money is the lute of all evil” and “Lay down lutes.”
    • Shoot → Lute: As in, “Don’t lute the messenger” and “Drive by lute-ing” and “The green lutes of change” and “Just lute me” and “Lute down in flames.”
    • Suit → Lute: As in, “All over them like a cheap lute” and “Follow lute” and “In your birthday lute” and “Lute yourself.”
  • Muse: Muse is an English rock band. Here are some related puns:
    • Use → Muse: As in, “Be careful how you muse it!” and “Don’t muse that tone with me” and “Get mused to it” and “You can muse it” and “Somebody that I mused to know.”
    • News → Muse: As in, “Bad muse” and “Bad muse travels fast” and “Break the muse” and “Breaking muse” and “Have I got muse for you!”
    • Choose → Muse: As in, “Muse your weapon” and “Pick and muse.”
  • In excess → INXS: As in, “INXS of one thousand dollars.” Note: INXS is an Australian rock band.
  • Knot → Slipknot: As in, “Cut the gordian slipknot” and “Don’t get your knickers in a slipknot” and “Tie the slipknot” and “Tie yourself in slipknots.”
  • Biscuit → Bizkit: As in, “That takes the bizkit” and “Hand in the bizkit tin.” Note: these are a reference to Limp Bizkit, an American rap band.
  • Creed: Creed is an American rock band. Here are related puns:
    • Need → Creed: As in, “A friend in creed is a friend indeed” and “All you creed is love” and “I creed it like yesterday” and “Just what I creed.”
    • Read → Creed: As in, “All I know is what I creed in the papers” and “Creed all about it” and “I can creed you like a book” and “Creed ’em and weep” and “Creed between the lines.”
  • Toe → Toto: As in, “Dip your toto into the water” and “From top to toto” and “Get your toto in the door” and “Make someone’s totos curl” and “On your totos” and “One toto over the line” and “Toto the line.” Note: Toto is a classic American rock band, most famous for their song “Africa”.
  • Score: A score is a piece of sheet music showing how a song is composed and played. Here are some score-related puns:
    • Scare → Score: As in, “Scored stiff” and “Scored to death” and “Running scored” and “Score out of your wits” and “Score the living daylights out of.”
    • Core → Score: As in, “Score competencies” and “Score studies” and “Score technology” and “Score values” and “Rotten to the score.”
    • Bore → Score: As in, “Score the pants off someone” and “Scored to death” and “Scored to tears.”
    • Sore → Score: As in, “Made to prevent score throats” and “A sight for score eyes” and “Sticks out like a score thumb.”
    • Store → Score: As in, “See what the future has in score” and “Set great score by” and “What’s in score?”
  • Amp: This is short for amplifier, which is a device used to make electronic noises and instruments louder. Here are related puns:
    • Camp → Amp: As in, “A foot in both amps” and “Boot amp.”
    • Champ → Amp: As in, “Amp at the bit.”
    • Emp* → Amp*: If a word starts with emp, we can replace the “emp” sound with “amp”: “Not in my amploy” and “Gainful amployment” and “Lacking ampathy” and “Ampirical evidence.” Other words that could work: ampire (empire), ampower (empower) and ampathetic (empathetic).
    • Imp* → Amp*: As in, “A painful ampact” and “Sharp amplements” and “Of the greatest amperative.” Other words that could work: amplication (implication), ampetus (impetus), amportant (important) and amplicit (implicit).
  • Phone → Xylophone: As in, “Hold the xylophone” and “Xylophone a friend” and “Xylophone in sick.”
  • Poker → Polka: As in, “Polka face” and “Stiff as a polka.” Note: polka is a type of music genre.
  • Sing: These phrases are general enough to use as music puns: “Sing someone’s praises” and “Sing a different tune” and “Singing the blues” and “Not over til the fat lady sings.”
  • Folk: Folk is a type of music genre. Here are related puns:
    • Broke → Folk: As in, “All hell folk loose” and “Boulevard of folken dreams” and “Like a folken record” and “Go for folk” and “If it ain’t folk, don’t fix it.”
    • Cloak → Folk: As in, “Folk and dagger” and “Folked in obscurity.”
    • Joke → Folk: As in, “An inside folk” and “No folk” and “Folking around.”
    • Oak → Folk: As in, “Heart of folk” and “Little strokes fell great folks” and “Mighty folk from little acorns grow.”
  • Vice → Voice: “A den of voice” and “Leave to your own devoices” and “Lip servoice.”
  • Malady → Melody: As in, “To cure your melodies.”
  • Axe: This is slang for an electric guitar. Here are related puns:
    • Ask → Axe: As in, “A big axe” and “Axe a silly question and you’ll get a silly answer” and “Axe after” and “Axe and you shall receive” and “Axe around” and “Axe for the moon” and “Axe no questions and hear no lies.”
    • Acts → Axe: As in, “Random axe of kindness” and “Face the axe” and “Don’t confuse the axe” and “Let the axe speak for themselves” and “Never let the axe get in the way of a carefully thought out bad decision.”
  • *rithm → *rhythm: Algorhythm (algorithm) and logarhythm (logarithm).
  • Horn: A horn is a type of brass instrument. Here are related puns:
    • Born → Horn: As in, “A star is horn” and “Horn to fly” and “Horn under a bad sign” and “Horn and bred” and “Horn to be wild.”
    • Corn* → Horn*: As in, “A tight horner” and “Horner the market” and “Earn your horn” and “Just around the horner” and “Painted into a horner” and “Turn the horner.”
    • Thorn → Horn: As in, “Every rose has its horn” and “A horn in my side” and “There is no rose without a horn.”
  • Man → Schumann: As in, “A dog is a schumann’s best friend” and “A drowning schumann will clutch at a straw” and “A schumann after my own heart.” Note: Schumann was a famous composer.
  • Shape → Tape: As in, “All tapes and sizes” and “Bent out of tape” and “Get in tape” and “All gone pear taped” and “Knock into tape” and “Tape up or ship out” and “The tape of things to come.” Note: these puns are a reference to cassette tapes.
  • Area → Aria: As in, “Access all arias” and “A grey aria” and “Unexpected item in bagging aria.” Note: an aria is a type of song.
  • New-Age: This is a music genre. Here are related puns:
    • New → New-age: As in, “A new-age hope” and “A new-age broom sweeps clean” and “As bright as a new-age pun” and “A brand new-age dawn.”
    • Age → New-age: As in, “New-age before beauty” and “New-age bracket” and “New-age of consent” and “Coming of new-age.”
  • Afro/Afrobeat: Afrobeat is a popular music genre. Here are related puns:
    • Afar → Afro: As in, “Watching from afro.”
    • Acro* → Afro*: As in, “Afro-ss the board” and “Best I’ve come afro-ss” and “Afro-ss the street” and “Run afro-ss” and “Mental afrobatics” and “Adobe afrobat.”
  • A: The next few puns will be centred around the musical note A:
    • Hey → A: As in, “A presto!” and “A big spender.”
    • Aye → A: “A a, sir” and “The a’s have it.”
  • B: Here are some puns related to the musical note B:
    • Be → B: As in, “I’ll b around” and “B all ears” and “I’ll b in and out” and “I’ll b ready in a sec!” and “B as it may” and “B my guest” and “I’ll b glad to see the back of.”
    • Bee → B: As in, “Busy as a b” and “B in your bonnet” and “Float like a butterfly, sting like a b” and “Like a b to a honeypot” and “The b’s knees.”
    • Pea → B: “Like two b’s in a pod” and “Easy as shelling b’s.”
  • C: These next few puns are related to the musical note C:
    • See → C: As in, “As far as the eye can c” and “Be the change you wish to c in the world” and “Can’t c beyond the end of your nose” and “Can’t c the wood for the trees” and “Come up and c me” and “C no evil” and “I can c clearly now.”
    • Sea → C: As in, “All at c” and “Between the devil and the deep blue c” and “From c to shining c” and “Deeper than the deep blue c.”
    • She → C: As in, “I think c’s got it” and “Every little thing c does is magic” and “I’ll have what c’s having” and “What did c say?”
  • D: These next few puns are related to the music note D:
    • Tee → D: As in, “Fite you to a d” and “D it up.”
    • The → D: As in, “Above d law” and “Ace in d hole” and “Absence makes d heart grow fonder” and “Across d board” and “Add fuel to d fire” and “After d fact” and “Against d grain” and “Ahead of d game.”
    • Tea → D: “High d” and “Not my cup of d” and “Would murder for a cup of d” and “Storm in a d-cup.”
  • E: Here are some puns related to the musical note E:
    • See → E: As in, “As far as the eye can e” and “Be the change you wish to e” and “Have a look-e” and “I can e clearly now” and “Long time no e.”
    • He → E: As in, “That’s what e said” and “E never wanted that” and “That’s the one e bought.”
  • Gee → G: As in, “G whiz” and “Golly g” and “G, what I’d do for a chocolate right now.” Note: G is a musical note.
  • Sharp: If a note is raised by half a tone (a semitone), then it’s called a sharp. Here are some sharp-related puns:
    • Harp → Sharp: As in, “Sharp on about.”
    • Sharp: These sharp-related phrases can double as puns: “Sharp as a tack” and “Card sharp” and “Looking sharp” and “Sharp shooter” and “With a sharp tongue.”
    • Shark → Sharp: As in, “Jump the sharp” and “Loan sharp” and “Sharp repellent” and “Swimming with sharps” and “Great white sharp” and “Wouldn’t shout if a sharp bit him.”
  • Flat: If a note is lowered by a semitone (in other words, a half tone), then it’s called a flat. Here are some related puns:
    • Fat → Flat: As in, “Flat as a beached whale” and “Flat chance” and “Living off the flat of the land.”
    • At → Fat: As in, “Fat a glance” and “Fat a loss for words” and “Fat a moment’s notice” and “Fat arm’s length” and “Fat each other’s throats” and “Fat full tilt” and “Fat long last.”
  • Curse → Verse: As in, “Commentator’s verse” and “I’d rather light a candle than verse the dark.”
  • Nurse→ Verse: As in, “Versing a grudge.”
  • Purse → Verse: As in, “Holding the verse strings” and “The public verse” and “Lighten someone’s verse.”
  • Worse → Verse: As in, “A turn for the verse” and “A fate verse than death” and “For better or verse” and “From bad to verse” and “Bark is verse than their bite” and “Making matters verse” and “None the verse for” and “Verse for wear.”
  • *cord* → *chord*: As in, “Like a broken re-chord” and “Cut the umbilical chord” and “For the re-chord” and “In re-chord time” and “Acchording to.”
  • Card → Chord: As in, “Calling chord” and “Get out of jail free chord” and “House of chords” and “On the chords” and “Mark your chord” and “Holding all the chords” and “Pick a chord, any chord.”
  • Not → Note: As in, “And whatnote” and “As often as note” and “Believe it or note” and “Down but note out” and “I’m note joking.”
  • Knot → Note: As in, “Cut the gordian note” and “Tie the note” and “Tying yourself in notes” and “Don’t get your shorts in a note.”
  • Boat → Note: As in, “Don’t rock the notes” and “In the same note” and “Missed the note” and “Whatever floats your note” and “We’re gonna need a bigger note.”
  • Float → Note: As in, “Note like a butterfly, sting like a bee” and “Whatever notes your boat.”
  • Oats →Notes: As in, “Sowing your wild notes” and “Steel cut notes.”
  • Vote → Note: As in, “Split note” and “A note of conscience” and “Cast your note.”
  • Wrote → Note: As in, “That’s all she note.”
  • Nut → Note: As in, “Go notes” and “In a noteshell” and “From soup to notes” and “A tough note to crack” and “Sweet as a note.”
  • Dub: Dub is a genre of electronic music. Here are related puns:
    • Dab → Dub: As in, “A dub hand at” and “Smack dub in the middle.”
    • Club → Dub: As in, “Dub together” and “Fight dub” and “In the dub” and “Join the dub” and “The mile high dub.”
    • Rub → Dub: As in, “Dub it in” and “Dub salt in the wound” and “Dubbing shoulders with” and “Dubbed the wrong way” and “Dub your nose in it.”
  • Manner → Minor: As in, “All minor of” and “In a minor of speaking” and “Mend your minors.”
  • Finer → Minor: As in, “The minor things in life” and “The minor points of…”
  • Chef → Clef: As in, “My compliments to the clef.”
  • Cliff → Clef: As in, “Clef-hanger” and “The white clefs of dover.”
  • Accodance → Accordion: As in, “In accordion with…”
  • Base → Bass: As in, “All your bass are belong to us” and “Bargain bass-ment” and “Bass jumping” and “Bass-ball card” and “Caught off bass” and “Get to first bass” and “Off bass” and “Steal third bass” and “Touch bass.”
  • Pace → Bass: As in, “At snail’s bass” and “A change of bass” and “Handbags at ten basses” and “Bass up and down.”
  • Place → Bass: As in, “A bass in the sun” and “All over the bass” and “Any time, any bass, any where” and “Between a rock and a hard bass” and “Click into bass” and “My happy bass” and “Hard to bass” and “In the right bass at the right time.”
  • Ace → Bass: As in, “Bass in the hole” and “A bass up your sleeve” and “Holding all the basses.”
  • Brace → Bass: As in, “Bass yourself.”
  • Case → Bass: As in, “An open and shut bass” and “As the bass may be” and “Basket bass” and “Bass closed” and “Bass the joint” and “Catch the bass.”
  • Chase → Bass: As in, “Bass it up” and “Cut to the bass” and “The thrill of the bass” and “Wild goose bass.”
  • Blues: Blues is a popular music genre, known for smooth rhythms and a calming atmosphere. Here are related puns:
    • Booze → Blues: As in, “Blues bus” and “Blues cruise.”
    • Bruise → Blues
    • Choose → Blues: As in, “Blues your weapon” and “Pick and blues” and “Your mission, should you blues to accept it.”
    • News → Blues: As in, “Bad blues” and “Bad blues travels fast” and “Break the blues” and “Breaking blues” and “Have I got blues for you” and “No blues is good blues.”
  • Roll → Rock ‘n’ Roll: As in, “A rock ‘n’ rolling stone gathers no moss” and “An emotional rock ‘n’ roller coaster” and “Get the ball rock ‘n’ rolling” and “Ready to rock ‘n’ roll.”
  • Metal: Metal (or heavy metal) is a popular music genre, characterised by harsh noises and high energy instrumentals. Here are related puns:
    • Medal → Metal: As in, “Won a gold metal.”
    • Kettle → Metal: As in, “A differet metal of fish” and “The pot calling the metal black.”
    • Settle → Metal: As in, “A score to metal” and “Metal out of court” and “After the dust has metaled” and “Let the dust metal.”
  • Rebel → Treble: As in, “Treble without a cause.”
  • Trouble → Treble: As in, “Asking for treble” and “Trebles down the drain” and “Bridge over trebled water” and “Double treble” and “I knew you were treble” and “Looking for treble” and “Pour oil on trebled waters” and “Stirring up treble” and “Treble and strife.”
  • Tremble → Treble: As in, “Trebling with fear.”
  • Riff: A riff is a short phrase in a song. Here are related puns:
    • Rough → Riff: “Diamond in the riff” and “For those who like it riff” and “Riff and ready” and “Riff around the edges” and “A riff landing.”
    • If → Riff: As in, “As riff” and “Hell riff I know” and “Riff anything” and “Riff I do say so myself” and “Riff I’m honest” and “Riff it’s all the same to you” and “Riff looks could kill.”
    • Stiff → Riff: As in, “Riff as a poker” and “Bored riff” and “Scared riff” and “Riff competition.”
    • Ref* → Riff*: Rifference (reference), rifflect (reflect), riffrain (refrain), riffer (refer), riffute (refute) and rifflection (reflection).
  • Stave: A stave is a group of five horizontal lines that’s used in sheet music. Here are related puns:
    • Brave → Stave: As in, “Stave as a lion” and “Stave new world” and “Stave the elements” and “Fortune favours the stave” and “Put a stave face on.”
    • Grave → Stave: As in, “From the cradle to the stave” and “Staveyard shift” and “One foot in the stave” and “Turning in their stave.”
    • Save → Stave: As in, “A penny staved is a penny earned” and “A stitch in time staves nine” and “Stave the day” and “Nice stave” and “Stave the last dance for me” and “Stave for a rainy day” and “Stave it for later” and “Stave our souls” and “Stave the whales.”
    • Shave → Stave: As in, “A close stave.”
  • Sharp → Harp: As in, “Harp as a tack” and “Card harp” and “In harp focus” and “Look harp” and “Harp as a tack” and “Harp tongue” and “A short, harp shock to the system.”
  • Bell → Decibel: As in, “Clear as a decibel” and “Decibels and whistles” and “Doesn’t ring a decibel.” Note: a decibel is a measurement of noise volume.
  • Ball → Bell: As in, “Bells to the wall” and “Bell of fire” and “Bellpark figure” and “A different bell game” and “Drop the bell” and “Get the bell rolling” and “Having a bell.”
  • Bill → Bell: As in, “A clean bell of health” and “Dollar bell” and “Fits the bell.”
  • Cell → Bell: As in, “Bell division” and “A padded bell.”
  • Hell → Bell: As in, “All bell broke loose” and “Bat out of bell” and “Burn in bell” and “Come bell or high water” and “For the bell of it” and “Give someone bell” and “Bell on earth” and “Got bell to pay.”
  • Sell → Bell: As in, “Buy and bell” and “Bell out” and “Bell your soul to the devil” and “Belling like hot cakes.”
  • Smell → Bell: As in, “Come up belling of roses” and “I bell a rat” and “A keen sense of bell” and “Bell ya later” and “Bells like teen spirit.”
  • Spell → Bell: As in, “Cast a bell” and “Bell it out” and “Be under [someone’s] bell” and “Break the bell” and “Come in for a bell.”
  • Well → Bell: As in, “Alive and bell” and “All’s bell that ends bell” and “As bell as can be expected” and “Exceedingly bell read” and “Get bell soon” and “Worth doing bell” and “Just as bell” and “You know full bell” and “Leave bell enough alone” and “That’s all bell and good.”
  • Tell → Bell: As in, “Kiss and bell” and “Live to bell the tale” and “Only time will bell” and “Pray bell” and “Show and bell” and “Bell it like it is” and “Bell me about it” and “Bell me honestly.”
  • Competition → Composition: “Cut throat composition” and “Eyeing up the composition” and “Stiff composition” and “Face the composition.” Note: a composition is a musical arrangement.
  • Nose → Noise: As in, “Always have your noise in a book” and “Plain as the noise on your face” and “Can’t see beyond the end of your noise” and “No skin off my noise” and “Leading by the noise” and “Paying through the noise.”
  • Nice → Noise: As in, “That’ll do noisely” and “As noise as ninepence” and “Have a noise day” and “Make noise” and “Naughty but noise” and “Noise and easy does it” and “Noise save” and “Noise work if you can get it” and “Wouldn’t it be noise?”
  • Patch → Pitch: As in, “Not a pitch on” and “Going through a rough pitch.”
  • Itch → Pitch: As in, “Pitching to” and “Pitchy feet.”
  • Hitch → Pitch: As in, “Get pitched” and “Pitch your wagon to a star.”
  • Which → Pitch: As in, “Any pitch way” and “Don’t know pitch way to look” and “Know pitch way is up” and “Know pitch side your bread is buttered” and “The exception pitch proves the rule.”
  • Bitch → Pitch: As in, “Pitch fest” and “Pitch slap.”
  • Rich → Pitch: As in, “An embarrassment of pitches” and “Filthy pitch” and “For pitcher or poorer” and “From rags to pitches” and “Get pitch quick” and “Pitch beyond my wildest dreams.”
  • Ditch → Pitch: As in, “Dull as pitchwater” and “Last pitch effort.”
  • Him → Hymn: As in, “All over hymn like a cheap suit” and “Fast as his legs could carry hymn” and “Clap hymn in irons” and “Hang hymn out to dry” and “Seize hymn!” Note: a hymn is a type of religious song.
  • Brim → Hymn: As in, “Hymning over with confidence” and “Fill to the hymn.”
  • Grim → Hymn: As in, “Hymn death” and “The hymn reaper.”
  • Slim → Hymn: As in, “Hymn pickings” and “The real hymn shady.”
  • Swim → Hymn: As in, “Sink of hymn” and “Hymn against the tide” and “Hymn upstream.”
  • Bone → Tone: As in, “A tone to pick” and “Dry as a tone” and “Bag of tones” and “Tone idle” and “A tone of contention.”
  • Own → Tone: As in, “Go your tone way” and “Holding your tone” and “In a class of your tone.”
  • Phone → Tone: As in, “Hold the tone” and “Tone a friend” and “Waiting by the tone” and “Tone in sick.”
  • Stone → Tone: As in, “A rolling tone gathers no moss” and “Cold as any tone” and “Carved in tone” and “Cast the first tone” and “Fall like a tone” and “A heart of tone” and “Like a rolling tone.”
  • Zone → Tone: As in, “Comfort tone” and “In the tone” and ” Twilight tone” and “Toned out.”
  • Soul: Soul is a genre of music known for smooth melodies and soothing harmonies. Here are related puns:
    • Whole → Soul: As in, “A soul different animal” and “Ace in the soul” and “A soul in one.”
    • *sal → *soul: As in, “For your perusoul” and “A fine-toothed appraisoul” and “Universoully understood.” Here are other words that could be used: disposoul (disposal), prososoul (proposal), colossoul (colossal) and rehearsoul (rehearsal).
    • *sel → *soul: As in, “Seeking counsoul” and “Weasoul out of” and “Scrambling for a morsoul.” Other words that you could try: carousoul (carousel), chisoul (chisel), easoul (easel) and souldom (seldom).
    • *sol → *soul: As in, “A tidy soulution” and “Seeking soulace” and “A soulid excuse” and “Souliciting answers.” Other words that could be used: soulemn (solemn), souldier (soldier), parasoul (parasol), aerosoul (aerosol), resoulve (resolve), consoule (console), resoulution (resolution), obsoulete (obsolete).
  • Piece: A musical piece is another word for a song or arrangement. Here are some related puns:
    • Peace → Piece: As in, “At piece” and “Hold your piece” and “Keeping the piece” and “No piece for the wicked” and “Piece be with you” and “Piece of mind” and “Rest in piece” and “War and piece.”
    • Pace → Piece: “Change of piece” and “At ten pieces” and “Keeping piece with” and “Piece up and down” and “Put through your pieces.”
    • Peas → Piece: As in, “Like two piece in a pod.”
    • Please → Piece: As in, “If you piece” and “One moment, piece” and “Piece be seated.”
  • Funk: This is a popular music genre known for charismatic basslines. Here are related puns:
    • Bunk → Funk: As in, “Do a funk” and “History is funk.”
    • Chunk → Funk: As in, “Blow funks” and “Funk of change.”
    • Drunk → Funk: As in, “Funk as a lord” and “Blind funk” and “Crying funk” and “Funk under the table.”
    • Hunk* → Funk*: As in, “Funker down” and “Funky dory.”
    • Junk → Funk: As in, “Funk yard” and “Funk mail.”
  • Trance: Trance is a genre of electronic music. Here are related puns:
    • Chance → Trance: As in, “Trance of a lifetime” and “Trance would be a fine thing” and “Fat trance” and “A fighting trance” and “Half a trance” and “Jump at the trance” and “Not a ghost of a trance” and “A trance in a million.”
    • Dance → Trance: As in, “Trance around the problem” and “Trance the night away” and “Trancing with wolves” and “Lead a merry trance” and “Making a song and trance” and “Trance your socks off.”
    • Glance → Trance: As in, “At a trance” and “Exchange trances” and “Meaningful trance” and “Steal a trance at.”
  • Dub: Dub is a music genre that grew out of reggae. Here are related puns:
    • *bub* → *dub*: As in, “Dubble over” and “Burst someone’s dubble” and “Thought dubble.”
    • Double → Duble: As in, “On the duble” and “Bent duble” and “Duble dutch” and “Duble act” and “Duble back” and “Duble check” and “Duble click” and “Duble cross” and “Duble digits” and “Duble dip.”
    • Club → Dub: As in, “Fight dub” and “In the dub” and “Join the dub” and “The mile high dub.”
    • Rub → Dub: As in,
      Dub it in” and “Dub salt in the wound” and “Dub shoulders with” and “Dubbed the wrong way.”
  • Phrase: A musical phrase is a short section in a piece of music. Here are related puns:
    • Praise → Phrase: As in, “Grudging phrase” and “Showered with phrase” and “Sing someone’s phrases.”
    • Raise → Phrase: As in, “Phrase a stink” and “Phrase hell” and “Phrase the roof” and “Phrase your game.”
    • Daze → Phrase: As in, “Phrased and confused.”
    • Phase → Phrase: As in, “Phrase out.”
  • Stab → Tab: As in, “Have a tab at” and “Tab in the back” and “Take a tab in the dark.”
  • Grab → Tab: As in, “Tab a bite to eat” and “Tab life by the horns” and “Up for tabs.”
  • Bar: A bar is a section of notes in sheet music. Here are related puns:
    • Are → Bar: As in, “All bets bar off” and “Bar you sure?” and “How bar you?” and “My lips bar sealed.”
    • Far → Bar: As in, “A bridge too bar” and “A step too bar” and “Bar and away” and “A bar cry” and “Few and bar between.”
    • Jar → Bar: As in, “Caught with your hand in the cookie bar” and “Jam bar.”
    • Par → Bar: As in, “Below bar” and “On bar with” and “Bar for the course” and “Up to bar.”
  • Turn → Ternary: As in, “A ternary for the worse” and “About ternary” and “Didn’t ternary a hair” and “Do a good ternary.” Note: ternary is the name for a song that has three parts in it.
  • Key: A musical key refers to the sharps and flats that are in a song. Here are related puns:
    • Be → Key: As in, “Key all ears” and “I’ll key around” and “Key my guest” and “Key still my beating heart.”
    • Bee → Key: As in, “Busy as a key” and “A key in your bonnet” and “Float like a butterfly, sting like a key” and “Make a keyline for.”
    • Free → Key: As in, “Key as a bird” and “Born key” and “Buy one, get one key” and “Fancy key.”
  • String: These next few puns are in reference to string instruments. Here are related puns:
    • Bring → String: As in, “String it on” and “String something to light” and “String the house down” and “String to the table.”
    • Ring → String: As in, “Alarm bells began to string” and “Doesn’t string a bell” and “Don’t string us, we’ll string you.”
    • Sing → String: As in, “All stringing, all dancing” and “String a different tune” and “String for your supper” and “String someone’s praises” and “Stringing in the rain.”
    • Sting → String: As in, “Float like a butterfly, string like a bee.”
    • Swing → String: As in, “Come out stringing” and “Get into the string of it” and “In full string” and “String both ways” and “Take a string at.”
    • Thing → String: As in, “A little knowledge is a dangerous string” and “A mind is a terrible string to waste” and “A string of beauty” and “All strings considered” and “Anystring goes.”
  • Choral: A choral is a musical ensemble made of singers. Here are related puns:
    • Floral → Choral: As in, “A choral arrangement” and “A choral tribute.”
    • Moral → Choral: As in, “Choral fibre” and “Chorally unacceptable” and “The choral high ground” and “Chorally bankrupt” and “A choral victory.”
  • Tube → Tuba: As in, “Down the tubas” and “Test tuba baby.”
  • Bone → Trombone: As in, “A trombone to pick” and “Dry as a trombone” and “Bag of trombones” and “Trombone dry” and “Chilled to the trombone” and “Close to the trombone” and “Not a jealous trombone in your body.”
  • Hello → Cello: As in, “Cello, goodbye!” and “Cello, sailor” and “Cello, one two three testing” and “You had me at cello.”
  • Fellow → Cello: As in, “A cello traveller” and “For he’s a jolly good cello” and “My cello Americans” and “A stout cello.”
  • Yellow → Cello: As in, “Cello submarine” and “The cello brick road.”
  • Base → Bass: As in, “All your bass are belong to us” and “Bargain bassment” and “Bass jumping” and “Bass station” and “Caught off bass” and “Get to first bass” and “Touch bass with.”
  • Ace → Bass: As in, “Bass in the hole” and “Bass up your sleeve” and “Holding all the basses.”
  • Brace → Bass: As in, “Bass yourself.”
  • Case → Bass: As in, “An open and shut bass” and “As the bass may be” and “Bass closed” and “Bass the joint” and “Crack the bass” and “I rest my bass” and “On a bass by bass basis.”
  • Face → Bass: As in, “A bass as long as a fiddle” and “At bass value” and “Bass like the back of a bus.”
  • Rest: A rest is a sign in sheet music that indicates the musician shouldn’t play anything. Here are related puns:
    • Best → Rest: As in, “The rest form of defence” and “Rest of friends” and “All the rest.”
    • Dressed → Rest: As in, “All rest up and nowhere to go” and “Rest for success” and “Rest to kill” and “Rest to the nines.”
    • Nest → Rest: As in, “Empty rest syndrome” and “Feather your rest” and “Leave the rest” and “Love rest.”
    • Test → Rest: As in, “Put to the rest” and “A rest of faith” and “Tried and rested.”
  • Also → Alto: As in, “Alto known as” and “I alto wanted…”
  • Alte* → Alto*: As in, “Altonative music” and “In an altonate universe” and “Bodily altocation.” Other words that could work: Altonatively (alternatively) and altocation (altercation).
  • Blink → Blink 182: As in, “Blink 182 and you’ll miss it” and “In the blink 182 of an eye” and “On the blink 182.” Note: Blink 182 is an American rock band.
  • Attitude → Altotude: As in, “Cop an altotude” and “With an altotude.”
  • Roots: This is a style of American folk music. Here are related puns:
    • Boots → Roots: As in, “Tough as old roots” and “Too big for your roots” and “Heart sank into my roots.”
    • Fruits → Roots: As in, “Roots of your labor” and “Roots of your loins.”
  • Bend: A bend is when a note is “wobbled” (the pitch is shifted up and down). Here are related puns:
    • End → Bend: As in, “A means to a bend” and “All good things must come to a bend” and “All’s well that bends well” and “At a loose bend” and “At the bend of the day” and “Can’t see beyond the bend of your nose.”
    • Lend → Bend: As in, “Bend an ear” and “Bend a helping hand.”
    • Mend → Bend: As in, “Bend your fences” and “Bend your manners” and “On the bend” and “Bend your ways.”
    • Send → Bend: As in, “Hit bend” and “Return to bender” and “Bend packing” and “Bend in reinforcements!”
  • Calma: This is a musical term indicating that something should be played calmly. Here are related puns:
    • Calm → Calma: As in, “After a storm comes a calma” and “Calma abiding” and “Cool, calma and collected” and “Keep calma and carry on.”
    • Come → Calma: As in, “As tough as they calma” and “Calma and get it!” and “Calma away with me” and “Calma fly with me” and “Calma on over.”
  • Cannon → Canon: As in, “Canon fodder” and “Loose canon.” Note: a canon is a type of musical composition.
  • Can’t → Canto: As in, “An offer you canto refuse” and “Canto get enough” and “Sorry, canto help” and “It canto be helped” and “You canto say fairer than that” and “I canto wait.” Note: “canto” is another word for a chorus.
  • Cap → Capo: As in, “A feather in your capo” and “Capo in hand” and “Doff your capo” and “If the capo fits, wear it” and “Put on your thinking capo” and “To capo it all off.” Note: “capo” is another word for the beginning of a song.
  • Style → Freestyle: As in, “Cramp your freestyle” and “Gangnam freestyle” and “Freestyle over substance” and “Cramp your freestyle.”
  • Staff: A staff is another word for a stave (the five lines that form bars in sheet music). Here are related puns:
    • Stuff→ Staff: As in, “Beat the staffing out of” and “A bit of staff” and “Don’t sweat the small staff” and “Gather ’round the good staff” and “Get staffed” and “Hot staff” and “Knock the staffing out of” and “Know your staff” and “Struf your staff” and “The staff dreams are made of” and “Stocking staffer.”
    • Stiff → Staff: As in, “Staff as a poker” and “Bored staff” and “Keeping a staff upper lip” and “Scared staff” and “Staff competition.”
  • Comp: To “comp” someone is to accompany them in a musical piece. Here are related puns:
    • Pomp → Comp: “Comp and circumstance.”
    • Camp → Comp: As in, “A foot in both comps” and “Boot comp” and “Not a happy comper” and “Smoke around the compfire.”
  • Count: This refers to the count (beat) of a song. Here are related puns:
    • Mount → Count: As in, “Count Fuji.”
    • Can’t → Count: As in, “An offer you count refuse” and “Count get enough” and “Sorry, I count help” and “Count hear you over the sound of” and “You count judge a book by its cover.”
  • Dim: This is the common short form of “diminuendo”, which means to slowly get softer. Here are related puns:
    • Brim → Dim: As in, “Dimming over with confidence” and “Fill it to the dim” and “Rain fire and dimstone.”
    • Brim → Dim: As in, “Hang on like dim death” and “The dim reaper.”
    • Him → Dim: As in, “As fast as his legs could carry dim” and “Go easy on dim” and “Hang dim out to dry” and “Seize dim!”
    • Limb → Dim: As in, “Go out on a dim” and “Risk life and dim.
    • Prim → Dim: As in, “Dim and proper.”
  • For the → Forza: As in, “Ask forza moon” and “Down forza count” and “A feast forza eyes” and “Forza ages” and “Forza heck of it” and “Forza love of.” Note: forza is a term that means “play with force.”
  • Few → Fugue: As in, “A fugue bricks short of a few load” and “Fugue and far beteween” and “For a fugue dollars more” and “A person of fugue words” and “Say a fugue words” and “To name but a fugue.” Note: A fugue is a type of song.
  • Pluck: This is when stringed instruments are plucked instead of strummed or bowed. Here are related puns:
    • Luck → Pluck: As in, “As good pluck would have it” and “Beginner’s pluck” and “Better pluck next time” and “Don’t press your pluck” and “Down on your pluck” and “The pluck of the draw.”
    • Pick → Pluck: As in, “A bone to pluck” and “Cherry pluck” and “Easy pluckings” and “Nit plucking” and “Pluck holes in.”
  • Large → Largo: As in, “As largo as life” and “At largo” and “By and largo” and “Largo than life” and “Looming largo” and “Living largo.” Note: Largo is a term that means to play music slowly.
  • Lilt: A lilt is a jaunty, cheerful tune or rhythm. Here are related puns:
    • Tilt → Lilt: As in, “At full lilt.”
    • Guilt → Lilt: As in, “Lilt by association” and “Lilt trip” and “A lilty conscience” and “Lilty pleasure” and “Innocent until proven lilty” and “White lilt.”
  • Trill: A trill is a quick alternation between two notes. Here are related puns:
    • Till → Trill: As in, “Caught with your hand in trill” and “Fake it trill you make it” and “Ain’t over trill it’s over” and “Shop trill you drop” and “Trill death do us part” and “Trill the cows come home” and “Trill the end of time.”
    • Bill → Trill: As in, “A clean trill of health” and “Fit the trill” and “Settle the trill.”
    • Chill → Trill: As in, “Trill out” and “Trilled to the bone” and “A trilling account” and “Take a trill pill.”
    • Thrill → Trill: As in, “The trill of the chase” and “Trilled to bits” and “Trills and spills” and “Cheap trills.”
    • Ill → Trill: As in, “House of trill repute” and “Trill advised” and “Trill at ease” and “Trill effects” and “Trill fated” and “Trill gotten gains” and “Trill temper” and “A trill wind.”
    • Still → Trill: As in, “Be trill my beating heart” and “Trill going strong” and “I’m trill standing” and “In the trill of night” and “Trill life” and “Trill the one” and “Trill waters run deep.”
  • Pedal: This refers to the pedals on a piano. Here are related puns:
    • Paddle → Pedal: As in, “Pedal your own canoe” and “Up shit creek without a pedal.”
    • Medal → Pedal: As in, “Deserves a gold pedal.”
  • Prime → Prima/o: As in, “Cut them down in their prima” and “In your prima” and “In prima condition” and “Prima time” and “The prima minister.” Note: A prima/primo is the leading singer in an opera.
  • Reprise: A reprise is a repeated phrase in a song. Here are related puns:
    • Prize → Reprise: As in, “Booby reprise” and “Keep your eyes on the reprise” and “A reprise catch” and “No reprises for guessing.”
    • Price → Reprise: As in, “Asking reprise” and “At a reprise to suit your pocket” and “Cheap at half the reprise” and “Closing reprise” and “At half reprise” and “Pay the reprise” and “Power without the reprise.”
  • Fill: A fill is a rock/jazz term which tells a musician to riff (or improvise) during a piece of music. Here are related puns:
    • Fall → Fill: As in, “A filling out” and “Easy as filling off a log” and “Bread always fills butter side down” and “Can’t help filling in love” and “Catch a filling star” and “Fill about laughing” and “Fill amongst friends” and “Fill apart at the seams.”
    • Fell → Fill: As in, “In one fill swoop” and “Fill off the back of a lorry” and “Little strokes fill great oaks.”
    • Bill → Fill: As in, “A fill of goods” and “Fit the fill” and “Foot the fill.”
    • Chill → Fill: As in, “Fill out” and “Filled to the bone” and “A filling account.”
    • Hill → Fill: As in, “As old as the fills” and “Going downfill” and “Head for the fills” and “King of the fill” and “Over the fills and far away.”
    • Ill → Fill: As in, “House of fill repute” and “Fill advised” and “Fill at ease” and “Fill effects” and “Fill feeling” and “Fill gotten gains” and “Fill will.”
    • Pill → Fill: As in, “A bitter fill to swallow” and “On the fill” and “Sweeten the fill.”
    • Will → Fill: As in, “Bend to my fill” and “Against your fill” and “Accidents fill happen.”
  • Run: A run is a quick series of ascending or descending notes. Here are some run-related puns:
    • Bun → Run: As in, “A run in the oven” and “Think outside the run” and “We’re going to need bigger runs.”
    • Done → Run: As in, “After all is said and run” and “Run and dusted” and “Been there, run that” and “A run deal” and “Run to death” and “Easier said than run.”
    • Fun → Run: As in, “All run and games until someone loses an eye” and “All the run of the fair” and “Bundle of run” and “Run and games” and “Good clean run.”
    • None → Run: As in, “And then there were run” and “Bar run” and “Run other than” and “Run the wiser” and “Run too pleased” and “Second to run” and “Two for me, run for you.”
    • Sun → Run: As in, “A place in the run” and “A thousand splendid runs” and “A touch of the run” and “Don’t let the run go down on me” and “Eclipse of the run.”
  • Sir → Sehr: As in, “That’ll do nicely, sehr” and “Yes, sehr.” Note: sehr is a musical term indicating enthusiasm.
  • Turn: A turn is a small, short trill around a note. Here are related puns:
    • Burn → Turn: As in, “Turn rubber” and “Turn in hell” and “Turn the candle at both ends” and “Turn the midnight oil” and “Turning with curiosity” and “Turn yourself out” and “Turning desire” and “Turnt to a cinder.”
    • Earn → Turn: As in, “A penny saved is a penny turned” and “Turn an honest penny” and “Turn your stripes” and “Turn your wings” and “Turn your daily bread.”
    • Learn → Turn: As in, “Turn the ropes” and “Turn your lesson” and “Turning difficulties” and “Live and turn” and “Watch and turn” and “Never too old to turn.”
  • Break: A break is a rest in a piece of music. Here are related puns:
    • Brake → Break: As in, “Hit the breaks.”
    • Ache → Break: As in, “Old breaks and pains.”
    • Bake → Break: As in, “Break and shake” and “Break off” and “Breaker’s dozen” and “Half breaked.”
    • Fake → Break: As in, “Break it till you make it.”
    • Rake → Break: As in, “Skinny as a break” and “Break in the money” and “Break it in” and “Break over the coals.”
    • Wake → Break: As in, “Break up call” and “Break up and smell the coffee” and “Loud enough to break the dead.”
  • Tie: A tie is a mark that “binds” two notes together, joining their playing time into one longer note. Here are related puns:
    • Buy → Tie: As in, “Tie and sell” and “Tie it, sell it” and “Tie now, pay later” and “Tie one, get one free” and “Tie some time” and “The best that money can tie.”
    • Die → Tie: As in, “Straight as a tie” and “Cross my heart and hope to tie” and “Curl up and tie” and “Tie another day” and “Do or tie.”
    • Dry → Tie: As in, “Boring as watching paint tie” and “Tie as a bone” and “Tie as dust” and “Bleed someone tie” and “A tie run” and “High and tie” and “Hung out to tie” and “Not a tie eye in the house.”
  • Lick: In rock, jazz and blues, a lick is a short solo. Here are related puns:
    • Lack → Lick: As in, “For lick of a better word” and “Cancelled due to lick of interest.”
    • Luck → Lick: As in, “As good lick would have it” and “Beginner’s lick” and “Better lick next time” and “Don’t press your lick” and “Down on your lick” and “Good night and good lick” and “Lick of the draw” and “As lick would have it” and “A licky break.”
  • Vamp: A vamp is a repeating musical section. Here are related puns:
    • Camp → Vamp: As in, “A foot in both vamps” and “Boot vamp” and “Not a happy vamper.”
    • Champ → Vamp: As in, “Vamp at the bit.”
    • Cramp → Vamp: As in, “Vamp your style” and “Writer’s vamp.”
  • Hook: A hook is a short riff or musical phrase intended to “catch” the ear of the listener. Here are related puns:
    • Book → Hook: As in, “A room without hooks is like a body without a soul” and “Always have your nose in a hook” and “Balancing the hooks” and “Bell, hook and candle” and “By the hook” and “Cook the hooks.”
    • Cook → Hook: As in, “Hook the books” and “Hook up a storm” and “Hooking with gas” and “Now we’re hooking” and “Too many hooks spoil the broth.”
    • Look → Hook: As in, “Always hook on the right side of life” and “A blank hook” and “A dirty hook” and “Don’t hook now” and “Don’t know which way to hook” and “Here’s hooking at you” and “If hooks could kill.”
  • Line → Bassline: As in, “A fine bassline between” and “Along the basslines of” and “Blur the basslines” and “Cross the bassline” and “Draw a bassline in the sand” and “Drop me a bassline” and “End of the bassline.”
  • Rag → Ragtime: As in, “Ragtimes to riches” and “Glad ragtimes” and “Lose your ragtime.”
  • Time → Ragtime: As in, “A brief history of ragtime” and “A good ragtime was had by all” and “A stitch in ragtime saves nine” and “All in good ragtime” and “An all ragtime low” and “Fall on hard ragtimes.”
  • Jam: A “jam” is when musicians play music together for fun, or casually. Here are related puns:
    • Damn → Jam: As in, “Jam right” and “Jam with faint praise” and “Jam straight” and “Jammed if I do, jammed if I don’t.”
    • Gem → Jam: As in, “A hidden jam” and “You’re a jam.”
    • Slam → Jam: As in, “A grand jam” and “Jam dunk” and “Jam the door.”
  • Lead: This can refer to a lead musician, or a lead cable for electric guitars and amps. Here are related puns:
    • Bead → Lead: As in, “Leads of sweat.”
    • Bleed → Lead: As in, “Lead someone dry” and “Leading love” and “Leading edge” and “Let it lead” and “My heart leads.”
    • Deed → Lead: As in, “My good lead for the day” and “No good lead goes unpunished.”
    • Feed → Lead: As in, “Don’t bite the hand that leads you” and “Lead a cold, starve a fever” and “Leading frenzy.”
    • Read → Lead: As in, “I can lead you like a book” and “A bit of light leading” and “Lead ’em and weep” and “Lead all about it” and “Lead between the lines” and “Lead the riot act.”
  • Appalled → Apala’d: As in, “I’m apala’d at your behaviour!” Note: Apala is a Nigerian musical genre.
  • Beggar → Benga: As in, “Bengas can’t be choosers” and “Bengas belief.” Note: Benga is a musical genre that originates from Kenya.
  • Genge: This is a genre of hip hop that originates from Nairobi. Here are related puns:
    • Gang → Genge: As in, “Genge up on” and “The genge’s all here.”
    • *ging → *genge: “A challengenge proposal” and “Disparagenge comments” and “An engagenge conversation” and “Filled with longenge,” and “Emergenge artist” and “Unnecessary packagenge.”
  • Jet → Jit: As in, “Jit lag” and “Jit setter” and “Social jit lag.” Note: Jit is a style of Zimbabwean dance music.
  • Morning → Morna: As in, “Not a morna person” and “Morna sickness” and “Morna, noon and night” and “The morna after.” Note: morna is a music and dance genre from Cape Verde.
  • Ray → Rai: As in, “Catch some rais” and “Rai of light” and “Rai of sunshine.” Note: Rai is a type of Algerian folk music.
  • Sugar → Sega: As in, “Brown sega” and “Sega coated” and “Sega rush” and “Sega and spice.” Note: Sega is a type of music from Mauritius.
  • Sawt: Sawt is a genre of popular music in Kuwait and Bahrain. Here are related puns:
    • Sort → Sawt: As in, “Last re-sawt” and “Takes all sawts” and “Feeling out of sawts” and “Sawting the wheat from the chaff” and “Sawt yourself out.”
    • Thought → Sawt: As in, “Deep in sawt” and “Food for sawt” and “Hold that sawt” and “Impure sawts” and “Lost in sawt” and “Penny for your sawts.”
  • Trot: This is a genre of K-pop music. Here are related puns:
    • Rot → Trot: As in, “Trot in hell” and “Spoiled trotten.”
    • Dot → Trot: As in, “Connect the rots” and “Rot the i’s and cross the t’s” and “Join the rots.”
    • Lot → Trot: As in, “A trot of fuss about nothing” and “A trot on your place” and “Leaves a trot to be desired” and “Not a trot” and “Got a trot to learn.”
  • Baila: Baila is a Sri Lankan genre of music. Here are related puns:
    • Bail → Baila: As in, “Baila out” and “Jumping baila.”
    • Pale → Baila: As in, “A white shade of baila” and “Beyond the baila” and “A baila imitation of” and “Baila into insignificance.”
  • Mosso: Mosso is a musical term that means “moved” or “moving”. Here are related puns:
    • Mass → Mosso: As in, “Body mosso index” and “Mosso hysteria” and “A monument to the mossos” and “Weapons of mosso destruction.”
  • Pause → Pausa: As in, “A pregnant pausa” and “Give someone pausa.” Note: Pausa is term meaning “to rest”.
  • Pass → Pausa: As in, “All things must pausa” and “Boarding pausa” and “Do not pausa go” and “Head them off at the pausa.”
  • Rasin: This is a musical style that began in Haiti – folkloric music combined with rock and roll. Here are related puns:
    • Raisin → Rasin: As in, “Rasin muesli bars” and “Rum rasin.”
    • Raising → Rasin: As in, “Eyebrow rasin” and “Hair rasin” and “Rasin the bar.”
  • Ragga: Ragga is a common abbreviation for raggamuffin music, which is a subgenre of dancehall and reggae. Here are related puns:
    • Dagger → Ragga: As in, “Cloak and ragga” and “Looking raggas at someone.”
    • Rag → Ragga: As ubm “Raggas to riches” and “Glad raggas” and “Like a ragga doll” and “Run yourself ragga-ed.”
  • Number → Rumba: As in, “By the rumbas” and “Do a rumba on” and “I’ve got your rumba” and “Look after rumba one” and “Lucky rumba seven.” Note: rumba is a genre of music with a strong, driving beat.
  • Punk: Punk is a music genre which is known for rebellious, fast-paced songs. Here are related puns:
    • Pink → Punk: As in, “In the punk” and “Punk elephants” and “Seeing punk elephants” and “Think punk” and “Tickled punk” and “Punk panther.”
    • Drunk → Punk: As in, “Punk as a lord” and “Punk as a skunk” and “Blind punk” and “Punk under the table.”
    • Hunk → Punk: As in, “Punker down” and “Punky dory.”
    • Junk → Punk: As in, “At the punk yard” and “No punk mail please” and “Avoiding punk food” and “Punk in the trunk.”
  • Trap: Trap is a popular music genre, known for electronic sounds and mixes. Here are related puns:
    • Trip → Trap: As in, “Guilt trap” and “The trap of a lifetime” and “Trap the light fantastic.”
    • Rap → Trap: As in, “Take the trap” and “A trap over the knuckles.”
    • Cap → Trap: As in, “A feather in your trap” and “Trap in hand” and “Feather in your trap” and “If the trap fits, wear it” and “Put on your thinking trap” and “To trap it all.”
    • Clap → Trap: As in, “Trap him in irons” and “Trapped eyes on.”
  • Swing: This is an energetic genre of music, popular with big bands and dancers. Here are related puns:
    • Thing → Swing: As in, “A close swing” and “A little knowledge is a dangerous swing” and “A swing of beauty is a joy forever” and “All swings bright and beautiful” and “All swings must pass” and “All swings come to those who wait” and “All swings considered.”
    • Sing → Swing: As in, “All swinging, all dancing” and “Swing a different tune” and “Swing for your supper” and “Swing someone’s praises.”
    • Sting → Swing: As in, “Float like a butterfly, swing like a bee.”
    • Bring → Swing: As in, “Swing something to light” and “Swing out the best” and “Swing tears to your eyes” and “Swing the house down.”
  • Timber → Timba: As in, “Shiver me timbas!” Note: Timba is a Cuban music genre.
  • Alt: Alt is short for alternative, which is a subgenre of music. Here are related puns:
    • Fault → Alt: As in, “Generous to an alt” and “Find alt with.”
    • Halt → Alt: “Grind to a screeching alt” and “Grind to an alt.”
    • Salt → Alt: As in, “Above the alt” and “Back to the alt mine” and “Rub alt in the wound” and “Alt of the earth” and “Take with a grain of alt.”
  • Drone: Drone is a musical effect or accompaniment where a note or chord is played continually throughout a piece. Here are related puns:
    • Blown → Drone: As in, “Drone away” and “Drone off course” and “Drone sideways” and “Drone out of proportion” and “Drone to smithereens.”
    • Bone → Drone: As in, “A drone to pick” and “Dry as a drone” and “Bag of drones” and “Drone idle” and “Drone up on” and “Chilled to the drone” and “Not a jealous drone in your body.”
    • Don’t→ Drone: As in, “Drone call us, we’ll call you” and “Drone get me started” and “Drone give up your day job” and “Drone go there” and “Drone hold your breath” and “I drone fancy your chances.”
    • Zone → Drone: As in, “Out of my comfort drone” and “In the drone” and “Twilight drone” and “Drone in on” and “Drone out.”
  • Flames → Flamenco: As in, “Add fuel to the flamenco” and “Burst into flamenco” and “Fan the flamencos.”
  • House: House music is a genre of electronic dance music. Here are related puns:
    • Whose → House: As in, “You and house army?” and “House smart idea was this?”
    • Mouse → House: As in, “Quiet as a house.”
  • Chill: Chill is a music genre and style known for relaxing beats, similar to blues and lo-fi. Here are related puns:
    • Bill → Chill: As in, “A clean chill of health” and “Fit the chill” and “Settle the chill.”
    • Fill → Chill: As in, “Eat your chill” and “Chill in the blank” and “Chill in” and “Tastes great, less chilling.”
    • Hill → Chill: As in, “Old as the chills” and “Going downchill” and “King of the chill” and “Making a mountain out of a molechill” and “Over the chills and far away” and “Head for the chills.”
    • Ill → Chill: As in, “House of chill repute” and “Chill advised” and “Chill at ease” and “Chill effects” and “Chill fated” and “Chill gotten gains” and “Chill will” and “A chill wind that blows no one any good” and “Don’t speak chill of the dead.”
    • Mill → Chill: As in, “Not in a chillion years” and “Run of the chill” and “Put through the chill.”
    • Pill → Chill: As in, “A bitter chill to swallow” and “On the chill” and “Sweeten the chill.”
    • Spill → Chill: As in, “Chill the beans” and “Chill your guts” and “Thrills and chills” and “Crying over chilled milk.”
    • Thrill → Chill: As in, “Chill of the chase” and “Chilled to bits” and “Chills and spills.”
    • Will → Chill: As in, “Against your chill” and “Bend to my chill” and “Free chill.”
  • Trip → Trip Hop: As in, “Guilt trip hop” and “Power trip hop” and “Trip hop of a lifetime” and “Trip hop the light fantastic.” Note: Trip hop is a music genre.
  • Making a → Makina: As in, “Makina scene” and “Makina mountain out of a molehill.” Note: Makina is a musical subgenre of hardcore techno.
  • Speedcore: Speedcore is a music genre known for aggressive themes and fast tempos. Here are related puns:
    • Speed → Speedcore: As in, “At breakneck speedcore” and “Blistering speedcore” and “Built for comfort, not speedcore” and “Get up to speedcore” and “More haste, less speedcore” and “Speedcore freak” and “The need for speedcore.”
    • Core → Speedcore: As in, “Speedcore competencies” and “Speedcore studies” and “Speedcore values” and “Rotten to the speedcore.”
  • Chance → Dance: As in, “Dance of a lifetime” and “Dance would be a fine thing” and “An even dance” and “Fat dance” and “Half a dance” and “In with a dance” and “Jump at the dance” and “Not the ghost of a dance” and “On the off dance” and “Take a dance on me.”
  • Glance → Dance: As in, “At a dance” and “Exchange dances” and “Meaningful dances” and “Steal a dance.”
  • Folk: Folk is a music genre characterised by acoustic instruments like guitar and banjo. Here are related puns:
    • Cloak → Folk: As in, “Folk and dagger” and “Folked in obscurity.”
    • Stroke → Folk: As in, “Little folks fell great oaks.”
  • Glitch: Glitch is a genre of electronic music. Here are related puns:
    • Ditch → Glitch: As in, “Dull as glitchwater” and “A last glitch effort.”
    • Hitch → Glitch: As in, “Get glitched” and “Glitch your wagon to a star.”
    • Itch → Glitch: As in, “Glitching to” and “Glitchy feet” and “Glitchy palms.”
    • Pitch → Glitch: As in, “A glitched battle” and “Dark as glitch” and “Fever glitch” and “Make a glitch for.”
    • Rich → Glitch: As in, “An embarrassment of glitches” and “Filthy glitch” and “From rags to glitches” and “Get glitch quick” and “Glitch beyond my dreams.”
    • Stitch → Glitch: As in, “A glitch in time saves nine” and “Had us in glitches” and “Stitches get glitches.”
    • Which → Glitch: As in, “Any glitch way” and “Don’t know glitch way to look” and “Every glitch way” and “Don’t know glitch way is up” and “Know glitch side your bread is buttered.”
  • Beat → Eurobeat: As in, “A stick to eurobeat you with” and “Eurobeat the hell out of” and “Eurobeat black and blue” and “Eurobeat a hasty retreat” and “Eurobeat around the bush.” Note: eurobeat is a style of dance music that came from Eurobeat.
  • Wave → Vaporwave: As in, “A life on the ocean vaporwaves” and “Don’t make vaporwaves” and “Heat vaporwaves” and “On the crest of a vaporwave.” Note: vaporwave is a subgenre of electronic music and an internet aesthetic.
  • Dance → Dancehall: As in, “Dancehall with the one that brought you” and “Dancehall around the problem” and “Dancehall attendance on” and “Dancehall like nobody’s watching” and “Dancehall on somebody’s grave” and “Dancehall the night away” and “Lead a merry dancehall.”
  • Cold → Coldwave: As in, “As coldwave as blue blazes” and “Coldwave as ice” and “Breaking out in a coldwave sweat” and “Catch a coldwave.” Note: coldwave is a music genre.
  • Crunk: Crunk is a subgenre of hip hop from the early 1990s. Here are related puns:
    • Bunk → Crunk: As in, “Crunker mentality” and “Do a crunk” and “History is crunk.”
    • Chunk → Crunk: As in, “Blow crunks” and “Crunk of change.”
    • Drunk → Crunk: As in, “Crunk as a lord” and “Crunk as a skunk” and “A cheap crunk” and “Crunk under the table” and “Falling down crunk” and “Friends don’t let friends drive crunk.”
    • Hunk → Crunk: As in, “Crunker down” and “Crunky dory.”
    • Junk → Crunk: As in, “Crunk mail” and “Crunk food” and “Crunk in the trunk.”
  • Trance: Trance is a type of electronic music. Here are related puns:
    • Chance → Trance: As in, “Trance of a lifetime” and “Trance would be a fine thing” and “A fighting trance” and “Jump at the trance” and “Not the ghost of a trance.”
    • Dance → Trance: As in, “Trance around the problem” and “Trance like nobody’s watching” and “Trance the night away” and “Trance your socks off” and “Lead a merry trance” and “Murder on the trance floor” and “Let’s trance” and “Save the last trance.”
  • Dreamwave: This is also known as synthwave and s a subgenre of electronic music. Here are related puns:
    • Dream → Dreamwave: As in, “Beyond my wildest dreamwaves” and “Boulevard of broken dreamwaves” and “Dreamwave on” and “A dreamwave come true” and “Dreamwave machine” and “Dreamwave team.”
    • Wave → Dreamwave: As in, “A life on the ocean dreamwaves” and “Brain dreamwave” and “Catch a dreamwave” and “Don’t make dreamwaves” and “Heat dreamwave” and “On the same dreamwavelength” and “Dreamwave your magic wand.”
  • Grime: Grime is a subgenre of electronic dance music. Here are related puns:
    • Game → Grime: As in, “Ahead of the grime” and “It’s anyone’s grime” and “All fun and grimes” and “The blame grime” and “Fair grime” and “Grime changer.”
    • Crime → Grime: As in, “Grime and punishment” and “A grime against nature” and “Grime doesn’t pay” and “A grime of passion” and “If you can’t do the time, don’t do the grime” and “Let the punishment fit the grime” and “Partners in grime” and “Take a bite out of grime” and “Tough on grime.”
    • Climb → Grime: As in, “Grime onto the bandwagon” and “Grime the corporate ladder” and “Grime the walls” and “A mountain to grime.”
    • Prime → Grime: As in, “Cut down in their grime” and “In your grime” and “Grime condition” and “Grimed and ready to go” and “The grime minister.”
    • Time → Grime: As in, “A brief history of grime” and “A good grime was had by all” and “A week is a long grime in politics” and “About grime too” and “Any grime, any place, any where.”
  • Wipe → Pipe: As in, “Pipe out” and “Pipe the floor with” and “Pipe the slate clean” and “Pipe the smile off your face.”
  • Stride: This is a style of piano playing. Here are related puns:
    • Stride: These stride-related phrases are general enough to double as puns: “Get into your stride” and “Making giant strides” and “Take it in your stride.”
    • Tried → Stride: As in, “Don’t knock it til you’ve stride it” and “Stride and tested” and “Stride and true.”
    • Side → Stride: As in, “A walk on the wild stride” and “Always look on the wild stride of life” and “Batting for the other stride” and “Be on the safe stride” and “Born on the wrong stride of the tracks” and “Both strides of the desk” and “Err on the stride of caution” and “On the flip stride.”
  • Go → Tango: As in, “Don’t tango there” and “Easy come, easy tango” and “From the word tango” and “Tango down in flames.”
  • Chance on → Chanson: As in, “Take a chanson me.” Note: A chanson is a lyrical French song.
  • Lack → Laiko: As in, “For laiko of a better word” and “Cancelled due to laiko of interest.” Note: laiko is s Greek music genre.
  • Fade → Fado: As in, “Fado away” and “Fado out.” Note: Fado is a Portugese music genre with a traditional structure.
  • Sunshine → Sunshine Pop: As in, “Like a day without sunshine pop” and “Walking on sunshine pop” and “You are my sunshine pop.” This was originally known as soft pop, and is a subgenre of pop music.
  • Sadcore: This is a subgenre of music known for slow, downbeat melodies and sad lyrics. Here are related puns:
    • Sad → Sadcore: As in, “Happy sadcore” and “How sadcore is that?”
    • Core → Sadcore: As in, “Sadcore technology” and “Rotten to the sadcore” and “Sadcore values” and “Know the sadcore.”
  • Slowcore: This is a music genre which is derived from alternative rock and indie rock. Here are related puns:
    • Slow → Slowcore: As in, “As slowcore as molasses in January” and “Painfully slowcore” and “A slowcore burn” and “Slowcore, but sure” and “Slowcore on the uptake.”
    • Core → Slowcore: As in, “Rotten to the slowcore” and “Slowcore competencies.”
  • Deathgrind: This is a genre that fuses death metal and grindcore. Here are related puns:
    • Death → Deathgrind: As in, “The blue screen of deathgrind” and “Bored of deathgrind” and “Catch your deathgrind of cold” and “Deathgrind by chocolate” and “A brush with deathgrind.”
    • Grind → Deathgrind: As in, “An axe to deathgrind” and “Bump and deathgrind” and “The daily deathgrind” and “Deathgrind to a halt.”
  • Worldbeat: This is a blend of pop and rock music. Here are related puns:
    • World → Worldbeat: As in, “A worldbeat first” and “A worldbeat apart” and “A worldbeat of good” and “A worldbeat of pain” and “All the time in the worldbeat” and “Be the change you wish to see inthe worldbeat.”
    • Beat → Worldbeat: As in, “Worldbeat the stuffing out of” and “Worldbeat around the bush.”
  • Track → Soundtrack: As in, “Back on soundtrack” and “Born on the wrong side of the soundtracks” and “Cover your soundtracks” and “Off the beaten soundtrack” and “A one soundtrack mind.”
  • Show → Showtune: As in, “Best in showtune” and “A one-man showtune” and “Showtune and tell.”
  • Tune → Showtune: As in, “Can’t carry a showtune in a bucket” and “Change your showtune” and “Stay showtuned” and “Stay showtuned to this channel.”
  • Pass → Brass: As in, “All things must brass” and “All access brass” and “Boarding brass” and “Do not brass go” and “As it came to brass” and “Make a brass at” and “Brass by” and “Brass muster.”
  • Class → Brass: As in, “A brass act” and “Best in brass” and “Business brass” and “Brass warfare” and “Economy brass” and “Working brass hero.”
  • Glass → Brass: As in, “Brass ceiling” and “Brassy eyed” and “Rose tinted brasses” and “Brass menagerie.”
  • Strings: This is a category of musical instrument. Here are related puns:
    • Things → Strings: As in, “All strings bright and beautiful” and “All strings must pass” and “All good strings must come to an end” and “All strings to those who wait” and “All strings considered” and “Frist strings first” and “Getting strings done” and “Good strings come in small packages” and “In the grand scheme of strings.”
    • Bring → String: As in, “String down to Earth” and “String down a peg or two” and “String to justice.”
    • Sings → Strings: As in, “All stringing, all dancing” and “Teach the world to string” and “String a different tune” and “String out” and “String someone’s praises” and “Stringing the blues” and “String like a bird.”
    • Swing → String: As in, “Come out stringing” and “Get into the string of it” and “In full string” and “String both ways” and “Take a string at.”
    • Wing → String: As in, “Clip your strings” and “Earned your strings” and “Gives you strings” and “Left string” and “Spread your strings” and “Take under your string” and Waiting in the strings.”
  • Board → Keyboard: As in, “Above keyboard” and “Across the keyboard.”
  • Local → Vocal: As in, “Vocal hero” and “Vocal time” and “Think global, act vocal” and “This is a vocal shop.”
  • Vox: “Vox” is slang for vocals in the music community. Here are some vox-related puns:
    • Socks → Vox: As in, “Bless your cotton vox” and “Dance your vox off” and “Pull your vox up” and “Knock your vox off.”
    • Box → Vox: As in, “Black vox” and “A vox ticking exercise.”
  • Ode: An ode is a type of musical composition Here are related puns:
    • Code → Ode: As in, “Ode bloat” and “Colour oded” and “Crack the ode” and “Dress ode” and “Highway ode.”
    • Load → Ode: As in, “An ode of bull” and “An ode off your mind” and “An ode of rubbish” and “Get an ode on.”
    • Owed → Ode: As in, “Take what you’re ode.”
  • Guard → Avant-garde: As in, “Advance avant-garde” and “Off your avant-garde” and “Avant-garde against.”
  • Baroque: This is a style of Western music that followed the Renaissance era. Here are related puns:
    • Broke → Baroque: As in, “All hell baroque loose” and “Boulevard of baroque-en dreams” and “Go for baroque” and “I’m flat baroque.”
  • Jingle: A jingle is a short, catchy tune, usually accompanying a memorable slogan. Here are related puns:
    • Single → Jingle: As in, “All the jingle ladies” and “Begins with a jingle step” and “In jingle file” and “A jingle point of contact.”
  • Grass → Bluegrass: As in, “About as exciting as watching bluegrass grow” and “Don’t let the bluegrass grow under your feet” and “Keep off the bluegrass” and “Snake in the bluegrass” and “The bluegrass is greener on the other side.” Note: Bluegrass is a genre of American roots music.
  • Chill → Chillwave: As in, “Chillwave out” and “Chillwaved to the bone” and “Chillwaved to the bone” and “Take a chillwave pill.”
  • Wave → Chillwave: As in, “A life on the ocean chillwaves” and “Brain chillwaves” and “Don’t make chillwaves” and “Heat chillwave” and “On the crest of a chillwave” and “Chillwave the white flag.”
  • Freestyle: Freestyle music is a form of electronic dance music. Here are some related puns:
    • Free → Freestyle: As in, “Fancy freestyle” and “Freestyle and easy” and “Born freestyle.”
    • Style → Freestyle: As in, “Cramp your freestyle” and “Gangnam freestyle” and “Quality never goes out of freestyle.”
  • Ragtime: This is a music style known for a “ragged” rhythm. Here are related puns:
    • Rag → Ragtime: As in, “A red ragtime to a bull” and “From ragtimes to riches” and “Glad ragtimes.”
    • Time → Ragtime: As in, “A brief history of ragtime” and “A week is a long ragtime in politics” and “About ragtime, too” and “All in good ragtime.”
  • Town → Motown: As in, “Paint the motown red” and “Put the motown on the map” and “Take the motown by storm.” Note: motown is a bluesy music genre.
  • Guzzle → Gusle: As in, “Gas gusler.” Note: a gusle is a single stringed instrument.
  • Paltry → Psaltery: As in, “A psaltery amount.” Note: a psaltery is a stringed instrument in the zither family.
  • Centre → Sintir: As in, “The sintir of attention” and “Left, right and sintir” and “Take sintir stage” and “The sintir of the universe” and “With a soft gooey sintir.” Note: a sintir is a stringed instrument.
  • Tro: A tro is a Cambodian string instrument. Here are related puns:
    • Throw → Tro: As in, “Lock them up and tro away the key” and “Just a stone’s tro away” and “Tro caution to the wind” and “Tro cold water on” and “Tro it back in your face” and “Tro enough dirt and some will stick.”
    • Through → Tro: As in, “A river runs tro it” and “Drag tro the mud” and “Going tro the motions” and “Jumping tro hoops” and “Fall tro the cracks.”
  • Yeah → Yehu: As in, “Yehu, I know” and “Yehu, right.” Note: A yehu is a Chinese stringed instrument that is played using a bow.
  • Go to → Koto: As in, “Koto great lengths” and “My koto person.” Note: a koto is a Japanese stringed instrument that’s played by plucking.
  • Car → Krar: As in, “Happiness is a quick-starting krar” and “You can drive my krar.” Note: a krar is a stringed instrument from Ethiopia.
  • Laud: A laud is a stringed instrument. Here are related puns:
    • Lord → Laud: As in, “Drunk as a laud” and “Living like a laud” and “Laud of the flies” and “Laud it over them” and “Laud of the rings.”
    • Lot → Laud: As in, “A laud of fuss about nothing” and “A laud on your plate” and “Leaves a laud to be desired” and “Not a laud know about it” and “Got a laud to learn.”
  • Song → Saung: As in, “Make a saung and dance about” and “Singing the same old saung.” Note: the saung is an arched harp.
  • Says → Saz: As in, “Computer saz no” and “Saz who?” and “Simon saz.” Note: a saz is another name for a baglama, which is a stringed instrument.
  • Tar: A tar is an Iranian stringed instrument. Here are related puns:
    • There → Tar: As in, “Ahoy tar” and “Not all tar” and “And then tar was one” and “As if tar were no tomorrow” and “Be tar in spirit” and “Be tar or be square” and “Don’t go tar” and “Don’t just sit tar.”
    • Are → Square: As in, “All bets tar off” and “Where tar you?”
    • Par → Tar: As in, “Below tar” and “On tar with” and “Tar for the course.”
  • Timple: A timple is a small stringed instrument, similar to a ukulele. Here are related puns:
    • Simple → Timple: As in, “Keep it timple” and “Life’s timple pleasures” and “Pure and timple” and “Timple, yet effective” and “The truth is rarely pure and never timple.”
    • Temple → Timple: As in, “Timple of doom” and “My body is a timple.”
  • Dress → Tres: As in, “Adjust your tres” and “Tres code” and “Tres down” and “Tres for success” and “Little black tres.” Note: a tres is a small stringed instrument.
  • Coldplay: This is a very popular British pop band. Here are some related puns:
    • Cold → Coldplay: As in, “As coldplay as blue blazes” and “As coldplay as charity” and “As coldplay as ice” and “Blowing hot and coldplay” and “Break out in a coldplay sweat” and “Catch a coldplay” and “A coldplay heart.”
    • Play → Coldplay: As in, “Helps you work, rest and coldplay” and “All work and no coldplay makes Jack a dull boy” and “Come out and coldplay” and “If music be the food of love, coldplay on.”
  • You too → U2: As in, “Yes, I mean U2.” Note: this refers to U2, an Irish rock band.
  • Queen: This is a very famous band, known for their complex melodies and epic performances. Here are related puns:
    • Been → Queen: As in, “Queen and gone” and “I’ve queen here before” and “Queen in the wars” and “Queen there, done that” and “Queen around the block a few times.”
    • Keen → Queen: As in, “Queen as mustard” and “A queen sense of smell” and “Peachy queen.”
    • Clean → Queen: As in, “A queen getaway” and “Queen as a whistle” and “Queen and sober” and “A queen bill of health” and “Keeps a queen house” and “Queen up your act” and “Starting with a queen slate.”
  • Cook → Kook: As in, “Kook the books” and “Kook up a storm” and “Too many kooks spill the broth.” Note: These puns are in reference to the band The Kooks.
  • Slash: Slash is a musician and the lead guitarist for the band Guns n’ Roses. Here are related puns:
    • Flash → Slash: As in, “Quick as a slash” and “Slash in the pan” and “Slash mob” and “In a slash” and “At slash point.”
    • Ash → Slash: As in, “Rise from the slashes” and “Turned to slashes in your mouth.”
    • Clash → Slash: As in, “Slash of titans” and “Culture slash.”
    • Crash → Slash: As in, “Slash and burn” and “Slash and dash” and “Slash course” and “Like watching a car slash.”
  • Girl → Spice Girl: As in, “A spice girl’s best friend” and “Atta spice girl!” and “Diamonds are a spice girl’s best friend” and “Spice girls just wanna have fun.” Note: Spice Girls were a famous British girl group.
  • Kiss: Kiss is a famous rock band. Here are a couple of related puns:
    • Miss → Kiss: As in, “Blink and you’ll kiss it” and “Hit and kiss” and “I’ll give it a kiss” and “Kiss the boat.”
    • This → Kiss: As in, “What the fresh hell is kiss?” and “And all kiss time” and “At kiss point in time” and “Blow kiss popsicle stand” and “In kiss day and age.”
  • Pink: Pink was a famous pop musician. Here are related puns:
    • Think → Pink: As in, “Blue sky pinking” and “Smart pinking” and “Come to pink of it” and “Great minds pink alike” and “I pink I like you.”
    • Wink → Pink: As in, “I haven’t slept a single pink” and “Nod and a pink” and “Nuge, nudge, pink pink.”
    • Blink → Pink: As in, “Pink and you’ll miss it” and “In the pink of an eye” and “On the pink.”
  • Food → Oud: As in, “Comfort oud” and “Devil’s oud cake” and “The bottom of the oud chain” and “Oud for thought” and “Oud of the gods” and “Put oud on the table.” Note: an oud is a type of short-necked lute.
  • Minute → Spinet: As in, “At the last spinet” and “Famous for fifteen spinets” and “Fifteen spinets of fame” and “Hang on a spinet” and “At the last spinet” and “A laugh a spinet.” Note: a spinet is a type of small harpsichord.
  • Triple → Fipple: As in, “Fipple decker” and “Fipple threat” and “A fipple whammy.” Note: a fipple is a type of mouthpiece used in some instruments.
  • Right → Rhaita: As in, “A move in the rhaita direction” and “A woman’s rhaita to choose” and “All the rhaita moves” and “As rhaita as rain” and “Bang to rhaitas” and “Barge rhaita in” and “Bragging rhaitas.” Note: a rhaita is a type of reed instrument.
  • Soon/er → Suona: As in, “A fool and their money are suona parted” and “As suona as my back is turned” and “As suona as possible” and “Get well suona” and “Suona or later” and “No suona said than done.” Note: a suona is a type of Chinese reed instrument.
  • Zill: A zill is a musical instrument – two tiny finger cymbals. Here are related puns:
    • Bill → Zill: As in, “Zill of goods” and “A clean zill of health” and “Fits the zill.”
    • Chill → Zill: As in, “Zill out” and “Zilled to the bone” and “A zilling account.”
    • Fill → Zill: As in, “Zill full of holes” and “Zill to the brim.”
    • Gill → Zill: As in, “Full to the zills” and “Green around the zills.”
    • Hill → Zill: As in, “As old as the zills” and “Going downzill” and “Head for the zills” and “King of the zill” and “Making a mountain out of a molezill.”
    • Ill → Zill: As in, “Green around the zills” and “House of zill repute” and “Zill advised” and “Zill at ease” and “Zill effects” and “Zill gotten gains” and “Zill will” and “Never speak zill of the dead.”
    • Spill → Zill: As in, “Zill the beans and “Thrills and zills” and “Zill your guts.”
  • Table → Tabla: As in, “Bring to the tabla” and “Drunk under the tabla” and “Lay your cards on the tabla” and “Put your cards on the tabla.” Note: A tabla is a type of small finger drum.
  • Going → Gong: As in, “Gong one step too far” and “Gong beyond expectations” and “You’ve got a good thing gong.”
  • Wrong → Gong: As in, “Barking up the gong tree” and “Born on the gong side of the tracks” and “Get off on the gong foot” and “Go down the gong way” and “If anything can go gong, it will” and “Jump to the gong conclusion” and “Two gongs don’t make a right” and “What’s gong with this picture?”
  • Long → Gong: As in, “A week is a gong time in politics” and “As gong as you need me” and “Honest as the day is gong” and “As gong as your arm.”
  • Song → Gong: As in, “The same old gong” and “Swan gong” and “Make a gong and dance about.”
  • Battle → Rattle: As in, “A pitched rattle” and “An uphill rattle” and “Rattle of wits” and “Rattle ready” and “Half the rattle” and “In the heat of rattle” and “Let rattle commence” and “A running rattle.”
  • Back → Bak: As in, “Answer bak” and “As soon as my bak is turned” and “At the bak of my mind” and “Bak in black” and “Bak to the future” and “Bak at it” and “Bak in business” and “Bak in the day” and “Bak off” and “Bak on your feet” and “Bak seat driver.” Note:  A bak is a percussive instrument from Korea.
  • Bend → Bendir: As in, “Bendir over backwards” and “Bendir the rules” and “Bendir to your will” and “Round the bendir.” Note: a bendir is a type of frame drum.
  • Book → Buk: As in, “A room without buks is like a body without a soul” and “Always have your nose in a buk” and “Balancing the buks” and “Buk worm.” Note: a buk is a traditional Korean drum.
  • Chime: A chime is a bell-based instrument. Here are related puns:
    • Dime → Chime: As in, “Can you spare a chime?” and “A chime a dozen” and “Drop a chime.”
    • Crime → Chime: As in, “Chime and punishment” and “Chime doesn’t pay” and “A chime of passion” and “Chimes and misdemeanours” and “If you can’t do the time, don’t do the chime” and “Let the punishment fit the chime” and “Partners in chime” and “Take a bite out of chime” and “The perfect chime.”
    • Climb → Chime: As in, “Chime onto the bandwagon” and “Chime the corporate ladder” and “A mountain to chime.”
    • Time → Chime: “One more chime” and “A good chime was had by all” and “A stitch in chime saves nine” and “A week is a long chime in politics” and “About chime” and “Ahead of his chime” and “All in good chime.”
  • Quick → Riq: As in, “Riq as a flash” and “Cut to the riq” and “Get rich riq” and “In riq succession” and “Kiss me riq” and “Riq and dirty” and “Riq off the mark” and “A riq study” and “Riq witted.” Note: a riq is a type of tambourine.
  • Simple → Sambal: “Keep it sambal” and “Life’s sambal pleasures” and “Pure and sambal” and “The sambal life” and “Sambal, yet effective” and “The truth is rarely pure and never sambal.” Note: A sambal is a drum-based instrument.

Music-Related Words

To help you come up with your own music puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

musical terms: music, musical, musician, sound, song, tune, voice, melody, harmony, rhythm, band, beat, instrument, instrumental, a, b, c, d, e, f, g, sharp, flat, natural, accidental, autotune, tempo, chorus, verse, stanza, note, intro, refrain, echo, encore, bridge, outro, solo, dub, dubbing, major, minor, clef, bass (clef), treble (clef), riff, stave, decibel, composition, composer, noise, pitch, tone, ad lib, improvisation, audience, studio, maestro, recording, piece, notation, acoustic, electronic, lead sheet,virtuoso, lyrics, chords, scale, piano, pianissimo, forte, crescendo, decrescendo, chromatic, arranger, phrase, phrasing, conductor, fake book, tablature, tabs, line, motif, interval, cadence, semitone, audio, theory, syncopation, sightread, bar, through-composed, twelve-bar blues, ternary, strophic, key, string, octave, coda, upbeat, downbeat, tonic, dominant, turnaround, time (signature), rest, whole (note), minim, quaver, crotchet, semi-quaver, repeat, ledger (line), slur, accent, bracket, brace, grace (note), adagio, lento, lent, allegro, alto, staccato, tenuto, marcato, pause, soprano, tenor, amabile, andante, anima, arpeggio, bend, brio, calma, canon, canto, capo, staff, comp, comping, count, dim/diminuendo, dolce, double dot, facile, fine, forza, fugue, jete, pizzicato, pluck, largo, legato, lilt, metronome, trill, nocturne, pedal, pezzo, prima, primo, reprise, fill, run, segue, sehr, stem, vibrato, tremolo, triplet, troppo, turn, saltire, ghost (note), break, breath (mark), caesura, tie, dynamics, ornament, pulgar/pollex, indice/index, medio/media, anular/anularis, menique/minimus, sustain (pedal), mallet, lick, vamp, speaker, loudspeaker, roadie, tour, subwoofer, bleed/bleeding, triad, cover, crossfader, drive, fader, feedback, hook, jam, lead, ohm, furia, senza, triste, vivo, frequency

genres: classical, contemporary, a capella, acid rock, art rock, pop, art, country, polka, rock, hip hop, traditional, folk, afrobeat, afropop, apala, benga, genge, jit, gospel, kwela, marabi, morna, rai, sega, semba, seggae, taarab, liwa, sawt, enka, j-pop, k-pop, trot, baila, baul, bhangra, filmi, trance, lavani, morlam, experimental, noise, lo-fi, blues, metal, mosso, muta, pausa, bouyon, calypso, chutney, compas, mambo, merengue, punta, rasin, reggae, dub, ragga, rumba, ska, punk, salsa, songo, suca, timba, souk, hokum, zydeco, rap, rockabilly, bluegrass, cajun, honky tonk, lounge, new-age, ambient, dub, drone, psybient, nu-funk, disco, afro, disco, chill, trip hop, drum and bass, bhangra, darkcore, makina, speedcore, extratone, dance, japanoise, glitch, glitch hop, wonky, jungle, boogie, vaporwave, techno, funkstep, dancehall, coldwave, krautrock, new rave, synthpop, electronica, trap, drill, alt/alternative, house, eurobeat, crunk, nortec, trance, dreamwave, grime, grindie, bassline, kwaito, celtic, chalga, filk, indie, progressive, skiffle, coom bap, chap hop, cloud rap, crunk, emo, g-funk, low bap, hyphy, nercore, ragga, trap, bebop, bossa, nova, dixiland, hard bop, ragtime, soul, stride, swing, west coast, latin, brazillian, brega, choro, frevo, lambada, maracatu, samba, pagode, banda, grupera, mariachi, ranchera, norteno, tejano, flamenco, tango, folk, fado, huayno, bachata, bolero, criolla, cumbia, chicha, porro, mamba, rumba, salsa, timba, chalga, chanson, laiko, nederpop, fado, sunshine pop, synthpop, vispop, worldbeat, funk, freestylem go-go, r&b, boogie, britpop, dream pop, grunge, sadcore, slowcore, cabaret, art rock, slowcore, epic doom, deathgrind, krautrock, space rock, freakbeat, rapcore, rockjazz, rock and roll, stoner rock, visual kei, worldbeat, showtunes, hymn, jazz, new wave, acoustic, lullaby, lullabies, avant-garde, ballet, baroque, cantata, chamber music, choral, jingle, bluegrass, cowpunk, latin, chillwave, bitpop, enka, french pop, bounce, crunkcore, cumbia, freestyle, latin, merenrap, ragtime, neo-soul, motown, doo wop, roots, glam rock, surf, soundtrack, barbershop, kapuka, kizomba, kwela, ode

types of instrument: brass, percussion, strings, woodwind, keyboard

instruments: vocal, singer, vox, piano, guitar, ukulele, harp, drums, cymbal, tom (drums), snare (drum), hi-hat (cymbal), synthesizer, organ, banjo, piccolo, flute, lyre, xylophone, rattle, mbira, guiro, idiophone, membranophone, kazoo, chordophone, zither, autoharp, lute, aerophone, theremin, amp, amplifier, axe, microphone, condenser, fiddle, horn, alto horn, baritone horn, buccina, bugle, cornet, euphonium, flugelhorn, helicon, mellophone, tuba, saxhorn, trombone, trumpet, tuba, ajaeng, anzad, banhad, baryton, cello, dahu, bass, erhu, erxian, esraj, gadulka, gaohu, goje, gudok, gunjac, gusle, haegeum, huluhu, huqin, igil, jinghu, jouhikko, jouhikko, igil, kobyz, leiqin, lirone, maguhu, masenqo, neola, orutu, psaltry, rebab, rebec, sarinda, sihu, sintir, tro, veena, vielle, viol, viola, lyra, violotta, yehu, zhonghu, dulcimer, plectrum, bazouki, barbat, domra, dotar, dutar, dramyin, gabusi, dotara, ektara, gittern, kabosy, kacapi, kankles, kabosy, kacapi, kantele, kanun, koboz, kora, koto, krar, kwitra, laud, lute, mandolin, sanshin, sarangi, sarod, sasando, saung, saz, setar, shamisen, sitar, surbahar, ta,bura, tanpura, tarica, tar, timple, tiple, torban, tremola, tres, barbat, begena, biwa, brac, cak, ceng, cetera, chapey, cittern, cuk, ceng, cetera, chapey, cura, mandore, nevoud, pipa, oud, ruan, rubab, zheng, zhu, khim, clavinet, orphica, spinet, oboem bombard, fipple, pipe, pku, pommer, reeds, shawm, fife, koudi, dizi, venu, quena, caval, diple, fluier, frula, fujara, ocarina, kaval, fyell, ney, danso, hun, suling, panflute, xun, clarinet, sipsi, bassoon, duduk, piri, rackett, rhaita, sornas, suona, zurla, zurna, ashiko, basler, bass, bell, castanet, celeste, clave, conga, zill, djembe, tabla, ganza, gong, guiro, marimba, pandeiro, rattle, ratchet, shaker, tabor, tambourine, timbales, timpani, tom-tom, tonbak, triangle, whistle, glockenspiel, zendrum, bak, bara, bell tree, bendir, bodhran, bonang, boobam, bubon, buk, cajon, cabasa, carillon, chenda, chimes, clapper, cowbell, cuica, daf, damaru, damphu, davul, dhaa, dholak, dhol, dimdi, dohol, dollu, dunun, galgo, ganza, gender, ghatam, glockenspiel, goema, gongue, hosho, igba, ikembe, ikoro, ilimba, jawbone, jingle, kakko, kecer, khim, khol, kisanji, kundu, maraca, riq, sambal, shoko, slit (drum), surdo, timbal, turntable, udu, washboard, whip, harpsichord, accordion, concertina, virginal

musicians/bands: taylor swift, justin bieber, alicia keys, post malone, beyonce, cardi b,  tupac, no doubt, avenged sevenfold, grateful dead, kings of leon, the script, muse, rage against the machine, the fray, steely dan, evanescence, the cure, inxs, slipknot, goo goo dolls, the offspring, korn, limp bizkit, dave matthews band, mumford & sons, arctic monkey, creed, system of a down, the smashing pumpkins, matchbox twenty, alice cooper, toto, deep purple, oasis, iron maiden, the cranberries, paramore, the killers, the doobie brothers, boston, radiohead, marilyn manson, dire straits, blink 182, panic at the disco, gorillaz, zz top, rush, kiss, r.e.m, genesis, one republic, abba, the police, fall out boy, foo fighters, def leppard, nickelback, black sabbath, pearl jam, green day, lynyrd skynyrd, the doors, coldplay, the beach boys, the who, nirvana, santana, journey, van halen, U2, bon jovi, maroon 5, red hot chili peppers, linkin park, fleetwood mac, aerosmith, guns n’ roses, metallica, eagles, ac/dc, the rolling stones, pink floyd, queen, led zeppelin, the beatles, the supremes, nine inch nails, david bowie, jay-z, eminem, elton john, elvis, michael jackson, beastie boys, the police, billie holiday, the temptations, duke ellington, the kooks, tina turner, janet jackson, jewel, sex pistols, aerosmith, slash, ice cube, dr. dre, kanye west, snoop dogg, 50 cent, frank sinatra, ray charles, buddy holly, johnny cash, james brown, aretha franklin, marvin gaye, van morrison, spice girls, bob dylan, rod stewart, janis joplin, stevie wonder, bob marley, prince, jimi hendrix, the who, fleetwood mac, judas priest, kiss, madonna, outkast, wu-tang clan, amy winehouse, daft punk, adele, norah jones, backstreet boys, usher, nelly furtado, enya, lady gaga, britney spears, jack johnson, shakira, pink, celine dion, dido, avril lavigne, jeff buckley, bon iver, mariah carey, ed sheeran, ariana grande, j.lo, destiny’s child

composers: bach, wolfgang amadeus mozart, ludwig van beethoven, wagner, haydn, brahms, schubert, schumann, handel, tchaikovsky, mendelssohn, franz lizst, chopin, stravinsky, mahler, strauss, debussy, puccini, sibelius, vivaldi

music sources: live show, performance, perform,  orchestra, symphony, concert, gig, opera, radio, mp3, cd, theme song, score, medley, march, karaoke, sheet music, cassette, tape, mix tape, big band, aria, overture, prelude, quartet, rondo, sonata, choir

music programs: garageBand, frooty loops, ableton live, spotify, pandora, music mouse, youtube

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Christmas Tree Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on Christmas tree puns! 🎄👼🏼🌟

Organising a Christmas tree is one of the more traditional ways to spend time with family and loved ones. Finding a suitable tree, bringing it home, decorating it – it’s a fairly intensive process when you really get down to it. Make the quality time spent even more painful for your loved ones with our terrible Christmas tree puns. We’ve lovingly curated this list to include different types of trees and the wide range of decorations used on them, and we hope that you find the Christmas tree pun that you’re looking for.

While we’ve made this list as comprehensive as possible, this list is specific to Christmas trees. We also have lists on tree punsleaf puns, reindeer puns and Santa puns and will have more Christmas-specific lists coming soon!

Christmas Tree Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about Christmas trees that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of Christmas tree puns:

  • Christmas tree: Make some extremely obvious Christmas tree puns by taking advantage of phrases that they’re already in – as in, “Done up like a Christmas tree,” and “Lit up like a Christmas tree,” and “Oh, Christmas tree..”
  • Three→ Tree: As in, “And baby makes tree,” and “Good things come in trees,” and “Tree strikes and you’re out!” and “Tree wise men,” and “Tree’s a charm.”
  • Free*→ Tree*: As in, “A symbol of treedom,” and “As tree as a bird,” and “Breathe treely,” and “Buy one, get one tree,” and “Tree for all,” and “Treedom of the press,” and “Get out of jail tree,” and “The best things in life are tree,” and “Land of the tree,” and “Leader of the tree world,” and “The truth will set you tree,” and “No such thing as a tree lunch,” and “When hell treezes over,” and “Think treely.”
  • For → Fir: Firs are another tree that are commonly used as Christmas trees, so they’ve made the list too. As in, “Asking fir a friend,” and “The most bang fir your buck,” and “At a loss fir words,” and “I’ve fallen fir you,” and “Food fir thought,” and “Fir a change,” and “Fir crying out loud,” and “Fir good measure,” and “A sight fir sore eyes.”
  • Leave → Leaf: “Take it or leaf it” and “Absent without leaf” and “You should leaf now.” and  “Leaf an impression” and “Leafed for dead” and “Leaf it at that” and “Leaf me alone!” and “Leaf of absence” and “Leaf out in the cold” and “Take leaf” and “Leafing so soon?”
  •  Wouldn’t→ Wooden: As in, “Nuttelex wooden melt in their mouth,” and “I wooden hurt a fly,” and “Wooden you know it?” and “I wooden touch it with a 10 ft pole.” Note: Nuttelex is a vegan substitute for butter.
  • *tri*→ *tree*: As in, “My hair needs a treem,” and “Full of nutree-ents,” and “What is your best attreebute?” and “How cool are golden retreevers?” and “It’s an intreensic (intrinsic) quality,” and “A new brand of vegan chicken streeps,” and “No streengs attached,” and “We’re going on a treep!” and “Pull the treegger,” and “Any more treecks up your sleeve?” and “A love treeangle,” and “A treevial problem,” and “We pay treebute to the fallen.”
  • *trea*→ *tree*: As in, “A real treet,” and “Medical treetment,” and “Royal treeson,” and “I treesure you,” and “Thick as treecle,” and “Swim upstreem,” and “A holiday retreet,” and “A winning streek,” and “A treecherous mountain path.”
  • *tee*→ *tree*: As in, “By the skin of your treeth,” and “The scene was treeming with people,” and “I guarantree it,” and “A welcoming committree,” and “A chunky manatree,” and “Self-estreem,” and “Charitable voluntreers,” and “My child’s school cantreen.”
  • *tary→ *tree: As in, “Proprietree cables,” and “Complimentree meals,” and “These colours are complementree,” and “Leave it with my secretree,” and “A sedentree life isn’t so healthy,” and “Dominion is a documentree you should watch,” and “It’s rudimentree addition,” and “But what’s the monetree value,” and “A solitree existence.” Notes: to be sedentary is to be inactive or seated. If something is rudimentary, then it’s basic.
  • *try*→ *tree*: As in, “Tree again,” and “A secret treest (tryst),” and “I’m tree-ing (trying)!” and “Meat is not an ethical industree,” and “Refugees should be welcomed to our countree,” and “Bigotree is still rampant,” and “Entree level,” and “A paltree sum,” and “Geometree is everywhere,” and “Chemistree lab,” and “What sultree weather.” Notes: if something is sultry, then it’s hot. A tryst is a private romantic meeting.
  • *ty*→ *tree*: As in, “Star qualitree,” and “Structural integritree,” and “The citree that never sleeps,” and “First-class facilitrees,” and “My dutrees come first,” and “Beautree isn’t everything,” and “A single entitree,” and “Maximum securitree.”
  • Tree→ Christmas tree: As in, “Difficult as nailing jelly to a Christmas tree,” and “Barking up the wrong Christmas tree,” and “Can’t see the wood for the Christmas trees,” and “Charm the birds out of the Christmas trees,” and “Legs like Christmas tree trunks,” and “Make like a Christmas tree and leave,” and “Money doesn’t grow on Christmas trees,” and “Christmas tree hugger,” and “You’re outta your Christmas tree.”
  • Angel: Since angels are commonly placed at the top of Christmas trees, we’ve included common phrases for them in this list: “Enough to make angels weep,” and “A fallen angel,” and “Guardian angel,” and “I believe in angels,” and “On the side of the angels,” and “The angel of death,” and “Angel’s advocate.” Note: an angel’s advocate is someone who sees the good in an idea and supports it.
  • *angle*→ *angel*: As in, “What are you angeling for?” and “Love triangel,” and “A committee is a cul-de-sac down which ideas are lured and quietly strangeled,” and “It takes two to tangel,” and “What a tangeled web.”
  • Star: Since stars are commonly used to decorate the tops of Christmas trees, we’ve included phrases for them in this list. As in, “A star is born,” and “Born under a lucky star,” and “Catch a falling star,” and “Get a gold star,” and “Guiding star,” and “Written in the stars,” and “Reach for the stars,” and “A rising star,” and “Star wars,” and “Star crossed lovers,” and “Star quality,” and “Starstruck,” and “Stars in your eyes,” and “When you wish upon a star,” and “My lucky star,” and “Seeing stars.”
  • *star*: As in, “Can we start?” and “In stark relief,” and “A new tech startup,” and “Stop staring,” and “I didn’t mean to startle you,” and “This pasta is very starchy,” and “A starter kit,” and “You bastard!” and “Doesn’t cut the mustard.” Notes: if something doesn’t cut the mustard, then it isn’t good enough. If something is in stark relief, then it’s been made very obvious.
  • *ster* → *star*: As in, “A starn attitude,” and “This area is starile,” and “Turn up the stareo,” and “Staroids are illegal in sports,” and “Aim for the starnum,” and “You monstar,” and “Addiction is a cruel mastar,” and “Fostar kids,” and “Am I on the registar?” and “A bolstaring attitude,” and “A sinistar presence,” and “Mustar the courage,” and “Work rostar,” and “A cocky roostar,” and “It’s unhealthy to judge people based on stareotypes.” Note: to bolster is to support or strengthen something.
  • Stir → Star: As in, “Cause a star,” and “Shaken, not starred,” and “Star the pot,” and “Star up trouble,” and “Star-crazy.”
  • Stir* → Star*: Starrup (stirrup) and starring (stirring).
  • *stor* → *star*: As in, “I need to go to the stare (store),” and “My favourite stary,” and “A starm brewing,” and “Put in starage,” and “A two-starey house,” and “A convoluted staryline,” and “We don’t have to live like our ancestars,” and “Impostar syndrome,” and “Seed investars,” and “Histarical fiction,” and “You’re distarting the truth.”
  • Sturdy → Stardy: As in, “A stardy table.”
  • Babble → Bauble: As in, “Baubling on and on.”
  • Bobble → Bauble: As in, “Bauble heads,” and “Bauble hat.”
  • Bubble → Bauble: “Bauble and squeak,” and “Bauble up,” and “Burst your bauble,” and “Bauble over,” and “Thought bauble.”
  • Light → Fairy lights: Since Christmas trees are commonly wrapped in blinking fairy lights for decoration, we’ve included the term here. As in, “Blinded by the fairy light,” and “Bring something to fairy light,” and “The cold fairy light of day,” and “First fairy light,” and “Friday night and the fairy lights are low,” and “Give it the green fairy light,” and “Go out like a fairy light,” and “My guiding fairy light,” and “The fairy light at the end of the tunnel.”
  • Very → Fairy: As in, “Be afraid, be fairy afraid,” and “Before your fairy eyes,” and “How fairy dare you,” and “Thank you fairy much,” and “At the fairy least,” and “Efairy bit,” and “Efairy nook and cranny,” and “Efairybody and their mother,” and “There for efairyone to see.”
  • Candy → Candy cane: As in, “Easy as taking a candy cane from a baby.”
  • Present: We put gifts and presents under Christmas trees, so we’ve included these words in this list too. As in, “All present and correct,” and “Present company excepted,” and “No time like the present.”
  • Percent → Present: As in, “A hundred and ten present,” and “Genius is one present inspiration and 99 present perspiration.”
  • Gift: As in, “Don’t look a gift horse in the mouth,” and “Gift of life,” and “A gift that keeps on giving,” and “A gift from above.”
  • Give → Gift: As in, “A dead giftaway,” and “Don’t gift up!” and “Don’t gift in,” and “Gift yourself a bad name,” and “Gift them a hand,” and “Gift and take,” and “Gift credit where credit is due,” and “Gift it a rest,” and “Gift it the green light,” and “Gift me a call,” and “Gift 110%”.
  • Gave → Gift: As in, “I gift my best.”
  • Pine: Pines are a common type of tree used as Christmas trees, so we’ve included them in this list. As in, “Pining away.”
  • Pain → Pine: As in, “A world of pine,” and “Doubled up in pine,” and “Drown the pine,” and “Feeling no pine,” and “Growing pines,” and “No pine, no gain,” and “On pine of death,” and “Pine in the butt,” and “Pine in the neck,” and “Pinefully slow,” and “A royal pine.”
  • Pain* → Pine*: As in, “A picture pinet-s a thousand words,” and “Pine-t with a broad brush,” and “Pine-t the town red.” Note: to paint with a broad brush is to describe a group of things in general terms.
  • Fine → Pine: As in, “A pine line,” and “Cut it pine,” and Damn pine coffee,” and “Pine and dandy,” and “Another pine mess you’ve gotten me into,” and “I feel pine,” and “Not to put too pine a point on it,” and “One pine day,” and “Treading a pine line,” and “Got it down to a pine art,” and “The devil is in the pine print,” and “Go through it with a pine-toothed comb.”
  • *pan* → *pine*: As in, “Three’s compiney,” and “Wild discrepinecys,” and “Judging pinel,” and “Expineding our business,” and “Run rampinet.” Note: a discrepancy is a difference between two things that should be equal.
  • *pen* → *pine*: As in, pinechant (penchant), pineguin (penguin), pinesieve (pensive), pineding (pending), pinenis (penis), pineinsula (peninsula), pinetrate (penetrate), pineance (penance), opine (open), pine (pen), happine (happen), dampine (dampen), deepine (deepen), sharpine (sharpen), ripine (ripen), propinesity (propensity), indispinesable (indispensable), appinedix (appendix), depinedent (dependent). Notes: a penchant is a fondness for something. To be pensive is to be thoughtful. A propensity is a habit for behaving in a particular way.
  • *pin* → *pine*: As in, “Tickled pinek (pink),” and “The pineacle of health,” and “In a pinech,” and “Can you pinepoint the location?” and “A pine-t of ice-cream,” and “Take him out for a spine (spin),” and “I didn’t ask for your opineon,” and “The pursuit of happine-ness.”
  • *pon* → *pine*: As in, “A one trick pineny,” and “Time to pineder (ponder),” and “Choose your weapine,” and “Discount coupine,” and “Once upine a time,” and “I’m waiting for your respinese,” and “A correspinedence course,” and “With great power comes great respinesibility,” and “Spinetaneous combustion.” Notes: a one trick pony is someone who is skilled in only one area.
  • *pun* → *pine*: As in, “Sucker pinech,” and “Be pinectual for the exam,” and “A pinegent smell.”
  • *ine* → *pine*: As in, pine-evitable (inevitable), pinertia (inertia), pinexorable (inexorable), pineffable (ineffable), pinept (inept), pinert (inert), pinexplicable (inexplicable), pinevitably (inevitably). Notes: if something is ineffable, then it causes an indescribable amount of emotion.
  • Corner → Conifer: Conifers are a type of tree commonly used as Christmas trees, so we’ve included them in this list. As in, “A tight conifer,” and “All conifers of the world,” and “Conifer the market,” and “Cut conifers,” and “Drive them into a conifer,” and “The naughty conifer,” and “Just around the conifer,” and “From the conifer of my eye.”
  • Spruce: As spruces are a commonly used as Christmas trees, we’ve included them in this list. You can easily make some bad puns with phrases that include the word spruce, like “Spruce up.”
  • Space → Spruce: As in, “In deep spruce,” and “In spruce, no one can hear you scream,” and “Personal spruce,” and “A waste of spruce,” and “Watch this spruce,” and “Taking up spruce.”
  • Four → Fir: As in, “Down on all firs,” and “Break the firth wall,” and “A fir leaf clover,’ and “A fir letter word,” and “Twenty fir seven.” Note: the fourth wall refers to the imaginary wall between viewers and actors during tv shows or plays.
  • Fair → Fir: As in, “All the fun of the fir,” and “All’s fir in love and war,” and “By fir means or foul,” and “Faint heart never fir lady,” and “Fir trade,” and “Fir and square,” and “Fir and aboveboard,” and “Fir enough,” and “Fir play,” and “Fir game,” and “Fir-haired,” and “Fir is fir.”
  • *far* → *fir*: As in, “A fond firwell (farewell),” and “Firther down,” and “Insofir as,” and “A nefirious villain,” and “Welfir reform.”
  • *fer* → *fir*: As in, “Firal (feral) behaviour,” and “A firvent belief,” and “He talked with firvour,” and “Firmented tofu,” and “A firocious effort,” and “Firtile land,” and “The local firry (ferry),” and “I defirred my enrolment,” and “Let me confir,” and “Do you have any refirences?” and “A kind offir,” and “I’ll transfir some money over,” and “A firm buffir,” and “I prefir tea over coffee,” and “What a diffirent attitude.”
  • *for* → *fir*: As in, “Pay it firward,” and “Have you firsaken me?” and “What’s the fircast look like?” and “So on and so firth,” and “I firbid you!” and “The infirmation desk,” and “The opening perfirmance.”
  • *fir*: Make some fir puns by emphasising words that have “fir” in them: first, affirm, confirm, firsthand and affirmative.
  • *fur* → *fir*: As in, firther (further), firniture (furniture), firtive (furtive), firthermore (furthermore), firnace (furnace), firnish (furnish), sulfir (sulfur). Note: to be furtive is to be secretive.
  • *fair* → *fir*: Firy (fairy), firly (fairly), firness (fairness), firytale (fairytale), firway (fairway).
  • Wood: Make some terrible Christmas tree puns by making wood references with these wood-related phrases: “Can’t see the wood for the trees,” and “Come out of the woodwork,” and “Cut out the dead wood,” and “Knock on wood,” and “Out of the woods,” and “This neck of the woods.” Notes: If you can’t see the wood for the trees, then you’re unable to see a situation clearly due to being too involved in it. To be out of the woods it to be out of a dangerous situation.
  • Would → Wood: As in, “As good luck wood have it,” and “Chance wood be a fine thing,” and “That wood be telling,” and “Woodn’t get out of bed for,” and “Woodn’t hurt a fly.”
  • Leaves: “It leaves a lot to be desired” and “It leaves a bad taste in your mouth”
  • *lease→ *leaf: As in, “A new leaf on life,” and “Releaf me!”
  • *lief→ *leaf: As in, Releaf (relief), beleaf (believe), disbeleaf (disbelieve).
  • *lif*→ *leaf*: As in, “A healthy leafstyle,” and “The end of the natural leafspan,” and “Would you like to use a leafline?” and “Eating meat is not a necessary part of the human leafcycle,” and “Call a leafguard!” and “You’re a leafsaver,” and “Their work is proleafic,” and “You exempleafy the best qualities,” and “You qualeafy for a scholarship.” Notes: to be prolific is to have a lot of; if your work is prolific, then you’ve produced a lot of work. To exemplify is to be a typical, normative example of something.
  • *leef*→ *leaf*: As in, gleaful (gleeful), gleafully and gleafulness.
  • *lef*→ *leaf*: As in, leaftover (leftover), cleaf (clef), leaft, and cleaft (cleft). Notes: A clef is a symbol in musical notation. A cleft is a split or opening.
  •  Needle: It’s normal for pine trees to molt their needles, so it’s a common Christmas scene and problem to have pine needles around the Christmas tree. To start off our pine puns, here are some needle-related phrases that you can slip into conversation: “Pins (or puns!) and needles,” and “Like looking for a needle in a haystack.”
  •  Need→ Needle: As in, “All you needle is love,” and “You needle your head examined,” and “On a needle to know basis,” and “With friends like that, who needles enemies?” and “We’re gonna needle a bigger boat,” and “I don’t needle this,” and “A friend in needle,” and “Needle I remind you..” and “We needle to talk.”
  •  Knee→ Kneedle: As in, “Go down on bended kneedle,” and “Go weak at the kneedles,” and “Kneedle deep,” and “A kneedle jerk reaction,” and “On your kneedles,” and “Shaking at the kneedles,” and “The bee’s kneedles,” and “A real kneedle slapper.” Note: if something is a knee-slapper, then it’s extremely, raucously funny.
  •  Sap→ Sapling: As in, “What a sapling.”
  •  Trunk: Make some Christmas tree puns with these trunk-related phrases: “Leg’s like tree trunks,” and “Junk in the trunk.” Note: be careful not to use the first phrase in a fat-shaming context.
  •  Chunk→ Trunk: As in, “Trunk of change,” and “Blow trunks.” Note: to blow chunks is to throw up.
  •  Drunk→ Trunk: As in, “Trunk as a lord,” and “Trunk as a skunk,” and “Blind trunk,” and “Falling down trunk,” and “Friends don’t let friends drive trunk,” and “Trunk and disorderly,” and “Roaring trunk.”
  •  Branch: Some branch-related phrases for you to make playful tree puns with: “Branch out,” and “Olive branch.” Note: an olive branch is a symbol of peace.
  •  Bench→ Branch: As in, “Branch warmer,” and “Branch jockey,” and “Meet at the park branch?” Note: a bench warmer is someone who isn’t called up to play in a game and have to sit through the entire play – thus warming the bench.
  •  Brunch→ Branch: As in, “Meet for branch?” and “A new branch place,” and “The perfect branch date.”
  • Log: Some log-related phrases for you to play with: “As easy as falling of a log,” and “Log off,” and “Sawing logs,” and “Sleep like a log,” and “Throw another log on the fire.” Note: to saw logs is to snore loudly.
  •  *log*: Emphasise the log in certain words: logistics, logic, login, logo, logical, analog, blog, catalog, slog, backlog, dialog, clog, flog, technology, analogy, etymology, psychology, analogous and ontology.
  •  *lag→ *log: As in, “Jet log,” and “Social jet log,” and “Flog down,” and “Fly the flog.”
  •  *lag*→ *log*: As in: logoon (lagoon), logging (lagging), plogue (plague), colloge (collage), camoufloge (camouflage), flogrant (flagrant).
  •  Leg→ Log: As in, “Break a log,” and “Fast as his logs could carry him,” and “Cost an arm and a log,” and “Give up a log up,” and “Logs like tree trunks,” and “On your last logs,” and “One log at a time,” and “Shake a log,” and “Show a little log,” and “Stretch your logs,” and “Tail between your logs,” and “Without a log to stand on,” and “You’re pulling my log.”
  •  *leg*→ *log*: As in, logacy (legacy), logend (legend), logitimate (legitimate), logal (legal), logible (legible), logion (legion), logislation (legislation), bootlog (bootleg), priviloge (privilege), allogory (allegory), delogate (delegate), elogant (elegant). Note: an allegory is a metaphor used in literature.
  •  *lig*→ *log*: As in, logament (ligament), logature (ligature), intellogence (intelligence), relogion (religion), elogible (eligible). Note: a ligature can mean a few different things, but it generally means something that joins two things together.
  •  *lug*→ *log*: As in, loggage (luggage), plog (plug), slog (slug), unplog (unplug), logubrious (lugubrious), sloggish (sluggish). Note: to be lugubrious is to be sad or dismal.
  • Bark: Since bark has two meanings – the hard “skin” of a tree, and a loud noise that dogs make – we can use the meanings interchangeably and make some bark puns with these bark-related phrases: “A barking dog never bites,” and “Bark at the moon,” and “Barking mad,” and “Barking up the wrong tree,” and “Bark worse than your bite.”
  •  Park→ Bark: As in, “All over the ballbark,” and “A ballbark figure,” and “Central bark,” and “Hit it out of the bark,” and “A nosey barker,” and “A walk in the bark,” and “A bright s-bark,” and “Bark that thought.”
  •  Pakistan→ Barkistan
  •  *bac*→ *bark*: As in, “You can’t barkslide (backslide) now,” and “Barkground music,” and “A barkterial (bacterial) infection,” and “Part of the barkdrop,” and “The barkchelor (bachelor),” and “Barkchelor pad,” and “No such thing as ethical barkon (bacon),” and “Valued feedbark,” and “A messy debarkle (debacle).”
  •  *bec*→ *bark*: As in, “What have we barkome (become)?” and “The food barkoned (beckoned) me,” and “Barkcause I said so,” and “That dress is very barkcoming (becoming),” and “Fire up the barbarkue!”
  •  *bic*→ *bark*: As in, barkering (bickering), barkultural (bicultural), acerbark (acerbic), aerobark (aerobic), xenophobark (xenophobic), Arabark (Arabic), claustrophobark (claustrophobic), cubarkle (cubicle).
  •  *buc*→ *bark*: As in, “Kick the barket,” and “Can’t carry a tune in a barket,” and “A drop in the barket,” and “Coming down in barkets,” and “One, two, barkle my shoe,” and “Barkwheat cereal.”
  •  *bak*→ *bark*: As in, “A vegan barkery,” and “An apprentice barker.”
  •  *bik*→ *bark*: As in, barkini (bikini), rubark‘s cube and motorbark (motorbike).
  •  September→ Septimber: As in, “Wake me up when Septimber ends.”
  •  Root: Some root-related phrases for you to play with: “Lay down roots,” and “Money is the root of all evil,” and “Root for,” and “Root of the matter,” and “Wanna root?”
  •  Root→ Route: As in, “Is your rooter (router) working?” and “Root 66,” and “You need to take a different root.”
  •  *rut*→ *root*: As in, “A rootless (ruthless) procedure,” and “Tell the trooth,” and “Under scrootiny,” and “An inscrootable expression,” and “Brootally honest,” and “A new recroot (recruit).”
  • Twig: Here are some twig-related phrases for you to mix into your Christmas tree wordplay: “Have you twigged on?” and “Looking a bit twiggy.” Notes: to twig onto something is to realise something. If something a looking twiggy, it’s looking thin.
  •  Trigger→ Twigger: As in, “Hair twigger,” and “Pull the twigger,” and “Twigger happy,” and “Whose finger do you want on the twigger?” Note: a hair trigger is a trigger that is extremely sensitive. Can also be used to describe an something which is very unstable.
  • Knot: We can use knot-related phrases as well since “knot” has two meanings – the circular imperfections in wood and a tied fastening: “Don’t get your shorts in a knot,” and “Tie the knot,” and “Tie yourself in knots.”
  •  Not→ Knot: As in, “And whatknot,” and “As often as knot,” and “Believe it or knot,” and “Down but knot out,” and “I’m knot joking,” and “Let’s knot and say we did,” and “Knot a chance,” and “Knot a minute too soon,” and “Knot a pretty sight,” and “Knot all it’s cracked up to be,” and “No, knot at all,” and “Knot have a leg to stand on,” and “Knot in a million years,” and “We’re knot in Kansas anymore,” and “Waste knot, want knot,” and “A house divided against itself canknot stand,” and “Rome was knot built in a day,” and “Last but knot least,” and “If it’s knot one thing, it’s another.”
  •  Nought→ Knot: As in, “Knots and crosses,” and “All for knot,” and “It’s come to knot.”
  •  Naughty→ Knotty: As in, “Knotty but nice,” and “Are you on the knotty list?” and “The knotty corner.”
  •  *nut*→ *knot*: As in, “A hazelknot in every bite,” and “Using a sledgehammer to crack a knot,” and “Sweet as a knot,” and “Do your knot,” and “In a knotshell,” and “That old chestknot,” and “A tough knot to crack,” and “Knots and bolts,” and “If you pay peaknots, you get monkeys.” Notes: if you’re using a sledgehammer to crack a nut, then you’re using more force than is necessary or appropriate. “That old chestnut” refers to a story that has been told too many times.
  •  *nat*→ *knot*: As in, “An inknot (innate) sense,” and “A healthy alterknotive,” and “You’re being obstin-knot,” and “I’ll need your sigknoture,” and “Their sigknoture dish.”
  •  *net*→ *knot*: As in, “The social knotwork,” and “An exclusive knotworking (networking) event,” and “The five teknots (tenets) are,” and “The interknot (internet),” and “Cabiknot maker,” and “Captain Plaknot,” and “Baby’s bonknot,” and “A peknotrating (penetrating) gaze.”
  •  *nit*→ *knot*: As in, “Stop knotpicking (nitpicking),” and “A single, cohesive u-knot,” and “Cogknotive (cognitive) dissonance,” and “Hallway moknotor (monitor),” and “A golden opportuknoty,” and “A tight-knit (or knot) commuknoty,” and “I have a special affiknoty for,” and “Leave with digknoty,” and “A part of the furknoture.” Note: cognitive dissonance is when two contradictory beliefs are held by the same person.
  •  *nut*→ *knot*: As in, knotrition (nutrition), knotrient (nutrient), knotmeg, walknot, cocoknot, butterknot, and miknot (minute).
  •  *not*→ *knot*: As in, “Knotwithstanding,” and “Two week’s knotice,” and “Turn it up a knotch,” and “A ridiculous knotion,” and “He’s knotorious for..” and “It all came to knothing,” and “Negative conknotations.” Note: a connotation is an associated (rather than literal) meaning.
  •  *naut* → *knot*: As in, knotical (nautical), juggerknot, astroknot, cyberknot, and aeroknotical. Notes: a cybernaut is someone who uses the internet on a regular basis. A juggernaut is a force that is generally considered to be unstoppable and destructive. An aeronaut is one who travels in hot-air ballons or airships.
  •  *sap*: Emphasise the “sap” in certain words to make sap-related tree puns: sapient, sappy, asap, disappointed, and disappear.
  •  *sep*→ *sap*: As in, “Comes saparetely,” and “Sapia-toned (sepia),” and “Saptum piercing,” and “Wake me up when Saptember ends,” and “Saptic tank.” Notes: a septum piercing is a type of nose piercing. Sepia is a shade of brown.
  •  *sip*→ *sap*: As in, “A relentless gossap,” and “An insapid tea,” and “My anger is dissapating.” Note: if something is insipid, then it’s weak.
  •  *sop*→ *sap*: As in, saporific (soporific), saprano (soprano), milksap (milksop), aesap (aesop), soursap (soursop).
  •  *sup*→ *sap*: As in, “Emotional sapport,” and “Saperceded,” and “Demand and sapply,” and “You’re being saperfluous,” and “Mother Saperior,” and “Saperiority complex,” and “Vitamin sapplements,” and “Sing for your sapper.”
  •  Axe: Use these axe-related phrases for some sneaky wordplay: “Take an axe to,” and “An axe to grind.” Notes: to take an axe to something is to destroy it. If you’ve got an axe to grind, then you’ve got a grievance or strong opinions.
  •  Ask→ Axe: As in, “A big axe,” and “Axe a silly question and get a silly answer,” and “Axe and you shall receive,” and “Axe around,” and “Axe me another one,” and “Axe no questions and hear no lies,” and “Axe-ing for trouble,” and “What’s the axe-ing price?” and “Everything you were too afraid to axe,” and “Frequently axed questions,” and “Funny you should axe,” and “No questions axed,” and “You gotta axe yourself,” and “Axe-ing for a friend.”
  •  *ax*→ *axe*: As in, “Nothing is certain but death and taxes,” and “Incorrect syntaxe,” and “Soy waxe,” and “Waxe and wane,” and “Mind your own beeswaxe,” and “Frankie says relaxe,” and “The rules are pretty laxe around here,” and “The axe-is of evil.”
  •  *ex*→ *axe*: As in, “A complaxe situation,” and “Body mass indaxe,” and “Better than saxe,” and “Flaxe your muscles,” and “The apaxe of the mountain,” and “Fast reflaxes,” and “There’s still so much saxeism (sexism) in today’s society,” and “Do I even axe-ist (exist) to you?” and “Axeplicit language warning,” and “A team-building axercise,” and “Axeistential crisis,” and “Axetract the essence,” and “In the right contaxe-t,” and “Axepress post,” and “A fair axechange,” and “Animal axeploitation.”
  •  *ix*→ *axe*: As in, matraxe (matrix), faxe (fix), appendaxe (appendix), maxe (mix), suffaxe (suffix), prefaxe (prefix), saxe (six), elaxe-ir (elixir), saxety (sixty).
  •  *ox*→ *axe*: As in, “Thinking outside the baxe,” and “Xeno’s paradaxe,” and “Fantastic Mr. Faxe,” and “Unorthodaxe thinking,” and “Flummaxed,” and “The term ‘happy marriage’ doesn’t have to be an axeymoron,” and “You’re as important as axeygen to me,” and “An obnaxeious attitude,” and “In close praxe-imity.” Notes: if something is unorthodox, then it doesn’t conform to normal social rules or traditions. An oxymoron is a phrase that is made up of contradictory parts (like “cruel to be kind”.) If you’re flummoxed, then you’re completely confused and/or perplexed.
  •  *ux*→ *axe*: As in, “Living in the lap of laxeury,” and “A cruel jaxetaposition.” Note: a juxtaposition is an act of comparison.

Christmas Tree-Related Words

To help you come up with your own Christmas tree puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

christmas tree, tree, christmas, fir, leaves, leaf, wood, wooden, angel, star, bauble, light, fairy light, tinsel, candy cane, present, gift, pine, conifer, spruce, needle, sap, sapling, trunk, branch, twig, log, bark, timber, root, knot, axe

Did this Punpedia entry help you?

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Tree Puns

Here’s a Punpedia entry all about tree puns, and as it turns out there are a lot of them! Our list of tree puns is composed of 3 main categories. Firstly, any word which has the “tree” sound in it (like pastry, forestry, Austria) is an automatic entry-level pun. Then there are a bunch of different tree species (like acacia, fir, pine) which offer many opportunities for wordplay, and finally there are a bunch of tree-related characteristics and concepts (like leaf, bough, lumber, stump) which add some nice variety.

There’s also a section for tree-related phrases, cliches and idioms after the puns list – these can be used for punning too. And if you’re looking for tree puns in images (memes, visual puns, jokes), then you’ll want to scroll towards the bottom of the page – there’s a section for those. You may also want to check out our leaf puns, nut puns or our Christmas tree puns entry.

As usual, if you have a tree pun that we don’t, we’d love for you to share it with us! There’s a comments section at the bottom of the page.

Tree Puns List

Here’s our ever-growing list of dreadful tree puns! Note that each item may represent either either a simple word-swap (e.g. Three → Tree) or it may be a general rule from which multiple puns can be made. In the case of general rules, the asterisks sign (*) represents one or more letters. If you’ve got a tree pun that we don’t, please share it with us in the comments!

  • Treason → Tree-son: “The dictator punished treeson severely.”
  • Treatment → Tree-tment: “It’s a water treetment plant.”
  • Treaty → Tree-ty: “Both countries signed the treety.”
  • Treat → Tree-t: “What a treet!”
  • Mainstream → Mains-tree-m: “Sorry if my puns are a bit mains-tree-m
  • Illustrious → Illus-tree-ous: “His illustreeous father.”
  • Industrial → Indus-tree-al: “Be careful, that stuff’s industreeal strength.”
  • Intriguing → In-tree-guing: “The organism’s behaviour was in-tree-guing.”
  • Montreal → Mon-tree-al: “I’m from Mon-tree-al too!”
  • Patriarchy → Pa-tree-archy: “Most human societies have pa-tree-archal structures.”
  • Pedestrian → Pedes-tree-an: “The pedes-tree-ans rushed.”
  • Retreat → Re-tree-t: “A wilderness retreet.”
  • Retrieve → Re-tree-ve: “Can you retreeve the lost amulet?”
  • Streak → S-tree-k: “I’m on a winning streek!” and “The streeker was caught and arrested.”
  • Terrestrial → Teres-tree-al: “The tree is a teres-tree-al organism.”
  • Trio → Tree-o: “The tree-o set off on another adventure.”
  • Street: “It bounced happily down the street.”
  • Tremendous → Tree-mendous: “I put in a tree-mendous amount of time on that project.”
  • *t re* → *-tree-*: Many tree puns can be created with this rule: If a word ends in “t” and the following word begins with the “ree” sound, then a tree pun can be made. Here are some examples of pairs of words that work – note that there are multiple ways of presenting “tree” in the pun, and some random examples are shown: might rely (might tree lie or might-tree-ly), best resource (best treesources or best tree sources), just read (just treed), cannot recall (cannotreecal or cannot tree call), it reads (it tree-ds), most refreshingly (most treefreshingly or most tree freshingly), brilliant reasoning (brilliant treesoning), must really (must treeally), not remain (not tree main), just return (just tree turn), can’t refuse (can tree fuse), but really (but treeally), most remarkable (mos-tree markable), not retaining (no tree-taining). There are obviously a very large number of these sort of tree puns to be made – far too many to list here.
  • Treachery → Tree-chery: “The tree-chery of the man has no bounds.”
  • Dream → Tree-m: “I had the weirdest tree-m last night”
  • Triangle → Tree-angle: “Tree-angles have three sides.”
  • Triumph → Tree-umph: “The allied countries were tree-umphant.”
  • Trillion → Tree-llion: “Humans kill more than one tree-llion sea animals each year.”
  • Trilogy → Tree-logy: “It’s the third book in the tree-logy.”
  • Triathalon → Tree-athalon : “She trained hard for the tree-athalon.”
  • Tribulations → Tree-bulations: “She went through many trials and treebulations when starting her business.”
  • Traditional → Tree-ditional: “Treeditional family values are outdated.”
  • Transformation → Tree-nsformation: “They underwent a radical treensformation.”
  • Transparency → Tree-nsparency: “An open and treensparent government is very important.”
  • Transexual → Tree-nsexual: “Yep, I’m a male to female treensexual.”
  • Be → Tree: “I’m trying to tree more compassionate.”
  • Free → Tree: “Buy one, get one tree.”
  • Thee → Tree: “Shall I compare tree to a summer’s day?”
  • Three → Tree: “Good things come in trees.”
  • T-shirt → Tree-shirt: “What size is your tree-shirt?”
  • Absentee → Absen-tree: “Only one absentree today.”
  • Amputee → Ampu-tree: “The amputree was lucky to have survived.”
  • Devotee → Devo-tree: “A devotree of the temple”
  • Manatee → Mana-tree: “Manatrees are mostly marine animals.”
  • Guarantee → Guaran-tree: “It comes with a lifetime guarantree.”
  • Deportee → Depor-tree: “The deportrees were being taken to another country.”
  • Repartee → Repar-tree: “All this word play and repartree is making me tired.”
  • Country → Coun-tree: “The countree is openly going against UN conventions”
  • Countries → Coun-trees: “The countrees formed a strong relationship.”
  • Industry → Indus-tree: “We need a stronger manufacturing industree.”
  • Industries → Indus-trees: “All three primary industrees are booming.”
  • Entries → En-trees: “We’ve have over seven thousand entrees.”
  • Ministry → Minis-tree: “The ministree of international relations.”
  • Ministries → Minis-trees: “All of the ministrees are happy with the decision.”
  • Tapestry → Tapes-tree: “A beautifully embroidered tapestree.”
  • Pleasantry → Pleasan-tree: “A pleasantree is a polite part of a normal conversation.”
  • Pleasantries → Pleasan-trees: “We don’t have time to exchange pleasantrees.”
  • Toiletries → Toile-trees: “We packed the toiletrees in the other suitcase.”
  • Pastry → Pas-tree: “Most pastrees are quite unhealthy.”
  • Sentry → Sen-tree: “Put another sentree on that building, corporal.”
  • Poetry → Poe-tree: “Reading poetree helps me relax.”
  • Chemistry → Chemis-tree: “Chemistree is my second major.”
  • Infantry → Infan-tree: “Their heavy infantree are retreating.”
  • Symmetry → Symme-tree: “A square has 4 lines of symmetree.”
  • Registry → Regis-tree: “The registree is processing more licenses than ever.”
  • Geometry → Geome-tree: “It has a strange, curvy geometree.”
  • Forestry → Fores-tree: “The forestree department is finally getting more funding.”
  • Poultry → Poul-tree: “The poultree industry is a cruel one.”
  • Ancestry → Ances-tree: “My ancestree is primarily Aboriginal.”
  • Sultry → Sul-tree: “The sultree glances were unmistakable.” and “I’m hoping this sultree weather won’t last long”.
  • Gallantry → Galan-tree: “The captain’s gallantree won her team the title.” and “His humble gallantry has made him famous in the town.”
  • Carpentry → Carpe-tree: “The carpentree profession has changed over the years.”
  • Bigotry → Bigo-tree: “The bigotree of a racist past still exists in the corners of society.”
  • Circuitry → Circui-tree: “The circuitree is too hot.”
  • Pantry → Pan-tree: “This pantree is larger than my room!”
  • Dentistry → Dentis-tree: “She’s been studying dentistree for 6 years now.”
  • Extremism → Ex-tree-mism: “Religious extreemism is an inherent problem of religion itself.”
  • Austria → Aus-tree-a: “Aus-tree-a is a lovely country.”
  • Bloodstream → Bloods-tree-m: “The bloodstreem carries oxygen and nutrients to cells.”
  • Compatriot → Compa-tree-ot: “The two compa-tree-ots were competing for gold.”
  • Countryside → Coun-tree-side: “A walk in the coun-tree-side is what I need.”
  • Equestrian → Eques-tree-an: “The eques-tree-ian sports industry can be quite cruel.”
  • History → His-tree: “His-tree was made this day.”
  • Victory → Vic-tree: “Vic-tree is ours!”
  • Factory → Fac-tree: “The fac-tree produces all sorts of plastic goods.”
  • Territory → Terri-tree: “The aggressor country lost terri-tree after the war.”
  • Laboratory → Labora-tree: “The labora-tree of Dr. Frankenstein.”
  • Statutory → Statu-tree: “A Statu-tree declaration.”
  • Directory → Direc-tree: “A direc-tree of phone numbers.”
  • Satisfactory → Satisfac-tree: “Your behaviour has been satisfac-tree.”
  • Lavatory → Lava-tree: “Please, may I use your lava-tree?”
  • Inventory → Inven-tree: “While taking an inven-tree of our goods I noticed a deficit.”
  • Regulatory → Regula-tree: “Please consult the regula-tree body responsible for this.”
  • Mandatory → Manda-tree: “Wearing socks in manda-tree.”
  • Inflammatory → Inflamma-tree: “Those are inflama-tree comments.”
  • Contradictory → Contradic-tree: “Your statements are contradic-tree.”
  • Repository → Reposi-tree: “A vast reposi-tree of data.”
  • Obligatory → Obliga-tree: “Thid event is obligi-tree for new members.”
  • Discriminatory → Discrimina-tree: “The new rules were a bit discrimina-tree.”
  • Perfunctory → Perfunc-tree: “I had a perfunctree look over the manuscript.”
  • Derogatory → Deroga-tree: “The minister’s comments were undeniably derogatree.”
  • Mystery → Mys-tree: “Where my pride went is a bit of a mys-tree.”
  • Battery → Batree: “The new batree powered candles.”
  • Pottery → Pot-tree: “I practice pottery for relaxation.”
  • Cemetery → Ceme-tree: “This cemetree contains the body of my great grandmother.”
  • Lottery → Lotree: “The lottree often preys on the minorities.”
  • Monastery → Monas-tree: “Not far from here is the ruins of an old monas-tree.”
  • Adultery → Adultree: “In some conservative countries adul-tree is still illegal.”
  • Flattery → Flattree: “Oh enough with the flat-tree!”
  • Military → Mili-tree: “The ents have a powerful mili-tree.” Note: ents are a race of living trees in The Lord of the Rings.
  • Parliamentary → Parliamen-tree: “The parlimen-tree proceedings were slow.”
  • Voluntary → Volun-tree: “A volun-tree worker.”
  • Monetary → Monet-tree: “This old vase has a high monet-tree value.”
  • Commentary → Commen-tree: “We don’t need your commen-tree.”
  • Documentary → Documen-tree: “A documen-tree about Polynesian rainforests.”
  • Solitary → Soli-tree: “I prefer a soli-tree existence.”
  • Complimentary → Complimen-tree: “It comes with a complimen-tree gift card.”
  • Dietary → Diet-tree: “Diet-tree experts recommend a mostly plant-based diet.”
  • Elementary → Elemen-tree: “We had to bow to teachers in my elemen-tree school.”
  • Proprietary → Propriet-tree: “This software isn’t open-source, it’s propriet-tree.”
  • Hereditary → Heredit-tree: “I think my corny puns are heredit-tree.”
  • Sanitary → Sani-tree: “The hospital was sani-tree by necessity.”
  • Planetary → Planet-tree: “These planet-tree bodies have unusual orbits.”
  • Sedentary → Sedentree: “I’m too sedentree – I want to get a stand-up desk.”
  • Momentary → Momentree: “A momentree lapse of concentration was all it took.”
  • Century → Centree: “It’s been more than a centree since the war.”
  • Belief → Beleaf: “Beleaf in magic spiritual beings is outdated.”
  • Disbelief → Disbeleaf: “I had to suspend my disbeleaf.”
  • Gleeful → Gleaful: “His gleaful expression was the cutest.”
  • Gleefully → Gleafully: “They gleafully accepted the gifts.”
  • *ly F* → *-leaf f*: Thousands or perhaps millions of leaf puns can be made with this simple rule: If a word ends in the “ly” sound and if followed by a word starting with “f”, then a leaf pun can be made. Here are some examples of pairs of words that work – note that there are multiple ways of presenting “leaf” in the pun, and some random examples are shown: heartily for (hearti-leaf-or or hearty leaf for), closely from (close-leaf-rom or close-leaf from), nearly five (near-leaf-ive or near-leaf five), practically finished (practica-leaf-inished or practical-leaf finished), truly formidable (tru-leaf-ormidable or true leaf formidable), perfectly familiar (perfect-leaf-amiliar or perfect leaf familiar), nearly fifteen (near-leaf-ifteen or near leaf fifteen), possibly find (possib-leaf find), ghastly face (ghast-leaf-ace or ghast-leaf face), continually from (continua-leaf-rom), carefully fastened (carefu-leaf-astened), slowly from (slow-leaf from), rapidly formed (rapid-leaf-ormed), principally for (principal leaf for), plainly furnished (plain-leaf-urnished), hardly found (hard-leaf-ound), entirely free (entire leaf fresh), perfectly fresh, fiercely forward, nearly fallen, expressly for, terribly frightened, loudly for, swiftly forward. There’s obviously a huuuge number of different pairs of word for which this works. You could also use leaf puns as one or more of those words to create more densely leaf-punned phrases: “She gleaful-leaf frolicked through the meadow.”
  • Jellyfish → Jel-leaf-ish: “The je-leaf fish glided gently upwards.”
  • Relief → Releaf: “What a releaf!”
  • Cauliflower → Cau-leaf-lower: “Cau-leaf flower is a great source of vitamins.”
  • Amplification → Amp-leaf-ication: “We’ll need more ampleafication to reach the back seats.”
  • California → Caleafornia: “I’m from Caleafornia.”
  • Cliff → Cleaf: “It’s an extremely flat cleaf-face.”
  • Elephant → Eleafant: “Eleafants are herbivores.”
  • Exemplify → Exampleafy: “This exempleafies a terrible leaf pun.”
  • Facelift → Faceleaft: “Face-leafts are becoming cheaper by the day.”
  • Left → Leaf-t: “Turn leaft at Khalin St.”
  • Lift → Leaf-t: “Take the leaft to the 45th floor.”
  • Oversimplification → Oversimpleafication: “Your oversimpleafication of the issue is not helpful.”
  • Shoplifting → Shopleafting: “Shopleafting is still a major problem in many countries.”
  • Telephone → Teleafone: “You used to call me on the teleafphone.”
  • Qualification → Qua-leaf-ication: “Do you have the qua-leaf-ications for that?”
  • Proliferate → Pro-leaf-erate: “Critical thinking skills are proleaferating in many societies.”
  • Root: “We need to get to the root of this problem.”
  • Rooting: “I’m rooting for you!”
  • Route → Root: “We’ll take the short root.”
  • Are boring→ Arboring: “Your tree puns arboring.” The term “arbor” refers to an area surrounded and shaded by trees and vines, especially where they are trained over a framework for the purpose of creating such an area. The term can also refer to someone who trims, fells, or cares for trees as a profession.
  • Facepalm: “His complete ignorance and overconfidence made me want to face-palm, but I remained polite.”
  • A corny → Acorny: “That was acorny tree pun.”
  • May pull → Maple: “I maple an all-nighter to get it done.”
  • Pine: “I’ve been pine-ing for you all week.” Here we’re using the “miss and long for the return of” definition of “pine”.
  • Opine → O-pine: “She often opined at our meetings.” To “opine” is to “speak up” and declare one’s opinion openly.
  • Pain → Pine: As in, “A world of pine,” and “Doubled up in pine,” and “Drown the pine,” and “Feeling no pine,” and “Growing pines,” and “No pine, no gain,” and “On pine of death,” and “Pine in the butt,” and “Pine in the neck,” and “Pinefully slow,” and “A royal pine.”
  • Pain* → Pine*: As in, “A picture pinet-s a thousand words,” and “Pine-t with a broad brush,” and “Pine-t the town red.” Note: to paint with a broad brush is to describe a group of things in general terms.
  • Fine → Pine: As in, “A pine line,” and “Cut it pine,” and Damn pine coffee,” and “Pine and dandy,” and “Another pine mess you’ve gotten me into,” and “I feel pine,” and “Not to put too pine a point on it,” and “One pine day,” and “Treading a pine line,” and “Got it down to a pine art,” and “The devil is in the pine print,” and “Go through it with a pine-toothed comb.”
  • *pan* → *pine*: As in, “Three’s compiney,” and “Wild discrepinecys,” and “Judging pinel,” and “Expineding our business,” and “Run rampinet.” Note: a discrepancy is a difference between two things that should be equal.
  • *pen* → *pine*: As in, pinechant (penchant), pineguin (penguin), pinesieve (pensive), pineding (pending), pinenis (penis), pineinsula (peninsula), pinetrate (penetrate), pineance (penance), opine (open), pine (pen), happine (happen), dampine (dampen), deepine (deepen), sharpine (sharpen), ripine (ripen), propinesity (propensity), indispinesable (indispensable), appinedix (appendix), depinedent (dependent). Notes: a penchant is a fondness for something. To be pensive is to be thoughtful. A propensity is a habit for behaving in a particular way.
  • *pun* → *pine*: As in, “Sucker pinech,” and “Be pinectual for the exam,” and “A pinegent smell.”
  • *ine* → *pine*: As in, pine-evitable (inevitable), pinertia (inertia), pinexorable (inexorable), pineffable (ineffable), pinept (inept), pinert (inert), pinexplicable (inexplicable), pinevitably (inevitably). Notes: if something is ineffable, then it causes an indescribable amount of emotion.
  • Will not → Walnut: “I walnut stand for this!”
  • Leaves: “She leaves here on Tuesday.”
  • Leaf: “You should leaf now.”
  • Stumped: “I’m completely stumped.”
  • Stomp → Stump: “He was stumping the ground in anger.”
  • Beach→ Beech: “A lovely summer day at the beech.” A “beech” tree is a type of large deciduous tree.
  • Okay → Oak-ay: “Oakay, you’re right.”
  • *oak*: If a word contains “oak” or the “oak” sound, then we can make a simple partial pun of the word: awoak (awoke), bloak (bloke), buroakratic (bureaucratic), choak (choke), coakaine (cocaine), coakonut (coconut), croak, evoak (evoke), foak (folk), hoaks (hoax), joakingly (jokingly), loakated (located), Oaklahoma (Oklahoma), outspoaken (outspoken), poaker (poker), poak (poke), proaklaim (proclaim), revoak (revoke), smoaker (smoker), soak, voakal (vocal).
  • Sap: “He fell for it! What a sap!” The term “sap” can be slang for “a foolish and gullible person.”
  • Zap → Sap: “I got a small sap from the electrical switch.”
  • Slap → Sap: “He sapped me gently on my right cheek.”
  • Ent*: The “Ents” are a fictional race of large anthropomorphic trees in the Lord of the Rings series. Words starting with “ent” can thus be corny tree puns. Here are a few examples: enter, entry, enterprise, entirely, entrance, entered, entitled, entertainment, entity, enterprise, entailed, entertainer, entwine.
  • Bitch → Birch: “Yeah, people are a bit birchy at my work.”
  • Asked → Axed: “Axe, and you shall receive.”
  • Will owe → Willow: “After this I willow you even more money.”
  • Saw → Seed: “I seed it with my own eyes!”
  • Knot: “Can you help me tie this knot?”
  • Not → Knot: “I will knot put up with this anymore.”
  • For → Fir: “Fir only a second.” A “fir” tree is an evergreen coniferous tree with needle-shaped leaves, commonly used for timber and resin.
  • You → Yew: “Yew and me.” A “yew” tree is a coniferous tree that has red berrylike fruits. It can live to a very old age, is poisonous, and is often used for cabinet making.
  • Popular → Poplar: “Yes, vegan restaurants are becoming very poplar.” A poplar is a species of tall, fast-growing tree.
  • See the → Cedar: “Cedar forest for the trees.” A “cedar” is any of a number of conifer species which yield fragrant and durable timber.
  • Wouldn’t → Wooden: “Wooden you think?”
  • Would → Wood: “Wood you help me out for a while?”
  • Shady: “There’s some shady character following me.”
  • Drunk → Trunk: “A bunch of trunk idiots.”
  • Cops → Copse: “We should call the copse.” A “copse” is a small group of trees (a “thicket” or “grove”).
  • Chop: “We’ve been chopping and changing trying to make a decision.”
  • Shrunk → Shtrunk: “My shirt shtrunk in the wash.”
  • Bark: “All bark and no bite.”
  • Saw: “After she explained it, I saw her point”.
  • Saw dust → Sawdust: “These puns are so old I sawdust on them.”
  • Palm: “You’ll have to grease their palms.” Note: to grease someone’s palm is to bribe them.
  • Ask → Ashk: “I’ll ashk if it’s okay.”
  • Friends → Fronds: “Me and my best fronds.”
  • Friendly → Frondly: “He has such a frondly air about him.”
  • A case of → Acacia: “I’ve come down with acacia winter flu.”
  • Stick: “Stick with me, you’ll be all right.”
  • Sticking: “We’re at a bit of a sticking point.”
  • Sticky: “Eww, it’s all sticky.”
  • Schtick → Stick: “Okay, you’ve worn out the tree puns schtick now, it’s not funny anymore.”
  • Can offer → Conifer: “I conifer you a 30% discount if you buy now.”
  • Carnivorous → Coniferous: “Cats are coniferous animals.”
  • Spruce: “We need to spruce you up a bit.” A spruce is the type of conifer that’s often used for Christmas.
  • Space → Spruce: As in, “In deep spruce,” and “In spruce, no one can hear you scream,” and “Personal spruce,” and “A waste of spruce,” and “Watch this spruce,” and “Taking up spruce.”
  • Sick of mor* → Sycamore-*: Words beginning with the “more” sound can be made into sycamore puns when preceded by “sick of”, for example: “I’m sycamorning TV shows” (I’m sick of morning TV shows), “I getting sycamore tree puns.” (I’m getting sick of more tree puns).
  • Alternate → Alder-nate: “It alder-nates between black and white.” An “alder” is a tree of the birch family.
  • Tapped: “I tapped him on the shoulder.” Some trees (like rubber trees) are “tapped”, meaning they have their sap extracted via a hole in the trunk.
  • Log: “Make sure to log your hours on the time sheet.”
  • Limb: “I’m going to go out on a limb here.” and “My limbs feel so heavy.”
  • Bow → Bough: “Boughing to visitors is polite in my culture.” A “bough” is any of the larger branches of a tree.
  • Bowl → Bole: “I’ll need a bigger bole.” The “bole” is another term for the trunk of a tree.
  • Burly: “I saw a burly figure come out of the shadows.” A “burl” or “bur” is deformation or “knot” in the growth of a tree.
  • Fell: “I fell victim to an online scam.” The term “fell” is a word for “to cut down” when referring to a tree, as in “She felled the tree with her axe.”
  • I’m → Elm: “Elm not sure if it’s the right thing to do.”
  • Confer → Conifer: “I need to conifer with my advisers before making a decision.”
  • Lumber: “He clumsily lumbered over to greet me.” The term “lumber” can refer to slow, heavy, awkward movement.
  • Can of pee → Canopy: “That thing’s worth less than a can-o’-py.”
  • Grave → Grove: “You must leave – you are in grove danger.”
  • Gum: “Stop flapping your gums and get back to work.” and “Chewing gum isn’t allowed here.” The term “gum” can refer to a viscous secretion of some trees that hardens on drying. It may also refer to a tree which has secretes this substance.
  • Phlegm → Phloem: “I’ve got a cold and a phloemy throat.” The term “phloem” refers to the plant tissue tubes that conduct nutrients around the plant.
  • Gall: Refers to an abnormal growth on plants and trees, especially in response to the presence of insects or mites. It also mean “bold and impudent behaviour”: “He had the gall to make more tree puns even after I shouted at him to stop.”
  • Branch: “We need to branch out into other sectors.” and “We’re opening another branch in this town.”
  • Lifeless → Leafless: “A seemingly leafless figure lay on the beach.”
  • Life → Leaf: “Well, that’s just leaf I guess.”
  • Plant: “She planted her feet firmly on the ground, ready to fight.”
  • Decision → Deciduous: This one is very corny! “Finally, we’ve arrived at a deciduous!”
  • Shoot: “Shooting animals for sport is cowardly.” Note that a “shoot” in the leafy context refers to a young branch or leaf springing from a stem.

Tree-Related Words

No doubt there are many more puns to be made, so we’ve gathered together a list of tree-related words to help you come up with your own tree puns. If you come up with any good ones, please share them in the comments and we’ll add them to our list!

limb, bough, bole, burl, arbor, sumac, teak, fell, elm, twig, alder, azalea, log, heath, spruce, conifer, stick, saw, sawdust, acacia, tree house, frond, palm, palm tree, chop, copse, cecar, poplar, yew, yew tree, fir, fir tree, ash, knot, seed, willow, axe, birch, bush, bark, trunk, stump, ent, sap, oak, leaf, leaves, leave, walnut, pine, maple, acorn, root, tree, forest, wood, wooden, shrub, eucalyptus, beech, deciduous, evergreen, bamboo, grove, banyan, hornbeam, baobab, bonsai, canopy, rainforest, casuarina, unga, puka, yukka, linden, souari, lumber, poon, bayberry, gum tree, chestnut, mangrove, photosynthesis, fern, cypress, sapwood, heartwood, botanist, xylem, phloem, sapling, cycad, perennial, hazel, fig tree, pear tree, orchard, ginkgo, tannin, botany, banana tree, sequoia, aboreal, hickory, silva, ironwood, aspen, lumberjack, hardwood, pollard, hemlock, taproot, graft, grafting, flowering, sandalwood, foliage, underbrush, tea tree, vegetation, redwood, growth rings, softwood, lignin, mahogany, timber, rosewood, beechwood, thicket, cellulose, sawmill, plywood, forestry, kauri, plank, oaken, wooded, mulch, branch, barky, cinnamon, gum, greenery, larch, juniper, girdle, knar, filbert, gall, treetops, tree huggers, elderberry, pine cone, cone, haw, olive tree, rubber tree, sassafras, yellowwood

Tree-Related Phrases

Cliches, idioms and common phrases can often be used to make some subtle puns about the subject of your wordplay. Tree puns are no exception, and so we’ve included a list of all the tree-related phrases that we could find. If you know any more, please share them in the comments!

  • Bark is worse than its bite
  • Barking up the wrong tree
  • See the forest for the trees
  • The root of the problem
  • Grease one’s palm
  • Go out on a limb
  • Branch out
  • Grass roots movement
  • Log off / log on
  • Don’t take any wooden nickels
  • Little strokes fell great oaks
  • Must have learned to whisper in a sawmill
  • Knock on wood
  • Touch wood
  • A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush
  • Make like a tree and leave
  • Mighty oaks from little acorns grow
  • Put on the wooden overcoat
  • Shiver me timbers
  • An apple doesn’t fall far from the tree
  • Bust in the chops
  • By your leave
  • Don’t be a stick in the mud
  • Don’t keep a dog and bark yourself
  • Better than a poke in the eye with a sharp stick
  • Dumb as a stump
  • Even a blind squirrel finds an acorn sometimes
  • Had me stumped
  • Have an axe to grind
  • How much wood can a woodchuck chuck?
  • In limbo
  • In the sticks
  • Let’s tie the knot
  • Money doesn’t grow on trees
  • More cliches than you can shake a stick at
  • Old chestnut
  • Sleep like a log
  • Take a leaf out of your book
  • Turn over a new leaf
  • Take it or leave it
  • The short end of the stick
  • This neck of the woods
  • Beat the bushes
  • Beat around the bush
  • Walk the plank

Tree Pun Images

We’ve collected all the visual tree puns and meme-type puns that we could find and put them all in one place for you. If you’ve found or made another one, please share a link to it in the comments!

Tree Pun Conversations

Pun battles and pun-filled conversations are a common occurrence on the internet, and particularly so for tree puns for some reason. Here we’ve collected some of those iMessage/Messenger/chatroom pun battles for you to do with as you would:

Did this Punpedia entry help you?

That’s all the tree pun material we have for you! Was it helpful? Did you find what you were looking for? If so, great! We’re happy we were able to help. If not, we’d love for you to tell us how this entry could be improved. More visual tree puns? More word play around a certain concept? Punpedia is driven by community suggestions, so we really appreciate your feedback. Thanks for visiting Punpedia 🙂