Music Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on music puns! 🎵 🎹 🎼 🎶

Music is a huge and deeply ingrained part of our culture. We hear music not only in songs, but also in advertisments, movies, stories and tv shows (even wrestlers have theme songs!). We’ve done our best to cover this broad scope with music puns that span from composers to musicians to musical terminology.

While we’ve made this list as thorough as possible, it is specific to music. You might also be interested in our party puns.

Music Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about music that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of music puns:

  • Soon → Tune: As in, “A fool and their money are tune parted” and “As tune as my back is turned” and “As tune as possible” and “Get well tune” and “Tuner or later” and “Too much too tune.”
  • Bend → Band: As in, “Band over backwards” and “Band the rules” and “Band your ear.”
  • Land → Band: As in, “Band ahoy!” and “Band of hope and glory” and “Band of make believe” and “In the band of the living.”
  • Sand → Band: As in, “Draw a line in the band” and “The bands of time.”
  • Brand → Band: As in, “Band new” and “A band new ballgame” and “A band new day” and “Band spanking new.”
  • Grand → Band: As in, “Delusions of bandeur” and “Band theft auto” and “Band slam” and “A band slam” and “The band canyon.”
  • Hand → Band: As in, “Bands on deck” and “Bite your band off” and “Bound band and foot.”
  • Tenner → Tenor: As in, “That’ll cost you a tenor.”
  • Apparatus → Opera-tus: As in, “A complicated opera-tus.”
  • Can you → Kanye: As in, “Kanye get it done by 5pm?” and “Kanye think about it?” Note: This is a reference to Kanye West, a famous rapper.
  • Hop → Hip Hop: As in, “Hip hop to it” and “Hip hop, skip and jump” and “Hip hopping mad.” Note: hip hop is a popular music genre.
  • Spot → Spotify: As in, “A blind spotify” and “Got a soft spotify for” and “That really hit the spotify” and “In a tight spotify” and “Spotify the difference.” Note: Spotify is a music provider.
  • Big → Gig: As in, “A gig ask” and “Gig shot” and “Earning gig bucks” and “Look at the gig picture” and “Bright lights, gig city” and “Make it gig” and “No gig deal” and “Open your gig mouth.”
  • Dig → Gig: As in, “Gig your own grave” and “Gig your heels in” and “Gig up the dirt” and “A gig for victory.”
  • Rock: Rock is a mainstream music genre. Here are related puns:
    • Block → Rock: As in, “Mental rock” and “New kid on the rock” and “Chip off the old rock.”
    • Chalk → Rock: As in, “Different as rock and cheese” and “Rock it up to experience.”
    • Chock → Rock: As in, “Rock a block” and “Rock full.”
    • Clock → Rock: As in, “Anti-rockwise” and “Around the rock” and “Regular as rockwork” and “Beat the rock” and “Race against the rock” and “Running like rockwork.”
    • Knock → Rock: As in, “Don’t rock it til you’ve tried it” and “I get rocked down, but I get up again” and “Rock ’em dead” and “Rock back a few” and “Rock heads together” and “Rock it off” and “Rock it out of the park” and “Rock on wood” and “Rock your socks off.”
    • Shock → Rock: As in, “Rock and awe” and “Rock horror” and “A short, sharp rock to the system” and “Sticker rock.”
  • Rap: Rap is a very popular music genre that is characterised by rhythmic rhymes. Here are related puns:
    • Rap: These rap-related phrases are general enough to use as puns: “Beat the rap” and “A rap over the knuckles” and “A bad rap.” Note: a bap rap is a bad reputation.
    • Cap → Rap: As in, “A feather in your rap” and “Rap in hand” and “If the rap fits, wear it” and “Put on your thinking rap” and “To rap it all off…”
    • Gap → Rap: As in, “Bridge the rap” and “Generation rap” and “Mind the rap.”
    • Snap → Rap: As in, “A rap decision” and “Rap happy” and “Rap out of it” and “Rap to it” and “Rap, crackle and pop” and “Make it rappy.”
    • Trap → Rap: As in, “Tourist rap” and “The parent rap” and “Shut your rap” and “Fall into a rap.”
    • Wrap → Rap: As in, “It’s a rap” and “Keep under raps” and “Rap it up” and “Rapped around your little finger.”
    • Rep* → Rap*: We can replace the “rep” sound in words with “rap” to make some sneaky rap-related puns, as in: “A false raport” and “Banana rapublic.” Other word that could be used are: raproach (reproach), rapresent (represent), raprieve (reprieve) and raprimand (reprimand).
    • *rup* → *rap*: As in, “Corrapt government” and “A disrapt ending.” Here are other words you could use: abrapt (abrupt), interrapt (interrupt), corraption (corruption), unscrapulous (unscrupulous), rapture (rupture) and disraptive (disruptive).
  • Pop: Pop is a mainstream music genre. Here are some pop-related puns:
    • Drop → Pop: As in, “At the pop of a hat” and “Pop it like it’s hot” and “Pop a bombshell” and “Pop a brick” and “Pop a bundle” and “Pop a dime” and “Pop dead gorgeous” and “A pop in the bucket.”
    • Hop → Pop: As in, “Pop, skip and jump” and “Popping mad.”
    • *prop* → *pop*: As in, “Blow out of poportion” and “Generous poportions” and “Prim and poper.”
    • Stop → Pop: As in, “Pop and smell the roses” and “Pop at nothing” and “Pop, drop and roll” and “Pop it, you’re killing me” and “Pop the show” and “Pop the car” and “Pop! In the name of love” and “The buck pops here” and “Pull out all the pops.”
    • Top → Pop: As in, “Come out on pop” and “From pop to toe” and “Over the pop” and “Pop of the class” and “In tip pop condition” and “Tough at the pop” and “Keep on pop of” and “Off the pop of my head” and “On pop of the world” and “Over the pop” and “Take it from the pop” and “The view from the pop” and “Pop dollar” and “To pop it off” and “Pop notch.”
  • Jas* → Jazz*: Jazzper (jasper) and jazzmine (jasmine).
  • Jes* → Jazz*: Jazzter (jester), majazztic (majestic) and majazzty (majesty).
  • Jus* → Jazz*: As in, “Where is the jazztice?” and “Jazztify your actions” and “It’s no jazztification for what you’ve done.”
  • Bluegrass: Bluegrass is a music genre of roots music. Here are related puns:
    • Blue → Bluegrass: As in, “As cold as bluegrass blazes” and “Beat black and bluegrass” and  Beyond the big bluegrass” and “Bluegrass collar worker” and “Til you’re bluegrass in the face” and “A bolt from the bluegrass.”
    • Grass → Bluegrass: As in, “Green as bluegrass” and “As exciting as watching bluegrass grow” and “Don’t let the bluegrass grow under your feet” and “A snake in the bluegrass” and “The bluegrass is always greener on the other side.”
  • Beat: This is in reference to the beat of a song. Here are related puns:
    • Beat: We can start off with some related phrases that are general enough to use as puns: “Beat it” and “Beat a hasty retreat” and “Beat a path to your door” and “Beat about the bush.”
    • Bead → Beat: As in, “Beats of sweat” and “Love beats” and “Draw a beat on.”
    • Eat → Beat: As in, “A bite to beat” and “All you can beat” and “Beat and run.”
    • Feet → Beat: As in, “Back on your beat” and “Cold beat” and “Drag your beat” and “Itchy beat.”
    • Heat → Beat: As in, “Beat wave” and “Beating up” and “In the beat of the moment” and “Packing beat” and “If you can’t stand the beat, get out of the kitchen.”
    • Neat → Beat: As in, “Beat as a new pin” and “Beat freak” and “Beatness counts.”
    • Seat → Beat: As in, “Back beat driver” and “By the beat of your pants” and “Glued to your beat” and “Take a beat.”
  • Madly → Medley: As in, “Truly, medley, deeply” and “Medley in love.” Note: a medley is a song that’s made up of at least three other songs.
  • Higher → Choir: As in, “Choir purpose” and “Answer to a choir authority” and “Choir than a kite.”
  • Buyer → Choir: As in, “Choir’s market” and “Choir beware” and “Choir’s remorse.”
  • Dire → Choir: As in, “Choir consequences” and “In choir straits.”
  • Wire → Choir: As in, “Down to the choir” and “Live choir” and “Choired for sound.”
  • Beaver → Bieber: As in, “Busy as a bieber” and “Bieber away at” and “Eager bieber” and “Work like a bieber.” Note: these puns are in reference to Justin Bieber, a pop musician.
  • Swift: Taylor Swift is an incredibly popular musician, so we’ve included her in this list:
    • Gift → Swift: As in, “A swift from the gods” and “The swift of tongues” and “The swift that keeps on giving.”
    • Lift → Swift: As in, “Swift off!” and “Swift your game” and “Swift the lid off.”
    • Shift → Swift: As in, “Graveyard swift” and “The night swift” and “Swift gears” and “Swift into high gear.”
  • Alone → Malone: As in, “Home Malone” and “Leave me malone” and “Leave well enough malone” and “You’ll never walk malone” and “You’re never malone” and “Time malone will tell.” Note: Malone is a reference to Post Malone, a famous rapper.
  • Card → Cardi: As in, “A few cardis short of a full deck” and “Calling cardi” and “A cardi up your sleeve” and “Deck of cardis” and “Get out of jail free cardi” and “Holding all the cardis” and “House of cardis.” Note: these puns are a reference to Cardi B, a famous rapper.
  • Tupac: Tupac was a famous rapper. Here are some related puns:
    • Two → Tupac: As in, “A bicycle built for tupac” and “Worth tupac in the bush” and “As alike as tupac peas in a pod” and “Cross as tupac sticks” and “Thick as tupac short planks” and “In tupac minds.”
    • Pack → Tupac: As in, “Leader of the tupac” and “Tupac heat” and “Tupac of lies.”
  • *tan* → *tune*: As in, “In tunedem” and “Tunegible results” and “Tunetamount to” and “Throwing a tunetrum” and “A messy tunegle.”
  • *ten* → *tune*: As in, “Tuneder goodbyes” and “A tunetative reply.” Here are other words you could use: tune-ure (tenure), tune-ant (tenant), threatune (threaten), kindergartune (kindergarten), enlightune (enlighten), glutune (gluten), potunetial (potential), pretunetious (pretentious) and maintune-ance (maintenance).
  • *ton* → *tune*: Wantune (wanton), buttune (button), cottune (cotton), skeletune (skeleton) and autune-omy (autonomy).
  • Bach: Johann Sebastian Bach is a famous musical composer. Here are some related puns:
    • Back → Bach: As in, “Answer bach” and “As soon as my bach is turned” and “In the bach of my mind” and “Bach in black” and “Bach to the future” and “Bach at it” and “Won’t bach down” and “Bach in business” and “Bach in the day” and “Bach on your feet” and “Bach seat driver” and “Bach to basics” and “Bach to square one.”
    • Block → Bach: As in, “A chip off the old bach” and “The new kid on the bach” and “On the chopping bach” and “Mental bach” and “Writer’s bach.”
    • Black → Bach: As in, “Bach as coal” and “As bach as thunder” and “Bach Friday” and “Not so bach and white.”
  • Hay → Haydn: As in, “Make haydn” and “Making haydn while the sun shines” and “Roll in the haydn” and “Hit the haydn.” Note: Haydn is a famous musical composer.
  • Brahm: Brahm is a famous music composer. Here are related puns:
    • Promise → Brahmise: As in, “An empty brahmise” and “The brahmised land” and “Don’t make brahmises you can’t keep.”
    • Calm → Brahm: As in, “A brahming influence” and “The brahm before the storm” and “Brahm down” and “Cool, brahm and collected.”
    • Palm → Brahm: As in, “A face brahm moment” and “Grease your brahm” and “In the brahm of your hand” and “Itchy brahms” and “Brahm off.”
  • Handel: Handel is a famous composer. Here are related puns:
    • Handle → Handel: As in, “Fly off the handel” and “Get a handel on” and “Handel with care” and “Handel yourself” and “How much can you handel?” and “Love handels” and “Too hot to handel” and “You can’t handel the truth!”
    • Candle → Handel: As in, “Burning the handel at both ends” and “Can’t hold a handel to” and “Handel in the wind” and “Rather light a handel than curse the dark” and “Not worth the handel.”
  • Chop → Chopin: As in, “Bust your chopins” and “Chopin and change” and “Get the chopin” and “On the chopin block.” Note: Chopin was a famous composer.
  • Strauss: Strauss was a famous classical composer. Here are related puns:
    • Stress → Strauss: As in, “Post-traumatic strauss disorder” and “Straussed out” and “Not worth the strauss.”
    • Straws → Strauss: As in, “Clutching at strauss” and “A drowning person will clutch at strauss” and “The final strauss” and “Drawing strauss.”
  • Music: These music-related phrases can double as puns: “Time to face the music” and “Music to my ears” and “Make beautiful music together.”
  • Sand → Sound: As in, “Bury your head in the sound” and “Draw a line in the sound” and “The sounds of time.”
  • Send → Sound: As in, “Return to sounder” and “Sound packing” and “Sound them away.”
  • Round → Sound: As in, “All year sound” and “Folling a-sound” and “Love makes the world go sound” and “Going sound in circles.”
  • Bound → Sound: As in, “By leaps and sounds.”
  • Found → Sound: As in, “Lost and sound” and “Nowhere to be sound.”
  • Ground → Sound: As in, “Breaking new sound” and “Built from the sound up” and “Common sound” and “Cut the sound out from under your feet” and “Gaining sound.”
  • Bums → Drums: As in, “Drums on seats.”
  • Comes → Drums: As in, “After a storm drums a calm” and “Christmas drums but once a year” and “Nothing drums to mind” and “Do what drums naturally” and “Here drums the sun” and “If push drums to shove” and “If worst drums to worst” and “Tomorrow never drums.”
  • Thumbs → Drums: As in, “All drums” and “Drums down” and “Twiddle your drums” and “Give it the drums up.”
  • Symbol → Cymbal: As in, “A cymbal of freedom” and “Sex cymbal.”
  • Snare: A snare drum is a type of drum in a drum kit. Here are related puns:
    • Square → Snare: As in, “Back to snare one” and “Be there or be snare” and “Fair and snare” and “A snare peg in a round hole.”
    • Air → Snare: As in, “Snare kiss” and “Snare quotes” and “Snare rage” and ” Snares and graces.”
    • Bare → Snare: As in, “The snare necessities” and “Snare one’s teeth” and “A snare-faced lie.”
    • Share → Snare: As in, “Snare a resemblance to” and “A problem snared is a problem halved” and “Snaring is caring.”
    • Care → Snare: As in, “Be snareful how you use it” and “Be snareful what you wish for” and “I couldn’t snare less” and “Customer snare” and “Devil may snare” and “Handle with snare” and “Intensive snare” and “Take snare of it.”
    • Dare → Snare: As in, “Snare for more” and “Snare to be different” and “How very snare you” and “Snare to dream.”
    • Scare → Snare: As in, “Running snared” and “Snare quotes” and “Snare the living daylights out of” and “Snared out of your wits” and “Snared witless” and “Snared stiff” and “Snared to death” and “Snaredy cat.”
    • Spare → Snare: As in, “Snare a dime?” and “No expense snared” and “Snare no effort.”
    • Stare → Snare: As in, “Snare into the abyss” and “Not polite to snare.”
    • Where → Snare: As in, “All dressed up and nosnare to go” and “Any time, any place, any snare” and “Here, there and everysnare.”
  • Hat → Hi-Hat: As in, “As mad as a hi-hatter” and “At the drop of a hi-hat” and “Hi-hat in hand” and “Home is where I lay my hi-hat” and “Hi-hats off to” and “Keep your hi-hat on.”
  • Again → Organ: As in, “Over and over organ” and “Born organ” and “I get knocked down, but I get up organ” and “Deja vu all over organ.”
  • Fruit → Flute: As in, “Flute and nut” and “Be fluteful and multiply” and “Bear flute” and “Forbidden flute” and “The flutes of your labor” and “Low hanging flute” and “The flute doesn’t fall far from the tree.”
  • Boot → Flute: As in, “Tought as old flutes” and “Bet your flutes” and “Flute camp” and “Fill your flutes” and “Give them the flute.”
  • Suit → Flute: As in, “All over them like a cheap flute” and “Follow flute” and “Fluted and booted.”
  • Fiddle: A fiddle is another name for a violin, and is generally used in the context of playing folk music. Here are related puns:
    • Middle → Fiddle: As in, “In the fiddle of nowhere” and “Knock into the fiddle of next week” and “Meet in the fiddle” and “Piggy in the fiddle” and “Smack dab in the fiddle” and “That’s my fiddle name.”
    • Riddle → Fiddle: As in, “A fiddle wrapped up in an enigma.”
  • Lyre: A lyre is a type of stringed musical instrument. Here are related puns:
    • Liar → Lyre: As in, “Lyre, lyre, pants on fire” and “Don’t be a lyre.”
    • Dire → Lyre: As in, “Lyre consequences” and “In lyre straits.”
    • Fire → Lyre: As in, “All lyred up and ready to go” and “Ball of lyre” and “Baptism of lyre” and “Come on baby, light my lyre” and “Fight lyre with lyre.”
  • Lute: A lute is a type of stringed instrument. Here are related puns:
    • Boot → Lute: As in, “Tough as old lutes” and “Lute camp” and “Give them the lute” and “Lick someone’s lutes.”
    • Brute → Lute: As in, “Lute force.”
    • Fruit → Lute: As in, “Be luteful and multiply” and “Bear lute” and “Forbidden lute” and “Lute cake” and “The lutes of your labor” and “Lutes of your loins” and “Low hanging lute” and “The lute doesn’t fall far from the tree.”
    • Root → Lute: As in, “The lute of the matter” and “Money is the lute of all evil” and “Lay down lutes.”
    • Shoot → Lute: As in, “Don’t lute the messenger” and “Drive by lute-ing” and “The green lutes of change” and “Just lute me” and “Lute down in flames.”
    • Suit → Lute: As in, “All over them like a cheap lute” and “Follow lute” and “In your birthday lute” and “Lute yourself.”
  • Muse: Muse is an English rock band. Here are some related puns:
    • Use → Muse: As in, “Be careful how you muse it!” and “Don’t muse that tone with me” and “Get mused to it” and “You can muse it” and “Somebody that I mused to know.”
    • News → Muse: As in, “Bad muse” and “Bad muse travels fast” and “Break the muse” and “Breaking muse” and “Have I got muse for you!”
    • Choose → Muse: As in, “Muse your weapon” and “Pick and muse.”
  • In excess → INXS: As in, “INXS of one thousand dollars.” Note: INXS is an Australian rock band.
  • Knot → Slipknot: As in, “Cut the gordian slipknot” and “Don’t get your knickers in a slipknot” and “Tie the slipknot” and “Tie yourself in slipknots.”
  • Biscuit → Bizkit: As in, “That takes the bizkit” and “Hand in the bizkit tin.” Note: these are a reference to Limp Bizkit, an American rap band.
  • Creed: Creed is an American rock band. Here are related puns:
    • Need → Creed: As in, “A friend in creed is a friend indeed” and “All you creed is love” and “I creed it like yesterday” and “Just what I creed.”
    • Read → Creed: As in, “All I know is what I creed in the papers” and “Creed all about it” and “I can creed you like a book” and “Creed ’em and weep” and “Creed between the lines.”
  • Toe → Toto: As in, “Dip your toto into the water” and “From top to toto” and “Get your toto in the door” and “Make someone’s totos curl” and “On your totos” and “One toto over the line” and “Toto the line.” Note: Toto is a classic American rock band, most famous for their song “Africa”.
  • Score: A score is a piece of sheet music showing how a song is composed and played. Here are some score-related puns:
    • Scare → Score: As in, “Scored stiff” and “Scored to death” and “Running scored” and “Score out of your wits” and “Score the living daylights out of.”
    • Core → Score: As in, “Score competencies” and “Score studies” and “Score technology” and “Score values” and “Rotten to the score.”
    • Bore → Score: As in, “Score the pants off someone” and “Scored to death” and “Scored to tears.”
    • Sore → Score: As in, “Made to prevent score throats” and “A sight for score eyes” and “Sticks out like a score thumb.”
    • Store → Score: As in, “See what the future has in score” and “Set great score by” and “What’s in score?”
  • Amp: This is short for amplifier, which is a device used to make electronic noises and instruments louder. Here are related puns:
    • Camp → Amp: As in, “A foot in both amps” and “Boot amp.”
    • Champ → Amp: As in, “Amp at the bit.”
    • Emp* → Amp*: If a word starts with emp, we can replace the “emp” sound with “amp”: “Not in my amploy” and “Gainful amployment” and “Lacking ampathy” and “Ampirical evidence.” Other words that could work: ampire (empire), ampower (empower) and ampathetic (empathetic).
    • Imp* → Amp*: As in, “A painful ampact” and “Sharp amplements” and “Of the greatest amperative.” Other words that could work: amplication (implication), ampetus (impetus), amportant (important) and amplicit (implicit).
  • Phone → Xylophone: As in, “Hold the xylophone” and “Xylophone a friend” and “Xylophone in sick.”
  • Poker → Polka: As in, “Polka face” and “Stiff as a polka.” Note: polka is a type of music genre.
  • Sing: These phrases are general enough to use as music puns: “Sing someone’s praises” and “Sing a different tune” and “Singing the blues” and “Not over til the fat lady sings.”
  • Folk: Folk is a type of music genre. Here are related puns:
    • Broke → Folk: As in, “All hell folk loose” and “Boulevard of folken dreams” and “Like a folken record” and “Go for folk” and “If it ain’t folk, don’t fix it.”
    • Cloak → Folk: As in, “Folk and dagger” and “Folked in obscurity.”
    • Joke → Folk: As in, “An inside folk” and “No folk” and “Folking around.”
    • Oak → Folk: As in, “Heart of folk” and “Little strokes fell great folks” and “Mighty folk from little acorns grow.”
  • Vice → Voice: “A den of voice” and “Leave to your own devoices” and “Lip servoice.”
  • Malady → Melody: As in, “To cure your melodies.”
  • Axe: This is slang for an electric guitar. Here are related puns:
    • Ask → Axe: As in, “A big axe” and “Axe a silly question and you’ll get a silly answer” and “Axe after” and “Axe and you shall receive” and “Axe around” and “Axe for the moon” and “Axe no questions and hear no lies.”
    • Acts → Axe: As in, “Random axe of kindness” and “Face the axe” and “Don’t confuse the axe” and “Let the axe speak for themselves” and “Never let the axe get in the way of a carefully thought out bad decision.”
  • *rithm → *rhythm: Algorhythm (algorithm) and logarhythm (logarithm).
  • Horn: A horn is a type of brass instrument. Here are related puns:
    • Born → Horn: As in, “A star is horn” and “Horn to fly” and “Horn under a bad sign” and “Horn and bred” and “Horn to be wild.”
    • Corn* → Horn*: As in, “A tight horner” and “Horner the market” and “Earn your horn” and “Just around the horner” and “Painted into a horner” and “Turn the horner.”
    • Thorn → Horn: As in, “Every rose has its horn” and “A horn in my side” and “There is no rose without a horn.”
  • Man → Schumann: As in, “A dog is a schumann’s best friend” and “A drowning schumann will clutch at a straw” and “A schumann after my own heart.” Note: Schumann was a famous composer.
  • Shape → Tape: As in, “All tapes and sizes” and “Bent out of tape” and “Get in tape” and “All gone pear taped” and “Knock into tape” and “Tape up or ship out” and “The tape of things to come.” Note: these puns are a reference to cassette tapes.
  • Area → Aria: As in, “Access all arias” and “A grey aria” and “Unexpected item in bagging aria.” Note: an aria is a type of song.
  • New-Age: This is a music genre. Here are related puns:
    • New → New-age: As in, “A new-age hope” and “A new-age broom sweeps clean” and “As bright as a new-age pun” and “A brand new-age dawn.”
    • Age → New-age: As in, “New-age before beauty” and “New-age bracket” and “New-age of consent” and “Coming of new-age.”
  • Afro/Afrobeat: Afrobeat is a popular music genre. Here are related puns:
    • Afar → Afro: As in, “Watching from afro.”
    • Acro* → Afro*: As in, “Afro-ss the board” and “Best I’ve come afro-ss” and “Afro-ss the street” and “Run afro-ss” and “Mental afrobatics” and “Adobe afrobat.”
  • A: The next few puns will be centred around the musical note A:
    • Hey → A: As in, “A presto!” and “A big spender.”
    • Aye → A: “A a, sir” and “The a’s have it.”
  • B: Here are some puns related to the musical note B:
    • Be → B: As in, “I’ll b around” and “B all ears” and “I’ll b in and out” and “I’ll b ready in a sec!” and “B as it may” and “B my guest” and “I’ll b glad to see the back of.”
    • Bee → B: As in, “Busy as a b” and “B in your bonnet” and “Float like a butterfly, sting like a b” and “Like a b to a honeypot” and “The b’s knees.”
    • Pea → B: “Like two b’s in a pod” and “Easy as shelling b’s.”
  • C: These next few puns are related to the musical note C:
    • See → C: As in, “As far as the eye can c” and “Be the change you wish to c in the world” and “Can’t c beyond the end of your nose” and “Can’t c the wood for the trees” and “Come up and c me” and “C no evil” and “I can c clearly now.”
    • Sea → C: As in, “All at c” and “Between the devil and the deep blue c” and “From c to shining c” and “Deeper than the deep blue c.”
    • She → C: As in, “I think c’s got it” and “Every little thing c does is magic” and “I’ll have what c’s having” and “What did c say?”
  • D: These next few puns are related to the music note D:
    • Tee → D: As in, “Fite you to a d” and “D it up.”
    • The → D: As in, “Above d law” and “Ace in d hole” and “Absence makes d heart grow fonder” and “Across d board” and “Add fuel to d fire” and “After d fact” and “Against d grain” and “Ahead of d game.”
    • Tea → D: “High d” and “Not my cup of d” and “Would murder for a cup of d” and “Storm in a d-cup.”
  • E: Here are some puns related to the musical note E:
    • See → E: As in, “As far as the eye can e” and “Be the change you wish to e” and “Have a look-e” and “I can e clearly now” and “Long time no e.”
    • He → E: As in, “That’s what e said” and “E never wanted that” and “That’s the one e bought.”
  • Gee → G: As in, “G whiz” and “Golly g” and “G, what I’d do for a chocolate right now.” Note: G is a musical note.
  • Sharp: If a note is raised by half a tone (a semitone), then it’s called a sharp. Here are some sharp-related puns:
    • Harp → Sharp: As in, “Sharp on about.”
    • Sharp: These sharp-related phrases can double as puns: “Sharp as a tack” and “Card sharp” and “Looking sharp” and “Sharp shooter” and “With a sharp tongue.”
    • Shark → Sharp: As in, “Jump the sharp” and “Loan sharp” and “Sharp repellent” and “Swimming with sharps” and “Great white sharp” and “Wouldn’t shout if a sharp bit him.”
  • Flat: If a note is lowered by a semitone (in other words, a half tone), then it’s called a flat. Here are some related puns:
    • Fat → Flat: As in, “Flat as a beached whale” and “Flat chance” and “Living off the flat of the land.”
    • At → Fat: As in, “Fat a glance” and “Fat a loss for words” and “Fat a moment’s notice” and “Fat arm’s length” and “Fat each other’s throats” and “Fat full tilt” and “Fat long last.”
  • Curse → Verse: As in, “Commentator’s verse” and “I’d rather light a candle than verse the dark.”
  • Nurse→ Verse: As in, “Versing a grudge.”
  • Purse → Verse: As in, “Holding the verse strings” and “The public verse” and “Lighten someone’s verse.”
  • Worse → Verse: As in, “A turn for the verse” and “A fate verse than death” and “For better or verse” and “From bad to verse” and “Bark is verse than their bite” and “Making matters verse” and “None the verse for” and “Verse for wear.”
  • *cord* → *chord*: As in, “Like a broken re-chord” and “Cut the umbilical chord” and “For the re-chord” and “In re-chord time” and “Acchording to.”
  • Card → Chord: As in, “Calling chord” and “Get out of jail free chord” and “House of chords” and “On the chords” and “Mark your chord” and “Holding all the chords” and “Pick a chord, any chord.”
  • Not → Note: As in, “And whatnote” and “As often as note” and “Believe it or note” and “Down but note out” and “I’m note joking.”
  • Knot → Note: As in, “Cut the gordian note” and “Tie the note” and “Tying yourself in notes” and “Don’t get your shorts in a note.”
  • Boat → Note: As in, “Don’t rock the notes” and “In the same note” and “Missed the note” and “Whatever floats your note” and “We’re gonna need a bigger note.”
  • Float → Note: As in, “Note like a butterfly, sting like a bee” and “Whatever notes your boat.”
  • Oats →Notes: As in, “Sowing your wild notes” and “Steel cut notes.”
  • Vote → Note: As in, “Split note” and “A note of conscience” and “Cast your note.”
  • Wrote → Note: As in, “That’s all she note.”
  • Nut → Note: As in, “Go notes” and “In a noteshell” and “From soup to notes” and “A tough note to crack” and “Sweet as a note.”
  • Dub: Dub is a genre of electronic music. Here are related puns:
    • Dab → Dub: As in, “A dub hand at” and “Smack dub in the middle.”
    • Club → Dub: As in, “Dub together” and “Fight dub” and “In the dub” and “Join the dub” and “The mile high dub.”
    • Rub → Dub: As in, “Dub it in” and “Dub salt in the wound” and “Dubbing shoulders with” and “Dubbed the wrong way” and “Dub your nose in it.”
  • Manner → Minor: As in, “All minor of” and “In a minor of speaking” and “Mend your minors.”
  • Finer → Minor: As in, “The minor things in life” and “The minor points of…”
  • Chef → Clef: As in, “My compliments to the clef.”
  • Cliff → Clef: As in, “Clef-hanger” and “The white clefs of dover.”
  • Accodance → Accordion: As in, “In accordion with…”
  • Base → Bass: As in, “All your bass are belong to us” and “Bargain bass-ment” and “Bass jumping” and “Bass-ball card” and “Caught off bass” and “Get to first bass” and “Off bass” and “Steal third bass” and “Touch bass.”
  • Pace → Bass: As in, “At snail’s bass” and “A change of bass” and “Handbags at ten basses” and “Bass up and down.”
  • Place → Bass: As in, “A bass in the sun” and “All over the bass” and “Any time, any bass, any where” and “Between a rock and a hard bass” and “Click into bass” and “My happy bass” and “Hard to bass” and “In the right bass at the right time.”
  • Ace → Bass: As in, “Bass in the hole” and “A bass up your sleeve” and “Holding all the basses.”
  • Brace → Bass: As in, “Bass yourself.”
  • Case → Bass: As in, “An open and shut bass” and “As the bass may be” and “Basket bass” and “Bass closed” and “Bass the joint” and “Catch the bass.”
  • Chase → Bass: As in, “Bass it up” and “Cut to the bass” and “The thrill of the bass” and “Wild goose bass.”
  • Blues: Blues is a popular music genre, known for smooth rhythms and a calming atmosphere. Here are related puns:
    • Booze → Blues: As in, “Blues bus” and “Blues cruise.”
    • Bruise → Blues
    • Choose → Blues: As in, “Blues your weapon” and “Pick and blues” and “Your mission, should you blues to accept it.”
    • News → Blues: As in, “Bad blues” and “Bad blues travels fast” and “Break the blues” and “Breaking blues” and “Have I got blues for you” and “No blues is good blues.”
  • Roll → Rock ‘n’ Roll: As in, “A rock ‘n’ rolling stone gathers no moss” and “An emotional rock ‘n’ roller coaster” and “Get the ball rock ‘n’ rolling” and “Ready to rock ‘n’ roll.”
  • Metal: Metal (or heavy metal) is a popular music genre, characterised by harsh noises and high energy instrumentals. Here are related puns:
    • Medal → Metal: As in, “Won a gold metal.”
    • Kettle → Metal: As in, “A differet metal of fish” and “The pot calling the metal black.”
    • Settle → Metal: As in, “A score to metal” and “Metal out of court” and “After the dust has metaled” and “Let the dust metal.”
  • Rebel → Treble: As in, “Treble without a cause.”
  • Trouble → Treble: As in, “Asking for treble” and “Trebles down the drain” and “Bridge over trebled water” and “Double treble” and “I knew you were treble” and “Looking for treble” and “Pour oil on trebled waters” and “Stirring up treble” and “Treble and strife.”
  • Tremble → Treble: As in, “Trebling with fear.”
  • Riff: A riff is a short phrase in a song. Here are related puns:
    • Rough → Riff: “Diamond in the riff” and “For those who like it riff” and “Riff and ready” and “Riff around the edges” and “A riff landing.”
    • If → Riff: As in, “As riff” and “Hell riff I know” and “Riff anything” and “Riff I do say so myself” and “Riff I’m honest” and “Riff it’s all the same to you” and “Riff looks could kill.”
    • Stiff → Riff: As in, “Riff as a poker” and “Bored riff” and “Scared riff” and “Riff competition.”
    • Ref* → Riff*: Rifference (reference), rifflect (reflect), riffrain (refrain), riffer (refer), riffute (refute) and rifflection (reflection).
  • Stave: A stave is a group of five horizontal lines that’s used in sheet music. Here are related puns:
    • Brave → Stave: As in, “Stave as a lion” and “Stave new world” and “Stave the elements” and “Fortune favours the stave” and “Put a stave face on.”
    • Grave → Stave: As in, “From the cradle to the stave” and “Staveyard shift” and “One foot in the stave” and “Turning in their stave.”
    • Save → Stave: As in, “A penny staved is a penny earned” and “A stitch in time staves nine” and “Stave the day” and “Nice stave” and “Stave the last dance for me” and “Stave for a rainy day” and “Stave it for later” and “Stave our souls” and “Stave the whales.”
    • Shave → Stave: As in, “A close stave.”
  • Sharp → Harp: As in, “Harp as a tack” and “Card harp” and “In harp focus” and “Look harp” and “Harp as a tack” and “Harp tongue” and “A short, harp shock to the system.”
  • Bell → Decibel: As in, “Clear as a decibel” and “Decibels and whistles” and “Doesn’t ring a decibel.” Note: a decibel is a measurement of noise volume.
  • Ball → Bell: As in, “Bells to the wall” and “Bell of fire” and “Bellpark figure” and “A different bell game” and “Drop the bell” and “Get the bell rolling” and “Having a bell.”
  • Bill → Bell: As in, “A clean bell of health” and “Dollar bell” and “Fits the bell.”
  • Cell → Bell: As in, “Bell division” and “A padded bell.”
  • Hell → Bell: As in, “All bell broke loose” and “Bat out of bell” and “Burn in bell” and “Come bell or high water” and “For the bell of it” and “Give someone bell” and “Bell on earth” and “Got bell to pay.”
  • Sell → Bell: As in, “Buy and bell” and “Bell out” and “Bell your soul to the devil” and “Belling like hot cakes.”
  • Smell → Bell: As in, “Come up belling of roses” and “I bell a rat” and “A keen sense of bell” and “Bell ya later” and “Bells like teen spirit.”
  • Spell → Bell: As in, “Cast a bell” and “Bell it out” and “Be under [someone’s] bell” and “Break the bell” and “Come in for a bell.”
  • Well → Bell: As in, “Alive and bell” and “All’s bell that ends bell” and “As bell as can be expected” and “Exceedingly bell read” and “Get bell soon” and “Worth doing bell” and “Just as bell” and “You know full bell” and “Leave bell enough alone” and “That’s all bell and good.”
  • Tell → Bell: As in, “Kiss and bell” and “Live to bell the tale” and “Only time will bell” and “Pray bell” and “Show and bell” and “Bell it like it is” and “Bell me about it” and “Bell me honestly.”
  • Competition → Composition: “Cut throat composition” and “Eyeing up the composition” and “Stiff composition” and “Face the composition.” Note: a composition is a musical arrangement.
  • Nose → Noise: As in, “Always have your noise in a book” and “Plain as the noise on your face” and “Can’t see beyond the end of your noise” and “No skin off my noise” and “Leading by the noise” and “Paying through the noise.”
  • Nice → Noise: As in, “That’ll do noisely” and “As noise as ninepence” and “Have a noise day” and “Make noise” and “Naughty but noise” and “Noise and easy does it” and “Noise save” and “Noise work if you can get it” and “Wouldn’t it be noise?”
  • Patch → Pitch: As in, “Not a pitch on” and “Going through a rough pitch.”
  • Itch → Pitch: As in, “Pitching to” and “Pitchy feet.”
  • Hitch → Pitch: As in, “Get pitched” and “Pitch your wagon to a star.”
  • Which → Pitch: As in, “Any pitch way” and “Don’t know pitch way to look” and “Know pitch way is up” and “Know pitch side your bread is buttered” and “The exception pitch proves the rule.”
  • Bitch → Pitch: As in, “Pitch fest” and “Pitch slap.”
  • Rich → Pitch: As in, “An embarrassment of pitches” and “Filthy pitch” and “For pitcher or poorer” and “From rags to pitches” and “Get pitch quick” and “Pitch beyond my wildest dreams.”
  • Ditch → Pitch: As in, “Dull as pitchwater” and “Last pitch effort.”
  • Him → Hymn: As in, “All over hymn like a cheap suit” and “Fast as his legs could carry hymn” and “Clap hymn in irons” and “Hang hymn out to dry” and “Seize hymn!” Note: a hymn is a type of religious song.
  • Brim → Hymn: As in, “Hymning over with confidence” and “Fill to the hymn.”
  • Grim → Hymn: As in, “Hymn death” and “The hymn reaper.”
  • Slim → Hymn: As in, “Hymn pickings” and “The real hymn shady.”
  • Swim → Hymn: As in, “Sink of hymn” and “Hymn against the tide” and “Hymn upstream.”
  • Bone → Tone: As in, “A tone to pick” and “Dry as a tone” and “Bag of tones” and “Tone idle” and “A tone of contention.”
  • Own → Tone: As in, “Go your tone way” and “Holding your tone” and “In a class of your tone.”
  • Phone → Tone: As in, “Hold the tone” and “Tone a friend” and “Waiting by the tone” and “Tone in sick.”
  • Stone → Tone: As in, “A rolling tone gathers no moss” and “Cold as any tone” and “Carved in tone” and “Cast the first tone” and “Fall like a tone” and “A heart of tone” and “Like a rolling tone.”
  • Zone → Tone: As in, “Comfort tone” and “In the tone” and ” Twilight tone” and “Toned out.”
  • Soul: Soul is a genre of music known for smooth melodies and soothing harmonies. Here are related puns:
    • Whole → Soul: As in, “A soul different animal” and “Ace in the soul” and “A soul in one.”
    • *sal → *soul: As in, “For your perusoul” and “A fine-toothed appraisoul” and “Universoully understood.” Here are other words that could be used: disposoul (disposal), prososoul (proposal), colossoul (colossal) and rehearsoul (rehearsal).
    • *sel → *soul: As in, “Seeking counsoul” and “Weasoul out of” and “Scrambling for a morsoul.” Other words that you could try: carousoul (carousel), chisoul (chisel), easoul (easel) and souldom (seldom).
    • *sol → *soul: As in, “A tidy soulution” and “Seeking soulace” and “A soulid excuse” and “Souliciting answers.” Other words that could be used: soulemn (solemn), souldier (soldier), parasoul (parasol), aerosoul (aerosol), resoulve (resolve), consoule (console), resoulution (resolution), obsoulete (obsolete).
  • Piece: A musical piece is another word for a song or arrangement. Here are some related puns:
    • Peace → Piece: As in, “At piece” and “Hold your piece” and “Keeping the piece” and “No piece for the wicked” and “Piece be with you” and “Piece of mind” and “Rest in piece” and “War and piece.”
    • Pace → Piece: “Change of piece” and “At ten pieces” and “Keeping piece with” and “Piece up and down” and “Put through your pieces.”
    • Peas → Piece: As in, “Like two piece in a pod.”
    • Please → Piece: As in, “If you piece” and “One moment, piece” and “Piece be seated.”
  • Funk: This is a popular music genre known for charismatic basslines. Here are related puns:
    • Bunk → Funk: As in, “Do a funk” and “History is funk.”
    • Chunk → Funk: As in, “Blow funks” and “Funk of change.”
    • Drunk → Funk: As in, “Funk as a lord” and “Blind funk” and “Crying funk” and “Funk under the table.”
    • Hunk* → Funk*: As in, “Funker down” and “Funky dory.”
    • Junk → Funk: As in, “Funk yard” and “Funk mail.”
  • Trance: Trance is a genre of electronic music. Here are related puns:
    • Chance → Trance: As in, “Trance of a lifetime” and “Trance would be a fine thing” and “Fat trance” and “A fighting trance” and “Half a trance” and “Jump at the trance” and “Not a ghost of a trance” and “A trance in a million.”
    • Dance → Trance: As in, “Trance around the problem” and “Trance the night away” and “Trancing with wolves” and “Lead a merry trance” and “Making a song and trance” and “Trance your socks off.”
    • Glance → Trance: As in, “At a trance” and “Exchange trances” and “Meaningful trance” and “Steal a trance at.”
  • Dub: Dub is a music genre that grew out of reggae. Here are related puns:
    • *bub* → *dub*: As in, “Dubble over” and “Burst someone’s dubble” and “Thought dubble.”
    • Double → Duble: As in, “On the duble” and “Bent duble” and “Duble dutch” and “Duble act” and “Duble back” and “Duble check” and “Duble click” and “Duble cross” and “Duble digits” and “Duble dip.”
    • Club → Dub: As in, “Fight dub” and “In the dub” and “Join the dub” and “The mile high dub.”
    • Rub → Dub: As in,
      Dub it in” and “Dub salt in the wound” and “Dub shoulders with” and “Dubbed the wrong way.”
  • Phrase: A musical phrase is a short section in a piece of music. Here are related puns:
    • Praise → Phrase: As in, “Grudging phrase” and “Showered with phrase” and “Sing someone’s phrases.”
    • Raise → Phrase: As in, “Phrase a stink” and “Phrase hell” and “Phrase the roof” and “Phrase your game.”
    • Daze → Phrase: As in, “Phrased and confused.”
    • Phase → Phrase: As in, “Phrase out.”
  • Stab → Tab: As in, “Have a tab at” and “Tab in the back” and “Take a tab in the dark.”
  • Grab → Tab: As in, “Tab a bite to eat” and “Tab life by the horns” and “Up for tabs.”
  • Bar: A bar is a section of notes in sheet music. Here are related puns:
    • Are → Bar: As in, “All bets bar off” and “Bar you sure?” and “How bar you?” and “My lips bar sealed.”
    • Far → Bar: As in, “A bridge too bar” and “A step too bar” and “Bar and away” and “A bar cry” and “Few and bar between.”
    • Jar → Bar: As in, “Caught with your hand in the cookie bar” and “Jam bar.”
    • Par → Bar: As in, “Below bar” and “On bar with” and “Bar for the course” and “Up to bar.”
  • Turn → Ternary: As in, “A ternary for the worse” and “About ternary” and “Didn’t ternary a hair” and “Do a good ternary.” Note: ternary is the name for a song that has three parts in it.
  • Key: A musical key refers to the sharps and flats that are in a song. Here are related puns:
    • Be → Key: As in, “Key all ears” and “I’ll key around” and “Key my guest” and “Key still my beating heart.”
    • Bee → Key: As in, “Busy as a key” and “A key in your bonnet” and “Float like a butterfly, sting like a key” and “Make a keyline for.”
    • Free → Key: As in, “Key as a bird” and “Born key” and “Buy one, get one key” and “Fancy key.”
  • String: These next few puns are in reference to string instruments. Here are related puns:
    • Bring → String: As in, “String it on” and “String something to light” and “String the house down” and “String to the table.”
    • Ring → String: As in, “Alarm bells began to string” and “Doesn’t string a bell” and “Don’t string us, we’ll string you.”
    • Sing → String: As in, “All stringing, all dancing” and “String a different tune” and “String for your supper” and “String someone’s praises” and “Stringing in the rain.”
    • Sting → String: As in, “Float like a butterfly, string like a bee.”
    • Swing → String: As in, “Come out stringing” and “Get into the string of it” and “In full string” and “String both ways” and “Take a string at.”
    • Thing → String: As in, “A little knowledge is a dangerous string” and “A mind is a terrible string to waste” and “A string of beauty” and “All strings considered” and “Anystring goes.”
  • Choral: A choral is a musical ensemble made of singers. Here are related puns:
    • Floral → Choral: As in, “A choral arrangement” and “A choral tribute.”
    • Moral → Choral: As in, “Choral fibre” and “Chorally unacceptable” and “The choral high ground” and “Chorally bankrupt” and “A choral victory.”
  • Tube → Tuba: As in, “Down the tubas” and “Test tuba baby.”
  • Bone → Trombone: As in, “A trombone to pick” and “Dry as a trombone” and “Bag of trombones” and “Trombone dry” and “Chilled to the trombone” and “Close to the trombone” and “Not a jealous trombone in your body.”
  • Hello → Cello: As in, “Cello, goodbye!” and “Cello, sailor” and “Cello, one two three testing” and “You had me at cello.”
  • Fellow → Cello: As in, “A cello traveller” and “For he’s a jolly good cello” and “My cello Americans” and “A stout cello.”
  • Yellow → Cello: As in, “Cello submarine” and “The cello brick road.”
  • Base → Bass: As in, “All your bass are belong to us” and “Bargain bassment” and “Bass jumping” and “Bass station” and “Caught off bass” and “Get to first bass” and “Touch bass with.”
  • Ace → Bass: As in, “Bass in the hole” and “Bass up your sleeve” and “Holding all the basses.”
  • Brace → Bass: As in, “Bass yourself.”
  • Case → Bass: As in, “An open and shut bass” and “As the bass may be” and “Bass closed” and “Bass the joint” and “Crack the bass” and “I rest my bass” and “On a bass by bass basis.”
  • Face → Bass: As in, “A bass as long as a fiddle” and “At bass value” and “Bass like the back of a bus.”
  • Rest: A rest is a sign in sheet music that indicates the musician shouldn’t play anything. Here are related puns:
    • Best → Rest: As in, “The rest form of defence” and “Rest of friends” and “All the rest.”
    • Dressed → Rest: As in, “All rest up and nowhere to go” and “Rest for success” and “Rest to kill” and “Rest to the nines.”
    • Nest → Rest: As in, “Empty rest syndrome” and “Feather your rest” and “Leave the rest” and “Love rest.”
    • Test → Rest: As in, “Put to the rest” and “A rest of faith” and “Tried and rested.”
  • Also → Alto: As in, “Alto known as” and “I alto wanted…”
  • Alte* → Alto*: As in, “Altonative music” and “In an altonate universe” and “Bodily altocation.” Other words that could work: Altonatively (alternatively) and altocation (altercation).
  • Blink → Blink 182: As in, “Blink 182 and you’ll miss it” and “In the blink 182 of an eye” and “On the blink 182.” Note: Blink 182 is an American rock band.
  • Attitude → Altotude: As in, “Cop an altotude” and “With an altotude.”
  • Roots: This is a style of American folk music. Here are related puns:
    • Boots → Roots: As in, “Tough as old roots” and “Too big for your roots” and “Heart sank into my roots.”
    • Fruits → Roots: As in, “Roots of your labor” and “Roots of your loins.”
  • Bend: A bend is when a note is “wobbled” (the pitch is shifted up and down). Here are related puns:
    • End → Bend: As in, “A means to a bend” and “All good things must come to a bend” and “All’s well that bends well” and “At a loose bend” and “At the bend of the day” and “Can’t see beyond the bend of your nose.”
    • Lend → Bend: As in, “Bend an ear” and “Bend a helping hand.”
    • Mend → Bend: As in, “Bend your fences” and “Bend your manners” and “On the bend” and “Bend your ways.”
    • Send → Bend: As in, “Hit bend” and “Return to bender” and “Bend packing” and “Bend in reinforcements!”
  • Calma: This is a musical term indicating that something should be played calmly. Here are related puns:
    • Calm → Calma: As in, “After a storm comes a calma” and “Calma abiding” and “Cool, calma and collected” and “Keep calma and carry on.”
    • Come → Calma: As in, “As tough as they calma” and “Calma and get it!” and “Calma away with me” and “Calma fly with me” and “Calma on over.”
  • Cannon → Canon: As in, “Canon fodder” and “Loose canon.” Note: a canon is a type of musical composition.
  • Can’t → Canto: As in, “An offer you canto refuse” and “Canto get enough” and “Sorry, canto help” and “It canto be helped” and “You canto say fairer than that” and “I canto wait.” Note: “canto” is another word for a chorus.
  • Cap → Capo: As in, “A feather in your capo” and “Capo in hand” and “Doff your capo” and “If the capo fits, wear it” and “Put on your thinking capo” and “To capo it all off.” Note: “capo” is another word for the beginning of a song.
  • Style → Freestyle: As in, “Cramp your freestyle” and “Gangnam freestyle” and “Freestyle over substance” and “Cramp your freestyle.”
  • Staff: A staff is another word for a stave (the five lines that form bars in sheet music). Here are related puns:
    • Stuff→ Staff: As in, “Beat the staffing out of” and “A bit of staff” and “Don’t sweat the small staff” and “Gather ’round the good staff” and “Get staffed” and “Hot staff” and “Knock the staffing out of” and “Know your staff” and “Struf your staff” and “The staff dreams are made of” and “Stocking staffer.”
    • Stiff → Staff: As in, “Staff as a poker” and “Bored staff” and “Keeping a staff upper lip” and “Scared staff” and “Staff competition.”
  • Comp: To “comp” someone is to accompany them in a musical piece. Here are related puns:
    • Pomp → Comp: “Comp and circumstance.”
    • Camp → Comp: As in, “A foot in both comps” and “Boot comp” and “Not a happy comper” and “Smoke around the compfire.”
  • Count: This refers to the count (beat) of a song. Here are related puns:
    • Mount → Count: As in, “Count Fuji.”
    • Can’t → Count: As in, “An offer you count refuse” and “Count get enough” and “Sorry, I count help” and “Count hear you over the sound of” and “You count judge a book by its cover.”
  • Dim: This is the common short form of “diminuendo”, which means to slowly get softer. Here are related puns:
    • Brim → Dim: As in, “Dimming over with confidence” and “Fill it to the dim” and “Rain fire and dimstone.”
    • Brim → Dim: As in, “Hang on like dim death” and “The dim reaper.”
    • Him → Dim: As in, “As fast as his legs could carry dim” and “Go easy on dim” and “Hang dim out to dry” and “Seize dim!”
    • Limb → Dim: As in, “Go out on a dim” and “Risk life and dim.
    • Prim → Dim: As in, “Dim and proper.”
  • For the → Forza: As in, “Ask forza moon” and “Down forza count” and “A feast forza eyes” and “Forza ages” and “Forza heck of it” and “Forza love of.” Note: forza is a term that means “play with force.”
  • Few → Fugue: As in, “A fugue bricks short of a few load” and “Fugue and far beteween” and “For a fugue dollars more” and “A person of fugue words” and “Say a fugue words” and “To name but a fugue.” Note: A fugue is a type of song.
  • Pluck: This is when stringed instruments are plucked instead of strummed or bowed. Here are related puns:
    • Luck → Pluck: As in, “As good pluck would have it” and “Beginner’s pluck” and “Better pluck next time” and “Don’t press your pluck” and “Down on your pluck” and “The pluck of the draw.”
    • Pick → Pluck: As in, “A bone to pluck” and “Cherry pluck” and “Easy pluckings” and “Nit plucking” and “Pluck holes in.”
  • Large → Largo: As in, “As largo as life” and “At largo” and “By and largo” and “Largo than life” and “Looming largo” and “Living largo.” Note: Largo is a term that means to play music slowly.
  • Lilt: A lilt is a jaunty, cheerful tune or rhythm. Here are related puns:
    • Tilt → Lilt: As in, “At full lilt.”
    • Guilt → Lilt: As in, “Lilt by association” and “Lilt trip” and “A lilty conscience” and “Lilty pleasure” and “Innocent until proven lilty” and “White lilt.”
  • Trill: A trill is a quick alternation between two notes. Here are related puns:
    • Till → Trill: As in, “Caught with your hand in trill” and “Fake it trill you make it” and “Ain’t over trill it’s over” and “Shop trill you drop” and “Trill death do us part” and “Trill the cows come home” and “Trill the end of time.”
    • Bill → Trill: As in, “A clean trill of health” and “Fit the trill” and “Settle the trill.”
    • Chill → Trill: As in, “Trill out” and “Trilled to the bone” and “A trilling account” and “Take a trill pill.”
    • Thrill → Trill: As in, “The trill of the chase” and “Trilled to bits” and “Trills and spills” and “Cheap trills.”
    • Ill → Trill: As in, “House of trill repute” and “Trill advised” and “Trill at ease” and “Trill effects” and “Trill fated” and “Trill gotten gains” and “Trill temper” and “A trill wind.”
    • Still → Trill: As in, “Be trill my beating heart” and “Trill going strong” and “I’m trill standing” and “In the trill of night” and “Trill life” and “Trill the one” and “Trill waters run deep.”
  • Pedal: This refers to the pedals on a piano. Here are related puns:
    • Paddle → Pedal: As in, “Pedal your own canoe” and “Up shit creek without a pedal.”
    • Medal → Pedal: As in, “Deserves a gold pedal.”
  • Prime → Prima/o: As in, “Cut them down in their prima” and “In your prima” and “In prima condition” and “Prima time” and “The prima minister.” Note: A prima/primo is the leading singer in an opera.
  • Reprise: A reprise is a repeated phrase in a song. Here are related puns:
    • Prize → Reprise: As in, “Booby reprise” and “Keep your eyes on the reprise” and “A reprise catch” and “No reprises for guessing.”
    • Price → Reprise: As in, “Asking reprise” and “At a reprise to suit your pocket” and “Cheap at half the reprise” and “Closing reprise” and “At half reprise” and “Pay the reprise” and “Power without the reprise.”
  • Fill: A fill is a rock/jazz term which tells a musician to riff (or improvise) during a piece of music. Here are related puns:
    • Fall → Fill: As in, “A filling out” and “Easy as filling off a log” and “Bread always fills butter side down” and “Can’t help filling in love” and “Catch a filling star” and “Fill about laughing” and “Fill amongst friends” and “Fill apart at the seams.”
    • Fell → Fill: As in, “In one fill swoop” and “Fill off the back of a lorry” and “Little strokes fill great oaks.”
    • Bill → Fill: As in, “A fill of goods” and “Fit the fill” and “Foot the fill.”
    • Chill → Fill: As in, “Fill out” and “Filled to the bone” and “A filling account.”
    • Hill → Fill: As in, “As old as the fills” and “Going downfill” and “Head for the fills” and “King of the fill” and “Over the fills and far away.”
    • Ill → Fill: As in, “House of fill repute” and “Fill advised” and “Fill at ease” and “Fill effects” and “Fill feeling” and “Fill gotten gains” and “Fill will.”
    • Pill → Fill: As in, “A bitter fill to swallow” and “On the fill” and “Sweeten the fill.”
    • Will → Fill: As in, “Bend to my fill” and “Against your fill” and “Accidents fill happen.”
  • Run: A run is a quick series of ascending or descending notes. Here are some run-related puns:
    • Bun → Run: As in, “A run in the oven” and “Think outside the run” and “We’re going to need bigger runs.”
    • Done → Run: As in, “After all is said and run” and “Run and dusted” and “Been there, run that” and “A run deal” and “Run to death” and “Easier said than run.”
    • Fun → Run: As in, “All run and games until someone loses an eye” and “All the run of the fair” and “Bundle of run” and “Run and games” and “Good clean run.”
    • None → Run: As in, “And then there were run” and “Bar run” and “Run other than” and “Run the wiser” and “Run too pleased” and “Second to run” and “Two for me, run for you.”
    • Sun → Run: As in, “A place in the run” and “A thousand splendid runs” and “A touch of the run” and “Don’t let the run go down on me” and “Eclipse of the run.”
  • Sir → Sehr: As in, “That’ll do nicely, sehr” and “Yes, sehr.” Note: sehr is a musical term indicating enthusiasm.
  • Turn: A turn is a small, short trill around a note. Here are related puns:
    • Burn → Turn: As in, “Turn rubber” and “Turn in hell” and “Turn the candle at both ends” and “Turn the midnight oil” and “Turning with curiosity” and “Turn yourself out” and “Turning desire” and “Turnt to a cinder.”
    • Earn → Turn: As in, “A penny saved is a penny turned” and “Turn an honest penny” and “Turn your stripes” and “Turn your wings” and “Turn your daily bread.”
    • Learn → Turn: As in, “Turn the ropes” and “Turn your lesson” and “Turning difficulties” and “Live and turn” and “Watch and turn” and “Never too old to turn.”
  • Break: A break is a rest in a piece of music. Here are related puns:
    • Brake → Break: As in, “Hit the breaks.”
    • Ache → Break: As in, “Old breaks and pains.”
    • Bake → Break: As in, “Break and shake” and “Break off” and “Breaker’s dozen” and “Half breaked.”
    • Fake → Break: As in, “Break it till you make it.”
    • Rake → Break: As in, “Skinny as a break” and “Break in the money” and “Break it in” and “Break over the coals.”
    • Wake → Break: As in, “Break up call” and “Break up and smell the coffee” and “Loud enough to break the dead.”
  • Tie: A tie is a mark that “binds” two notes together, joining their playing time into one longer note. Here are related puns:
    • Buy → Tie: As in, “Tie and sell” and “Tie it, sell it” and “Tie now, pay later” and “Tie one, get one free” and “Tie some time” and “The best that money can tie.”
    • Die → Tie: As in, “Straight as a tie” and “Cross my heart and hope to tie” and “Curl up and tie” and “Tie another day” and “Do or tie.”
    • Dry → Tie: As in, “Boring as watching paint tie” and “Tie as a bone” and “Tie as dust” and “Bleed someone tie” and “A tie run” and “High and tie” and “Hung out to tie” and “Not a tie eye in the house.”
  • Lick: In rock, jazz and blues, a lick is a short solo. Here are related puns:
    • Lack → Lick: As in, “For lick of a better word” and “Cancelled due to lick of interest.”
    • Luck → Lick: As in, “As good lick would have it” and “Beginner’s lick” and “Better lick next time” and “Don’t press your lick” and “Down on your lick” and “Good night and good lick” and “Lick of the draw” and “As lick would have it” and “A licky break.”
  • Vamp: A vamp is a repeating musical section. Here are related puns:
    • Camp → Vamp: As in, “A foot in both vamps” and “Boot vamp” and “Not a happy vamper.”
    • Champ → Vamp: As in, “Vamp at the bit.”
    • Cramp → Vamp: As in, “Vamp your style” and “Writer’s vamp.”
  • Hook: A hook is a short riff or musical phrase intended to “catch” the ear of the listener. Here are related puns:
    • Book → Hook: As in, “A room without hooks is like a body without a soul” and “Always have your nose in a hook” and “Balancing the hooks” and “Bell, hook and candle” and “By the hook” and “Cook the hooks.”
    • Cook → Hook: As in, “Hook the books” and “Hook up a storm” and “Hooking with gas” and “Now we’re hooking” and “Too many hooks spoil the broth.”
    • Look → Hook: As in, “Always hook on the right side of life” and “A blank hook” and “A dirty hook” and “Don’t hook now” and “Don’t know which way to hook” and “Here’s hooking at you” and “If hooks could kill.”
  • Line → Bassline: As in, “A fine bassline between” and “Along the basslines of” and “Blur the basslines” and “Cross the bassline” and “Draw a bassline in the sand” and “Drop me a bassline” and “End of the bassline.”
  • Rag → Ragtime: As in, “Ragtimes to riches” and “Glad ragtimes” and “Lose your ragtime.”
  • Time → Ragtime: As in, “A brief history of ragtime” and “A good ragtime was had by all” and “A stitch in ragtime saves nine” and “All in good ragtime” and “An all ragtime low” and “Fall on hard ragtimes.”
  • Jam: A “jam” is when musicians play music together for fun, or casually. Here are related puns:
    • Damn → Jam: As in, “Jam right” and “Jam with faint praise” and “Jam straight” and “Jammed if I do, jammed if I don’t.”
    • Gem → Jam: As in, “A hidden jam” and “You’re a jam.”
    • Slam → Jam: As in, “A grand jam” and “Jam dunk” and “Jam the door.”
  • Lead: This can refer to a lead musician, or a lead cable for electric guitars and amps. Here are related puns:
    • Bead → Lead: As in, “Leads of sweat.”
    • Bleed → Lead: As in, “Lead someone dry” and “Leading love” and “Leading edge” and “Let it lead” and “My heart leads.”
    • Deed → Lead: As in, “My good lead for the day” and “No good lead goes unpunished.”
    • Feed → Lead: As in, “Don’t bite the hand that leads you” and “Lead a cold, starve a fever” and “Leading frenzy.”
    • Read → Lead: As in, “I can lead you like a book” and “A bit of light leading” and “Lead ’em and weep” and “Lead all about it” and “Lead between the lines” and “Lead the riot act.”
  • Appalled → Apala’d: As in, “I’m apala’d at your behaviour!” Note: Apala is a Nigerian musical genre.
  • Beggar → Benga: As in, “Bengas can’t be choosers” and “Bengas belief.” Note: Benga is a musical genre that originates from Kenya.
  • Genge: This is a genre of hip hop that originates from Nairobi. Here are related puns:
    • Gang → Genge: As in, “Genge up on” and “The genge’s all here.”
    • *ging → *genge: “A challengenge proposal” and “Disparagenge comments” and “An engagenge conversation” and “Filled with longenge,” and “Emergenge artist” and “Unnecessary packagenge.”
  • Jet → Jit: As in, “Jit lag” and “Jit setter” and “Social jit lag.” Note: Jit is a style of Zimbabwean dance music.
  • Morning → Morna: As in, “Not a morna person” and “Morna sickness” and “Morna, noon and night” and “The morna after.” Note: morna is a music and dance genre from Cape Verde.
  • Ray → Rai: As in, “Catch some rais” and “Rai of light” and “Rai of sunshine.” Note: Rai is a type of Algerian folk music.
  • Sugar → Sega: As in, “Brown sega” and “Sega coated” and “Sega rush” and “Sega and spice.” Note: Sega is a type of music from Mauritius.
  • Sawt: Sawt is a genre of popular music in Kuwait and Bahrain. Here are related puns:
    • Sort → Sawt: As in, “Last re-sawt” and “Takes all sawts” and “Feeling out of sawts” and “Sawting the wheat from the chaff” and “Sawt yourself out.”
    • Thought → Sawt: As in, “Deep in sawt” and “Food for sawt” and “Hold that sawt” and “Impure sawts” and “Lost in sawt” and “Penny for your sawts.”
  • Trot: This is a genre of K-pop music. Here are related puns:
    • Rot → Trot: As in, “Trot in hell” and “Spoiled trotten.”
    • Dot → Trot: As in, “Connect the rots” and “Rot the i’s and cross the t’s” and “Join the rots.”
    • Lot → Trot: As in, “A trot of fuss about nothing” and “A trot on your place” and “Leaves a trot to be desired” and “Not a trot” and “Got a trot to learn.”
  • Baila: Baila is a Sri Lankan genre of music. Here are related puns:
    • Bail → Baila: As in, “Baila out” and “Jumping baila.”
    • Pale → Baila: As in, “A white shade of baila” and “Beyond the baila” and “A baila imitation of” and “Baila into insignificance.”
  • Mosso: Mosso is a musical term that means “moved” or “moving”. Here are related puns:
    • Mass → Mosso: As in, “Body mosso index” and “Mosso hysteria” and “A monument to the mossos” and “Weapons of mosso destruction.”
  • Pause → Pausa: As in, “A pregnant pausa” and “Give someone pausa.” Note: Pausa is term meaning “to rest”.
  • Pass → Pausa: As in, “All things must pausa” and “Boarding pausa” and “Do not pausa go” and “Head them off at the pausa.”
  • Rasin: This is a musical style that began in Haiti – folkloric music combined with rock and roll. Here are related puns:
    • Raisin → Rasin: As in, “Rasin muesli bars” and “Rum rasin.”
    • Raising → Rasin: As in, “Eyebrow rasin” and “Hair rasin” and “Rasin the bar.”
  • Ragga: Ragga is a common abbreviation for raggamuffin music, which is a subgenre of dancehall and reggae. Here are related puns:
    • Dagger → Ragga: As in, “Cloak and ragga” and “Looking raggas at someone.”
    • Rag → Ragga: As ubm “Raggas to riches” and “Glad raggas” and “Like a ragga doll” and “Run yourself ragga-ed.”
  • Number → Rumba: As in, “By the rumbas” and “Do a rumba on” and “I’ve got your rumba” and “Look after rumba one” and “Lucky rumba seven.” Note: rumba is a genre of music with a strong, driving beat.
  • Punk: Punk is a music genre which is known for rebellious, fast-paced songs. Here are related puns:
    • Pink → Punk: As in, “In the punk” and “Punk elephants” and “Seeing punk elephants” and “Think punk” and “Tickled punk” and “Punk panther.”
    • Drunk → Punk: As in, “Punk as a lord” and “Punk as a skunk” and “Blind punk” and “Punk under the table.”
    • Hunk → Punk: As in, “Punker down” and “Punky dory.”
    • Junk → Punk: As in, “At the punk yard” and “No punk mail please” and “Avoiding punk food” and “Punk in the trunk.”
  • Trap: Trap is a popular music genre, known for electronic sounds and mixes. Here are related puns:
    • Trip → Trap: As in, “Guilt trap” and “The trap of a lifetime” and “Trap the light fantastic.”
    • Rap → Trap: As in, “Take the trap” and “A trap over the knuckles.”
    • Cap → Trap: As in, “A feather in your trap” and “Trap in hand” and “Feather in your trap” and “If the trap fits, wear it” and “Put on your thinking trap” and “To trap it all.”
    • Clap → Trap: As in, “Trap him in irons” and “Trapped eyes on.”
  • Swing: This is an energetic genre of music, popular with big bands and dancers. Here are related puns:
    • Thing → Swing: As in, “A close swing” and “A little knowledge is a dangerous swing” and “A swing of beauty is a joy forever” and “All swings bright and beautiful” and “All swings must pass” and “All swings come to those who wait” and “All swings considered.”
    • Sing → Swing: As in, “All swinging, all dancing” and “Swing a different tune” and “Swing for your supper” and “Swing someone’s praises.”
    • Sting → Swing: As in, “Float like a butterfly, swing like a bee.”
    • Bring → Swing: As in, “Swing something to light” and “Swing out the best” and “Swing tears to your eyes” and “Swing the house down.”
  • Timber → Timba: As in, “Shiver me timbas!” Note: Timba is a Cuban music genre.
  • Alt: Alt is short for alternative, which is a subgenre of music. Here are related puns:
    • Fault → Alt: As in, “Generous to an alt” and “Find alt with.”
    • Halt → Alt: “Grind to a screeching alt” and “Grind to an alt.”
    • Salt → Alt: As in, “Above the alt” and “Back to the alt mine” and “Rub alt in the wound” and “Alt of the earth” and “Take with a grain of alt.”
  • Drone: Drone is a musical effect or accompaniment where a note or chord is played continually throughout a piece. Here are related puns:
    • Blown → Drone: As in, “Drone away” and “Drone off course” and “Drone sideways” and “Drone out of proportion” and “Drone to smithereens.”
    • Bone → Drone: As in, “A drone to pick” and “Dry as a drone” and “Bag of drones” and “Drone idle” and “Drone up on” and “Chilled to the drone” and “Not a jealous drone in your body.”
    • Don’t→ Drone: As in, “Drone call us, we’ll call you” and “Drone get me started” and “Drone give up your day job” and “Drone go there” and “Drone hold your breath” and “I drone fancy your chances.”
    • Zone → Drone: As in, “Out of my comfort drone” and “In the drone” and “Twilight drone” and “Drone in on” and “Drone out.”
  • Flames → Flamenco: As in, “Add fuel to the flamenco” and “Burst into flamenco” and “Fan the flamencos.”
  • House: House music is a genre of electronic dance music. Here are related puns:
    • Whose → House: As in, “You and house army?” and “House smart idea was this?”
    • Mouse → House: As in, “Quiet as a house.”
  • Chill: Chill is a music genre and style known for relaxing beats, similar to blues and lo-fi. Here are related puns:
    • Bill → Chill: As in, “A clean chill of health” and “Fit the chill” and “Settle the chill.”
    • Fill → Chill: As in, “Eat your chill” and “Chill in the blank” and “Chill in” and “Tastes great, less chilling.”
    • Hill → Chill: As in, “Old as the chills” and “Going downchill” and “King of the chill” and “Making a mountain out of a molechill” and “Over the chills and far away” and “Head for the chills.”
    • Ill → Chill: As in, “House of chill repute” and “Chill advised” and “Chill at ease” and “Chill effects” and “Chill fated” and “Chill gotten gains” and “Chill will” and “A chill wind that blows no one any good” and “Don’t speak chill of the dead.”
    • Mill → Chill: As in, “Not in a chillion years” and “Run of the chill” and “Put through the chill.”
    • Pill → Chill: As in, “A bitter chill to swallow” and “On the chill” and “Sweeten the chill.”
    • Spill → Chill: As in, “Chill the beans” and “Chill your guts” and “Thrills and chills” and “Crying over chilled milk.”
    • Thrill → Chill: As in, “Chill of the chase” and “Chilled to bits” and “Chills and spills.”
    • Will → Chill: As in, “Against your chill” and “Bend to my chill” and “Free chill.”
  • Trip → Trip Hop: As in, “Guilt trip hop” and “Power trip hop” and “Trip hop of a lifetime” and “Trip hop the light fantastic.” Note: Trip hop is a music genre.
  • Making a → Makina: As in, “Makina scene” and “Makina mountain out of a molehill.” Note: Makina is a musical subgenre of hardcore techno.
  • Speedcore: Speedcore is a music genre known for aggressive themes and fast tempos. Here are related puns:
    • Speed → Speedcore: As in, “At breakneck speedcore” and “Blistering speedcore” and “Built for comfort, not speedcore” and “Get up to speedcore” and “More haste, less speedcore” and “Speedcore freak” and “The need for speedcore.”
    • Core → Speedcore: As in, “Speedcore competencies” and “Speedcore studies” and “Speedcore values” and “Rotten to the speedcore.”
  • Chance → Dance: As in, “Dance of a lifetime” and “Dance would be a fine thing” and “An even dance” and “Fat dance” and “Half a dance” and “In with a dance” and “Jump at the dance” and “Not the ghost of a dance” and “On the off dance” and “Take a dance on me.”
  • Glance → Dance: As in, “At a dance” and “Exchange dances” and “Meaningful dances” and “Steal a dance.”
  • Folk: Folk is a music genre characterised by acoustic instruments like guitar and banjo. Here are related puns:
    • Cloak → Folk: As in, “Folk and dagger” and “Folked in obscurity.”
    • Stroke → Folk: As in, “Little folks fell great oaks.”
  • Glitch: Glitch is a genre of electronic music. Here are related puns:
    • Ditch → Glitch: As in, “Dull as glitchwater” and “A last glitch effort.”
    • Hitch → Glitch: As in, “Get glitched” and “Glitch your wagon to a star.”
    • Itch → Glitch: As in, “Glitching to” and “Glitchy feet” and “Glitchy palms.”
    • Pitch → Glitch: As in, “A glitched battle” and “Dark as glitch” and “Fever glitch” and “Make a glitch for.”
    • Rich → Glitch: As in, “An embarrassment of glitches” and “Filthy glitch” and “From rags to glitches” and “Get glitch quick” and “Glitch beyond my dreams.”
    • Stitch → Glitch: As in, “A glitch in time saves nine” and “Had us in glitches” and “Stitches get glitches.”
    • Which → Glitch: As in, “Any glitch way” and “Don’t know glitch way to look” and “Every glitch way” and “Don’t know glitch way is up” and “Know glitch side your bread is buttered.”
  • Beat → Eurobeat: As in, “A stick to eurobeat you with” and “Eurobeat the hell out of” and “Eurobeat black and blue” and “Eurobeat a hasty retreat” and “Eurobeat around the bush.” Note: eurobeat is a style of dance music that came from Eurobeat.
  • Wave → Vaporwave: As in, “A life on the ocean vaporwaves” and “Don’t make vaporwaves” and “Heat vaporwaves” and “On the crest of a vaporwave.” Note: vaporwave is a subgenre of electronic music and an internet aesthetic.
  • Dance → Dancehall: As in, “Dancehall with the one that brought you” and “Dancehall around the problem” and “Dancehall attendance on” and “Dancehall like nobody’s watching” and “Dancehall on somebody’s grave” and “Dancehall the night away” and “Lead a merry dancehall.”
  • Cold → Coldwave: As in, “As coldwave as blue blazes” and “Coldwave as ice” and “Breaking out in a coldwave sweat” and “Catch a coldwave.” Note: coldwave is a music genre.
  • Crunk: Crunk is a subgenre of hip hop from the early 1990s. Here are related puns:
    • Bunk → Crunk: As in, “Crunker mentality” and “Do a crunk” and “History is crunk.”
    • Chunk → Crunk: As in, “Blow crunks” and “Crunk of change.”
    • Drunk → Crunk: As in, “Crunk as a lord” and “Crunk as a skunk” and “A cheap crunk” and “Crunk under the table” and “Falling down crunk” and “Friends don’t let friends drive crunk.”
    • Hunk → Crunk: As in, “Crunker down” and “Crunky dory.”
    • Junk → Crunk: As in, “Crunk mail” and “Crunk food” and “Crunk in the trunk.”
  • Trance: Trance is a type of electronic music. Here are related puns:
    • Chance → Trance: As in, “Trance of a lifetime” and “Trance would be a fine thing” and “A fighting trance” and “Jump at the trance” and “Not the ghost of a trance.”
    • Dance → Trance: As in, “Trance around the problem” and “Trance like nobody’s watching” and “Trance the night away” and “Trance your socks off” and “Lead a merry trance” and “Murder on the trance floor” and “Let’s trance” and “Save the last trance.”
  • Dreamwave: This is also known as synthwave and s a subgenre of electronic music. Here are related puns:
    • Dream → Dreamwave: As in, “Beyond my wildest dreamwaves” and “Boulevard of broken dreamwaves” and “Dreamwave on” and “A dreamwave come true” and “Dreamwave machine” and “Dreamwave team.”
    • Wave → Dreamwave: As in, “A life on the ocean dreamwaves” and “Brain dreamwave” and “Catch a dreamwave” and “Don’t make dreamwaves” and “Heat dreamwave” and “On the same dreamwavelength” and “Dreamwave your magic wand.”
  • Grime: Grime is a subgenre of electronic dance music. Here are related puns:
    • Game → Grime: As in, “Ahead of the grime” and “It’s anyone’s grime” and “All fun and grimes” and “The blame grime” and “Fair grime” and “Grime changer.”
    • Crime → Grime: As in, “Grime and punishment” and “A grime against nature” and “Grime doesn’t pay” and “A grime of passion” and “If you can’t do the time, don’t do the grime” and “Let the punishment fit the grime” and “Partners in grime” and “Take a bite out of grime” and “Tough on grime.”
    • Climb → Grime: As in, “Grime onto the bandwagon” and “Grime the corporate ladder” and “Grime the walls” and “A mountain to grime.”
    • Prime → Grime: As in, “Cut down in their grime” and “In your grime” and “Grime condition” and “Grimed and ready to go” and “The grime minister.”
    • Time → Grime: As in, “A brief history of grime” and “A good grime was had by all” and “A week is a long grime in politics” and “About grime too” and “Any grime, any place, any where.”
  • Wipe → Pipe: As in, “Pipe out” and “Pipe the floor with” and “Pipe the slate clean” and “Pipe the smile off your face.”
  • Stride: This is a style of piano playing. Here are related puns:
    • Stride: These stride-related phrases are general enough to double as puns: “Get into your stride” and “Making giant strides” and “Take it in your stride.”
    • Tried → Stride: As in, “Don’t knock it til you’ve stride it” and “Stride and tested” and “Stride and true.”
    • Side → Stride: As in, “A walk on the wild stride” and “Always look on the wild stride of life” and “Batting for the other stride” and “Be on the safe stride” and “Born on the wrong stride of the tracks” and “Both strides of the desk” and “Err on the stride of caution” and “On the flip stride.”
  • Go → Tango: As in, “Don’t tango there” and “Easy come, easy tango” and “From the word tango” and “Tango down in flames.”
  • Chance on → Chanson: As in, “Take a chanson me.” Note: A chanson is a lyrical French song.
  • Lack → Laiko: As in, “For laiko of a better word” and “Cancelled due to laiko of interest.” Note: laiko is s Greek music genre.
  • Fade → Fado: As in, “Fado away” and “Fado out.” Note: Fado is a Portugese music genre with a traditional structure.
  • Sunshine → Sunshine Pop: As in, “Like a day without sunshine pop” and “Walking on sunshine pop” and “You are my sunshine pop.” This was originally known as soft pop, and is a subgenre of pop music.
  • Sadcore: This is a subgenre of music known for slow, downbeat melodies and sad lyrics. Here are related puns:
    • Sad → Sadcore: As in, “Happy sadcore” and “How sadcore is that?”
    • Core → Sadcore: As in, “Sadcore technology” and “Rotten to the sadcore” and “Sadcore values” and “Know the sadcore.”
  • Slowcore: This is a music genre which is derived from alternative rock and indie rock. Here are related puns:
    • Slow → Slowcore: As in, “As slowcore as molasses in January” and “Painfully slowcore” and “A slowcore burn” and “Slowcore, but sure” and “Slowcore on the uptake.”
    • Core → Slowcore: As in, “Rotten to the slowcore” and “Slowcore competencies.”
  • Deathgrind: This is a genre that fuses death metal and grindcore. Here are related puns:
    • Death → Deathgrind: As in, “The blue screen of deathgrind” and “Bored of deathgrind” and “Catch your deathgrind of cold” and “Deathgrind by chocolate” and “A brush with deathgrind.”
    • Grind → Deathgrind: As in, “An axe to deathgrind” and “Bump and deathgrind” and “The daily deathgrind” and “Deathgrind to a halt.”
  • Worldbeat: This is a blend of pop and rock music. Here are related puns:
    • World → Worldbeat: As in, “A worldbeat first” and “A worldbeat apart” and “A worldbeat of good” and “A worldbeat of pain” and “All the time in the worldbeat” and “Be the change you wish to see inthe worldbeat.”
    • Beat → Worldbeat: As in, “Worldbeat the stuffing out of” and “Worldbeat around the bush.”
  • Track → Soundtrack: As in, “Back on soundtrack” and “Born on the wrong side of the soundtracks” and “Cover your soundtracks” and “Off the beaten soundtrack” and “A one soundtrack mind.”
  • Show → Showtune: As in, “Best in showtune” and “A one-man showtune” and “Showtune and tell.”
  • Tune → Showtune: As in, “Can’t carry a showtune in a bucket” and “Change your showtune” and “Stay showtuned” and “Stay showtuned to this channel.”
  • Pass → Brass: As in, “All things must brass” and “All access brass” and “Boarding brass” and “Do not brass go” and “As it came to brass” and “Make a brass at” and “Brass by” and “Brass muster.”
  • Class → Brass: As in, “A brass act” and “Best in brass” and “Business brass” and “Brass warfare” and “Economy brass” and “Working brass hero.”
  • Glass → Brass: As in, “Brass ceiling” and “Brassy eyed” and “Rose tinted brasses” and “Brass menagerie.”
  • Strings: This is a category of musical instrument. Here are related puns:
    • Things → Strings: As in, “All strings bright and beautiful” and “All strings must pass” and “All good strings must come to an end” and “All strings to those who wait” and “All strings considered” and “Frist strings first” and “Getting strings done” and “Good strings come in small packages” and “In the grand scheme of strings.”
    • Bring → String: As in, “String down to Earth” and “String down a peg or two” and “String to justice.”
    • Sings → Strings: As in, “All stringing, all dancing” and “Teach the world to string” and “String a different tune” and “String out” and “String someone’s praises” and “Stringing the blues” and “String like a bird.”
    • Swing → String: As in, “Come out stringing” and “Get into the string of it” and “In full string” and “String both ways” and “Take a string at.”
    • Wing → String: As in, “Clip your strings” and “Earned your strings” and “Gives you strings” and “Left string” and “Spread your strings” and “Take under your string” and Waiting in the strings.”
  • Board → Keyboard: As in, “Above keyboard” and “Across the keyboard.”
  • Local → Vocal: As in, “Vocal hero” and “Vocal time” and “Think global, act vocal” and “This is a vocal shop.”
  • Vox: “Vox” is slang for vocals in the music community. Here are some vox-related puns:
    • Socks → Vox: As in, “Bless your cotton vox” and “Dance your vox off” and “Pull your vox up” and “Knock your vox off.”
    • Box → Vox: As in, “Black vox” and “A vox ticking exercise.”
  • Ode: An ode is a type of musical composition Here are related puns:
    • Code → Ode: As in, “Ode bloat” and “Colour oded” and “Crack the ode” and “Dress ode” and “Highway ode.”
    • Load → Ode: As in, “An ode of bull” and “An ode off your mind” and “An ode of rubbish” and “Get an ode on.”
    • Owed → Ode: As in, “Take what you’re ode.”
  • Guard → Avant-garde: As in, “Advance avant-garde” and “Off your avant-garde” and “Avant-garde against.”
  • Baroque: This is a style of Western music that followed the Renaissance era. Here are related puns:
    • Broke → Baroque: As in, “All hell baroque loose” and “Boulevard of baroque-en dreams” and “Go for baroque” and “I’m flat baroque.”
  • Jingle: A jingle is a short, catchy tune, usually accompanying a memorable slogan. Here are related puns:
    • Single → Jingle: As in, “All the jingle ladies” and “Begins with a jingle step” and “In jingle file” and “A jingle point of contact.”
  • Grass → Bluegrass: As in, “About as exciting as watching bluegrass grow” and “Don’t let the bluegrass grow under your feet” and “Keep off the bluegrass” and “Snake in the bluegrass” and “The bluegrass is greener on the other side.” Note: Bluegrass is a genre of American roots music.
  • Chill → Chillwave: As in, “Chillwave out” and “Chillwaved to the bone” and “Chillwaved to the bone” and “Take a chillwave pill.”
  • Wave → Chillwave: As in, “A life on the ocean chillwaves” and “Brain chillwaves” and “Don’t make chillwaves” and “Heat chillwave” and “On the crest of a chillwave” and “Chillwave the white flag.”
  • Freestyle: Freestyle music is a form of electronic dance music. Here are some related puns:
    • Free → Freestyle: As in, “Fancy freestyle” and “Freestyle and easy” and “Born freestyle.”
    • Style → Freestyle: As in, “Cramp your freestyle” and “Gangnam freestyle” and “Quality never goes out of freestyle.”
  • Ragtime: This is a music style known for a “ragged” rhythm. Here are related puns:
    • Rag → Ragtime: As in, “A red ragtime to a bull” and “From ragtimes to riches” and “Glad ragtimes.”
    • Time → Ragtime: As in, “A brief history of ragtime” and “A week is a long ragtime in politics” and “About ragtime, too” and “All in good ragtime.”
  • Town → Motown: As in, “Paint the motown red” and “Put the motown on the map” and “Take the motown by storm.” Note: motown is a bluesy music genre.
  • Guzzle → Gusle: As in, “Gas gusler.” Note: a gusle is a single stringed instrument.
  • Paltry → Psaltery: As in, “A psaltery amount.” Note: a psaltery is a stringed instrument in the zither family.
  • Centre → Sintir: As in, “The sintir of attention” and “Left, right and sintir” and “Take sintir stage” and “The sintir of the universe” and “With a soft gooey sintir.” Note: a sintir is a stringed instrument.
  • Tro: A tro is a Cambodian string instrument. Here are related puns:
    • Throw → Tro: As in, “Lock them up and tro away the key” and “Just a stone’s tro away” and “Tro caution to the wind” and “Tro cold water on” and “Tro it back in your face” and “Tro enough dirt and some will stick.”
    • Through → Tro: As in, “A river runs tro it” and “Drag tro the mud” and “Going tro the motions” and “Jumping tro hoops” and “Fall tro the cracks.”
  • Yeah → Yehu: As in, “Yehu, I know” and “Yehu, right.” Note: A yehu is a Chinese stringed instrument that is played using a bow.
  • Go to → Koto: As in, “Koto great lengths” and “My koto person.” Note: a koto is a Japanese stringed instrument that’s played by plucking.
  • Car → Krar: As in, “Happiness is a quick-starting krar” and “You can drive my krar.” Note: a krar is a stringed instrument from Ethiopia.
  • Laud: A laud is a stringed instrument. Here are related puns:
    • Lord → Laud: As in, “Drunk as a laud” and “Living like a laud” and “Laud of the flies” and “Laud it over them” and “Laud of the rings.”
    • Lot → Laud: As in, “A laud of fuss about nothing” and “A laud on your plate” and “Leaves a laud to be desired” and “Not a laud know about it” and “Got a laud to learn.”
  • Song → Saung: As in, “Make a saung and dance about” and “Singing the same old saung.” Note: the saung is an arched harp.
  • Says → Saz: As in, “Computer saz no” and “Saz who?” and “Simon saz.” Note: a saz is another name for a baglama, which is a stringed instrument.
  • Tar: A tar is an Iranian stringed instrument. Here are related puns:
    • There → Tar: As in, “Ahoy tar” and “Not all tar” and “And then tar was one” and “As if tar were no tomorrow” and “Be tar in spirit” and “Be tar or be square” and “Don’t go tar” and “Don’t just sit tar.”
    • Are → Square: As in, “All bets tar off” and “Where tar you?”
    • Par → Tar: As in, “Below tar” and “On tar with” and “Tar for the course.”
  • Timple: A timple is a small stringed instrument, similar to a ukulele. Here are related puns:
    • Simple → Timple: As in, “Keep it timple” and “Life’s timple pleasures” and “Pure and timple” and “Timple, yet effective” and “The truth is rarely pure and never timple.”
    • Temple → Timple: As in, “Timple of doom” and “My body is a timple.”
  • Dress → Tres: As in, “Adjust your tres” and “Tres code” and “Tres down” and “Tres for success” and “Little black tres.” Note: a tres is a small stringed instrument.
  • Coldplay: This is a very popular British pop band. Here are some related puns:
    • Cold → Coldplay: As in, “As coldplay as blue blazes” and “As coldplay as charity” and “As coldplay as ice” and “Blowing hot and coldplay” and “Break out in a coldplay sweat” and “Catch a coldplay” and “A coldplay heart.”
    • Play → Coldplay: As in, “Helps you work, rest and coldplay” and “All work and no coldplay makes Jack a dull boy” and “Come out and coldplay” and “If music be the food of love, coldplay on.”
  • You too → U2: As in, “Yes, I mean U2.” Note: this refers to U2, an Irish rock band.
  • Queen: This is a very famous band, known for their complex melodies and epic performances. Here are related puns:
    • Been → Queen: As in, “Queen and gone” and “I’ve queen here before” and “Queen in the wars” and “Queen there, done that” and “Queen around the block a few times.”
    • Keen → Queen: As in, “Queen as mustard” and “A queen sense of smell” and “Peachy queen.”
    • Clean → Queen: As in, “A queen getaway” and “Queen as a whistle” and “Queen and sober” and “A queen bill of health” and “Keeps a queen house” and “Queen up your act” and “Starting with a queen slate.”
  • Cook → Kook: As in, “Kook the books” and “Kook up a storm” and “Too many kooks spill the broth.” Note: These puns are in reference to the band The Kooks.
  • Slash: Slash is a musician and the lead guitarist for the band Guns n’ Roses. Here are related puns:
    • Flash → Slash: As in, “Quick as a slash” and “Slash in the pan” and “Slash mob” and “In a slash” and “At slash point.”
    • Ash → Slash: As in, “Rise from the slashes” and “Turned to slashes in your mouth.”
    • Clash → Slash: As in, “Slash of titans” and “Culture slash.”
    • Crash → Slash: As in, “Slash and burn” and “Slash and dash” and “Slash course” and “Like watching a car slash.”
  • Girl → Spice Girl: As in, “A spice girl’s best friend” and “Atta spice girl!” and “Diamonds are a spice girl’s best friend” and “Spice girls just wanna have fun.” Note: Spice Girls were a famous British girl group.
  • Kiss: Kiss is a famous rock band. Here are a couple of related puns:
    • Miss → Kiss: As in, “Blink and you’ll kiss it” and “Hit and kiss” and “I’ll give it a kiss” and “Kiss the boat.”
    • This → Kiss: As in, “What the fresh hell is kiss?” and “And all kiss time” and “At kiss point in time” and “Blow kiss popsicle stand” and “In kiss day and age.”
  • Pink: Pink was a famous pop musician. Here are related puns:
    • Think → Pink: As in, “Blue sky pinking” and “Smart pinking” and “Come to pink of it” and “Great minds pink alike” and “I pink I like you.”
    • Wink → Pink: As in, “I haven’t slept a single pink” and “Nod and a pink” and “Nuge, nudge, pink pink.”
    • Blink → Pink: As in, “Pink and you’ll miss it” and “In the pink of an eye” and “On the pink.”
  • Food → Oud: As in, “Comfort oud” and “Devil’s oud cake” and “The bottom of the oud chain” and “Oud for thought” and “Oud of the gods” and “Put oud on the table.” Note: an oud is a type of short-necked lute.
  • Minute → Spinet: As in, “At the last spinet” and “Famous for fifteen spinets” and “Fifteen spinets of fame” and “Hang on a spinet” and “At the last spinet” and “A laugh a spinet.” Note: a spinet is a type of small harpsichord.
  • Triple → Fipple: As in, “Fipple decker” and “Fipple threat” and “A fipple whammy.” Note: a fipple is a type of mouthpiece used in some instruments.
  • Right → Rhaita: As in, “A move in the rhaita direction” and “A woman’s rhaita to choose” and “All the rhaita moves” and “As rhaita as rain” and “Bang to rhaitas” and “Barge rhaita in” and “Bragging rhaitas.” Note: a rhaita is a type of reed instrument.
  • Soon/er → Suona: As in, “A fool and their money are suona parted” and “As suona as my back is turned” and “As suona as possible” and “Get well suona” and “Suona or later” and “No suona said than done.” Note: a suona is a type of Chinese reed instrument.
  • Zill: A zill is a musical instrument – two tiny finger cymbals. Here are related puns:
    • Bill → Zill: As in, “Zill of goods” and “A clean zill of health” and “Fits the zill.”
    • Chill → Zill: As in, “Zill out” and “Zilled to the bone” and “A zilling account.”
    • Fill → Zill: As in, “Zill full of holes” and “Zill to the brim.”
    • Gill → Zill: As in, “Full to the zills” and “Green around the zills.”
    • Hill → Zill: As in, “As old as the zills” and “Going downzill” and “Head for the zills” and “King of the zill” and “Making a mountain out of a molezill.”
    • Ill → Zill: As in, “Green around the zills” and “House of zill repute” and “Zill advised” and “Zill at ease” and “Zill effects” and “Zill gotten gains” and “Zill will” and “Never speak zill of the dead.”
    • Spill → Zill: As in, “Zill the beans and “Thrills and zills” and “Zill your guts.”
  • Table → Tabla: As in, “Bring to the tabla” and “Drunk under the tabla” and “Lay your cards on the tabla” and “Put your cards on the tabla.” Note: A tabla is a type of small finger drum.
  • Going → Gong: As in, “Gong one step too far” and “Gong beyond expectations” and “You’ve got a good thing gong.”
  • Wrong → Gong: As in, “Barking up the gong tree” and “Born on the gong side of the tracks” and “Get off on the gong foot” and “Go down the gong way” and “If anything can go gong, it will” and “Jump to the gong conclusion” and “Two gongs don’t make a right” and “What’s gong with this picture?”
  • Long → Gong: As in, “A week is a gong time in politics” and “As gong as you need me” and “Honest as the day is gong” and “As gong as your arm.”
  • Song → Gong: As in, “The same old gong” and “Swan gong” and “Make a gong and dance about.”
  • Battle → Rattle: As in, “A pitched rattle” and “An uphill rattle” and “Rattle of wits” and “Rattle ready” and “Half the rattle” and “In the heat of rattle” and “Let rattle commence” and “A running rattle.”
  • Back → Bak: As in, “Answer bak” and “As soon as my bak is turned” and “At the bak of my mind” and “Bak in black” and “Bak to the future” and “Bak at it” and “Bak in business” and “Bak in the day” and “Bak off” and “Bak on your feet” and “Bak seat driver.” Note:  A bak is a percussive instrument from Korea.
  • Bend → Bendir: As in, “Bendir over backwards” and “Bendir the rules” and “Bendir to your will” and “Round the bendir.” Note: a bendir is a type of frame drum.
  • Book → Buk: As in, “A room without buks is like a body without a soul” and “Always have your nose in a buk” and “Balancing the buks” and “Buk worm.” Note: a buk is a traditional Korean drum.
  • Chime: A chime is a bell-based instrument. Here are related puns:
    • Dime → Chime: As in, “Can you spare a chime?” and “A chime a dozen” and “Drop a chime.”
    • Crime → Chime: As in, “Chime and punishment” and “Chime doesn’t pay” and “A chime of passion” and “Chimes and misdemeanours” and “If you can’t do the time, don’t do the chime” and “Let the punishment fit the chime” and “Partners in chime” and “Take a bite out of chime” and “The perfect chime.”
    • Climb → Chime: As in, “Chime onto the bandwagon” and “Chime the corporate ladder” and “A mountain to chime.”
    • Time → Chime: “One more chime” and “A good chime was had by all” and “A stitch in chime saves nine” and “A week is a long chime in politics” and “About chime” and “Ahead of his chime” and “All in good chime.”
  • Quick → Riq: As in, “Riq as a flash” and “Cut to the riq” and “Get rich riq” and “In riq succession” and “Kiss me riq” and “Riq and dirty” and “Riq off the mark” and “A riq study” and “Riq witted.” Note: a riq is a type of tambourine.
  • Simple → Sambal: “Keep it sambal” and “Life’s sambal pleasures” and “Pure and sambal” and “The sambal life” and “Sambal, yet effective” and “The truth is rarely pure and never sambal.” Note: A sambal is a drum-based instrument.

Music-Related Words

To help you come up with your own music puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

musical terms: music, musical, musician, sound, song, tune, voice, melody, harmony, rhythm, band, beat, instrument, instrumental, a, b, c, d, e, f, g, sharp, flat, natural, accidental, autotune, tempo, chorus, verse, stanza, note, intro, refrain, echo, encore, bridge, outro, solo, dub, dubbing, major, minor, clef, bass (clef), treble (clef), riff, stave, decibel, composition, composer, noise, pitch, tone, ad lib, improvisation, audience, studio, maestro, recording, piece, notation, acoustic, electronic, lead sheet,virtuoso, lyrics, chords, scale, piano, pianissimo, forte, crescendo, decrescendo, chromatic, arranger, phrase, phrasing, conductor, fake book, tablature, tabs, line, motif, interval, cadence, semitone, audio, theory, syncopation, sightread, bar, through-composed, twelve-bar blues, ternary, strophic, key, string, octave, coda, upbeat, downbeat, tonic, dominant, turnaround, time (signature), rest, whole (note), minim, quaver, crotchet, semi-quaver, repeat, ledger (line), slur, accent, bracket, brace, grace (note), adagio, lento, lent, allegro, alto, staccato, tenuto, marcato, pause, soprano, tenor, amabile, andante, anima, arpeggio, bend, brio, calma, canon, canto, capo, staff, comp, comping, count, dim/diminuendo, dolce, double dot, facile, fine, forza, fugue, jete, pizzicato, pluck, largo, legato, lilt, metronome, trill, nocturne, pedal, pezzo, prima, primo, reprise, fill, run, segue, sehr, stem, vibrato, tremolo, triplet, troppo, turn, saltire, ghost (note), break, breath (mark), caesura, tie, dynamics, ornament, pulgar/pollex, indice/index, medio/media, anular/anularis, menique/minimus, sustain (pedal), mallet, lick, vamp, speaker, loudspeaker, roadie, tour, subwoofer, bleed/bleeding, triad, cover, crossfader, drive, fader, feedback, hook, jam, lead, ohm, furia, senza, triste, vivo, frequency

genres: classical, contemporary, a capella, acid rock, art rock, pop, art, country, polka, rock, hip hop, traditional, folk, afrobeat, afropop, apala, benga, genge, jit, gospel, kwela, marabi, morna, rai, sega, semba, seggae, taarab, liwa, sawt, enka, j-pop, k-pop, trot, baila, baul, bhangra, filmi, trance, lavani, morlam, experimental, noise, lo-fi, blues, metal, mosso, muta, pausa, bouyon, calypso, chutney, compas, mambo, merengue, punta, rasin, reggae, dub, ragga, rumba, ska, punk, salsa, songo, suca, timba, souk, hokum, zydeco, rap, rockabilly, bluegrass, cajun, honky tonk, lounge, new-age, ambient, dub, drone, psybient, nu-funk, disco, afro, disco, chill, trip hop, drum and bass, bhangra, darkcore, makina, speedcore, extratone, dance, japanoise, glitch, glitch hop, wonky, jungle, boogie, vaporwave, techno, funkstep, dancehall, coldwave, krautrock, new rave, synthpop, electronica, trap, drill, alt/alternative, house, eurobeat, crunk, nortec, trance, dreamwave, grime, grindie, bassline, kwaito, celtic, chalga, filk, indie, progressive, skiffle, coom bap, chap hop, cloud rap, crunk, emo, g-funk, low bap, hyphy, nercore, ragga, trap, bebop, bossa, nova, dixiland, hard bop, ragtime, soul, stride, swing, west coast, latin, brazillian, brega, choro, frevo, lambada, maracatu, samba, pagode, banda, grupera, mariachi, ranchera, norteno, tejano, flamenco, tango, folk, fado, huayno, bachata, bolero, criolla, cumbia, chicha, porro, mamba, rumba, salsa, timba, chalga, chanson, laiko, nederpop, fado, sunshine pop, synthpop, vispop, worldbeat, funk, freestylem go-go, r&b, boogie, britpop, dream pop, grunge, sadcore, slowcore, cabaret, art rock, slowcore, epic doom, deathgrind, krautrock, space rock, freakbeat, rapcore, rockjazz, rock and roll, stoner rock, visual kei, worldbeat, showtunes, hymn, jazz, new wave, acoustic, lullaby, lullabies, avant-garde, ballet, baroque, cantata, chamber music, choral, jingle, bluegrass, cowpunk, latin, chillwave, bitpop, enka, french pop, bounce, crunkcore, cumbia, freestyle, latin, merenrap, ragtime, neo-soul, motown, doo wop, roots, glam rock, surf, soundtrack, barbershop, kapuka, kizomba, kwela, ode

types of instrument: brass, percussion, strings, woodwind, keyboard

instruments: vocal, singer, vox, piano, guitar, ukulele, harp, drums, cymbal, tom (drums), snare (drum), hi-hat (cymbal), synthesizer, organ, banjo, piccolo, flute, lyre, xylophone, rattle, mbira, guiro, idiophone, membranophone, kazoo, chordophone, zither, autoharp, lute, aerophone, theremin, amp, amplifier, axe, microphone, condenser, fiddle, horn, alto horn, baritone horn, buccina, bugle, cornet, euphonium, flugelhorn, helicon, mellophone, tuba, saxhorn, trombone, trumpet, tuba, ajaeng, anzad, banhad, baryton, cello, dahu, bass, erhu, erxian, esraj, gadulka, gaohu, goje, gudok, gunjac, gusle, haegeum, huluhu, huqin, igil, jinghu, jouhikko, jouhikko, igil, kobyz, leiqin, lirone, maguhu, masenqo, neola, orutu, psaltry, rebab, rebec, sarinda, sihu, sintir, tro, veena, vielle, viol, viola, lyra, violotta, yehu, zhonghu, dulcimer, plectrum, bazouki, barbat, domra, dotar, dutar, dramyin, gabusi, dotara, ektara, gittern, kabosy, kacapi, kankles, kabosy, kacapi, kantele, kanun, koboz, kora, koto, krar, kwitra, laud, lute, mandolin, sanshin, sarangi, sarod, sasando, saung, saz, setar, shamisen, sitar, surbahar, ta,bura, tanpura, tarica, tar, timple, tiple, torban, tremola, tres, barbat, begena, biwa, brac, cak, ceng, cetera, chapey, cittern, cuk, ceng, cetera, chapey, cura, mandore, nevoud, pipa, oud, ruan, rubab, zheng, zhu, khim, clavinet, orphica, spinet, oboem bombard, fipple, pipe, pku, pommer, reeds, shawm, fife, koudi, dizi, venu, quena, caval, diple, fluier, frula, fujara, ocarina, kaval, fyell, ney, danso, hun, suling, panflute, xun, clarinet, sipsi, bassoon, duduk, piri, rackett, rhaita, sornas, suona, zurla, zurna, ashiko, basler, bass, bell, castanet, celeste, clave, conga, zill, djembe, tabla, ganza, gong, guiro, marimba, pandeiro, rattle, ratchet, shaker, tabor, tambourine, timbales, timpani, tom-tom, tonbak, triangle, whistle, glockenspiel, zendrum, bak, bara, bell tree, bendir, bodhran, bonang, boobam, bubon, buk, cajon, cabasa, carillon, chenda, chimes, clapper, cowbell, cuica, daf, damaru, damphu, davul, dhaa, dholak, dhol, dimdi, dohol, dollu, dunun, galgo, ganza, gender, ghatam, glockenspiel, goema, gongue, hosho, igba, ikembe, ikoro, ilimba, jawbone, jingle, kakko, kecer, khim, khol, kisanji, kundu, maraca, riq, sambal, shoko, slit (drum), surdo, timbal, turntable, udu, washboard, whip, harpsichord, accordion, concertina, virginal

musicians/bands: taylor swift, justin bieber, alicia keys, post malone, beyonce, cardi b,  tupac, no doubt, avenged sevenfold, grateful dead, kings of leon, the script, muse, rage against the machine, the fray, steely dan, evanescence, the cure, inxs, slipknot, goo goo dolls, the offspring, korn, limp bizkit, dave matthews band, mumford & sons, arctic monkey, creed, system of a down, the smashing pumpkins, matchbox twenty, alice cooper, toto, deep purple, oasis, iron maiden, the cranberries, paramore, the killers, the doobie brothers, boston, radiohead, marilyn manson, dire straits, blink 182, panic at the disco, gorillaz, zz top, rush, kiss, r.e.m, genesis, one republic, abba, the police, fall out boy, foo fighters, def leppard, nickelback, black sabbath, pearl jam, green day, lynyrd skynyrd, the doors, coldplay, the beach boys, the who, nirvana, santana, journey, van halen, U2, bon jovi, maroon 5, red hot chili peppers, linkin park, fleetwood mac, aerosmith, guns n’ roses, metallica, eagles, ac/dc, the rolling stones, pink floyd, queen, led zeppelin, the beatles, the supremes, nine inch nails, david bowie, jay-z, eminem, elton john, elvis, michael jackson, beastie boys, the police, billie holiday, the temptations, duke ellington, the kooks, tina turner, janet jackson, jewel, sex pistols, aerosmith, slash, ice cube, dr. dre, kanye west, snoop dogg, 50 cent, frank sinatra, ray charles, buddy holly, johnny cash, james brown, aretha franklin, marvin gaye, van morrison, spice girls, bob dylan, rod stewart, janis joplin, stevie wonder, bob marley, prince, jimi hendrix, the who, fleetwood mac, judas priest, kiss, madonna, outkast, wu-tang clan, amy winehouse, daft punk, adele, norah jones, backstreet boys, usher, nelly furtado, enya, lady gaga, britney spears, jack johnson, shakira, pink, celine dion, dido, avril lavigne, jeff buckley, bon iver, mariah carey, ed sheeran, ariana grande, j.lo, destiny’s child

composers: bach, wolfgang amadeus mozart, ludwig van beethoven, wagner, haydn, brahms, schubert, schumann, handel, tchaikovsky, mendelssohn, franz lizst, chopin, stravinsky, mahler, strauss, debussy, puccini, sibelius, vivaldi

music sources: live show, performance, perform,  orchestra, symphony, concert, gig, opera, radio, mp3, cd, theme song, score, medley, march, karaoke, sheet music, cassette, tape, mix tape, big band, aria, overture, prelude, quartet, rondo, sonata, choir

music programs: garageBand, frooty loops, ableton live, spotify, pandora, music mouse, youtube

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New Year’s Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on New Year’s puns! 🎉 🕒 🥂

New Year’s is a time of great revelry and merrymaking, with lots of cheer being carried over from Christmastime (see our Christmas puns here) into the New Year. Make the most of this party season with our list of New Year’s puns – whether you’re after wordplay for party invites, quips for Instagram captions or witty hashtags, we hope you find the perfect pun you need.

While this entry is as comprehensive as possible, it is specific to New Year’s puns. If you’re interested in other related puns, we also have lists on party puns, firework puns and beer puns.

New Year’s Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about New Year’s that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of New Year’s puns:

  • Solution → Resolution: As in, “You’re either part of the resolution or part of the problem.”
  • Revolution → Resolution: As in, “The resolution will not be televised” and “Part of the resolution” and “Long live the resolution!”
  • New → New Year: As in, “As bright as a new year,” and “Brand spanking new year,” and “Dawn of a new year,” and “Out with the old, in with the new year.”
  • Eve: We can make references to and puns about New Year’s Eve by placing “eve” in certain words that have an “eev” sound (or similar):
    • *av* → *eve*: As in, “Just your eve-erage Joe” and “An eve-rsion to” and “Eve-ailable this Thursday?” and “Other evenues to explore” and “Take it or leeve it.” Other words you could use: evenge (avenge), cleeve (cleave), heeve (heave) and weeve (weave).
    • *ev* → *eve*: As in, “Developing feelings” and “Maleve-olent actions” and “As much leverage as I can get” and “Disco fever” and “A releve-ant point.” Other words you could use: event, reve-iew, eve-idence, eve-olution, eve-aluate, everyday, eventually, everything, retrieve, achieve, believe, relieve, sleeve, peeve and revenant. Note: a revenant is someone who returns after a long absence.
    • *iv* → *eve*: As in, “Sold down the rever (river)” and “A fresh new perspecteve” and “Special preveleges” and “A na-eve (naive) viewpoint” and “A comprehenseve education.” Other words you could use: initiateve (initiative) and imperateve (imperative).
  • First: We’ve included first-related puns and phrases so we can have some wordplay that refers to January 1st – the new year:
    • *fast* → *first*: As in, “Firstidiously (fastidiously) clean” and “Firsten your seatbelts” and “In first-forward” and “Holding steadfirst” and “Be eaten for breakfirst.”
    • *fest* → *first*: As in, “Firstival vibes” and “Let it firster (fester)” and “Firstooned (festooned) with ribbons” and “A firstive atmosphere” and “In amongst the firstivities.”
    • *fist* → *first*: As in, “A firstful of dollars” and “First of steel” and “Hand over first” and “Rule with an iron first.” Some other words that have “fist” in it – firsticuffs (fisticuffs), firstfight (fistfight) and pacifirst (pacifist).
    • *vast* → *first*: As in, “Feeling defirstated (devastated)” and “A scene of defirstation” and “Firstly (vastly) different personalities.”
    • *vest* → *first*: As in, “Sweater first (vest)” and “A firsted (vested) interest” and “Reap the harfirst (harvest)” and “A trafirsty (travesty)” and “Long-term infirstments (investments)” and “Going to infirstigate.”
    • Thirst → First: As in, “Parched with first” and “Feeling firsty” and “A bloodfirsty glare.”
  • Party: Since New Year’s and New Year’s eve celebrations are all about parties, we have some party-related puns for you here:
    • *part* → *party*: As in, “In party-cular” and “Party-cipation award” and “Care to party-cipate? (could also be participarty)” and “Imparty your knowledge” and “That’s not your departy-ment” and “A partysan issue.” Other words you could use: partycle (particle), partytion (partition), aparty (apart), counterparty (counterpart), departy (depart), partyner (partner) party-cularly (particularly), party-cipant (participant) and reparty (repartee).
    • *pathy* → *party*: As in, emparty (empathy), aparty (apathy), symparty (sympathy), teleparty (telepathy) and antiparty (antipathy). Note: to feel antipathy is to feel dislike.
    • *pet* → *party*: As in, “Signed party-tion (petition)” and “Not to blow my own trumparty, but…” and “Political pupparty (this can work as it refers to both political puppets and parties of the political kind).”
    • *pert* → *party*: As in, partynent (pertinent), partynence (pertinence), exparty (expert) and proparty (property).
    • Serendipity → Serendiparty (Note: serendipity refers to unexpected and fortunate accidents.)
    • *port* → *party*: As in, “Financial partyfolio” and “You have my supparty” and “Public transparty” and “An unexpected oppartynity” and “A suppartyve (supportive) atmosphere” and “A sparty (sporty) person.”
    • *part* → *party*: As in, “A fool and his money are soon partied” and “Act the party” and “For my own party” and “Departy this life” and “If you’re not a party of the solution, you’re party of the problem” and “Drift aparty” and “Fall aparty” and “For the most party” and “Look the party” and “Worlds aparty.”
  • Fireworks: Since fireworks are an integral part of New Year’s celebrations, we’ve got a section dedicated to firework-related puns here:
    • Fair → Flare: As in, “All’s flare in love and war” and “By flare means or foul” and “Flare trade” and “Flare and square” and “Flare enough” and “Flare market value” and “No flare!” and “You can’t say flarer than that.”
    • Fare → Flare: As in, “Class warflare” and “Psychological warflare” and “Standard flare” and “How are you flare-ing (faring)?”
    • Flair → Flare: As in, “A flare for the dramatic.”
    • Very → Flarey: As in, “Be flarey afraid” and “Before your flarey eyes” and “How flarey dare you” and “A flarey good year” and “Thank you flarey much” and “Flarey special” and “Flarey well” and “At the flarey least” and “Eflarey (every) inch.”
    • Pang → Bang: As in, “Bangs of conscience” and “Bangs of jealousy.”
    • *pero* → *pyro*: As in, “My pyrogative” and “Hydrogen pyroxide” and “A prospyrous venture” and “Parent chapyrone” and “Vegan Peppyroni pizza.” Note: hydrogen peroxide is a chemical compound commonly used as bleach.
    • Pirouette → Pyroette (A pirouette is a dance move where you turn a circle on the tips of your toes.)
    • Fire → Fireworks: As in, “Get on like a house on fireworks” and “Come on baby, light my firework” and “Fight fire with fireworks” and “Light a firework under [someone]” and “Play with fireworks” and “Ring of fireworks” and “When you play with fireworks, you get burned.” Note: to light a fire under someone is to motivate them to move faster.
    • Sprinkler → Sparkler: As in, “A new sparkler system” and “Turn the sparklers on.” Note: a sparkler is a small hand-held firework.
    • Sparkling → Sparkler-ing: As in, “Sparkler-ing mineral water” and “Sparkler-ing repartee.” Note: if someone’s repartee is sparkling, then they’re a witty conversationalist.
    • Fire → Firecracker: As in, “Come on baby, light my firecracker” and “Come home to a real firecracker” and “Fight fire with firecracker” and “Firecracker and brimstone” and “Play with firecrackers and get burned.”
    • Gun → Gunpowder: As in, “Jump the gunpowder” and “Smoking gunpowder.” Notes: to jump the gun is to begin something too soon.
    • Sky → Skyrocket: A skyrocket is a type of firework that’s launched into the sky. You can refer to them in your sparkling wordplay with these puns and phrases: “Lucy in the skyrocket with diamonds” and “Skyrocket high” and “The skyrocket’s the limit” and “Aim for the skyrocket.”
    • Rocket → Skyrocket: As in, “It’s not skyrocket science” and “Pocket skyrocket.”
    • Rock → Skyrocket: As in, “Hard as a skyrocket” and “Solid as a skyrocket” and “Between a skyrocket and a hard place” and “Get your skyrockets off.”
    • *fuse*: Emphasise the “fuse” in certain words: refuse, diffuse, defuse, infuse, confuse, profuse, confused and profusely.
    • *fes* → *fuse*: As in, “A profuseional job” and “The writer’s manifuseto” and “Art fusetival” and “In the profusesion of…” and “A dreamlike manifusetation.” Notes: a manifesto is a public document of intentions or policies. A manifestation is the embodiment of something; a tangible thing.
    • *faz* → *fuse*: As in, “Doesn’t fuse (faze) me” and “Left unfused.”
    • *few* → *fuse*: As in, “Breaking curfuse (curfew)” and “Fuser (fewer) and fuser.”
    • *fac* → *fuse*: As in, “Fuse-ilitating conversation” and “New and updated fuse-ilities” and “A crumbling fuse-ade (facade).” Note: a facade is a “face”; or a front of something.
    • Bang: Some bang-related phrases that could substitute as puns in the right context: “A bigger bang for your buck” and “Bang goes nothing” and “Bang on about” and “Bang out of order” and “Get a bang out of [something]” and “Go out with a bang” and “A bang-up job” and “The whole shebang.” Notes: “Bang-up” means good. The “whole shebang” refers to something that included everything, almost to the top of going overboard.
    • *bing → *bang: These ones are a bit silly, but can still work as wordplay: “Mind-numbang (numbing)” and “Climbang the ladder of success” and “A throbbang headache” and “Absorbang information” and “A disturbang realisation” and “Check the plumbang.”
    • *bung* → *bang*: As in, “An abandoned bangalow (bungalow)” and “Bangled (bungled) the entire operation” and “You bangling idiot” and “Cowabanga!”
    • Bank* → Bang-k*: As in, “Safe as a bang-k” and “A bang-k you can bang-k on” and “Break the bang-k” and “Laughing all the way to the bang-k” and “Piggy bang-k” and “The bang-k of mum and dad” and “Declare bang-kruptcy.”
    • Banger: While “bang” can refer to the noise a firework makes, bangers specifically refers to a type of firework. We can joke about these with these phrases and puns: “Tofu bangers and mash” and “A real head banger.” Note: while these bang-related puns refer to fireworks, they can also refer to the phrase “going out with a bang”, which means “a good time”.
    • *far* → *flare*: flarewell (farewell), neflareious (nefarious), welflare (welfare), fanflare (fanfare) and airflare (airfare).
    • Ferocious → Flareocious
    • *fair* → *flare*: As in, “An afflare of the heart” and “Away with the flare-ies” and “Tooth flarey” and “Unflare-ly done” and “In all flareness” and “Flareytale wedding” and “Unflare situation.”
    • Park → Spark: As in, “Spark my car” and “At central spark” and “Hit it out of the spark” and “Nosy sparker” and “A walk in the spark.”
    • Bark → Spark: As in, “Spark at the moon” and “Sparking mad” and “Sparking up the wrong tree” and “Spark worse than your bite.” Other words that include “bark” – emspark (embark) and disemspark (disembark).
    • Pakistan → Sparkistan
    • *spok* → *spark*: As in, “Very outsparken” and “A bespark (bespoke) suit” and “I spark too soon” and “The sparksperson for…” and “Have you sparken to them?”
    • *park* → *spark*: As in, “Sparking my car” and “Within the ballspark” and “An expensive carspark” and “You double-sparked (double-parked) me!” Other words you could use: theme spark (theme park), sparka (parka) and sparkour (parkour).
    • *pec* → *spark*: As in, “From a different persparktive” and “Resparkt my wishes” and “A prosparktive (prospective) employee” and “The colour sparktrum” and “Just sparkulation (speculation)” and “Sparktacles (spectacles) wearer.”
    • *pic* → *spark*: Consparkuous (conspicuous) and desparkable (despicable).
    • *perc* → *spark*: As in, “The coffee’s sparkolating (percolating)” and “The sparkussion (percussion) section.”
    • Blaze: Some blaze-related phrases that could work as wordplay: “Cold as blue blazes” and “Blaze a trail” and “Go out in a blaze of glory” and “Go to blazes” and “Why the blazes..?”
    • *blas* → *blaze*: As in, “Had a blaze-t” and “Such blazephemy!” and “You’ll get blaze-ted by the teacher.”
    • *blis* → *blaze*: As in, “At blazetering (blistering) speed” and “Blazefully (blissfully) unaware” and “Rock the establazement!” and “Establazed in 1990.”
    • Blizzard → Blaze-ard
    • *blaz* → *blaze*: As in, “An innovative trailblazer” and “Lend me your blazer” and “Emblaze-oned across her chest.”
    • *fresh* → *flash*: As in, “I’m flash out of” and “A flash pair of eyes” and “Flash start” and “Like a breath of flash air” and “Flash as a daisy” and “What flash hell is this?” and “Break for reflashments” and “Reflash (refresh) the page.” Other words you could use: flashwater (freshwater), reflasher (refresher) and flashman (freshman).
    • Frustration → Flashtration: As in, “Take your flashtrations out on..” Other related words: flashtrating (frustrating), flashtrated (frustrated) and flashtrate (frustrate).
    • So → Show: We’ve included show-related puns as “show” refers to “light show” (which is what fireworks are): “Show on and show forth” and “Can’t believe you’d go show far” and “If I do say show myself” and “Not show fast” and “Show far, show good” and “Show be it” and “Show long as” and “Show much for” and “Show there” and “Show and show (so and so).”
    • Sew → Show: As in, “Show me back together” and “Showing kit.”
    • Sow → Show: As in, “You reap what you show” and “Show the seeds of doubt.”
    • Slow → Show: As in, “Painfully show” and “Show on the uptake” and “Showly but surely” and “Show but sure” and “Can’t show down” and “In show motion” and “A show day.”
    • Play → Display: Since fireworks are also referred to as “light displays”, we’ve included some display-related puns: “Work, rest and display” and “All work and no display” and “Child’s display” and “Come out and display” and “Fair display” and “The games people display” and “Instant display” and “It’s good to display together” and “It’s not whether you win or lose, it’s how you display the game” and “A level displaying field.”
  • Blast: “Blasts” can refer to either fireworks or to a good time, both of which are common on New Year:
    • Last → Blast: As in, “At long blast” and “At the blast minute” and “Breathe your blast” and “Built to blast” and “Blast resort” and “Famous blast words” and “Free at blast” and “To the blast drop” and “Any blast requests?” and “You haven’t heard the blast of” and “Blast but not least” and “Blast call” and “Blast chance” and “Blast ditch effort” and “Blast gasp” and “Blast in, first out” and “Blast laugh” and “Blast minute” and “A blasting impression” and “On your blast legs” and “Peace at blast” and “Blast I heard” and “The blast straw.”
    • Past → Blast: As in, “Wouldn’t put it blast them” and “Blast its sell-by date” and “The distance blast.”
    • *bas* → *blast*: As in, blastard (bastard), bomblastic (bombastic) and alablaster (alabaster).
    • *bust* → *blast*: As in, “Blast a move” and “Spontaneous comblastion.” Other words you could use: blockblaster (blockbuster), dustblaster (dustbuster), filiblaster (filibuster) and roblast (robust). Notes: Filibuster refers to tactics used to delay proceedings of legislative bodies.
    • *blist* → *blast*: “At blastering speed” and “Blastering barnacles.”
    • *past* → *blast*: As in, “Greener blastures (pastures)” and “Favourite blasttime.” Other words you could use: blastel (pastel), blastor (pastor), blastry (pastry), blastoral (pastoral), blastiche (pastiche). Note: a pastiche is a piece of art that imitates the work of a previous artist. If something is pastoral, then it relates to rural life and scenes.
    • *plast* → *blast*: As in, blaster (plaster), blastic (plastic), blasticity (plasticity) and blastered (plastered).
    • *plist* → *blast*: As in, “Overly simblastic (simplistic).” Other related words: simblastically (simplistically) and oversimblastic (oversimplistic).
    • Blasphemy → Blastphemy
  • Count → Countdown: As in, “Countdown your blessings” and “Down for the countdown” and “Head countdown” and “Let me countdown the ways” and “Out for the countdown” and “You can countdown on me” and “Be able to countdown [something] on one hand” and “Lose countdown of”.
  • Event: There are multiple events that New Year’s is centred around (like parties, fireworks and ball drops), so we’ve included some event-related puns and phrases:
    • *vent* → *event*: eventure (venture), eventricle (ventricle), eventilation (ventilation), eventilate (ventilate), eventilator (ventilator), adevent (advent), circumevent (circumvent), prevent, coneventional (conventional).
    • Event: Some event-related phrases that could work in your party wordplay: “Current events” and “Happy event” and “The main event” and “Motion picture event” and “Turn of events.”
    • *vant* → *event*: As in, relevent (relevant) and irrelevent (irrelevant).
  • Champagne: A couple of general champagne-related phrases that could work as New Year’s puns in the right context: “Champagne for my real friends” and “Champagne taste on a beer budget.” Note: these phrases are nice and general as they can be used as metaphors and doesn’t have to refer to literal champagne, so they’re more versatile.
  • Pop: Since pop is another (more casual) word for champagne, we’ve included pop-related puns and phrases:
    • *pap* → *pop*: As in, “Acting like poparazzi” and “Popaya balm” and “Sprinkled with poprika.”
    • *pep* → *pop*: As in, “Dr. Popper” and “Full of energy and pop (pep)” and “Poppermint flavoured.”
    • *pip* → *pop*: As in, “Shut it, popsqueak.”
    • *pop*: You can emphasise the “pop” that already exists in certain words: “Contrary to popular opinion” and “Eye popping” and “Pop the question” and “Take a pop at” and “Blow this popsicle stand” and “A rising population” and “According to the populace.” Other words you could use: overpopulation, hippopotamus, Popeye, apopletic, lollipop, poplar, populist, poppy. Notes: a populist is someone who supports views or ideas simply because they’re popular rather than because they’re moral or correct. Poplars are a type of tree, and to be apopletic is to be furious.
  • Bubbly: Bubbly is another nickname for champagne, and you can include it in your terrible jokes with these puns:
    • Bubble → Bubbly: “Burst your bubbly” and “Thought bubbly” and “Bubbly over” and “Bubbly and squeak.”
    • Bubbly: As in, “A bubbly personality.” This phrase works as it’s metaphorical rather than literal, and so can be used quite generally.
  • Wine: Since wine is another large part of New Year’s celebrations, we’ve included some wine-related puns and phrases here for you too:
    • Win → Wine: As in, “Can’t wine for losing” and “Every one a wine-r” and “Heads I wine, tails you lose” and “How to wine friends and influence people” and “Play to wine” and “Wine big” and “Wine by a mile” and “Wine some, lose some” and “You can’t wine them all” and “You have to be in it to wine it.”
    • Wind → Wine-d: As in, “Any way the wine-d blows” and “Blow with the wine-d” and “Break wine-d” and “A breath of wine-d” and “A candle in the wine-d” and “Get wine-d of” and “An ill wine-d” and “Your second wine-d.”
    • When → Wine: As in, “Ready wine you are” and “Say wine” and “If and wine” and “Wine hell freees over” and “Wine it comes down to it.”
    • *wan* → *wine*: As in, “The one that I wine-t” and “Waste not, wine-t not” and “A wineton woman” and “Waxing and wine-ing” and “Winedering around” and “Monthly allowine-ce.”
    • *win* → *wine*: As in, “Taken under your wine-g (wing)” and “Out the winedow” and “Surviving the wineter” and “A winesome expression.”
    • Darwin → Darwine
    • *won* → *wine*: As in, “Feeling a bit wine-ky (wonky)” and “Works wine-ders” and “It’s a wine-derful life” and “No small wine-der” and “Feeling wine-derful” and “A wine-drous result” and “You had me wine-dering.”
    • *when* → *wine*: As in, “Wine-ever, wherever” and “Wine-ever you’re ready.”
    • *whin* → *wine*: As in, “Stop wine-ing” and “Having a wine-ge.”
    • *ween* → *wine*: As in, “In betwine a rock and a hard place.”
  • Booze: New Year’s exploits run the gamut from high-class wine and champagne to cheap drinks and booze, so we’ve included some boozy puns for you here:
    • Bruise → Booze: As in, “A boozed ego” and “You can’t protect your kids from every bump and booze.”
    • *bas* → *booze*: As in, “On a first-name boozeis (basis)” and “Back to boozeics (basics)” and “Yes, boozeically” and “The boozelisk in the Chamber of Secrets (I’m sure many people will find ways to make boozy pickup lines out of this one…so use it and similar puns with your best judgement).”
    • *bes* → *booze*: As in, “All the boozet (best)” and “Boozet (best) friends forever” and “Boozet of all” and “Boozepoke suit” and “Boozetow your wisdom” and “Sit boozeside me.” Other words you could use: booze-seech (beseech), booze-sotted (besotted), booze-siege (besiege). Notes: to beseech is to beg.
    • *bos* → *booze*: As in, booze-om (bosom), rooibooze (rooibos) and verbooze (verbose). Note: rooibos is a type of tea.
    • *bus* → *booze*: As in, “Thrown under the booze” and “Walk or take the booze” and “None of your boozeiness” and “Boozey bee” and “Course syllabooze.” Other words you could use: nimbooze (nimbus), omnibooze (omnibus) and abooze (abuse). Notes: a nimbus is a circle of light, or a halo.
    • *baz* → *booze*: As in, boozear (bazaar), booze-ooka (bazooka), booze-illion (bazillion).
    • *biz* → *booze*: As in, “Boozear (bizarre) circumstances,” and “That’s showbooze.”
    • *buz* → *booze*: As in, “Booze me in” and “Booze off” and “Booze-ing with excitement” and “Boozewords.” Other words you could use: booze-ard (buzzard), booze-ing (boozing) and boozer (buzzer).
    • *bows* → *booze*: As in, “Chasing rainbooze” and “Rainbooze and unicorns” and “Rub elbooze with.”
  • Drop: We can use ball-related phrases to refer to Times Square’s famous annual ball drop: “Drop the ball” and “Drop it like it’s hot” and “Drop a bombshell” and “Drop a bundle.”
  • Toast: Along with New Year’s resolutions, it’s common to make toasts at the end of the year to show gratitude for the passing year and aspirations for the new. Here are some toast-related puns for you to play with:
    • *toes → *toast: As in, “Keep you on your toast” and “Small potatoast” and “Don’t tread on anyone’s toast” and “Twinkle toast.”
    • Toss → Toast: As in, “Toast your cookies” and “Don’t give a toast” and “A coin toast” and “A toast-up between…” and “Toast your hat into the ring.” Note: to toss your cookies is to throw up.
    • *test* → *toast*: As in, “Not a beauty contoast” and “A blind toast” and “One, two, three toasting” and “Put to the toast” and “A toast of faith” and “Tried and toasted” and “The greatoast thing since sliced bread” and “Not in the slightoast” and “Protoast too much” and “Sniff toast” and “Stand the toast of time” and “Toast the waters” and “Forbidden fruit is always the sweetoast” and “Survival of the fittoast” and “A toastament of” and “Attoast to” and “The latoast and greatoast.” Other words you could use: toastimony (testimony), toastimonial (testimonial), neatoast (neatest) and cutoast (cutest).
    • Testosterone → Toastosterone
    • *tist* → *toast*: As in, “Signed by the artoast” and “According to statoastics (statistics).” Other words you could use: scientoast (scientist), elitoast (elitist), dentoast (dentist), orthodontoast (orthodontist).
  • Ring: We’ve got some ring-related phrases that could serve as puns in the right context so you can play on the phrase “ringing in the new year”:
    • *ran* → *ring*: As in, “Satisfaction guaringteed.”
    • *ren → *ring: As in, “Childring first” and “My brethring (brethren).”
    • *rin* → *ring*: As in, “Ringse and repeat” and “Run rings around” and “Skating ringk” and “Speaking in mandaring” and “Pop an aspiring” and “On pringciple” and “The pringcipal of” and “Intringsic qualities.”
    • *rang* → *ring*: As in, “Boomering effect” and “Sweet oringe” and “A formal arringement.”
    • Strength → Stringth: As in, “Go from stringth to stringth” and “Inner stringth” and “A tower of stringth.”
    • Ring: We’ll finish this ring-related section off with phrases and words that include the word “ring”: “Alarm bells began to ring” and “Dead ringer” and “Doesn’t ring a bell” and “Don’t ring us, we’ll ring you” and “In the ring” and “Ring of fire” and “Rings hollow” and “Ringing in your ears” and “Ringing off the hook.” Words you can use: spring, string, bearing, wring, engineering, caring and boring.
  • Midnight Kiss: Midnight kisses are one of New Year’s most beloved traditions. We can include them in our wordplay with these silly puns:
    • Kiss → Midnight kiss: As in: “Blow a midnight kiss” and “French midnight kiss” and “Midnight kiss me through the phone” and “Midnight kiss and make up” and “Midnight kiss and tell” and “Midnight kiss goodbye to” and “Midnight kiss it better” and “Midnight kiss me quick” and “Midnight kiss my ass” and “The midnight kiss of life” and “Save your midnight kisses for me” and “Sealed with a loving midnight kiss” and “You can midnight kiss that one goodbye” and “Hugs and midnight kisses.”
    • Kismet → Kissmet (note: kismet means destiny, or fate.)
  • Era: Since New Year’s marks the “end of an era”, we’ve got some era-related phrases and puns here for you too:
    • Hear → H-era: As in, “Ask no questions and h-era no lies” and “Can you h-era me?” and “Hard of h-eraing” and “H-era the last of” and “H-era them out” and “I can’t h-era myself think” and “Will never h-era the end of it.”
    • Here → H-era: As in, “Been h-era before” and “Do you come h-era often?” and “Fancy meeting you h-era” and “From h-era to eternity” and “I’ve had it up to h-era” and “H-era comes the sun” and “H-era and there” and “H-era there be monsters” and “H-era comes trouble” and “I’m h-era for you” and “H-era goes nothing” and “H-era today, gone tomorrow” and “H-era’s the thing…”
    • Ear → Era: As in, “All eras” and “Bend your era” and “Coming out of your eras” and “Era candy” and “An era for music” and “Era splitting” and “Give someone an era-ful” and “Fall about your eras” and “A grin from era to era” and “Have your eras chewed off” and “In one era, out the other” and “Lend an era” and “Keep your era to the ground” and “Music to my eras” and “Out of era-shot” and “Prick up your eras.”
    • Are → Era: As in, “All bets era off” and “Era you deaf?” and “Chances era” and “Here you era” and “How era you?” and “My lips era sealed” and “The stars era aligned.”
    • *ara* → *era*: As in, “My mascera is running” and “Out of cheracter” and “Running in perallel.” Other words you could use: erabesque (arabesque), erachnid (arachnid), ti-era (tiara), peradigm (paradigm), peradox (paradox), guerantee (guarantee), perameter (parameter). Note: an arabesque is a type of ballet dance move.
    • *ira* → *era*: As in, asperation (aspiration), insperation (inspiration), consperacy (conspiracy) and meracle (miracle).
  • *ere* → *era*: As in, “Hera and thera” and “Adhera to the rules” and “Severa punishment” and “A gloomy atmosphera” and “Be strong and persevera.” Other words you could use: austera (austere), interast (interest), referance (reference), serandipity (serendipity), differant (different).

New Year’s-Related Words

To help you come up with your own New Year’s puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

new year, new year’s eve, happy new year,  january 1st, old year’s day, saint sylvester’s day, resolutions, fireworks, celebration, countdown, party, champagne, pop, bubbly, wine, concert, ball drop, toast, “ring in”, “with a bang”, midnight kiss, tradition, era, annual

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Corn Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on corn puns! 🌽 🍿 Whether you need a caption for your corn maze photo, some corn sayings based on puns, or you’re trying to devise a silly corn pick-up line, we hope this entry serves you well.

Most of the easy corn puns are based around the word “corn” itself, but towards the end of the list there’s a bunch of other puns based around corn-related words.

You might also like to visit the Punpedia entry on vegetable puns.

Corn Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about corn that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page!

  • Corn → Can: As in “Corn’t we all just get along?” and “Appearances corn be deceptive.” and “Bit off more than you corn chew.” and “Corn you believe it?” and “You corn count on me.”
  • Corny: As in “Very corny puns”
  • Gone → Corn: As in “Here today, corn tomorrow.” and “It’s all corn pear-shaped.” and “Corn, but not forgotten.”
  • Kind → Corned: As in “Kill them with cornedness.” and “Cornedest regards, …” and “One of a corned” and “I paid him back in corned.” and “You have to be cruel to be corned.”
  • Scorn: As in “He became the object of scorn amongst his contemporaries.” and “They recieved scornful remarks for their lack of respect.”
  • Corner: As in “Out of the corner of my eye” and “They had me cornered” and “Go and sit in the naughty corner” and “I’ll be there soon, I’m just around the corner.” and “They come from all corners of the Earth.” and “We’ve cornered the market”.
  • Unicorn: As in “The last unicorn“.
  • Capricorn: As in “Astrology is silly, but my star sign is capricorn.”
  • Cornerstone: As in “Animal rights were the cornerstones of the new policy.”
  • Cornea: As in “My cornea is permanently damaged.”
  • Con* → Corn*: Very corny corn puns can be made with some words that start with the “con” sound (or similar): corntract, corncern, corntain, cornference, corntext, corncerned, corntrast, cornfidence, corndition, corntinue, cornsider, corntry, cornclusion, cornduct, cornversation, cornstruction, cornflict, corntribution, cornsent, cornsist, cornclude, cornservation, corntest, cornception, cornsequences, cornsult, corncert, cornventional, corncrete, corntinent, cornfine, cornsistantly, cornstitutional, cornvey, cornsiderably, cornsitituent, corntempt, corncede, cornfess, cornfrontation, corngregation, corntroversial, cornsensus, cornsultancy, cornquest, cornvicted, corngratulate. See this list for more.
  • *can* → *corn*: If a word contains the “can” sound (or similar), then a terrible corn pun can sometimes be made: corncel (cancel), corncellation (cancellation), corndidate (candidate), corndlelight (candlelight), cornibalism (cannibalism), cornteen (canteen), Scorndinavian (Scandinavian), scorndalous (scandalous), uncorny (uncanny).
  • *con* / *cahn* → *corn*: If a word contains the “con” sound (or similar), then a terrible corn pun can sometimes be made: ecornomists, incornsequential, discorntinuity, lexicorn, miscornduct, recornaissance, subcornscious, subcornsciously, subcorntinent, subcorntractor, uncornstitutional, uncornsciously, Wiscornsinlacornic (laconic), Americorn, balcorny, beacorn (of hope), applicornts (applicants), corntrydecornstruction, discorncerting, discornected, discorntinue, fecorndity (fecundity), forsacorn (forsaken), francornstein, heartbrocorn, icornography, incornceivable, insignificorned (insignificant), intercornect, lubricornt, mecornism (mechanism), miscornceptions, precornceptions, noncornformist, recorncile, secornhand, republicorn, supercornducting, uncorntrollable, uncornventional.
  • *carn*→*corn*: As in “This species is cornivorous.” and “Some superstitious people believe in reincornation.” and “Our team got beaten badly – it was utter cornage.”
  • Com* → Corn*: Some terrible corn puns can be made by replacing “com” at the start of a word with “corn” as in “You’re in good cornpany” and “You’ve made a cornplete fool of yourself” and “I’m a proud cornputer geek” and “We’ve got some stiff cornpetition” and “Cornpare and corntrast.” and “Shall I cornpare thee to a summer’s day?” and “He’s got an inferiority cornplex.” and “I think it’s due to a cornbination of factors.” and “Cornbine all the ingredients in a bowl.” and “You will be given $20 as cornpensation for your time.” and “I don’t feel cornfortable in my skin.” and “She’s got a strong cornpetitive streak.” and “… It’s cornplicated.” and “Cornplete and utter incornpetence.” and “A cornplimentary after-dinner mint.” and “You have to go. It’s cornpulsory.” There are more words starting with “com” in this list.
  • Kernel: As in “There is a kernel of truth to what she is saying.” and “This is the kernel of the argument.” and “The Linux kernel is free and open source.”
  • Sweet: Sweet corn is well known enough that you might be able to make a corn pun by simply mentioning “sweet” as in “You’re so sweet!” and “Oh that’s soo sweet!” and “Revenge is sweet” and “Short and sweet” and “Lay some sweet lines on someone” and “Sweet dreams” and “Sweet Jesus!” and “You bet your sweet life!” and “That was a sweet trick, dude.” and “Sweet as, bro.” and “Whisper sweet nothings” and “Home sweet home” and “Rose by any other name would smell as sweet” and “Sweet smell/taste of success/victory” and “Sweetheart“.
  • Suite → Sweet: As in “She was renting a 2-bedroom sweet for the summer.”
  • Sweat → Sweet: As in “Blood, sweet and tears” and “Beads of sweet rolled down my forehead” and “Break out in a cold sweet” and “By the sweet of my brow” and “Don’t sweet it.” and “Don’t sweet the small stuff.” and “All hot and sweety“.
  • Ask → Husk: As in “Husk a silly question and you’ll get a silly answer.” and “Husk and you shall receive.” and “She husked me out on a date” and “Funny you should husk” and “If you husk me, …” and “Don’t husk me!” and “That’s a big husk” and “What’s the husking price?” and “Don’t husk.” and “You’re husking for trouble” and “Don’t hesitate to husk” and “No questions husked.”
  • Husky: As in “He had a deep, husky voice.” and “The huskies pulled the sled at full speed.”
  • *usk* / *ask* → *husk*: If a word contains the “usk” sound (or anything vaguely similar) a silly corn husk pun can sometimes be made. Note that the terribleness of these ones will probably depend on your accent: conf-husk-ate (confiscate), hor-husk-opes (horoscopes), m-husk-quito (mosquito), m-husk-ular (muscular), min-husk-ule (minuscule), cardiov-husk-ular, m-husk-ara, m-husk-querading, m-husk-ulinity, b-husk-etball.
  • Stalk: The stem of a corn plant is called a “stalk”, and the term “corn stalk” may be well-known enough that the work “stalk” (in a non-stem sense) may qualify as a corn pun in the right context.
  • Field: The term “corn field” may be well-known enough that the term “field” alone (in a non-farming sense) may qualify as a corn pun in the right context: “It came out of left field” and “They had a field day” and “It’s a level playing field” and “She fielded the journalists’ questions adeptly”.
  • Filled → Field: As in “I have field my pun quota for today.” and “She field me in on the details”.
  • Failed → Field: As in “I have field in my duties, but I will try harder next time.”
  • Maze → Maize: As in “It’s a complicated maize to navigate.”
  • Mace → Maize: Another term for “pepper spray” is “mace”. It can also refer to a medieval spiked club weapon.
  •  Amazing→ Amaizing: As in “Truely amaizing.” and “Amaizing Grace.” and “I’m amaized!” and “To my utter amaizement …”
  • *mise → *maize: As in, minimaize (minimise), surmaize (surmise), victimaize (victimise), compromaize (compromise), customaize (customise), maximaize (maximise).
  • Nearly → Mealie: In South Africa, the term “mealie” can refer to a maize plan, maize kernels or to a corn cob. Example: “I mealie fell out of my chair!”
  • Cab → Cob: As in “Wave down a taxi cob
  • Cub → Cob: As in “A cute bear cob
  • *cob*: If a word contains the “cob” sound (or something vaguely similar), you can sometimes make a terrible corn cob pun: appli-cob-ility, amicobly (amicably), impracticoble, irrevocoble, inexplicobly, impeccobly, despicoble, macobre, unmista-cob-ly, unthin-cob-le, remar-cob-le.
  • Pop: As in “Pop on a hat.” and “Pop the question” and “Take a pop at”
  • *pop*: If a word contains “pop”, you may be able to emphasise it to make a popcorn pun: population, popularity, popular, populace, populous, populated, populist, unpopular.
  • *perp* → *pop*: If a word contains the “perp” sound (or similar), we can create a terrible popcorn pun: popendicular, popetrated, popetuity, popetuate, popetually, poplexed, poplexity, poplexed.
  • Creamed: As a creamed corn pun you might just be able to use the word “creamed” as in “We got creamed in our final match.”
  • Flake: As a corn flakes pun you might be able to just mention the word “flake” or “flakes” as in “He flakes so often it’s not worth asking him to come.” and “He so unreliable – total flake.” and “She’s a bit flaky.”
  • Crop: As in “Cream of the crop” and “Some new problems cropped up last minute”
  • Crap → Crop: As in “What a load of crop!”” and “He’s full of crop” and “I’ll beat the crop out of you!” and “Cut the crop!” and “Piece of crop” and “Oh crop“.
  • Shucks: The term “shuck” can refer to the husk (outer covering) of corn/maize or to the act of removing it. Example pun: “Aww shucks“.
  • Suck → Shuck: As in “This shucks.” and “Shuck it up.” and “He shucks up to her” and “Hah! Shuck it.”
  • Ear: As in “I’m all ears” and “It’s music to my ears” and “He’s wet behind the ears” and “I’m up to my ears in …” and “I’ve got money coming out of my ears” and “I can’t believe my ears” and “I’ve got my ear to the ground” and “But it fell on deaf ears” and “I think I’ll play it by ear” and “She pricked up her ears when …” and “He can talk your ear off” and “Blow it out your ear” and “Grinning from ear to ear“.
  • Here → Ear: As in “Ear and there” and “Do you come ear often?” and “Ear goes nothing!” and “Ear comes trouble” and “Ear’s the thing …” and “I’m outta ear” and “Neither ear nor there” and “Right ear, right now” and “Same ear.” and “See ear, …” and “You heard it ear first.”
  • Eerie → Earie: As in “Don’t you think this music sounds a bit earie?”
  • Air → Ear: As in “A breath of fresh ear” and “Vanished into thin ear.” and “It’s still up in the ear” and “Out of thin ear” and “He’s a bit of an ear head.” and “Full of hot ear“.

Corn-Related Words

There are many more puns to be made than could be documented in this Punpedia entry, and so we’ve compiled a list of corn-related concepts for you to use when creating your own puns. If you come up with a new pun, please share it in the comments!

corn, corny, cornfield, cornstalk, maize, cornmeal, cornstarch, cornhusking, husk, ear, mealie, hominy, corncob, cob, kernel, pone, popcorn, pop, sweet corn, shuck, johnnycake, nubbin, samp, grain, dent corn, flint corn, crop, harvest, yellow, tassel, baby corn, corn flakes, cereal, seed, corn syrup, crop circle, corn chips, creamed corn, polenta

Did this Punpedia entry help you?

Did you find the corn-related pun that you were looking for? If so, great! Otherwise, please let us know what you were looking for in the comments, below! Are you looking for puns for text messages, Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, or some other social media platform? Would you like to see more funny corn pun images? Or perhaps you just want more corn puns for your photo captions? Whatever the case, please let us know, and help us improve this Punpedia entry. If you’re got any corn puns (image or text) that aren’t included in this article, please submit them in the comments and one of our curators will add it as soon as possible. Thanks for visiting Punpedia 🙂