New Year’s Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on New Year’s puns! 🎉 🕒 🥂

New Year’s is a time of great revelry and merrymaking, with lots of cheer being carried over from Christmastime (see our Christmas puns here) into the New Year. Make the most of this party season with our list of New Year’s puns – whether you’re after wordplay for party invites, quips for Instagram captions or witty hashtags, we hope you find the perfect pun you need.

While this entry is as comprehensive as possible, it is specific to New Year’s puns. If you’re interested in other related puns, we also have lists on party puns, firework puns and beer puns.

New Year’s Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about New Year’s that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of New Year’s puns:

  • Solution → Resolution: As in, “You’re either part of the resolution or part of the problem.”
  • Revolution → Resolution: As in, “The resolution will not be televised” and “Part of the resolution” and “Long live the resolution!”
  • New → New Year: As in, “As bright as a new year,” and “Brand spanking new year,” and “Dawn of a new year,” and “Out with the old, in with the new year.”
  • Eve: We can make references to and puns about New Year’s Eve by placing “eve” in certain words that have an “eev” sound (or similar):
    • *av* → *eve*: As in, “Just your eve-erage Joe” and “An eve-rsion to” and “Eve-ailable this Thursday?” and “Other evenues to explore” and “Take it or leeve it.” Other words you could use: evenge (avenge), cleeve (cleave), heeve (heave) and weeve (weave).
    • *ev* → *eve*: As in, “Developing feelings” and “Maleve-olent actions” and “As much leverage as I can get” and “Disco fever” and “A releve-ant point.” Other words you could use: event, reve-iew, eve-idence, eve-olution, eve-aluate, everyday, eventually, everything, retrieve, achieve, believe, relieve, sleeve, peeve and revenant. Note: a revenant is someone who returns after a long absence.
    • *iv* → *eve*: As in, “Sold down the rever (river)” and “A fresh new perspecteve” and “Special preveleges” and “A na-eve (naive) viewpoint” and “A comprehenseve education.” Other words you could use: initiateve (initiative) and imperateve (imperative).
  • First: We’ve included first-related puns and phrases so we can have some wordplay that refers to January 1st – the new year:
    • *fast* → *first*: As in, “Firstidiously (fastidiously) clean” and “Firsten your seatbelts” and “In first-forward” and “Holding steadfirst” and “Be eaten for breakfirst.”
    • *fest* → *first*: As in, “Firstival vibes” and “Let it firster (fester)” and “Firstooned (festooned) with ribbons” and “A firstive atmosphere” and “In amongst the firstivities.”
    • *fist* → *first*: As in, “A firstful of dollars” and “First of steel” and “Hand over first” and “Rule with an iron first.” Some other words that have “fist” in it – firsticuffs (fisticuffs), firstfight (fistfight) and pacifirst (pacifist).
    • *vast* → *first*: As in, “Feeling defirstated (devastated)” and “A scene of defirstation” and “Firstly (vastly) different personalities.”
    • *vest* → *first*: As in, “Sweater first (vest)” and “A firsted (vested) interest” and “Reap the harfirst (harvest)” and “A trafirsty (travesty)” and “Long-term infirstments (investments)” and “Going to infirstigate.”
    • Thirst → First: As in, “Parched with first” and “Feeling firsty” and “A bloodfirsty glare.”
  • Party: Since New Year’s and New Year’s eve celebrations are all about parties, we have some party-related puns for you here:
    • *part* → *party*: As in, “In party-cular” and “Party-cipation award” and “Care to party-cipate? (could also be participarty)” and “Imparty your knowledge” and “That’s not your departy-ment” and “A partysan issue.” Other words you could use: partycle (particle), partytion (partition), aparty (apart), counterparty (counterpart), departy (depart), partyner (partner) party-cularly (particularly), party-cipant (participant) and reparty (repartee).
    • *pathy* → *party*: As in, emparty (empathy), aparty (apathy), symparty (sympathy), teleparty (telepathy) and antiparty (antipathy). Note: to feel antipathy is to feel dislike.
    • *pet* → *party*: As in, “Signed party-tion (petition)” and “Not to blow my own trumparty, but…” and “Political pupparty (this can work as it refers to both political puppets and parties of the political kind).”
    • *pert* → *party*: As in, partynent (pertinent), partynence (pertinence), exparty (expert) and proparty (property).
    • Serendipity → Serendiparty (Note: serendipity refers to unexpected and fortunate accidents.)
    • *port* → *party*: As in, “Financial partyfolio” and “You have my supparty” and “Public transparty” and “An unexpected oppartynity” and “A suppartyve (supportive) atmosphere” and “A sparty (sporty) person.”
    • *part* → *party*: As in, “A fool and his money are soon partied” and “Act the party” and “For my own party” and “Departy this life” and “If you’re not a party of the solution, you’re party of the problem” and “Drift aparty” and “Fall aparty” and “For the most party” and “Look the party” and “Worlds aparty.”
  • Fireworks: Since fireworks are an integral part of New Year’s celebrations, we’ve got a section dedicated to firework-related puns here:
    • Fair → Flare: As in, “All’s flare in love and war” and “By flare means or foul” and “Flare trade” and “Flare and square” and “Flare enough” and “Flare market value” and “No flare!” and “You can’t say flarer than that.”
    • Fare → Flare: As in, “Class warflare” and “Psychological warflare” and “Standard flare” and “How are you flare-ing (faring)?”
    • Flair → Flare: As in, “A flare for the dramatic.”
    • Very → Flarey: As in, “Be flarey afraid” and “Before your flarey eyes” and “How flarey dare you” and “A flarey good year” and “Thank you flarey much” and “Flarey special” and “Flarey well” and “At the flarey least” and “Eflarey (every) inch.”
    • Pang → Bang: As in, “Bangs of conscience” and “Bangs of jealousy.”
    • *pero* → *pyro*: As in, “My pyrogative” and “Hydrogen pyroxide” and “A prospyrous venture” and “Parent chapyrone” and “Vegan Peppyroni pizza.” Note: hydrogen peroxide is a chemical compound commonly used as bleach.
    • Pirouette → Pyroette (A pirouette is a dance move where you turn a circle on the tips of your toes.)
    • Fire → Fireworks: As in, “Get on like a house on fireworks” and “Come on baby, light my firework” and “Fight fire with fireworks” and “Light a firework under [someone]” and “Play with fireworks” and “Ring of fireworks” and “When you play with fireworks, you get burned.” Note: to light a fire under someone is to motivate them to move faster.
    • Sprinkler → Sparkler: As in, “A new sparkler system” and “Turn the sparklers on.” Note: a sparkler is a small hand-held firework.
    • Sparkling → Sparkler-ing: As in, “Sparkler-ing mineral water” and “Sparkler-ing repartee.” Note: if someone’s repartee is sparkling, then they’re a witty conversationalist.
    • Fire → Firecracker: As in, “Come on baby, light my firecracker” and “Come home to a real firecracker” and “Fight fire with firecracker” and “Firecracker and brimstone” and “Play with firecrackers and get burned.”
    • Gun → Gunpowder: As in, “Jump the gunpowder” and “Smoking gunpowder.” Notes: to jump the gun is to begin something too soon.
    • Sky → Skyrocket: A skyrocket is a type of firework that’s launched into the sky. You can refer to them in your sparkling wordplay with these puns and phrases: “Lucy in the skyrocket with diamonds” and “Skyrocket high” and “The skyrocket’s the limit” and “Aim for the skyrocket.”
    • Rocket → Skyrocket: As in, “It’s not skyrocket science” and “Pocket skyrocket.”
    • Rock → Skyrocket: As in, “Hard as a skyrocket” and “Solid as a skyrocket” and “Between a skyrocket and a hard place” and “Get your skyrockets off.”
    • *fuse*: Emphasise the “fuse” in certain words: refuse, diffuse, defuse, infuse, confuse, profuse, confused and profusely.
    • *fes* → *fuse*: As in, “A profuseional job” and “The writer’s manifuseto” and “Art fusetival” and “In the profusesion of…” and “A dreamlike manifusetation.” Notes: a manifesto is a public document of intentions or policies. A manifestation is the embodiment of something; a tangible thing.
    • *faz* → *fuse*: As in, “Doesn’t fuse (faze) me” and “Left unfused.”
    • *few* → *fuse*: As in, “Breaking curfuse (curfew)” and “Fuser (fewer) and fuser.”
    • *fac* → *fuse*: As in, “Fuse-ilitating conversation” and “New and updated fuse-ilities” and “A crumbling fuse-ade (facade).” Note: a facade is a “face”; or a front of something.
    • Bang: Some bang-related phrases that could substitute as puns in the right context: “A bigger bang for your buck” and “Bang goes nothing” and “Bang on about” and “Bang out of order” and “Get a bang out of [something]” and “Go out with a bang” and “A bang-up job” and “The whole shebang.” Notes: “Bang-up” means good. The “whole shebang” refers to something that included everything, almost to the top of going overboard.
    • *bing → *bang: These ones are a bit silly, but can still work as wordplay: “Mind-numbang (numbing)” and “Climbang the ladder of success” and “A throbbang headache” and “Absorbang information” and “A disturbang realisation” and “Check the plumbang.”
    • *bung* → *bang*: As in, “An abandoned bangalow (bungalow)” and “Bangled (bungled) the entire operation” and “You bangling idiot” and “Cowabanga!”
    • Bank* → Bang-k*: As in, “Safe as a bang-k” and “A bang-k you can bang-k on” and “Break the bang-k” and “Laughing all the way to the bang-k” and “Piggy bang-k” and “The bang-k of mum and dad” and “Declare bang-kruptcy.”
    • Banger: While “bang” can refer to the noise a firework makes, bangers specifically refers to a type of firework. We can joke about these with these phrases and puns: “Tofu bangers and mash” and “A real head banger.” Note: while these bang-related puns refer to fireworks, they can also refer to the phrase “going out with a bang”, which means “a good time”.
    • *far* → *flare*: flarewell (farewell), neflareious (nefarious), welflare (welfare), fanflare (fanfare) and airflare (airfare).
    • Ferocious → Flareocious
    • *fair* → *flare*: As in, “An afflare of the heart” and “Away with the flare-ies” and “Tooth flarey” and “Unflare-ly done” and “In all flareness” and “Flareytale wedding” and “Unflare situation.”
    • Park → Spark: As in, “Spark my car” and “At central spark” and “Hit it out of the spark” and “Nosy sparker” and “A walk in the spark.”
    • Bark → Spark: As in, “Spark at the moon” and “Sparking mad” and “Sparking up the wrong tree” and “Spark worse than your bite.” Other words that include “bark” – emspark (embark) and disemspark (disembark).
    • Pakistan → Sparkistan
    • *spok* → *spark*: As in, “Very outsparken” and “A bespark (bespoke) suit” and “I spark too soon” and “The sparksperson for…” and “Have you sparken to them?”
    • *park* → *spark*: As in, “Sparking my car” and “Within the ballspark” and “An expensive carspark” and “You double-sparked (double-parked) me!” Other words you could use: theme spark (theme park), sparka (parka) and sparkour (parkour).
    • *pec* → *spark*: As in, “From a different persparktive” and “Resparkt my wishes” and “A prosparktive (prospective) employee” and “The colour sparktrum” and “Just sparkulation (speculation)” and “Sparktacles (spectacles) wearer.”
    • *pic* → *spark*: Consparkuous (conspicuous) and desparkable (despicable).
    • *perc* → *spark*: As in, “The coffee’s sparkolating (percolating)” and “The sparkussion (percussion) section.”
    • Blaze: Some blaze-related phrases that could work as wordplay: “Cold as blue blazes” and “Blaze a trail” and “Go out in a blaze of glory” and “Go to blazes” and “Why the blazes..?”
    • *blas* → *blaze*: As in, “Had a blaze-t” and “Such blazephemy!” and “You’ll get blaze-ted by the teacher.”
    • *blis* → *blaze*: As in, “At blazetering (blistering) speed” and “Blazefully (blissfully) unaware” and “Rock the establazement!” and “Establazed in 1990.”
    • Blizzard → Blaze-ard
    • *blaz* → *blaze*: As in, “An innovative trailblazer” and “Lend me your blazer” and “Emblaze-oned across her chest.”
    • *fresh* → *flash*: As in, “I’m flash out of” and “A flash pair of eyes” and “Flash start” and “Like a breath of flash air” and “Flash as a daisy” and “What flash hell is this?” and “Break for reflashments” and “Reflash (refresh) the page.” Other words you could use: flashwater (freshwater), reflasher (refresher) and flashman (freshman).
    • Frustration → Flashtration: As in, “Take your flashtrations out on..” Other related words: flashtrating (frustrating), flashtrated (frustrated) and flashtrate (frustrate).
    • So → Show: We’ve included show-related puns as “show” refers to “light show” (which is what fireworks are): “Show on and show forth” and “Can’t believe you’d go show far” and “If I do say show myself” and “Not show fast” and “Show far, show good” and “Show be it” and “Show long as” and “Show much for” and “Show there” and “Show and show (so and so).”
    • Sew → Show: As in, “Show me back together” and “Showing kit.”
    • Sow → Show: As in, “You reap what you show” and “Show the seeds of doubt.”
    • Slow → Show: As in, “Painfully show” and “Show on the uptake” and “Showly but surely” and “Show but sure” and “Can’t show down” and “In show motion” and “A show day.”
    • Play → Display: Since fireworks are also referred to as “light displays”, we’ve included some display-related puns: “Work, rest and display” and “All work and no display” and “Child’s display” and “Come out and display” and “Fair display” and “The games people display” and “Instant display” and “It’s good to display together” and “It’s not whether you win or lose, it’s how you display the game” and “A level displaying field.”
  • Blast: “Blasts” can refer to either fireworks or to a good time, both of which are common on New Year:
    • Last → Blast: As in, “At long blast” and “At the blast minute” and “Breathe your blast” and “Built to blast” and “Blast resort” and “Famous blast words” and “Free at blast” and “To the blast drop” and “Any blast requests?” and “You haven’t heard the blast of” and “Blast but not least” and “Blast call” and “Blast chance” and “Blast ditch effort” and “Blast gasp” and “Blast in, first out” and “Blast laugh” and “Blast minute” and “A blasting impression” and “On your blast legs” and “Peace at blast” and “Blast I heard” and “The blast straw.”
    • Past → Blast: As in, “Wouldn’t put it blast them” and “Blast its sell-by date” and “The distance blast.”
    • *bas* → *blast*: As in, blastard (bastard), bomblastic (bombastic) and alablaster (alabaster).
    • *bust* → *blast*: As in, “Blast a move” and “Spontaneous comblastion.” Other words you could use: blockblaster (blockbuster), dustblaster (dustbuster), filiblaster (filibuster) and roblast (robust). Notes: Filibuster refers to tactics used to delay proceedings of legislative bodies.
    • *blist* → *blast*: “At blastering speed” and “Blastering barnacles.”
    • *past* → *blast*: As in, “Greener blastures (pastures)” and “Favourite blasttime.” Other words you could use: blastel (pastel), blastor (pastor), blastry (pastry), blastoral (pastoral), blastiche (pastiche). Note: a pastiche is a piece of art that imitates the work of a previous artist. If something is pastoral, then it relates to rural life and scenes.
    • *plast* → *blast*: As in, blaster (plaster), blastic (plastic), blasticity (plasticity) and blastered (plastered).
    • *plist* → *blast*: As in, “Overly simblastic (simplistic).” Other related words: simblastically (simplistically) and oversimblastic (oversimplistic).
    • Blasphemy → Blastphemy
  • Count → Countdown: As in, “Countdown your blessings” and “Down for the countdown” and “Head countdown” and “Let me countdown the ways” and “Out for the countdown” and “You can countdown on me” and “Be able to countdown [something] on one hand” and “Lose countdown of”.
  • Event: There are multiple events that New Year’s is centred around (like parties, fireworks and ball drops), so we’ve included some event-related puns and phrases:
    • *vent* → *event*: eventure (venture), eventricle (ventricle), eventilation (ventilation), eventilate (ventilate), eventilator (ventilator), adevent (advent), circumevent (circumvent), prevent, coneventional (conventional).
    • Event: Some event-related phrases that could work in your party wordplay: “Current events” and “Happy event” and “The main event” and “Motion picture event” and “Turn of events.”
    • *vant* → *event*: As in, relevent (relevant) and irrelevent (irrelevant).
  • Champagne: A couple of general champagne-related phrases that could work as New Year’s puns in the right context: “Champagne for my real friends” and “Champagne taste on a beer budget.” Note: these phrases are nice and general as they can be used as metaphors and doesn’t have to refer to literal champagne, so they’re more versatile.
  • Pop: Since pop is another (more casual) word for champagne, we’ve included pop-related puns and phrases:
    • *pap* → *pop*: As in, “Acting like poparazzi” and “Popaya balm” and “Sprinkled with poprika.”
    • *pep* → *pop*: As in, “Dr. Popper” and “Full of energy and pop (pep)” and “Poppermint flavoured.”
    • *pip* → *pop*: As in, “Shut it, popsqueak.”
    • *pop*: You can emphasise the “pop” that already exists in certain words: “Contrary to popular opinion” and “Eye popping” and “Pop the question” and “Take a pop at” and “Blow this popsicle stand” and “A rising population” and “According to the populace.” Other words you could use: overpopulation, hippopotamus, Popeye, apopletic, lollipop, poplar, populist, poppy. Notes: a populist is someone who supports views or ideas simply because they’re popular rather than because they’re moral or correct. Poplars are a type of tree, and to be apopletic is to be furious.
  • Bubbly: Bubbly is another nickname for champagne, and you can include it in your terrible jokes with these puns:
    • Bubble → Bubbly: “Burst your bubbly” and “Thought bubbly” and “Bubbly over” and “Bubbly and squeak.”
    • Bubbly: As in, “A bubbly personality.” This phrase works as it’s metaphorical rather than literal, and so can be used quite generally.
  • Wine: Since wine is another large part of New Year’s celebrations, we’ve included some wine-related puns and phrases here for you too:
    • Win → Wine: As in, “Can’t wine for losing” and “Every one a wine-r” and “Heads I wine, tails you lose” and “How to wine friends and influence people” and “Play to wine” and “Wine big” and “Wine by a mile” and “Wine some, lose some” and “You can’t wine them all” and “You have to be in it to wine it.”
    • Wind → Wine-d: As in, “Any way the wine-d blows” and “Blow with the wine-d” and “Break wine-d” and “A breath of wine-d” and “A candle in the wine-d” and “Get wine-d of” and “An ill wine-d” and “Your second wine-d.”
    • When → Wine: As in, “Ready wine you are” and “Say wine” and “If and wine” and “Wine hell freees over” and “Wine it comes down to it.”
    • *wan* → *wine*: As in, “The one that I wine-t” and “Waste not, wine-t not” and “A wineton woman” and “Waxing and wine-ing” and “Winedering around” and “Monthly allowine-ce.”
    • *win* → *wine*: As in, “Taken under your wine-g (wing)” and “Out the winedow” and “Surviving the wineter” and “A winesome expression.”
    • Darwin → Darwine
    • *won* → *wine*: As in, “Feeling a bit wine-ky (wonky)” and “Works wine-ders” and “It’s a wine-derful life” and “No small wine-der” and “Feeling wine-derful” and “A wine-drous result” and “You had me wine-dering.”
    • *when* → *wine*: As in, “Wine-ever, wherever” and “Wine-ever you’re ready.”
    • *whin* → *wine*: As in, “Stop wine-ing” and “Having a wine-ge.”
    • *ween* → *wine*: As in, “In betwine a rock and a hard place.”
  • Booze: New Year’s exploits run the gamut from high-class wine and champagne to cheap drinks and booze, so we’ve included some boozy puns for you here:
    • Bruise → Booze: As in, “A boozed ego” and “You can’t protect your kids from every bump and booze.”
    • *bas* → *booze*: As in, “On a first-name boozeis (basis)” and “Back to boozeics (basics)” and “Yes, boozeically” and “The boozelisk in the Chamber of Secrets (I’m sure many people will find ways to make boozy pickup lines out of this one…so use it and similar puns with your best judgement).”
    • *bes* → *booze*: As in, “All the boozet (best)” and “Boozet (best) friends forever” and “Boozet of all” and “Boozepoke suit” and “Boozetow your wisdom” and “Sit boozeside me.” Other words you could use: booze-seech (beseech), booze-sotted (besotted), booze-siege (besiege). Notes: to beseech is to beg.
    • *bos* → *booze*: As in, booze-om (bosom), rooibooze (rooibos) and verbooze (verbose). Note: rooibos is a type of tea.
    • *bus* → *booze*: As in, “Thrown under the booze” and “Walk or take the booze” and “None of your boozeiness” and “Boozey bee” and “Course syllabooze.” Other words you could use: nimbooze (nimbus), omnibooze (omnibus) and abooze (abuse). Notes: a nimbus is a circle of light, or a halo.
    • *baz* → *booze*: As in, boozear (bazaar), booze-ooka (bazooka), booze-illion (bazillion).
    • *biz* → *booze*: As in, “Boozear (bizarre) circumstances,” and “That’s showbooze.”
    • *buz* → *booze*: As in, “Booze me in” and “Booze off” and “Booze-ing with excitement” and “Boozewords.” Other words you could use: booze-ard (buzzard), booze-ing (boozing) and boozer (buzzer).
    • *bows* → *booze*: As in, “Chasing rainbooze” and “Rainbooze and unicorns” and “Rub elbooze with.”
  • Drop: We can use ball-related phrases to refer to Times Square’s famous annual ball drop: “Drop the ball” and “Drop it like it’s hot” and “Drop a bombshell” and “Drop a bundle.”
  • Toast: Along with New Year’s resolutions, it’s common to make toasts at the end of the year to show gratitude for the passing year and aspirations for the new. Here are some toast-related puns for you to play with:
    • *toes → *toast: As in, “Keep you on your toast” and “Small potatoast” and “Don’t tread on anyone’s toast” and “Twinkle toast.”
    • Toss → Toast: As in, “Toast your cookies” and “Don’t give a toast” and “A coin toast” and “A toast-up between…” and “Toast your hat into the ring.” Note: to toss your cookies is to throw up.
    • *test* → *toast*: As in, “Not a beauty contoast” and “A blind toast” and “One, two, three toasting” and “Put to the toast” and “A toast of faith” and “Tried and toasted” and “The greatoast thing since sliced bread” and “Not in the slightoast” and “Protoast too much” and “Sniff toast” and “Stand the toast of time” and “Toast the waters” and “Forbidden fruit is always the sweetoast” and “Survival of the fittoast” and “A toastament of” and “Attoast to” and “The latoast and greatoast.” Other words you could use: toastimony (testimony), toastimonial (testimonial), neatoast (neatest) and cutoast (cutest).
    • Testosterone → Toastosterone
    • *tist* → *toast*: As in, “Signed by the artoast” and “According to statoastics (statistics).” Other words you could use: scientoast (scientist), elitoast (elitist), dentoast (dentist), orthodontoast (orthodontist).
  • Ring: We’ve got some ring-related phrases that could serve as puns in the right context so you can play on the phrase “ringing in the new year”:
    • *ran* → *ring*: As in, “Satisfaction guaringteed.”
    • *ren → *ring: As in, “Childring first” and “My brethring (brethren).”
    • *rin* → *ring*: As in, “Ringse and repeat” and “Run rings around” and “Skating ringk” and “Speaking in mandaring” and “Pop an aspiring” and “On pringciple” and “The pringcipal of” and “Intringsic qualities.”
    • *rang* → *ring*: As in, “Boomering effect” and “Sweet oringe” and “A formal arringement.”
    • Strength → Stringth: As in, “Go from stringth to stringth” and “Inner stringth” and “A tower of stringth.”
    • Ring: We’ll finish this ring-related section off with phrases and words that include the word “ring”: “Alarm bells began to ring” and “Dead ringer” and “Doesn’t ring a bell” and “Don’t ring us, we’ll ring you” and “In the ring” and “Ring of fire” and “Rings hollow” and “Ringing in your ears” and “Ringing off the hook.” Words you can use: spring, string, bearing, wring, engineering, caring and boring.
  • Midnight Kiss: Midnight kisses are one of New Year’s most beloved traditions. We can include them in our wordplay with these silly puns:
    • Kiss → Midnight kiss: As in: “Blow a midnight kiss” and “French midnight kiss” and “Midnight kiss me through the phone” and “Midnight kiss and make up” and “Midnight kiss and tell” and “Midnight kiss goodbye to” and “Midnight kiss it better” and “Midnight kiss me quick” and “Midnight kiss my ass” and “The midnight kiss of life” and “Save your midnight kisses for me” and “Sealed with a loving midnight kiss” and “You can midnight kiss that one goodbye” and “Hugs and midnight kisses.”
    • Kismet → Kissmet (note: kismet means destiny, or fate.)
  • Era: Since New Year’s marks the “end of an era”, we’ve got some era-related phrases and puns here for you too:
    • Hear → H-era: As in, “Ask no questions and h-era no lies” and “Can you h-era me?” and “Hard of h-eraing” and “H-era the last of” and “H-era them out” and “I can’t h-era myself think” and “Will never h-era the end of it.”
    • Here → H-era: As in, “Been h-era before” and “Do you come h-era often?” and “Fancy meeting you h-era” and “From h-era to eternity” and “I’ve had it up to h-era” and “H-era comes the sun” and “H-era and there” and “H-era there be monsters” and “H-era comes trouble” and “I’m h-era for you” and “H-era goes nothing” and “H-era today, gone tomorrow” and “H-era’s the thing…”
    • Ear → Era: As in, “All eras” and “Bend your era” and “Coming out of your eras” and “Era candy” and “An era for music” and “Era splitting” and “Give someone an era-ful” and “Fall about your eras” and “A grin from era to era” and “Have your eras chewed off” and “In one era, out the other” and “Lend an era” and “Keep your era to the ground” and “Music to my eras” and “Out of era-shot” and “Prick up your eras.”
    • Are → Era: As in, “All bets era off” and “Era you deaf?” and “Chances era” and “Here you era” and “How era you?” and “My lips era sealed” and “The stars era aligned.”
    • *ara* → *era*: As in, “My mascera is running” and “Out of cheracter” and “Running in perallel.” Other words you could use: erabesque (arabesque), erachnid (arachnid), ti-era (tiara), peradigm (paradigm), peradox (paradox), guerantee (guarantee), perameter (parameter). Note: an arabesque is a type of ballet dance move.
    • *ira* → *era*: As in, asperation (aspiration), insperation (inspiration), consperacy (conspiracy) and meracle (miracle).
  • *ere* → *era*: As in, “Hera and thera” and “Adhera to the rules” and “Severa punishment” and “A gloomy atmosphera” and “Be strong and persevera.” Other words you could use: austera (austere), interast (interest), referance (reference), serandipity (serendipity), differant (different).

New Year’s-Related Words

To help you come up with your own New Year’s puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

new year, new year’s eve, happy new year,  january 1st, old year’s day, saint sylvester’s day, resolutions, fireworks, celebration, countdown, party, champagne, pop, bubbly, wine, concert, ball drop, toast, “ring in”, “with a bang”, midnight kiss, tradition, era, annual

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Holiday Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on holiday puns! ✈⛵ 🏖

Whether it’s a weekend away or a full-on sabbatical, everyone needs a holiday once in a while. Enjoy a quick break with us and our holiday puns – whether it’s by boat, plane, train or bus, we’ve endeavoured to cover it here. We hope that you have fun going through this list and that you find the perfect holiday pun for your needs.

While this list is as thorough and comprehensive as possible, it is for vacation type holidays in general – for specific destinations, we also have beach puns, and for annual holidays and events we have Thanksgiving puns and Halloween puns, with more to come!

Holiday Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about holidays that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of holiday puns:

  • Vacation: Since vacation is a synonym for holiday, we’ve included vacation-related phrases for you to play with: “A summer vacation,” and “We’re going on vacation!”
  • Vocation → Vacation: As in, “Helping others is my vacation.” Note: a vocation is a job or trade to which a person feels a special pull or love. 
  • Getaway: As in, “A clean getaway,” and “I really need to getaway.”
  • Weekend: Play with some weekend-related phrases in your holiday wordplay: “A wet weekend,” and “A long weekend,” and “A much-needed weekend.” Note: a wet weekend is a very boring or disappointing experience. 
  • We can → Weekend: As in, “Weekend do it!”
  • Oh, tell → Hotel: As in, “Hotel me what happened!”
  • Hotel: As in, “Heartbreak hotel,” and “Hotel California.” Note: “Heartbreak Hotel” and “Hotel California” are both names of famous songs that could work as holiday puns in the right context.
  • Hostile → Hostel: As in, “A hostel takeover,” and “A hostel environment.”
  • Retreat: As in, “Beat a hasty retreat,” and “Time to retreat.”
  • Treat → Retreat: As in, “Trick or retreat.”
  • Peach → Beach: As in, “Beachy keen,” and “A juicy beach,” and “Skin like beaches and cream.”
  • C → Sea: As in, “I need some vitamin sea.”
  • Day → Holiday: As in, “A holiday in the life of…” and “A holiday without sunshine is like night,” and “All in a holiday’s work,” and “All the livelong holiday,” and “An apple a holiday keeps the doctor away,” and “Another holiday older,” and “Another holiday, another dollar,” and “Around the world in eighty holidays,” and “As honest as the holiday is long,” and “At the end of the holiday,” and “Catch of the holiday,” and “A cold holiday in hell,” and “Dawn of a new holiday,” and “Forever and a holiday,” and “It’s just not my holiday,” and “Make a holiday of it,” and “Make my holiday.” Notes: if someone is as honest as the day is long, then they’re very honest. 
  • Air → Airbnb: As in, “Airbnbs and graces,” and “Breath of fresh airbnb,” and “Castles in the airbnb,” and “Clear the airbnb,” and “Hot airbnb,” and “In the airbnb tonight,” and “Something special in the airbnb,” and “Spring is in the airbnb,” and “There’s a nip in the airbnb.”
  • Destination: As in, “It’s not the journey, it’s the destination,” and “Final destination.”
  • Pack: To make travel puns, we can make references to packing (for a journey) : “Action packed,” and “Fanny pack,” and “I know, I packed it,” and “Jam packed,” and “Leader of the pack,” and “Pack a punch,” and “Pack it in,” and “Pack of lies,” and “Pack your bags!” and “Send packing,” and “Six pack,” and “Care package,” and “Packed to the rafters,” and “Good things come in small packages.”
  • Peck → Pack: As in, “A pack on the cheek,” and “Keep your packer up,” and “The packing order.” Notes: a pecking order is the hierarchy of power or status within a group. 
  • Pick → Pack: As in, “A bone to pack with you,” and “Want to pack some flowers?” and “Easy packings,” and “Hand packed,” and “Cherry pack,” and “You’re just nit packing,” and “Pack a card, any card,” and “Pack a fight,” and “Pack and choose,” and “Pack holes in,” and “Pack of the bunch,” and “Pack up the pieces,” and “Pack your brains,” and “See a penny and pack it up,” and “Stop packing at it.”
  • Back → Pack: As in, “As soon as my pack is turned,” and “You’ve got it packwards,” and “Don’t answer pack,” and “At the pack of my mind,” and “Pack to the future,” and “Pack from the dead,” and “Pack in the day,” and “Get pack on your feet,” and “Packseat driver,” and “Pack to basics,” and “Pack to school,” and “Pack to the drawing board,” and “A packhanded compliment,” and “Bend over packwards,” and “Comepack king,” and “Crawl pack into your shell,” and “Eyes in the pack of your head,” and “Fighting pack tears,” and “Go pack on your word,” and “I want you pack,” and “I scratch your pack, you scratch mine,” and “It’s all coming pack to me now,” and “Kick pack and enjoy,” and “I know it like the pack of my hand,” and “Like water off a duck’s pack,” and “Never look pack.”
  • *pack*: As in, package, packet, backpack, unpack, jetpack, and wolfpack
  • Stay → Staycation: As in, “Out-staycation one’s welcome,” and “Staycation safe,” and “Here to staycation,” and “If you can’t take the heat, staycation out of the kitchen.” Note: a staycation is where one takes time off to holiday, but spends the holiday resting at home. 
  • Bag: As in, “Bag a bargain,” and “Bag lady,” and “Bag of bones,” and “Bag of tricks,” and “Dirt bag,” and “It’s in the bag,” and “Let the cat out of the bag,” and “A mixed bag,” and “Pack your bags!” and “Bag of nerves,” and “Bottom of the bag.”
  • Brag → Bag: As in, “Bagging rights,” and “I don’t mean to bag, but…”
  • *bag*: Emphasize the existing “bag” in some words: airbag, scumbag, sandbag, handbag, gasbag, cabbage, garbage, and bagel
  • *big/bog/bug* → *bag*: As in, ambaguity, mind-baggling, jitterbag and ladybag
  • Suitcase: As in, “I live out of a suitcase.”
  • Case → Suitcase: As in, “An open and shut suitcase,” and “As the suitcase may be,” and “Suitcase closed,” and “Catch a suitcase,” and “Get off my suitcase,” and “I rest my suitcase,” and “In any suitcase,” and “On a suitcase by suitcase basis,” and “Suitcase of mistaken identity.”
  • Travel: As in, “Bad news travels fast,” and “Don’t just travel, travel right,” and “A fellow traveller,” and “A seasoned traveller,” and “The road less travelled,” and “Time travel,” and “Travel broadens the mind,” and “Travel light.”
  • Trouble → Travel: As in, “Asking for travel,” and “Bridge over traveled water,” and “Double travel,” and “Here comes travel,” and “Looking for travel,” and “A nose for travel,” and “This is a local shop, we’ll have no travel here,” and “Travel and strife,” and “Travel in paradise,” and “Up to your neck in travel.”
  • Travesty → Travelsty: As in, “I heard it on the news. What a travelsty.”
  • Extravagant → Extravelgant: As in, “An extravelgant dinner and date.”
  • Escape: As in, “The great escape,” and “Escape your memory,” and “Make good your escape,” and “A narrow escape.”
  • Scapegoat → Escapegoat: A scapegoat is an innocent who carries the blame for other’s actions.
  • Trip: As in, “Day tripped,” and “Guilt trip,” and “Power trip,” and “Road trip,” and “Trip of a lifetime,” and “A trip down memory lane.”
  • Ship → Trip: As in, “Abandon trip,” and “Don’t give up the trip,” and “Extend the hand of friend-trip,” and “Jump trip,” and “Loose lips sink trips,” and “Run a tight trip,” and “Trips of the desert,” and “Trips that pass in the night,” and “That trip has sailed,” and “Rebound relation-trip,” and “A stormy relation-trip.” Notes: loose lips sink ships is a warning against unguarded talk or gossip. 
  • *trip*: We can use words that contain the word “trip” to make some bad holiday puns: triple, tripe, tripod, triplet, trippy, strip, stripe, outstrip, airstrip
  • Journey: As in, “Journey to the centre of the Earth,” and “A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step,” and “It’s not the destination, it’s the journey.”
  • *jour* → *journey*: As in, journeylist (journalist), journeylism (journalism), bonjourney, sojourney, adjourney. Notes: a sojourn is a temporary stay. 
  • Leisure: As in, “A gentleman of leisure,” and “Marry in haste, repent at leisure.”
  • Pleasure → P-leisure: As in, “Business before p-leisure,” and “Earthly p-leisures,” and “Guilty p-leisures,” and “Life’s simple p-leisures.”
  • Break: Holidays are commonly referred to as “breaks” (as in, “I need a break!”) so we’ve included the word here: “A bad break,” and “At breakneck speed,” and “Bed and breakfast,” and “Break a leg,” and “Break and enter,” and “Break bread,” and “Break even,” and “Break out in a cold sweat,” and “Break the bank,” and “Break the mould,” and “A breakthrough,” and “Break your heart,” and “A deal breaker,” and “A lucky break,” and “All hell breaks loose.”
  • Brake → Break: As in, “Hit the breaks!”
  • Bake → Break: As in, “Break and shake,” and “Half-breaked.” Note: if something is half-baked, then not much effort was put into it. 
  • Rest: Since many people go on holiday to rest, we’ve included rest in this entry. As in, “At rest,” and “Come to rest,” and “A cut above the rest,” and “Eternal rest,” and “For the rest of us,” and “For the rest of your life,” and “Give it a rest,” and “I rest my case,” and “Laid to rest,” and “The rest is history.”
  • *rest*: As in, “In the interest of justice,” and “Make interesting,” and “Nearest and dearest,” and “Rest on your laurels,” and “Can’t see the forest for the trees,” and “Mud-wrestling,” and “On the crest of a wave,” and “Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery,” and “Interest free,” and “Can’t be underestimated.”
  • Wrist → Rest: As in, “Slap on the rest.”
  • *rust* → *rest*: As in, “Earn one’s crest,” and “Restle up,” and “Don’t trest anyone,” and “Trest is a two-way street.”
  • Tourist: As in, “Tourist trap.”
  • Terror → Tour: As in, “The tourists will have won,” and “Night tours.”
  • Broad → Abroad: As in, “As abroad as it is long,” and “Abroad brush,” and “Abroad shoulders,” and “In abroad daylight,” and “Abroad strokes.”
  • Brad → Abroad: As in, “Abroad Pitt.”
  • Bread → Abroad: As in, “Abroad and butter,” and “Abroad of life,” and “Abroadcrumb trail,” and “Half a loaf is better than no abroad,” and “Have your abroad buttered on both sides,” and “Put abroad on the table,” and “Take the abroad out of someone’s mouth,” and “The best thing since sliced abroad.”
  • Bored → Abroad: As in, “Abroad stiff,” and “Abroad to death,” and “Abroad to tears,” and “Abroad out of my mind.”
  • *broad* → *abroad*: As in, abroadway, abroadcast, abroadband, abroadsheet, and overabroad.”
  • Beach: “Beach bum,” and “Life’s a beach,” and “Meet me at the beach!”
  • B*tch → Beach: As in, “Beach fest,” and “Beach slap,” and “Life’s a beach,” and “Payback’s a beach,” and “Son of a beach,” and “Bow down, beaches.”
  • Breach → Beach: As in, “A beach of trust,” and “The perimeter has been beached!”
  • Beetroot → Beachroot: As in, “Red as a beachroot,” and “Chocolate beachroot cake,” and “A beachroot latte.”
  • Preach → Beach: As in, “Practice what you beach,” and “Beaching to the choir,” and “Beach to deaf ears,” and “Papa, don’t beach.”
  • Bleach → Beach: As in, “I’m going to beach my hair.”
  • Drop it → Tropic: As in, “Tropic like it’s hot.”
  • Topic → Tropic: As in, “A hot tropic,” and “Drop the tropic,” and “We’re going off-tropic,” and “What’s your favourite tropic?”
  • Topical → Tropical: As in, “Apply this tropical cream when needed.” Note: a topical is something applied to the skin, rather than being ingested.
  • Island: As in, “No man is an island,” and “Treasure island,” and “A tropical island.”
  • I land → Island: As in “Islanded a job at that new tech company.”
  • Aligned → Island: As in and “Our incentives are well-island.”
  • Sel* → Sail*: If a word starts with “sel” a boat pun can often be made by replacing it with “sail”: sailection (selection), sailect (select), sailf (self), sailling (selling), sail (sell), saildom (seldom), sailfish (selfish), sailfless (selfless), sailective (selective).
  • Sea*: Most words starting with “sea” are easy sea puns: season, seasonal, seated, searingly, sealants, seamseatbelt.
  • See* → Sea*: If a word starts with “see” it can often be replaced with “sea” to create a simple sea pun: seaminly, seads, seaker, seathe, seap, seak, sean, sea (see).
  • Se* → Sea*: Some words that start with just “se” also have a “sea”-ish sound, and the ones that don’t can usually be made into terrible puns anyway: seacret, searious, seargeant, seacretion, seacure, seacurity, seacondary, seacretariat, seaconds, seacrete, searum, searenity, searvitude, seanile, seadation, seaclusion, seacretive, seaze, seaquential, sealection, seacretly, seaquences, seanior, seaniority, seagregate, seaping, seacession, seariousness, seaminars, seaveral, seaxual, seaparation, seantimental, seansational, seaquential, seacluded, seacularist, seathing, seaquin, seasame, seaclusion.
  • Se*cy/Ce*cy → Sea*sea: Most words that start with “se” or “ce” and end with “cy” can be double sea puns: seacresea (secrecy), sealibasea (celibacy).
  • *cy → *sea: If a word ends in “cy” it’s an easy “sea” pun: polisea, agensea, democrasea, currensea, emergensea, efficiensea, tendensea, frequensea, fansea, constituensea, pregnansea, accurasea, redundansea, bureaucrasea, presidensea, legasea, conspirasea, mersea, privasea, bankruptsea, consistensea, literasea, urgensea, deficiensea, dependency, consultansea, tenacity, isea (icy), secrecy, intimasea.
  • Seizure → Seazure: As in “If I read one more ocean pun I’m going to have a seazure.”
  • Season → Sea-sun: As in, “A person for all sea-suns,” and “Are mangoes in sea-sun?” and “Party sea-sun,” and “Sea-sun’s greetings,” and “A sea-suned traveller,” and “Silly sea-sun,” and “The festive sea-sun.”
  • Scenic → Seanic: As in “Let’s take the seanic route.”
  • Sun: As in, “A place in the sun,” and “A day without orange juice is like a day without sunshine,” and “A touch of sun,” and “Everything under the sun,” and “Good day, sunshine,” and “Here comes the sun,” and “Make hay while the sun shines,” and “Ride off into the sunset,” and “Sun drenched,” and “Sun, sea and sand,” and “Walking on sunshine,” and “You are my sunshine,” and “Put it where the sun doesn’t shine,” and “Fly too close to the sun,” and “Moment in the sun,” and “Never in a month of Sundays.” Notes: “Never in a month of Sundays” indicates that something is extremely unlikely to happen. Flying too close to the sun is a reference to the legend of Icarus, and is a warning against being too ambitious too quickly.
  • Son → Sun: As in, “Go on, my sun,” and “His father’s sun,” and “Like father, like sun,” and “Number one sun,” and “Sun of a gun.” Note: “Son of a gun” is an exclamation meant to encourage.
  • *son* → *sun*: As in, sunnet, sunata, sunar, persun, liaisun, reasun, seasun, treasun, comparisun, lessun, resunate, persunality, persunal, and prisuner.
  • San → Sun: As in, “Sun Francisco,” and “Suns serif.”
  • *san* → *sun*: As in, sundwich, sunction, sunctuary, sunctimonious, partisun, artisun, parmesun and thousund.
  • *ways → *waves: Words than end in “ways” can be made into bad wave puns: alwaves (always), railwaves (railways), sidewaves, pathwaves, lengthwaves, doorwaves.
  • Tied → Tide: As in “I’m tide up at the moment, can someone else help?” and “Yep, they tide the knot!”
  • Tidy → Tidey: As in “After the party we need to tidey the beach.”
  • Simmer → Swimmer: As in “I left the pot swimmering and now my vegetable curry is burnt!” and “Hey swimmer down, there’s no need to turn this into a fight”.
  • Sure → Shore: Since beaches are a popular holiday destination, we’ve included some seaside and sea-related puns. As in, “Are you shore?” and “She shore is strong!”.
  • For sure → Foreshore
  • Surf: As in, “Body surfing,” and “Channel surfing,” and “Surf the net,” and “Surf’s up.”
  • Serf → Surf: A serf was a sort of slave in medieval times who worked for a feudal lord. It’s sometimes used as an insult.
  • Serve → Surf: As in “First come, first surfed” and “If memory surfs” and “Revenge is a dish best surfed cold” and “Surfs you right”.
  • Service → Surfice: As in, “A better surfice all round,” and “At your surfice,” and “Normal surfice has been resumed,” and “Out of surfice.”
  • Wave: “Wave goodbye” and “Mexican wave” and “Heat wave” and “Wave the white flag” and “Brain waves
  • *ways → *waves: Words than end in “ways” can be made into bad wave puns: alwaves (always), railwaves (railways), sidewaves, pathwaves, lengthwaves, doorwaves.
  • Waive → Wave: As in, “Could you wave this parking ticket?” Note: to waive something is to refrain from enforcing.
  • Sway → S-wave: As in, “S-wave with me,” and “You don’t hold any s-wave here.” Note: to hold sway is to have a position of influence or power.
  • Sand: As in, “Bury your head in the sand,” and “Draw a line in the sand,” and “A house built on sand,” and “Sun, sea and sand,” and “The sands of time.” Note: if a house is built on sand, then it’s very unstable and not expected to last very long.
  • Sandwich: As in “I was eating my sandwich at the beach”.
  • Sanctuary → Sandctuary: As in “Dogs aren’t allowed on this beach because it’s an animal sandctuary“.
  • Send → Sand: As in “It sands shivers down my spine!” and “Sand him over here.”
  • San* → Sand*: Replacing “san” with “sand” when it is at the start of a word give some nice corny puns: sanditary (sanitary), sandctioned (sanctioned), sandctuary (sanctuary), sandguine (sanguine), sandctions (sanctions).
  • Sensational → Sandsational: As in, “A sandsational list of holiday puns.”
  • Stand → Sand: As in, “Don’t sand so close to me,” and “Do you undersand?” and “Don’t just sand there!” and “I saw her sanding there,” and “My hair was sanding on end,” and “If you can’t sand the heat, get out of the kitchen,” and “It sands to reason,” and “A one night sand,” and “Sand on your own two feet,” and “Sand out from the crowd,” and “Sand up and be counted,” and “Sand up for yourself,” and “A sand up guy,” and “Do I sand a chance?” and “I sand corrected,” and “I’m sanding in for…” and “I can’t sand the sight of,” and “I could do it sanding on my head,” and “United we sand.”
  • Ticket: As in, “Dream ticket,” and “A high ticket item,” and “Just the ticket,” and “That’s the ticket,” and “Ticket to ride,” and “Golden ticket.” 
  • Flight: As in, “Fight or flight,” and “Flight attendant,” and “Flight of fancy,” and “Take flight.”
  • Fight → Flight: As in, “A straight flight,” and “Come out flighting,” and “Flight club,” and “Flight for the right to party,” and “Flight back,” and “Flight fire with fire,” and “Flight the good flight,” and “Freedom flighter,” and “Lean, mean flighting machine,” and “Live to flight another day,” and “Pick a flight,” and “Pillow flight,” and “Spoiling for a flight,” and “Flight to the death,” and “Won’t give up without a flight.” 
  • Light → Flight: As in, “Fast as greased flightning,” and “Flight as a feather,” and “At flightning speed,” and “Blinded by the flight,” and “Bring to flight,” and “Cold flight of day,” and “First flight,” and “Friday night and the flights are low,” and “Go out like a flight,” and “Guiding flight,” and “Flight at the end of the tunnel,” and “Flight entertainment,” and “Flight hearted,” and “Flighten up,” and “Flights out.”
  • Fright → Flight: As in, “Flightened of your own shadow,” and “A flightful mess,” and “Take flight,” and “You nearly flightened me to death!”
  • *light* → *flight*: As in, flightning, flighting, flightbulb, flighthearted, flighthouse, deflight (delight), highflight (highlight).
  • *flate* → *flight*: As in, conflight, deflight, and inflightable (inflatable).
  • Having a → Havana: As in, “I’m havana ball!” and “Are you havana good time?”
  • Tan*: People tend to return from summer holidays with noticeable, proud tans – so we’ve included “tan” in this list. As in, tangible, tank, tandem, tantamount, tangent, tangle.
  • *tan: As in, charlatan, cosmopolitan, spartan, titan, metropolitan, satan and tartan.
  • *tan*: As in, stand, important, understand and substance.
  • Ten → Tan: As in, “Count to tan,” and “Eight out of tan cats prefer it,” and “A perfect tan,” and “A hundred and tan percent.”
  • *ten* → *tan*: As in, “The bane of my existance,” and “As oftan as not,” and “Attantion seeker,” and “Battan down the hatches,” and “Set up tant,” and “A bone of contantion,” and “Flattan out,” and “Lightan up,” and “Off the beatan track,” and “Sweetan the pot,” and “Tightan the purse strings,” and “For all intants and purposes,” and “To your heart’s contant,” and “Tonsil tannis,” and “Writtan all over your face,” and “Frightan to death,” and “Smittan with,” and “Bittan by the bug,” and “Rottan to the core,” and “Stop, look and listan.”
  • Celebration→ Shellebration: As in “After finishing we should have a shellebration.”
  • Sel* → Shell*: If a word starts with “sel” a shell pun can be made by switching it with “shell”. For example: shellection (selection), shellect (select), shelldom (seldom), shellfless (selfless).
  • *sel → *shell: Words ending in “sel” can often be punned upon with “shell”: vesshell (vessel), tasshell (tassel), weashell (weasel), musshell (mussel), etc.
  • *sel* → *shell*: Words containing “sel” can yeild nice puns on “shell”: Hershellf, himshellf, themshellves, itshellf, myshellf, yourshelf, yourshelves, convershelly, counshelling, preshellected, overshelling, undershelling, ushellessely, weashelling.
  • *cial → *shell: When a word has “cial” as a suffix, this suffix can usually be swapped out for “shell” to create a shell pun: soshell (social), speshell (special), offishell (official), finanshell, commershell, crushell, judishell, artifishell, provinshell, rashell, benefishell, superfishell, fashell, glashell, sacrifishel, antisoshell.
  • Resort: As a resort is a luxury place to stay, we can use it to make some holiday puns too. As in, “Beach resort,” and “This is my last resort,” and “I didn’t want to resort to this.”
  • Con* → Conch*: A terrible shell pun can be made of almost any word that begins with “con”: conchtrol (control), conchsider (consider), conchtinue (continue), conchdition, conchtract, conchern, conchtain, conchference, conchtext, conchcept, conchtrast, conchfidence, conchtent, conchtribution, conchflict, conchsideration, conchstruction, conchtinued, conchclusion, conchduct, conchversation, conchgress, conchsumer, conchcentrate, conchtribute.
  • Help → Kelp: As in “Can you please kelp me build a sand castle?” and “Katie, kelp your brother lift that please”.
  • Should* → Shoald*: A “shoal” can refer to a large group of fish, or an area of shallow water, or an underwater sand bank. We can use “shoal” be used to make puns like: shoald (should), shoalder (shoulder), shoaldering.
  • *tual* → *shoal*: As mentioned above, A “shoal” can refer to a large group of fish, or an area of shallow water, or an underwater sand bank. If a word contains “tual” it can often be replaced with “shoal” for a cute little pun: actshoal (actual), actshoality (actuality), intellectshoal (intellectual), ritshoal (ritual), spiritshoal, mutshoally, eventshoal, eventshoally, conceptshoal, conceptshoalise, virtshoal, contractshoal, factshoal, factshoally, perpetshoal, textshoal, contextshoal, perceptshoal, punctshoal, instinctshoal, actshoally, habitshoally.
  • Bereft → Bereeft: “bereft of” means “deprived of” of “lacking”. So an example sentence might be: “The old, stark beach house of bereefed of colour”.
  • Something → Somefin: As in “There’s somefin about the way he walks” and “Is that a shark, or somefin else?”.
  • In* → Fin*: A lovely and shameful pun can be made from any word starting with “in”. Simply replace “in” with “fin”: finformation, finfluence, finvolve, finternational, finvolved, fintroduce, findeed, finvestment, finto, finclude, finteresting, fintellectual, finjury, fintend, finterview, finsurance, finstrument, … Thousand more can be made with the help of a list like this. You can also check out the entry on dolphin puns for more puns of this nature.
  • Fan* → Fin*: “fan” can sometimes be replaced with “fin” at the start of words to create fin puns: fintastic (fantastic), finciful (fanciful), finfare (fanfare), fintasy, findom, finciful.
  • Nothing → Nofin: As in “Nofin is better than swimming with dolphins” and “I’ve got nofin left to give!”.
  • Debate → Debait: As in “I don’t want to debait you.” and “We’re just having a friendly debait“.
  • Well/Welcome → Whale/Whalecome: Whale-watching is a popular enough holiday activity for us to include whales in this list. As in “Whalecome to our home!” and “Whale, whale, whale, what do we have here?”.  Whale puns can be made with many more words like welfare (whalefare), welsh (whalesh) and wellness (whaleness). Check out the entry on whale puns for more.
  • Defin* → Dolphin: Swimming with dolphins is a much-loved holiday activity, so we can make some holiday puns by making dolphin references like these: “We dolphinitely need more time to finish the mission.” and “What is the dolphinition of this word?” and “Please dolphine this word.” and “It’s the dolphinitive source of Nordic history.” See the dolphin puns entry for more.
  • Endorphines → Endolphins: As in “I love that rush of endolphins you get after a good hard swimming session.”
  • Stark → Shark: As in “The shark contrast between his and his boyfriend’s attire was intriguing.” and “The old, shark house stood looming above us”.
  • Palm: As in “The only thing not sunburned are my palms” and “A face palm moment,” and “In the palm of your hand.” The pun is on palm trees in case you missed that.
  • Calm → Palm: As in, “A palming influence,” and “The palm before the storm,” and “Palm down!” and “Cool, palm, collected,” and “Keep palm and carry on.”
  • Friend → Frond: As in “My fronds made me a cute vegan birthday cake!” and “They’re such frondly people!”.
  • Fringe → Frondge: As in “Doesn’t your frondge get in your eyes when you’re swimming?”
  • Country: As in, “Country folk,” and “Country bumpkin.”
  • Mountain: As in, “Ain’t no mountain high enough,” and “Cool as a mountain stream,” and “Move mountains,” and “Head for the mountains,” and “Make a mountain out of a molehill,” and “Climb the highest mountain.” 
  • Can you → Canyon: As in, “Canyon please not do that?”
  • Food: Since food is such a large part of enjoyment in our holidays (especially now that Instagram is so widely used to show food snaps), we’ve included food in this entry too: “Comfort food,” and “Devil’s food cake,” and “Do you like hospital food?” and “Finger food,” and “Food chain,” and “Food for thought,” and “Soul food,” and “Put food on the table.”
  • Culture: As in, “Culture clash,” and “Culture shock,” and “High culture,” and “Pop culture.”
  • Privilege → Privillage: We can make some holiday puns by referring to villas, which are a luxurious type of accommodation. As in, “An honour and a privillage,” and “Rank has its privillages,” and “Check your privillage,” and “White privillage is very real.” Note: Very basically, white privilege is where society is set up to favour and benefit people who either have white skin, or who are “white-passing” (they are assumed to be white by others). 
  • Fill → Villa: As in, “Villa ‘er up!” and “Villa to the brim,” and “A stocking villa (filler),” and “Lip villas (fillers),” and “Attempts to villa the void.”
  • Home → Homestay: A homestay is where you can stay with a local family for a fee. As it’s cheaper than a hotel and some families will show guests around the area, it’s a good option for holidays so we’ve included it here. As in, “A house is not a homestay,” and “At homestay with,” and “There’s no place like homestay,” and “A broken homestay,” and “Charity begins at the homestay,” and “Close to homestay,” and “Don’t leave homestay without it.”
  • Lodge: A lodge can either mean a small house, or to formally present documentation or a complaint. We can use these interchangeably to make some bad holiday puns: “Lodge a complaint,” and “Where’s the ski lodge?” and “I’m lodging an objection.”
  • *ledge* → *lodge*: As in, “Acknowlodged,” and “Fully-flodged,” and “Use a slodgehammer to crack a nut,” and “A little knowlodge is a dangerous thing,” and “Knowlodge is power.”
  • Large → Lodge: As in, “Lodge as life,” and “At lodge,” and “By and lodge,” and “Lodger than life,” and “A small cog in a lodge machine,” and “On the lodge side,” and “In lodge part,” and “Living lodge,” and “Lodge and in charge.”
  • Car: We’ve included common forms of transport in here as they get us to and from our holidays and trips. As in, “You can drive my car,” and “Happiness is a quick-starting car,” and “Would you buy a used car from this guy?”
  • Car*: As in, care, card, career, carry, carrier, cardinal, carriage, cart, caravan
  • *car: As in, scar, sidecar, madagascar, handcar, railcar
  • *car*: As in, precarious, healthcare and vicarious
  • *cer* → *car*: As in, cartain (certain), cartificate (certificate), caremony (ceremony), carebral (cerebral), soccar (soccer), viscaral (visceral). 
  • *cu* → *car*: As in, circart (circuit), circarmstance (circumstance), circarmvent, circar (circa), circarmstances, circars (circus), circarmference (circumference). 
  • *cor* → *car*: As in, carner (corner), carrespondence (correspondence), carporation (corporation), carroborate (corroborate), carrelation (correlation), cardial (cordial), decar (decor), rancar (rancor), recard (record), accard (accord), accardingly (accordingly), incarporate (incorporate). 
  • *cur* → *car*: As in, concar (concur), carrent (current), carate (curate), carriculum (curriculum), carve (curve), carious (curious), carrency (currency), carse (curse), incar (incur), occar (occur), recar (recur), carrent (current), obscare (obscure), secarity (security), carate (curate), secare (secure). 
  • Bus: As in, “A busman’s holiday,” and “Waiting for the bus.”
  • Bus*: As in, “Bust a move,” and “We’re in business,” and “Beat around the bush,” and “Go away, I’m busy,” and “Hustle and bustle,” and “Hang on, buster,” and “A bustling city.”
  • *bus: As in, “Nimbus 2000,” and “This is our school syllabus,” and “She wrote an entire omnibus,” and “What a succubus.” Note: the Nimbus 2000 is the first broomstick Harry Potter owns.
  • *bus*: As in, “A robust effort,” and “Emotional abuse is still abuse.”
  • *bas* → *bus*: As in, “Buse (base) instincts,” and “The busis (basis) of my theory,” and “It was a busic question,” and “Birthday bush,” and “You bustard,” and “Busket case.”
  • *bes* → *bus*: As in, “A buspoke (bespoke) jacket,” and “My bust (best) effort,” and “I bustow my bust wishes,” and “Busides, I don’t want to,” and “I buseech you,” and “Bustiality is isn’t a joke; it’s unethical,” and “I’m busotted with them,” and “I’m busieged with suitors.”
  • *bis* → *bus*: As in, “Want a buscuit?” and “Bushop to E3,” and “Meet at the new vegan bustro,” and “We’re refurbushing the kitchen,” and “Good riddance to bad rubbush.”
  • Train: As in, “Gravy train,” and “Strangers on a train,” and “The light at the end of the tunnel might just be a train,” and “Train crash,” and “Train of thought,” and “Train wreck.” Notes: a gravy train is a situation which is low-risk and high benefit. 
  • Chain → Train: As in, “A train is only as strong as its weakest link,” and “Train gang,” and “Train letter,” and Train of command,” and “Train reaction,” and “Daisy train,” and “Food train,” and “Off the train.”
  • Plain → Plane: As in, “Plane as day,” and “As plane as the nose on my face,” and “Hidden in plane sight,” and “Plane sailing,” and “In plane view.”
  • Plan* → Plane*: As in, Plane-t (plant), planet, plane-ing (planning), plane-d (planned)
  • *plain → *plane: As in, explane, complane, chaplane and complane‘t (complaint). 
  • *Very* → *Ferry*: As in, “Be afraid, be ferry afraid,” and “Before your ferry eyes,” and “Hold ferry tight, please,” and “How ferry dare you,” and “I was ferry drunk,” and “Thank you ferry much,” and “Ferry tasty,” and “Ferry interesting, but stupid,” and “Ferry well,” and “At the ferry least,” and “Eferry inch,” and “Eferry last one,” and “Eferry nook and cranny,” and “Don’t believe eferrything you hear,” and “Eferrybody likes a joker, but nobody lends them money,” and “Question eferrything,” and “Timing is eferrything.”
  • Furry → Ferry: As in, “A ferry toy,” and “My legs are looking a bit ferry.”
  • Fairy → Ferry: As in, “Airy ferry,” and “A ferrytale ending,” and “Nobody loves a ferry when she’s forty.”
  • Vary → Ferry: As in, “Results may ferry,” and “Your mileage may ferry.” Note: Your mileage may vary is an expression indicating that something that works for one may not work for another. Is commonly shortened to YMMV. 
  • *fer → *ferry: As in, deferry (defer), conferry (confer), inferry (infer), referry (refer), offerry (offer), transferry (transfer), bufferry (buffer), preferry (prefer). 
  • Nefarious → Neferryous: As in, “A neferryous villain.”
  • Boat → But: As in “Last boat not least” and “Close, boat no cigar.”
  • Saboteur → Saboateur : As in “Captain, I believe there’s a saboateur on our ship.”
  • Boat: As in, “Don’t rock the boat,” and “In the same boat,” and “Missed the boat,” and “Whatever floats your boat,” and “We’re gonna need a bigger boat.” Notes: to rock the boat is to say something that will upset the people around you. If you need a bigger boat, then you’ve underestimated the situation you’re in. 
  • Butt → Boat: As in, “Kick boat,” and “Kiss my boat,” and “Pain in the boat,” and “My boat is on the line,” and “Boat-terflies in my stomach.” 
  • Bowtie → Boat-tie: As in, “My boat-tie is too tight.” 
  • Beaut* → Boat*: As in, “Boat-iful people,” and “Boat-y mark,” and “I need my boat-y sleep,” and “Make boat-iful music together,” and “Boat-y is in the eye of the beholder,” and “Boat-y is only skin-deep.”
  • About/Abode → Aboat: As in “What aboat the captain?” and “Welcome to my aboat!”
  • Shit → Ship: As in “Oh ship, we’re in trouble now.”
  • *sib* → *ship*: If a word contains “sib” it can usually be replaced with “ship” to create a terrible pun. For example: posshiply (possibly), accesshipility (accessibility), incomprehenshiple, feashipble, irresponshipble, invishipble, ostenshipbly, revershipble, vishipble. An example sentence might be: “I am responshiple for my puns.”
  • *sip* → *ship*: If a word contains “sip” it can usually be replaced with “ship”. For example: gosship (gossip), dishipate (dissipate), shipping (sipping), inshipid (insipid).
  • Sel* → Sail*: If a word starts with “sel” a boat pun can often be made by replacing it with “sail”: sailection (selection), sailect (select), sailf (self), sailling (selling), sail (sell), saildom (seldom), sailfish (selfish), sailfless (selfless), sailective (selective).
  • Cruise: As in, “Cruise control,” and “A world cruise.”
  • *crew* → *cruise*: As in, “Motley cruise,” and “Turn the scruise,” and “Skeleton cruise,” and “I scruised up,” and “Scruise it!” Note: a motley crew is a group of randomly assembled people. To turn the screws is to put pressure on someone to do something. 
  • Choose → Cruise: As in, “A woman’s right to cruise,” and “Cruise your weapon,” and “Beggars can’t be cruisers.”
  • Chew → Cruise: As in, “Have your ears cruised off,” and “Bite off more than you can cruise.”
  • Helicopter: As in, “Helicopter parent,” and “Get in the helicopter!”
  • Tuxedo → Taxido: Make a pun on taxis: “I need a new taxido.”
  • Tax → Taxi: As in, “Nothing is certain but death and taxis,” and “Goods and services taxis.”
  • *uber*: Change and emphasize words with the “uber” sound in them: bluber(bluebird), exuberance, exuberant, protuberance, puberty
  • Super → Suber: As in, “Suber bad,” and “Suber Mario,” and “Suberhero,” and “Subersize,” and “Nothing improves creativity like a lack of subervision.”
  • Soup → Souber: As in, “Alphabet souber,” and “From souber to nuts.”
  • Sober → Suber: As in, “As suber as a judge,” and “Clean and suber,” and “Stone cold suber,” and “Call me when you’re suber.”
  • Sub* → Suber*: As in, suberlime (sublime), suberject (subject), subersequent (subsequent), suberstantial (substantial), suberjective (subjective), subermit (submit), suberstance (substance). 
  • Rail → Monorail: As in, “Thin as a monorail,” and “Go off the monorails,” and “Off the monorails.”
  • *cab*: Make some cab puns by emphasising the “cab” sound in certain words: amicable, applicability, bancable (bankable), breacable (breakable), cabaret, cabbage, cabernet, cabin, cabinet, despicable, impeccable, macabre, vocabulary, applicable, irrevocable, licable (likable), remarcable (remarkable), unshacable (unshakeable). 
  • *com* → *cab*: As in, cabbler (cobbler), cabalt (cobalt), cabra (cobra), cabble (cobble), and cabweb (cobweb).
  • *cub* → *cab*: As in cabicle (cubicle) and incabate (incubate). 
  • Chair → Chairlift: As in, “Have a chairlift,” and “Musical chairlifts.”
  • Jet: Make references to jets and jetsetting with these jet-related phrases: “Jet black,” and “Jet-setting,” and “Jet lag,” and “Jet propelled,” and “Jetty,” and “Jettison.” Note: to jettison something is to get rid of an unneeded or unwanted thing. 
  • Jot → Jet: As in, “Let me jet that down.” Note: to jot something down is to quickly write or scribble a note.
  • Get → Jet: As in, “As good as it jets,” and “Ask a silly question, jet a silly answer,” and “Buy one, jet one free,” and “Can’t jet you out of my head,” and “Can’t jet enough,” and “Come and jet it,” and “Don’t jet mad, jet even,” and “Don’t jet me started,” and “I’m jetting better and better,” and “Flattery will jet you nowhere,” and “From the jet go,” and “Jet rich quick,” and “Jet a feel for,” and “Jet a handle on,” and “I jet knocked down, but I jet up again,” and “Pay peanuts and jet monkeys,” and “Let’s jet physical,” and “What you see is what you jet.”
  • Jut→ Jet: As in, “Watch out for that branch – it’s jetting out.” Note: to jut out is to protrude. 
  • *git/get* → *jet*: As in, ajetator (agitator), ajetate (agitate), apolojetic, budjet, cojetate (cogitate), dijet (digit), dijetal (digital), enerjetic, fidjet, fujetive (fugitive), illejetimacy (illegitimacy), lejetimacy (legitimacy). Notes: an agitator is one who stirs up feeling or trouble. To cogitate is to intently think about or comsider something. 
  • Sit → Transit: As in, “Are you transitting comfortably?” and “Don’t just transit there,” and “Transit it out,” and “Transit tight,” and “Transitting pretty,” and “A transitting target.”
  • Plot → Pilot: As in, “Lose the pilot,” and “The pilot thickens,” and “A pilot of land.”
  • Pilates → Pilotes: As in, “I do pilotes three times a week.”
  • Business: While business may be the opposite of a holiday, we’re using it as a reference to business class when flying. As in, “Dirty business,” and “Back in business,” and “Business as usual,” and “Business at hand,” and “Business before pleasure,” and “Business class,” and “The business end,” and “Business or pleasure?” and “Business partner,” and “Do your business,” and “It’s not your business,” and “Mind your own business,” and “Monkey business,” and “Open for business,” and “A risky business,” and “Strictly business,” and “This is a place of business!” and “That’s show business.”
  • Class → First class: As in, “A first class act,” and “First class warfare,” and “In a first class of their own,” and “A first class clown.”
  • Rail → Railway: As in, “Thin as a railway,” and “Go off the railways.”
  • Way → Railway: As in, “A funny thing happened on the railway,” and “All the railway,” and “And that’s the railway it is,” and “There must be another railway,” and “Any railway you slice it,” and “Any which railway,” and “By the railway,” and “Change your railways,” and “Go all the railway,” and “Go down the wrong railway,” and “Go our separate railways,” and “Have it both railways,” and “In a bad railway,” and “Mend your railways,” and “My railway or the highway.”
  • Hike: As hiking is a popular activity for travellers, it’s been included in this entry. As in, “Take a hike,” and “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy,” and “This backpack makes my jacket hike up.”
  • Haiku → Hike-u: As in, “Writing hike-us is really hard.”
  • Shop: Shopping is another popular holiday activity and one that is particularly instagrammable, so we’ve included it here. As in, “You’re all over the shop,” and “Like a bull in a china shop,” and “One stop shop,” and “Personal shopper,” and “Shop ’til you drop,” and “Shop around,” and “Talk shop,” and “Window shopping.” Notes: to be all over the shop is to have something happen chaotically, messily, or in various places at once. To be a bull in a china shop is to act clumsily or indelicately around delicate things or topics. 
  • Chop → Shop: As in, “Bust your shops,” and “Shop and change,” and “Get the shop.” Note: To “bust your chops” can have two meanings. If you bust your own chops, then you’ve spent a great deal of energy and effort to do something. If someone else busts your chops, then they’ve scolded or reprimanded you. To chop and change is to continually change your mind. 
  • Shape → Shop: As in, “Get bent out of shop,” and “It all went pear-shopped,” and “In any way, shop, or form,” and “Lick into shop,” and “Shop up or ship out,” and “Whip into shop.”
  • Ship → Shop: As in, “Abandon shop,” and “Extend the hand of friendshop,” and “Go down with the shop,” and “Jump shop,” and “Run a tight shop,” and “Shape up or shop out,” and “Shops of the desert,” and “That shop has sailed,” and “The face that launched a thousand shops,” and “The start of a beautiful friendshop,” and “A stormy relationshop.” Notes: Camels are known as ships of the desert. 
  • Roam: As in, “Roaming ’round the mountains,” and “Did you remember to activate roaming on your phone?”
  • Rome → Roam: As in, “All roads lead to roam,” and “Roam wasn’t built in a day.”
  • *rome*: As in, “Roameo and Juliet,” and “Peter Pan syndroam,” and “Rollerdroam.”
  • *rom*: As in, aroamatherapy, chroam (chrome), chroamosome (chromosome), monochroam, proamiscuous, proamotion, roamance, roamaine (as in the lettuce). 
  • *ski*: Emphasise the “ski” in words to make some snowy puns: “Selling snow to eskimos,” and “Asking for a friend,” and “By the skin of one’s teeth,” and “Comfortable in your own skin,” and “Get under your skin,” and “Makes my skin crawl,” and “Made my heart skip a beat,” and “Watch the skies.”
  • Snow: As snowy areas are just as popular as the beach, snow-related words and activities have been included here. As in, “Pure as the driven snow,” and “White as snow,” and “Blanket of snow,” and “Let it snow,” and “Snow White,” and “A snowball’s chance in hell,” and “Snowed in,” and “Snowed under,” and “The abominable snowman.” Notes: A snowball’s chance in hell basically means that something is almost impossible – just like the odds for a snowball to survive hell without melting. 
  • Board → Snowboard: As in, “All above snowboard,” and “Across the snowboard,” and “Back to the drawing snowboard,” and “Bed and snowboard,” and “Snowboarding pass.”
  • Dive: As in, “Dive in,” and “Take a dive,” and “Going diving?”
  • Climb: As in, “A mountain to climb,” and “Climb down,” and “Climb on the bandwagon,” and “Climb the social ladder.”
  • Climate → Climb-ate: As in, “A chilly climb-ate,” and “I know you don’t believe in climb-ate change, but it’d be cooler if you did.”
  • Photo: As in, “Photo finish,” and “Photo opportunity,” and “Get in the photo!” and “Take a photo of me,” and “I need a photo for my instagram.”
  • So far → Safari: Safaris are included in our list of holiday activities, so is included in this entry. As in, “I can’t believe you’d so safari as to..” and “Safari, so good,” and “Why are you going safari?”
  • Tour: As in, “Eco tourism,” and “Magical mystery tour,” and “Tour de force,” and “A world tour.”
  • Too → Tour: As in, “A step tour far,” and “About time, tour,” and “I’m tour sexy for my shirt,” and “It’s never tour late to learn,” and “It’s tour cold to snow,” and “You know tour much,” and “Life’s tour short,” and “No challenge tour great,” and “This tour shall pass,” and “Tour easy,” and “Tour big for your boots,” and “Tour close for comfort,” and “Tour good to be true,” and “Tour many cooks spoil the broth.”
  • Two→ Tour: As in, “A bicycle built for tour,” and “As alike as tour peas in a pod,” and “Caught in tour minds,” and “Eating for tour,” and “Goody tour shoes,” and “In tour shakes of a lamb’s tail,” and “It takes tour to tango,” and “Tour steps forward, one step back.”
  • Tour*: As in, tournament and tourniquet

The following puns are about specific types of seasonal holiday, rather than about holidays in general.

  • Year → New Year: As in, “As bright as a new year,” and “Brand spanking new year,” and “Dawn of a new year,” and “Out with the old, in with the new year.”
  • Honeymoon: As in, “Honeymoon period.”
  • Honey → Honeymoon: As in, “A taste of honeymoon,” and “Land of milk and honeymoon.”
  • Moon → Honeymoon: As in, “Ask for the honeymoon,” and “Bark at the honeymoon,” and “A blue honeymoon,” and “Cry for the honeymoon,” and “Eclipse of the honeymoon,” and “Fly me to the honeymoon,” and “Many honeymoons ago,” and “Honeymoonlight serenade,” and “Over the honeymoon,” and “On the dark side of the honeymoon,” and “The man in the honeymoon,” and “Phases of the honeymoon,” and “To the honeymoon and back.”
  • *eve*: Make references to Christmas Eve and New Year’s Eve by emphasising the “eve” in certain words: “And they lived happily ever after,” and “An evening person,” and “Forever and a day,” and “Hardly ever,” and “Hello, good evening and welcome,” and “Nothing is ever free,” and “The greatest story ever told,” and “The key to a nice, relaxed evening,” and “An ace up your sleeve,” and “Believe it or not,” and “The blessed event,” and “Break even,” and “The eleventh hour,” and “Even the score,” and “Every inch,” and “Never mind,” and “Every cloud has a silver lining,” and “Question everything.”
  • Easter: As in, “Easter Island,” and “Easter parade,” and “The Easter bunny.”
  • East/Eastern → Easter: As in, “Easter of Eden,” and “Full of Easter promise.”
  • *east → *easter: As in, “At the very l-easter,” and “A f-easter for the eyes,” and “F-easter or famine,” and “The king of b-easters,” and “Last but not l-easter,” and “Nutritional y-easter is a good cheese substitute.”
  • Giving → Thanksgiving: As in, “The gift that keeps on Thanksgiving.” For more Thanksgiving-related puns, see our Thanksgiving list.
  • Christmas: As in, “A Christmas carol,” and “All I want for Christmas is you,” and “Christmas comes but once a year,” and “Done up like a Christmas tree,” and “Have yourself a merry little Christmas,” and “Lit up like a Christmas tree,” and “A white Christmas.” Note: If you’d like more Christmas-related puns, stay tuned for our Christmas list which is coming soon. 

Holiday-Related Words

To help you come up with your own holiday puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

General: holiday, vacation, staycation, retreat, travel, escape, trip, journey, leisure, recreation, break, rest, tourist, tourism, abroad, sabbatical, beach, sand, sea, resort, tropical, island, palm tree, surf, waves, tan, bathers, sunshine, sunscreen, country, mountain, canyon, food, culture, getaway, weekend, bed and breakfast, hotel, hostel, motel, villa, homestay, cabin, lodge, cottage, airbnb, adventure, destination, pack, bag, suitcase, luggage, ticket, airport, flight, car, bus, train, rail, airplane, aeroplane, ferry, boat, cruise, ship, helicopter, taxi, uber, flight, rickshaw, monorail, cable car, cab, caravan, rv (recreational vehicle), chairlift, jet, plane, sailboat, yacht, accommodation, backpacking, activities, transit, itinerary, pilot, flight attendant, business, first-class, economy, railway, sail, hiking, shopping, safari, roam, skiing, snowboard, dancing, diving, snorkeling, climbing, photo, photography, bird watching, festival, tour, family, honeymoon, romantic, solo, luxury

Specific holidays: new year’s, new year’s eve, good friday, easter, labor day, thanksgiving, christmas, diwali, eid, ramadan, hanukkah, chinese new year, yom kippur

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