Egg Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on egg puns! 🥚🐣🐔

Eggs are a wildly popular food, with the US alone producing over 105 billion eggs in 2017. They’re celebrated for their cultural and religious significance (as a symbol for birth and new beginnings, especially during Easter) and are loved for their culinary versatility, appearing not only in savory dishes but also sweets like cakes and custard.

Unfortunately, the egg industry is nothing to be celebrated, as it’s an industry based on a system of abuse, neglect and murder. Luckily, we don’t have to support this as there are many substitutes that we can use instead of eggs – if you’re after protein, there are plenty of vegan sources of protein. If you’re wanting to bake, there are vegan egg replacements too. If you want chocolate eggs for Easter, you’re covered there too. Along with there being an abundance of choice on the internet, you’re guaranteed to find something at your local grocery store.

Whether you came here looking for a silly joke for a pun thread or a clever Instagram hashtag, we hope you enjoy this list and leave with the right pun for your needs (and a better understanding of the egg industry).

Egg Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about eggs that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of egg puns:

  • Joke → Yolk: As in, “Inside yolk” and “Yolk’s on you” and “Yolking around.”
  • Oak → Yolk: As in, “A heart of yolk” and “Solid as a yolk” and “Little strokes fell great yolks” and “Mighty yolks from little acorns grow.”
  • Folk → Yolk: As in, “Different strokes for different yolks” and “Show’s over, yolks” and “That’s all, yolks” and “All just yolktales.”
  • I’m lettin’ → Omlettin’: As in, “Omlettin‘ them go” and “Omlettin‘ you have it.” Note: here are some recipes for vegan omelettes.
  • Shell: The following puns are about the shell of the egg, which can be valued for their high calcium content (there are some other foods high in calcium that you can eat instead):
    • Celebration→ Shellebration: As in “After finishing we should have a shellebration.”
    • Shall→ Shell: As in “Shell I compare thee to a summer’s day?” and “He who lives by the sword shell die by the sword.”
    • Sell → Shell: “How many do we have left to shell?”
    • Hell → Shell: “The party last night was a shell of a time.”
  • *eg* → *egg*: We can sneak the word “egg” into words that have similar sounds, like so: “Get a legg on” and “Neggative results” and “Had you pegged as…” and “I begg to differ” and “Where do I beggin?” Other words that could work: leggacy, eggocentric, nutmegg, bootlegg, dregg and integgrity.
  • *ig* → *egg*: We can swap “ig” sounds for “egg” sounds, as in, “Keep on degging (digging)” and “Eggnorance is not bliss” and “You can’t eggnore it forever” and “Choosing to remain eggnorant” and “Eggnite your passion.”
  • *ecc* → *egg*: “A real eggcentric” and “Impeggable (impeccable) taste.”
  • *ex* → *eggs*: As in, “A compleggs situation” and “Indeggsed (indexed) files” and “Better than seggs (sex)” and “Don’t fleggs your muscles here” and “Pure refleggs (reflex)” and “From eggsperience” and “Taken out of conteggst (context)” and “Eggspress post” and “In eggschange.” Other words you could use: eggsploit (exploit), eggstract (extract), eggsercise (exercise), eggsistential (existential), eggserpt (except), eggsample (example), eggsacerbate (exacerbate), eggsamine (examine), eggsact (exact), eggsasperate (exasperate), eggsclusive (exclusive), eggsited (excited), eggsellent (excellent), eggsess (excess), eggsempt (exempt), eggsemplify (exemplify), eggsecution (execution), eggsfoliate (exfoliate), eggshibit (exhibit), eggshaust (exhaust), eggsausted (exhausted), eggsibition (exhibition), eggsilarating (exhilarating), eggshale (exhale), eggsist (exist), eggsit (exit), eggsotic (exotic), eggsorbitant (exorbitant), eggspect (expect), eggsquisite (exquisite), eggstension (extension), eggstrapolate (extrapolate), eggstensive (extensive), eggstraordinary (extraordinary), eggsuberant (exuberant) and eggsude (exude).
  • *ec* → *egg*: As in, “New teggnology” and “Change the subjeggt” and “Be objeggtive” and “High seggurity” and “An effeggtive technique” and “Solar egglipse.” Other words you could use: seggular (secular), feggless (feckless), egglectic (eclectic), eggonomy (economy), eggo (echo), eggology (ecology) and eggstatic (ecstatic).
  • *ac* → *egg*: As in, “Taken into eggount” and “Take eggtion” and “In on the eggt (act)” and “Looking for eggommodation.” Other words you could use: eggnowledge (acknowledge), eggrue (accrue) and eggronym (acronym)
  • *ag* → *egg*: As in, “In the begg (bag)” and “Capture the flegg” and “Tegging along” and “Stop dregging your feet” and “Reggs to riches” and “Snegg (snag) a great deal.” Other words you could use: preggmatic (pragmatic), propeggate (propagate), eggregate (aggregate), eggainst (against), eggnostic (agnostic), egghast (aghast), eggree (agree) and eggreement (agreement).
  • Egg: We’ll finish this section off with some egg-related phrases that are general enough to use as puns: “As sure as eggs is eggs” and “A bad egg” and “Don’t put all your eggs in one basket” and “Nest egg” and “Walking on eggshells” and “Can’t make a cake without breaking some eggs.”
  • Fly → Fry: As in, “Come fry with me” and “Born to fry” and “Frying by the seat of your pants” and “Fry off the handle” and “Off to a frying start” and “Pass with frying colours” and “Go fry a kite” and “Don’t give a frying f*ck” and “Pigs might fry” and “The only way to fry.”
  • Free* → Fry*: As in, “Symbol of frydom” and “Fry as a bird” and “Born fry” and “Breathe fryly” and “Buy one, get one fry” and “Calorie fry” and “Footloose and fancy fry” and “Fry for all” and “Fry enterprise” and “Fry range” and “The best things in life are fry.”
  • Cry → Fry: As in, “A fry for help” and “A shoulder to fry on” and “Fry foul” and “Fry your heart out” and “For frying out loud” and “Don’t fry over spilt milk.”
  • *fra* → *fry*: As in, “Freeze fryme” and “Picture fryme” and “Frymed for the murder of…” and “Please refryne from…”
  • *fre* → *fry*: As in, “Radio fryquency” and “Frydom of the press” and “Like a fryt (freight) train.”
  • Fight → Fryt: As in, “A straight fryt” and “Come out fryting” and “Fryt for the right to party” and “Fryt back” and “Fryting back tears” and “Fryt fire with fire” and “Fryting like cats and dogs” and “Fryt or flight” and “Fryt the good fryt” and “Fryt tooth and nail” and “A fryting chance” and “Fryting fit” and “Freedom fryter” and “Go down fryting” and “Live to fryt another day” and “Picking fryts” and “Pillow fryt” and “Spoiling for a fryt.”
  • Fright → Fryt: As in, “Frytened of your own shadow” and “Frytful mess” and “Take fryt” and “Fryten to death.”
  • Sel* → Shell*: If a word starts with “sel” a shell pun can be made by switching it with “shell”. For example: shellection (selection), shellect (select), shelldom (seldom), shellfless (selfless), shellfish (selfish).
  • *sel → *shell: Words ending in “sel” can often be punned upon with “shell”: vesshell (vessel), tasshell (tassel), weashell (weasel), musshell (mussel), etc.
  • *sel* → *shell*: Words containing “sel” can yeild nice puns on “shell”: Hershellf, himshellf, themshellves, itshellf, myshellf, yourshelf, yourshelves, convershelly, counshelling, preshellected, overshelling, undershelling, ushellessely, weashelling.
  • *cial → *shell: When a word has “cial” as a suffix, this suffix can usually be swapped out for “shell” to create a shell pun: soshell (social), speshell (special), offishell (official), finanshell, commershell, crushell, judishell, artifishell, provinshell, rashell, benefishell, superfishell, fashell, glashell, sacrifishel, antisoshell.
  • *yak* → *yolk*: As in, “Teriyolki tofu” and “A member of the yolkuza.” Note: the yakuza is an organised crime gang based in Japan.
  • Yukata → Yolkata: (note: a yukata is a type of light kimono.)
  • Hatch: These hatch-related phrases can double as egg puns: “Don’t count your chickens before they’ve hatched” and “Down the hatch” and “Hatch a cunning plan.”
  • Hitch → Hatch: As in, “Get hatched” and “Hatch your wagon to a star” and “Went off without a hatch.”
  • Late → Laid: As in, “Better laid than never” and “Catch you laider” and “Fashionably laid” and “Read any good books laidly?” and “Never too laid” and “It’s laider than you think” and “A laid bloomer” and “Laid in the day” and “Sooner rather than laider” and “Too little too laid.”
  • *lad* → *laid*: As in, “Laidy and the Tramp” and “Laidy Luck” and “Laiden with goods” and “Laidling out soup” and “Little laidybug” and “All the single laidies.” Other words that could work: salaid (salad), blaide (blade), accolaide (accolade) and malaidy. Note: a malady is an illness.
  • *knowledge* → *knowlaidge*: As in, “Seeking knowlaidge” and “Acknowlaidge your presence” and “Knowlaidgeable on the topic of” and “Give my acknowlaidgement to.”
  • *lid* → *laid*: As in, “Solaid as a rock” and “Valaid argument” and “Squalaid surroundings.” Other words that could work: invalaid (invalid), holaiday (holiday), consolaidate (consolidate), valaidate (validate) and solaidarity (solidarity).
  • *lat* → *laid*: “Game emulaidor” and “Collaideral damage” and “Plaidform shoes” and “Well-articulaided.” Other words that could work: laideral (lateral), laident (latent), laiditude (latitude), laidency (latency), articulaid (articulate) and conflaid (conflate). Note: to conflate is to bring things together, or to mix them.
  • *lit* → *laid*: These are a bit more of a stretch, but can still work. As in, “In the laiderature” and “I laiderally just said that” and “A laidany (litany) of items” and “The laideral meaning.” Other words: laidigation (litigation), facilaidy (facility), qualaidy (quality), humilaidy (humility), liabilaidy (liability), polaidics (politics), realaidy (reality) and accountabilaidy (accountability).
  • Afriad → Afried: As in, “Afried of your own shadow” and “Afried so” and “Be afried” and “Too afried to ask.”
  • Cried → Fried: As in, “Fried my eyes out.”
  • Pride → Fried: As in, “Bursting with fried” and “Hurt fried” and “Fried and prejudice” and “Fried and joy” and “Swallow your fried” and “Take fried in.”
  • Fired → Fried: As in, “All fried up and ready to go” and “You’re fried!”
  • *fly → *fry: Butterfry (butterfly) and dragonfry (dragonfly).
  • Free → Free range: As in, “As free range as a bird” and “Born free range” and “Buy one, get one free range” and “Free range and easy” and “Free range for all” and “Free range spirit” and “Live free range or die” and “Nothing is ever free range.” Note: unfortunately, “free range” doesn’t mean what most egg consumers think it does. Free range is essentially as harmful to chicken welfare as caged/battery (and all forms of chicken farming will still start with chick culling).
  • Cage: These next few puns are dedicated to the idea of cage eggs, which is a system that provides an extremely unethical and torturous way for hens to live:
    • Age → Cage: As in, “Cage before beauty” and “Cage of consent” and “An awkward cage” and “Come of cage” and “A golden cage” and “In this day and cage” and “Mental cage” and “The cage of reason” and “Through the cages” and “One for the cages.”
    • *age* → *cage*: As in, “Double-cagent” and “Modelling cagency” and “What’s your cagenda?” and “The gay cagenda” and “Cageing gracefully” and “Increase your levercage (leverage)” and “Encage combat!”
    • Decay → Decage: As in, “Tooth decage” and “Falling into decage.”
    • Gauge → Cage: As in, “Fuel cage” and “Trying to cage your reaction.”
  • Flattery → Battery: Related to cage eggs are battery cages, which refers specifically to the housing system that’s used for producing animal byproducts (so it includes but isn’t limited to eggs): “Battery will get you nowhere” and “Imitation is the sincerest form of battery.”
  • Check → Chick: As in, “Chick it out!” and “Chick your sources” and “Double chick” and “Keep in chick” and “Reality chick” and “Take a rainchick” and “Chick up on.”
  • Click → Chick: As in, “Chick bait” and “Chick into place” and “Chick your fingers” and “Double chick” and “We really chicked” and “Point and chick.”
  • Pick → Chick: As in, “A bone to chick” and “Cherry chick” and “Easy chickings” and “Nit chicking” and “Chick a fight” and “Chick a card, any card” and “Chick of the bunch” and “Chick holes in” and “Chick up the pieces” and “Chick up the tab” and “Chick your brains” and “Chick your battles.”
  • Quick → Chick: As in, “Chick as a flash” and “Cut to the chick” and “Fancy a chickie?” and “Get rich chick” and “In chick succession” and “Kiss me chick” and “Chick and dirty” and “Chick off the mark” and “Chick smart” and “A chick study” and “Chick witted” and “Chicker than the eye” and “Lightning chick.”
  • Chuck → Chick: As in, “Chick a sickie,” and “Get chicked out,” and “Chick overboard.”
  • Trick → Chick: As in, “Bag of chicks,” and “Every chick in the book,” and “How’s chicks?” and “Never misses a chick,” and “One chick pony,” and “A chick of the light,” and “Chick or treat!” and “Chicks of the trade,” and “Up to your old chicks.”
  • Thick → Chick: As in, “As chick as thieves,” and “Blood is chicker than water,” and “In the chick of things,” and “The plot chickens,” and “Chick and fast,” and “Through chick and thin,” and “Lay it on chick.”
  • White: The following puns refer to egg whites, which are valued for their low fat content and high protein (here are some other sources of protein):
    • Wide → White: As in, “Open white!” and “The world white web” and “White-eyed” and “Give them a white berth” and “Blow it white open” and “Cast a white net” and “White awake.”
    • Right → White: As in, “A move in the white direction” and “The white to choose” and “All the white moves” and “Animal whites” and “White as rain” and “Bragging whites” and “Civil whites” and “Dead to whites” and “Do alwhite for yourself” and “Fight for your whites” and “Get off on the white foot” and “Hold it white there!” and “Human whites” and “In the white place at the white time” and “Serves you white” and “Moving white along” and “White up your alley” and “White back at you.”
    • What → White: As in, “Do white comes naturally” and “For white it’s worth” and “Guess white?” and “I’ll have white she’s having” and “It is white it is” and “It’s not white it looks like” and “No matter white” and “So white?” and “White a piece of work” and “White are friends for?” and “White does that have to do with anything?”
    • Write → White: As in, “Nothing to white home about” and “Whiter’s block.”
    • Wait → White: As in, “A accident white-ing to happen” and “Good things to those who white” and “Lie in white” and “Ready and white-ing” and “White a minute” and “The white is over” and “Time whites for no-one” and “White in line” and “I can’t white” and “White and see” and “White-ing for the other shoe to drop” and “A white-ing game.”
    • Rite → White: As in, “Perform the last whites” and “White of passage.”
    • Weight → White: As in, “Pull your white” and “Punching above your white” and “Throw your white around” and “Watching your white” and “A white off my mind” and “Worth your white in gold” and “A dead white” and “Give white to” and “Hit above your white” and “The white of the world.”
    • *what* → *white*: somewhite (somewhat), whitesoever (whatsoever), whitenot (whatnot) and whitever (whatever).
  • Crack: The following puns refer to the act of cracking an egg in order to cook it (here are some great egg substitutes you can use in your cooking).
    • *cac* → *crack*: As in, “A crackophony of noise” and “Crackao flavoured.” Other words that could work: cracktus (cactus) and crackle (cackle). Note: a cacophony is a jumbled, chaotic mess of sound.
    • Cricket → Cracket
    • Croc* → Crack*: As in, “Crackodile tears” and “Delicate crackery” and “Potted crackus (crocus)” and “Simmering in the crackpot.” Note: a crocus is a type of flower.
    • Krak* → Crack*: Cracken (kraken) and crackatoa (krakatoa). Note: krakatoa is a volcanic island.
  • Approach → Appoach: As in, “The wrong appoach” and “Appoach the subject” and “A balanced appoach.”
  • Coach → Poach: As in, “Life poach” and “Head poach.”
  • Shamble → Scramble: As in, “A complete scramble” and “In total scrambles.”
  • Gamble → Scramble: As in, “Take a scramble” and “Scrambling addiction.”
  • Ramble → Scramble: As in, “Scrambling on and on” and “They’re funny, but tend to scramble.”
  • Scramble: “They scrambled to their feet.”
  • Then → Hen: As in, “All that and hen some” and “Now and hen” and “And hen there was one” and “That was hen, this is now” and “Right hen and there” and “But hen again…”
  • *hen*: Words than contain “hen” can be silly chicken/hen puns: Apprehend, appre-hen-sion, comprehend, comprehension, comprehensive, hence, henceforth, repre-hen-sible, stonehenge.
  • Comedian → Comedi-hen: As in, “You’re a real comedi-hen” and “Everyone’s a comedi-hen round here.”
  • *han* → *hen*: As in, “Give me your hend (hand),” and “Do you have a hendle (handle) on it?” and “You look so hendsome tonight,” and “Your hendwriting has improved,” and “Their kids are a real hendful,” and “She was raised as an orphen,” and “The elephent in the room,” and “Please enhence the image,” and “I’ve had an epipheny!” and “This is your last chence,” and “Change the chennel.”
  • *hin* → *hen*: As in, “You’re hendering (hindering) me,” and “Doorhenge,” and “Give me a hent (hint),” and “In hendsight (hinsight),” and “You’re a hendrance (hindrance),” and “Change comes from withen,” and “Looking a bit then (thin),” and “Take it on the chen (chin),” and “Got kicked in the shens (shins),” and “Contrary to what you may think, dolphens are mammals,” and “A rush of endorphens,” and “A street urchen.” Note: to hinder is to block someone’s progress or to make something difficult to complete.
  • *hon* → *hen*: As in, “Brutally henest (honest),” and “An henourable mention,” and “Hello, heney (honey).”
  • *hun* → *hen*: As in, “A wild hench (hunch),” and “The henter (hunter) becomes the hented (hunted),” and “One hendred,” and “I’m hengry,” and “That’s not what I henger (hunger) for.”
  • Hen: These hen-related phrases can be used as egg puns: “Don’t let the fox guard the hen-house” and “As scarce as hen’s teeth” and “A mother hen” and “Hen-pecked” and “Hen’s night/party”. Note: to be henpecked is to be bullied or intimidated by a woman.
  • Enough → Un oeuf (pronounced like “enough”): Un oeuf is French for “one egg”, so we’ve included it here as a terribly cheesy pun: “Because life’s complicated un oeuf” and “Close un oeuf” and “Un oeuf is un oeuf” and “Fair un oeuf” and “Hot un oeuf for you?” and “Can’t thank you un oeuf.”
  • Risk → Whisk: This refers to whisking eggs: “A calculated whisk” and “Whisk averse” and “Whisk life and limb” and “Whisk management” and “Whisky business” and “You run the whisk of” and “Whisking your neck.”
  • Wisconsin → Whiskonsin
  • Beat: These next few puns will refer to beating (mixing) eggs, which is commonly required for baking.
    • Bead → Beat: As in, “Beats of sweat.”
    • Beet → Beat: As in, “Red as a beatroot.”
    • *bat* → *beat*: As in, “Combeat boots” and “Mental acrobeatics” and “Dead beattery.” Other words that could work: numbeat (numbat), wombeat (wombat), exacerbeat (exacerbate), abeat (abate), debeat (debate) and verbeatim (verbatim). Note: to exacerbate something is to make it worse, and if something is verbatim, then it’s word for word.
    • *bet* → *beat*: As in, “For beatter or worse” and “You’d beatter” and “Stuck in beatween” and “Beatray someone’s confidence” and “In beata testing” and “For the beatterment of society” and “A cutting beatrayal.” Other words you could use: beatrothed (betrothed), alphabeat (alphabet), sherbeat (sherbet) and diabeates (diabetes).
    • *bit* → *beat*: As in, “Beattersweet feelings” and “Beatter chocolate” and “Take a gambeat.” Other words that could work: beatumen (bitumen), inhibeat (inhibit), exhibeat (exhibit), rabbeat (rabbit), habeat (habit), orbeat (orbit), inhabeat (inhabit), prohibeat (prohibit), arbeatrary (arbitrary) and beatch (b*tch). Note: if something is arbitrary, then it’s not based on objective logic.
    • *bed* → *beat*: These ones are a bit more of a stretch, but can still work: beatdazzled (bedazzled), beatdraggled (bedraggled), beatroom (bedroom), obeatient (obedient), obeatience (obedience), forbeat (forbid), morbeat (morbid) and libeato (libido).
    • *beet* → *beat*: Beatle (beetle), Beathoven (Beethoven) and beatroot (beetroot).
  • Easy → Over easy: “over easy” is a style of cooking eggs. As in, “As over easy as abc” and “As over easy as pie” and “Over easy access” and “Over easy come, over easy go” and “Over easy does it” and “Over easy on the eyes” and “Over easy pickings” and “Over easy street” and “Free and over easy” and “Take the over easy way out” and “Well that was over easy” and “Too over easy.”
  • Boil: These next few puns are a reference to boiled eggs.
    • Ball → Boil: As in, “Boilpark figure” and “A brand new boilgame” and “Bust your boils” and “Curve boil” and “A different boil game” and Drop the boil” and “Get the boil rolling” and “Have a boil” and “Keep your eye on the boil” and “Playing hardboil” and “A snowboil’s chance in hell” and “The boil is in your court” and “Up to your eyeboils in…”
    • Pale → Boil: As in, “Boils in comparison to” and “A boil imitation of…”
    • I’ll → Boil: As in, “Boil eat my hat” and “Boil be damned!”
    • Boy’ll (boy will) → Boil: As in, “That boil go far” and “That boil learn his lesson soon enough.”
    • *bal* → *boil*: As in, “Off-boilance” and “A delicate boilance” and “Secret boillot” and “Globoil sustainability” and “Nonverboil communication” and “Herboil tea.” Other words that could work: boilloon (balloon), boillistic (ballistic), triboil (tribal), canniboil (cannibal), verboil (verbal) and imboilance (imbalance).
    • Bel* → Boil*: boilieve (believe), boilief (belief) and boiloved (beloved).
    • *bil* → *boil*: As in, “Take responsiboility” and “Rehaboilitation centre” and “Environmental sustainaboility.” Other words you could use: liaboility (liability), accountaboility (accountability), aboility (ability) and capaboility (capability).
    • *bol* → *boil*: boilster (bolster), boilt (bolt), boild (bold), symboil (symbol), gamboil (gambol), hyperboile (hyperbole), aboilish (abolish) and metaboilism (metabolism).
    • *bul* → *boil*: boilshit (bullshit), Istanboil (Istanbul), neboilous (nebulous) and faboilous (fabulous). Note: if something is nebulous, then it’s cloudy or vague.
    • *pal* → *boil*: As in, “A princiboil player” and “Palpaboil (palpable) tension” and “A boiltry sum.” Note: if something is palpable, then it’s tangible.
    • *pol* → *boil*: As in, “Store boilicy” and “Identity boilitics” and “Boilice brutality” and “Scrub and boilish (polish).” Other words that could work: extraboilate (extrapolate), anthroboilogy (anthropology) and aboilogise (apologise).
  • Scratch → Scotch: Scotch eggs are another popular egg dish (which also has vegan recipes), so we’ve got a couple of related puns here: “I scotch your back, you scotch mine” and “Scotch the surface” and “Start from scotch” and “Up to scotch” and “Scotching your head” and “A real head-scotcher” and “Scotch an itch.”
  • Foul → Fowl: As in “By fair means or fowl” and “Cry fowl” and “Fowl language” and “Fowl up” and “No harm, no fowl” and “A fowl-mouthed person” and “Fowl play”
  • Fell → Fowl: As in “In one fowl swoop” and “Little strokes fowl great oaks” and “The bottom fowl out of the market” and “She fowl asleep at the wheel” and “He fowl under her spell” and “It fowl into my lap” and “She fowl victim to the scammer”. Note: If something is done in one fell swoop, then it was done quickly and in one single action.
  • Fall → Fowl: As in, “A fowling out,” and “Easy as fowling off a log,” and “Bread always fowls butter side down,” and “Can’t help fowling in love,” and “Catch a fowling star,” and “Fowl about laughing,” and “Fowl between the cracks,” and “Fowl from grace,” and “Fowl into bad habits,” and “A fowlen angel,” and “Oh how the mighty have fowlen,” and “The bigger they are, the harder they fowl,” and “United we stand, divided we fowl.”
  • Vowel → Fowl: As in, “The owl without a fowl.” Note: this is a reference to Bill Mlkvy.
  • *fal* → *fowl*: As in, fowllacy (fallacy), fowlter (falter), fowlse (false), fowllout (fallout), buffowlo (buffalo), crestfowllen (crestfallen), defowlt (default), downfowl (downfall), fowlsetto (falsetto), fowlt (fault), fowlsify (falsify), freefowl (freefall), nightfowl (nightfall), waterfowl (waterfall).
  • Paltry → Poultry: The term “paltry” means “small, insignificant or worthless” and the term “poultry” refers to domesticated chickens (and ducks, geese and other fowl). As in, “A poultry amount of work.”
  • Poetry → Poultry: As in, “Poultry in motion,” and “Spoken word poultry.” Note: spoken word poetry is performative poetry that tends to involve themes of social justice.
  • Poltergeist → Poultrygeist: As in, “Peeves the poultrygeist.” Note: Peeves is a famous poltergeist from the Harry Potter series.
  • Next → Nest: As in “Nest minute …” and “Better luck nest time” and “Boy/girl nest door” and “Nest generation” and “Nest in line to the throne” and “Nest to nothing” and “Take it to the nest level” and “Nest to nothing” and “The nest big thing.” and “Cleanliness is next to godliness” and “In nest to no time” and “Nest to nothing” and “One day chicken and the nest day feathers” and “Catch the nest wave” and “As ___ as the nest girl/guy”. Note: “One day chicken and the next day feathers” is a phrase indicating that things we consider valuable can be lost in no time at all (like a job, marriage, or a house etc).
  • Messed → Nest: As in, “You done nest up.”
  • *net* → *nest*: As in, “The nestwork is down” and “Social nestworking” and “The five tenests of” and “Internest connection” and “Captain Planest.” Other words you could use: cabinest (cabinet), bonnest (bonnet), sonnest (sonnet) and magnest (magnet). Note: a sonnet is a type of poem. A tenet is a guiding principle.
  • *nast* → *nest*: As in, “Cheap and nesty” and “A nesty piece of work.” Other words you could use: dynesty (dynasty), nestiness (nastiness), gymnest (gymnast) and monestery (monastery). Notes: a monastery is housing for monks and nuns. A dynasty is a line of rulers from the same family.
  • *nest*: You can emphasise the “nest” in these words: earnest, honest, dishonest, soonest, anesthesia and amnesty. Note: amnesty is a pardon, usually for a political offence.
  • *nist* → *nest*: As in, “The protagonest of the story” and “A misogynest comment” and “A powerful antagonest” and “A hedonestic lifestyle.” Other words you could use: feminest (feminist), chauvinest (chauvinist), communest (communist), adminestration (administration), adminester (administer), minester (minister) and anachronestic (anachronistic). Note: if something is anachronistic, then it doesn’t fit in with the time period.
  • *nost* → *nest*: As in, “Filled with nestalgia” and “A nestalgic smell” and “An assault on the nestrils” and “Agnestic worldview” and “Diagnestic outcome.”
  • Quiche: Quiches are a popular egg dish (which you can easily make an eggless version of) so we’ve included some quiche puns here:
    • Key → Quiche: As in, “A golden quiche can open any door” and “Fear is the quiche” and “The quiche to your heart” and “Quiche-hole surgery” and “Throw away the quiche” and “A low-quiche party” and “Off quiche” and “The quiche to the kingdom” and “Under lock and quiche” and “In a minor quiche” and “A quiche figure of” and “The quiche to success.”
    • Keep → Quiche: As in, “Known by the company you quiche” and “Don’t quiche us in suspense” and “Finders quiche-ers” and “Quiche your head” and “Quiche a lid on it” and “Quiche a straight face” and “Quiche an ear out.”
    • *kaysh* → *quiche*: If a word has a “kaysh” sound, we can replace it with “quiche”: aquiche-ia (acacia), alloquicheion (allocation), alterquiche-ion (altercation), amplifiquiche-ion (amplification), authentiquiche-ion (authentication), certifiquiche-ion (certification), clarifiquiche-ion (clarification), classifiquiche-ion (classification), communiquiche-ion (communication), compliquiche-ion (complication), dediquiche-ion (dedication), dupliquiche-ion (duplication), eduquiche-ion (education), electrifiquiche-ion (electrification), mediquiche-ion (medication) and justifiquiche-ion (justification).
    • *key* → *quiche*: As in, “Barrel of monquiche (monkeys)” and “Quit cold turquiche (turkey)” and “Bottle of whisquiche (whiskey).” Other words that could work: hoquiche (hockey), malarquiche (malarkey), donquiche (donkey), quicheboard (keyboard) and quichenote (keynote).
  • Farm: Since eggs are generally from farms, we’ve included some farm-related puns in here for you:
    • Firm → Farm: As in, “Round and farm” and “Farm up” and “Feet farmly planted” and “Terra farma.”
    • Harm → Farm: As in, “First, do no farm” and “Grievous bodily farm” and “In farm’s way” and “No farm done” and “No farm, no foul” and “Out of farm’s way” and “Wouldn’t farm a fly.”
    • Form → Farm: As in, “In good farm” and “Attack is the best farm of defence” and “Free farm” and “Imitation is the sincerest farm of flattery” and “Sarcasm is the lowest farm of wit” and “In any way, shape or farm” and “Take farm” and “True to farm” and “Evil takes many farms.”
    • Arm → Farm: As in, “Farm candy” and “Farmed and dangerous” and “Farmed struggle” and “Farmed intervention” and “Farmed to the hilt” and “As long as your farm” and “At farm’s length” and “The right to bear farms” and “A call to farms” and “Brothers in farms” and “Cost a farm and a leg” and “Give your right farm for” and “Up in farms” and “With open farms.”
    • Arm* → Farm*: As in, Farmageddon (armageddon), farmy (army), farmistice (armistice), farmour (armour). Note: an armistice is a formal agreement to stop fighting.
    • Am* → Farm*: As in, “That’s farmazing!” and “Farmateur work” and “Farmbiguous answers” and “Farmbitious projects.” Other words that could work: farmbivalent (ambivalent), Farmerican, farmendment (amendment), farmicable (amicable), farmidst (amidst), farmonnia (ammonia), farmmunition (ammunition), farmnesia (amnesia), farmong (among) and farmongst (amongst).
    • *fam* → *farm*: As in, “My farmily tree” and “A farmiliar place” and “Farm and fortune” and “Almost farmous” and “Wartime farmine” and “Farmiliarise yourself with your new home.” Other words that could work: farmished (famished), Oxfarm (Oxfam), infarmy (infamy) and infarmous (infamous).
    • Fem* → Farm*: As in, “The future is farmale” and “Farminism is not a dirty word” and “Feeling farminine.”
    • Fum* → Farm*: As in, “Farmbling around” and “Farming (fuming) mad” and “Farmigate the house.”
    • Ferment → Farment: (Note: this also works for other forms of the word, like farmentation (fermentation) and farmented (fermented)).
    • *firm* → *farm*: As in, “Can you please confarm your reservation?” and “Elderly and infarm” and “Motivational affarmations” and “Answer in the affarmative” and “Give confarmation.” Other words that could work: infarmary (infirmary), affarm (affirm) and farmware (firmware).
    • *form* → *farm*: As in, “A farmidable opponent” and “New, improved farmula” and “Which farmat should I save it in?” and “Farmal dresscode” and “Farmulate a plan.” Other words you could use: farmation (formation), farmative (formative), farmality (formality), platfarm (platform), infarm (inform), confarm (conform), transfarm (transform), perfarm (perform), unifarm (uniform), refarm (reform), landfarm (landform), infarmation (information) and perfarmance (performance).
    • *phem* → *farm*: blasfarmy (blasphemy), eufarmism (euphemism) and blasfarmous (blasphemous).
    • Sophomore → Sofarmore
    • Pharm* → Farm*: farmacy (pharmacy), farmaceutical (pharmaceutical) and farmacist (pharmacist).
  • Clutch: In this context, a clutch is a brood of chickens or a group of eggs. Make cheesy references to them with these puns:
    • Crutch → Clutch: As in, “On clutches” and “Using alcohol as a clutch.”
    • Glitch → Clutch: As in, “A clutch in the system.”
    • Clutch: Clutch has two meanings: to hold onto something tightly, and a group of eggs. We can make some egg puns using this: “A drowning person will clutch at a straw,” and “Pearl-clutcher.” Note: a pearl-clutcher is someone who is overly prudish.
    • Ovum: Ovums are egg cells (yes, we’re getting very technical here) so we’ve got some ovum-related puns for you to play with:
      • Over → Ovum: As in, “All ovum again” and “Bowled ovum” and “A bridge ovum troubled water” and “Brimming ovum with confidence” and “Come on ovum” and “Didn’t lose any sleep ovum it.”
      • Drove him → Dr’ovum: As in, “They dr’ovum to sleeplessness.”
  • Duck: Duck eggs are another type of egg commonly eaten by humans, so we’ve included them in this list too:
    • Dock → Duck: As in, “Charging duck” and “Waiting in the duck.”
    • Dark → Duck: As in, “After duck” and “Duck as pitch” and “Dancing in the duck” and “Duck before the dawn” and “Duck horse” and “Duck humour” and “Deep duck secret” and “Every duck cloud has a silver lining” and “In the duck” and “A duck and stormy night” and “Kept in the duck” and “A shot in the duck” and “My duckest hour.”
    • Tuck → Duck: As in, “Nip and duck” and “Duck in.”
    • Deck → Duck: As in, “All hands on duck” and “Clear the ducks” and “Deal from the bottom of the duck” and “Duck of cards” and “All ducked out” and “Hit the duck” and “Not playing with a full duck.”
    • Truck → Duck: As in, “By the duckload” and “Have no duck with” and “Fell off the back of a duck” and “Keep on duckin‘.”
    • Dec* → Duck*: As in, “A steady duckline (decline)” and “A duckadent meal” and “Falling into duckay.”
    • *dic* → *duck*: As in, “Look it up in the ducktionary” and “As the new laws ducktate (dictate)” and “A real ducktator” and “Orthopaeduck shoes” and “Call a meduck (medic)” and “Nomaduck lifestyle” and “The perioduck table.” Other words that could work: duckotomy (dichotomy – a separation of something into two), ducktum (dictum – an authoritative statement), sporaduck (sporadic – happening rarely and randomly), aciduck (acidic), episoduck (episodic), meduckal (medical), raduckal (radical), preduckament (predicament), induckate (indicate), vinduckate (vindicate) and deduckate (dedicate).
    • Doc* → Duck*: As in, “I need a ducktor!” and “Legal ducktrine (doctrine)” and “Official duckuments” and “Keep the ducket” and “A new vegan duckumentary” and “All in the duckumentation.”
    • *duc* → *duck*: As in, “Code of conduckt” and “New and improved produckt.”
    • Dakota → Duckota: (note: Dakota is the name of a few different towns and cities in the United States)
    • *tech* → *duck*: As in, “Cutting-edge ducknology” and “Masterful ducknique” and “Ducknical information” and “Ducknically, yes.”
  • Goose: Since goose eggs are another popular food, we included some goose-related puns and phrases here that could double as egg puns in a pinch:
    • Goes → Goose: As in, “The Academy award goose to…” and “Anything goose” and “As far as it goose” and “As the saying goose” and “As time goose by” and “Here goose nothing!” and “How goose it?” and “Goose without saying” and “Life goose on” and “No good deed goose unpunished” and “Steady as she goose” and “What goose up must come down” and “Who goose there?” and “My heart goose out to…”
    • Guess → Goose: As in, “It’s anybody’s goose” and “Goose what?” and “Gooseing games” and “Have a goose” and “Just lucky, I goose” and “Your goose is as good as mine” and “Second-gooseing yourself” and “You’ll never goose.”
    • *gas* → *goose*: As in, gooselight (gaslight), gooseoline (gasoline), flabbergooseted (flabbergasted), orgoose-sm (orgasm) and smorgoosebord (smorgasbord).
    • *gos* → *goose*: As in, “A relentless gooseip” and “Gooseamer wings” and “The goosepel truth.”
    • *gus* → *goose*: gooseto (gusto), gooset (gusset), gooset (gust), fungoose (fungus), bogoose (bogus), oesophagoose (oesophagus), asparagoose (asparagus), Augooset (August), disgooset (disgust) and disgooseting (disgusting).
  • Birth: Since eggs are literally to do with birth and are used to symbolise birth and re-birth in cultural celebrations, we’ve included some birth-related puns here too:
    • Berth → Birth: As in, “Give them a wide birth.” Note: berth in this context means room or space to move.
    • Earth → Birth: As in, “Journey to the centre of the birth” and “Brought down to birth” and “Cost the birth” and “Down to birth” and “Birth mother” and “Birthly delights” and “Birthly paradise” and “From the ends of the birth” and “Hell on birth” and “A scorched birth policy.”
    • Perth → Birth: (Note: Perth is the capital of Western Australia.)
    • Bath* → Birth*: Birthroom (bathroom), birthtub (bathtub), birthers (bathers), sabbirth (sabbath) and bloodbirth (bloodbath).
    • *beth* → *birth*: Birthlehem (Bethlehem) and Elizabirth (Elizabeth).
    • Bother* → Birther*: As in, “It’s not a birther” and “How birthersome” and “Hot and birthered” and “Stop birthering me.”
  • Roe: We aren’t just looking at chicken’s eggs in this list! Roe is popularly eaten as a delicacy, and since they’re fish eggs we’ve included them in this list.
    • Row → Roe: As in, “Front roe seats.”
    • Rue → Roe: As in, “You’ll roe the day!”
    • Throw → Roe: As in, “Roe away the key” and “A stone’s roe away” and “Roe another log on the dire” and “Roe a fit” and “Roe caution to the winds” and “Roe cold water on” and “Roe it back in their face” and “Roe the towel in” and “Roe up” and “Roe your weight around” and “Roe your hat into the ring” and “Roe a bone to.”
    • Toe → Roe: As in, “Dip your roe in the water” and “From top to roe” and “Head to roe” and “Make their roes curl” and “Roe the line” and “Twinkle roes.”
    • Rose → Roe-s: As in, “Come up smelling of roe-ses” and “Bed of roe-ses” and “Every roe-s has its thorn” and “Roe-s tinted glasses” and “Stop and smell the roe-ses.”
    • Rhe* → Roe*: roetoric (rhetoric), roetorical (rhetorical) and roematism (rheumatism).
    • Rho* → Roe*: roembus (rhombus) and roedodendron (rhododendron). Note: a rhododendron is a type of flower.
    • *roa* → *roe*: As in, “Hit the roed” and “On the roed” and “Middle of the roed” and “Roest me” and “Hear me roer (roar)” and “Approech carefully” and “A proe-active worker.” Other words that could work: reproech (reproach), broech (broach), throet (throat).
    • Rou* → Roe*: As in, “All year roe‘nd” and “Going roe‘nd in circles” and “Gather roe‘nd” and “Makes the world go roe‘nd” and “Rally roe‘nd” and “A roe‘ndabout way” and “Just a roe‘tine check” and “A roe‘gh adventure.”
    • *raw → *roe: As in, “It’s a droe” and “Withdroe from the race” and “The final stroe” and “A roe deal” and “Back to the droe-ing board” and “Droe the line” and “The luck of the droe.”
    • *rew* → *roe*: As in, “Little to no roeward” and “Needs a roewrite” and “A roewarding position” and “Scroe it” and “Skeleton croe” and “Written in Hebroe.”
    • *row* → *roe*: As in, “As if there’s no tomorroe” and “Here today, gone tomorroe” and “Drowning in sorroe” and “A narroe escape” and “Groe-ing up.” Other words that could work: roedy (rowdy), throe (throw), croe (crow), burroe (burrow) and proe-ess (prowess).
    • Re* → Roe*: As in, “For future roeference” and “Not a roelevant point” and “Requires further roesearch” and “Steely roesolve” and “Made roedundant” and “Graphic roendering.”
    • *ro* → *roe*: As in, “Going proe” and “Acting like a heroe” and “Build yourself up from zeroe” and “Microe loans” and “Throe the ball!” Other words you could use: Camaroe (a Camaro is a type of car), maestroe, euroe, syndroeme (syndrome), troepe (trope), troell (troll), roell (roll), stroeke (stroke), oxymoroen (oxymoron), thoroegh (thorough) and stroell (stroll).
    • *rus* → *roes*: thesauroes (thesaurus), proedent (prudent) and accroe (accrue).
  • Easter: Since some people might be after eggs of the chocolatey Easter variety, we’ve included Easter puns in here too:
    • Easter: As in, “Easter Island,” and “Easter parade,” and “The Easter bunny.”
    • East/Eastern → Easter: As in, “Easter of Eden,” and “Full of Easter promise.”
    • *east → *easter: As in, “At the very l-easter,” and “A f-easter for the eyes,” and “F-easter or famine,” and “The king of b-easters,” and “Last but not l-easter,” and “Nutritional y-easter is a good cheese substitute.”
  • Ail → Quail: Since quail eggs are eaten as well (more commonly in Asian countries), we’ve got them in this list too: “What quails you?”

The following puns are specific to characters and celebrity names:

  • Yoko Ono → Yolko Ono
  • Edward Scissorhands → Eggward Scissorhands
  • Ed Sheeran → Egg Sheeran
  • Benedict Cumberbatch → Eggs Benedict Cumberbatch
  • Liam Hemsworth → Liam Hensworth
  • Michelle Obama → Mi-shell Obama
  • Megan Fox → Meggan Fox
  • Charles Dickens → Charles Chickens

Note: if you’d like further information about the egg industry or avoiding eggs in your diet and lifestyle, the documentary Dominion is a great place to start. For further information on other animal industries and support in starting your own vegan lifestyle, Earthling Ed’s videos are a great source of information, as are the vegan and animal rights subreddits.

Egg-Related Words

To help you come up with your own egg puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

general: egg, shell, yolk, white, crack, fry, fried, boil, poach, scrambled, hard-boiled, omelette, devilled, pickled, scotch, benedict, florentine, beat, sunny, over easy, hatch, laid, free range, cage, hen, battery, chicken, duck, goose, easter, rotten, whisk, frittata, quiche, farm, fowl, nest, zygote, embryo, fertilised, ovum, incubate, clutch, birth, roe, caviar, carton, cholesterol, fat, salmonella, quail, faberge

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Turkey Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on turkey puns! 🦃 ⛅

While turkeys are seasonally popular due to holiday demand, they’re loved all year round at Punpedia. Whether you’re looking for a specific pun for your Thanksgiving celebrations, attempting to contribute to (or win!) a pun thread, or trying to make some really terrible pick-up lines, we hope this list has what you need.

Note: Punpedia never jokes about killing or hurting animals, and so you won’t find any puns about slaughtering, plucking, debeaking, battery cages, or anything like that. Only happy puns that are friendly to our turkey pals 🙂 Enjoy!

Turkey Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about turkeys that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s the list of turkey puns:

  • Turkey: As in, “Cold turkey,” and “Talk turkey.” Notes: Cold turkey refers to the abrupt and complete quitting of something. To talk turkey is to speak frankly and openly.
  • The Key → Turkey: As in, “Turkey to your heart,” and “Lock him up and throw away turkey,” and “Turkey to a nice, relaxed evening,” and “Turkey to success.”
  • Gobble: Turkeys are known for their signature “gobbling” sound. As gobbling also means to eat quickly and messily, we can make some corny turkey puns out of using these double meanings. Adult male turkeys are also called gobblers, so there are pun possibilities there too.
  • Goblet → Gobble-t: As in, “A wine gobble-t,” and “Crystal gobble-t.”
  • Goblin → Gobblin’: As in, “Gobblin‘ down a vegan feast.”
  • Bird: There are quite a few phrases/idioms related to birds which can be used as puns in the right context: “A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush” and “A bird-brain” and “Bird’s eye view” and “A little bird told me …” and “An early bird” and “Early bird gets the worm” and “Like a bird in a gilded cage” and “The birds and the bees” and “Birds of a feather flock together” and “Flip someone the bird” and “Free as a bird” and “The bird has flown” and “Sing like a bird” and “Jailbird“.
  • Fowl: As in, “Neither fish nor fowl.” Note: this refers to something which is not easily categorised.
  • Foul → Fowl: As in “By fair means or fowl” and “Cry fowl” and “Fowl language” and “Fowl up” and “No harm, no fowl” and “A fowl-mouthed person” and “Fowl play”.
  • Fell → Fowl: As in “In one fowl swoop” and “Little strokes fowl great oaks” and “The bottom fowl out of the market” and “She fowl asleep at the wheel” and “He fowl under her spell” and “It fowl into my lap” and “She fowl victim to the scammer”. Note: If something is done in one fell swoop, then it was done quickly and in one single action.
  • Fall → Fowl: As in, “A fowling out,” and “Easy as fowling off a log,” and “Bread always fowls butter side down,” and “Can’t help fowling in love,” and “Catch a fowling star,” and “Fowl about laughing,” and “Fowl between the cracks,” and “Fowl from grace,” and “Fowl into bad habits,” and “A fowlen angel,” and “Oh how the mighty have fowlen,” and “The bigger they are, the harder they fowl,” and “United we stand, divided we fowl.”
  • Vowel → Fowl: As in, “The owl without a fowl.” Note: this is a reference to Bill Mlkvy.
  • *fal* → *fowl*: As in, fowllacy (fallacy), fowlter (falter), fowlse (false), fowllout (fallout), buffowlo (buffalo), crestfowllen (crestfallen), defowlt (default), downfowl (downfall), fowlsetto (falsetto), fowlt (fault), fowlsify (falsify), freefowl (freefall), nightfowl (nightfall), waterfowl (waterfall).
  • Chuck → Chick: As in, “Chick a sickie,” and “Get chicked out,” and “Chick overboard.”
  • Trick → Chick: As in, “Bag of chicks,” and “Every chick in the book,” and “How’s chicks?” and “Never misses a chick,” and “One chick pony,” and “A chick of the light,” and “Chick or treat!” and “Chicks of the trade,” and “Up to your old chicks.”
  • Thick → Chick: As in, “As chick as thieves,” and “Blood is chicker than water,” and “In the chick of things,” and “The plot chickens,” and “Chick and fast,” and “Through chick and thin,” and “Lay it on chick.”
  • Then → Hen: As in, “All that and hen some” and “Now and hen” and “And hen there was one” and “That was hen, this is now” and “Right hen and there” and “But hen again…”
  • Hen: “Don’t let the fox guard the hen-house” and “As scarce as hen’s teeth” and “A mother hen” and “Hen-pecked” and “Hen’s night/party”. Note: to be henpecked is to be bullied or intimidated by a woman.
  • *hen*: Words than contain “hen” can be silly chicken/hen puns: Apprehend, appre-hen-sion, comprehend, comprehension, comprehensive, hence, henceforth, repre-hen-sible, stonehenge.
  • *han* → *hen*: As in, “Give me your hend (hand),” and “Do you have a hendle (handle) on it?” and “You look so hendsome tonight,” and “Your hendwriting has improved,” and “Their kids are a real hendful,” and “She was raised as an orphen,” and “The elephent in the room,” and “Please enhence the image,” and “I’ve had an epipheny!” and “This is your last chence,” and “Change the chennel.”
  • *hin* → *hen*: As in, “You’re hendering (hindering) me,” and “Doorhenge,” and “Give me a hent (hint),” and “In hendsight (hinsight),” and “You’re a hendrance (hindrance),” and “Change comes from withen,” and “Looking a bit then (thin),” and “Take it on the chen (chin),” and “Got kicked in the shens (shins),” and “Contrary to what you may think, dolphens are mammals,” and “A rush of endorphens,” and “A street urchen.” Note: to hinder is to block someone’s progress or to make something difficult to complete.
  • *hon* → *hen*: As in, “Brutally henest (honest),” and “An henourable mention,” and “Hello, heney (honey).”
  • *hun* → *hen*: As in, “A wild hench (hunch),” and “The henter (hunter) becomes the hented (hunted),” and “One hendred,” and “I’m hengry,” and “That’s not what I henger (hunger) for.”
  • Tom: Male turkeys are called “toms”. Make some bad tom puns with these: “Peeping tom,” and “Tom, Dick and Harry,” and “Tom foolery.”
  • *tom*: As in, “Red as a tomato,” and “An old tome,” and “Tomb Raider,” and “As if there were no tomorrow,” and “Custom made,” and “Rock bottom,” and “An atomic flavour,” and “The Phantom Menace,” and “Another symptom of,” and “It takes time to get accustomed,” and “The epitome of grace,” and “Turns my stomach,” and “The customer is not always right.”
  • *tam* → *tom*: As in, tome (tame), tomper (tamper), tomarind (tamarind), tomp (tamp), bantom (bantam), stomp (stamp), testoment (testament), stomina (stamina), metomorphosis (metamorphosis), vitomin (vitamin), stompede (stampede), contomination (contamination). Note: to tamp or tamper something is to press it firmly down so that it becomes compressed. Bantam is a class of weight and is used both in measuring poultry weight and in boxing/mixed martial arts.
  • *tem* → *tom*: As in, tomporal (temporal), tomper (temper), tomperature (temperature), tomperament (temperament), tomplate (template), tomporary (temporary), tompo (tempo), tompest (tempest), systom (system), stom (stem), ecosystom (ecosystem), itom (item), totom (totem), contompt (contempt), and contomplate (contemplate). Notes: temporal means relating to time. A tempest is a storm.
  • *tim* → *tom*: As in, tomeline (timeline), tomid (timid), tomely (timely), tomber (timber), tomeframe (timeframe), toming (timing), verbatom (verbatim), victom (victim), ultomate (ultimate), intomate (intimate), legitomate (legitimate), estomate (estimate), sentoment (sentiment), optomal (optimal), optomistic (optimistic).
  • *tum* → *tom*: As in, tomble (tumble), tomultuous (tumultuous), tomult (tumult), tombler (tumbler), tommy (tummy), tomeric (tumeric), momentom (momentum), quantom (quantum), stomp (stump), and stomble (stumble). Note: if something is tumultuous, then it’s chaotic. Briefly put, quantum refers to the smallest amount of something.
  • Fly: There are a few phrases related to flying which can be used as bird puns in the right context: “Fly by the seat of your pants” and “Fly in the face of the evidence” and “Fly off the shelves” and “A fly on the wall” and “Fly by night” and “On the fly” and “Pigs might fly” and “Let fly” and “Watch the sparks fly” and “Fly in the ointment” and “Fly into a rage” and “Fly off the handle” and “Fly the coop” and “I’ve gotta fly” and “Fly the white flag” and “Wouldn’t hurt a fly
  • Fry → Fly: As in, “Bigger fish to fly,” and “Out of the flying pan, into the fire,” and “Small fly.” Note: to be out of the frying pan and into the fire means to have escaped one situation only to be caught up in a worse one.
  • Flight: “Flight of fancy” and “Take flight” and “Flight of imagination” and “In full flight” and “Flight attendant”.
  • Waddle → Wattle: As in, “Look at that duck’s wattle.” Note: a wattle is the fleshy part on the turkey’s face that hangs down.
  • Snooty → Snood-y: As in, “A snood-y waiter.” Note: a snood is a part of the turkey’s forehead.
  • Feather: There are a few phrases related to feathers: “As light as a feather” and “In full feather” and “Feather in your cap (symbol of honour/achievement)” and “Feather one’s nest” and “Ruffle (a few/someone’s) feathers” and “You could have knocked me down with a feather“.
  • Father → Feather: As in “The founding feathers” and “Like feather, like son”.
  • Further → Feather: As in “Without feather ado” and “Look no feather” and “Kick the can feather down the road”
  • Beard: As in, “His beard was white as snow.” Note: turkeys have beards.
  • Beer → Beard: As in, “Cry into your beard,” and “Everything you always wanted in a beard,” and “Ginger beard,” and “I’m only here for the beard,” and “Life’s not all beard and skittles,” and “The champagne of beards,” and “Hold my beard.”
  • Beak: “To wet one’s beak” and “beak” may be slang for nose in some places.
  • Peek → Beak: As in “Beak-a-boo” and “Sneak beak“.
  • Peak → Beak: As in “Beak performance” and “They climbed to the beak
  • Peck: “The pecking order” and “Peck at (eat only a bit)” and “You have to eat a peck of dirt before you die”. Note: having to eat a peck of dirt before you die means that no-one can escape unpleasant things; everyone will have some kind of unfortunate circumstance to endure during their lifetime.
  • *pec* → *peck*: As in, “Peckuliar circumstances,” and “Peckan pie,” and “Work those pecks (pecs)!” and “Don’t make a specktacle of yourself,” and “A different perspecktive,” and “Treat them with respeckt,” and “Take all aspeckts into account,” and “Sexuality is a specktrum,” and “Prospecktive interests.”
  • *pac* → *peck*: As in, “Good things come in small peckages,” and “A blood peckt,” and “Pay pecket,” and “Positive social impeckt,” and “A compeckt car,” and “Peckyderm (pachyderm).” Note: a pachyderm is a type of animal (elephants are pachyderms).
  • *pic* → *peck*: As in, “The big peckture,” and “Peck up sticks,” and “In a peckle,” and “A peckturesque view,” and “A few sandwiches short of a pecknic (picnic),” and “An epeck movie,” and “I’m a bit myopeck,” and “Stay on topeck,” and “A new biopeck,” and “A philanthropeck mission,” and “Acting conspeckuous,” and “An accurate depecktion,” and “A despeckable villain.” Notes: if someone is myopic, then they’re short-sighted. A biopic is a biographical film. A philanthropic cause is one which aims to promote charity and the welfare of others.
  • *poc* → *peck*: As in, “Pecket-sized,” and “Get outta here with your hypeckrisy (hypocrisy),” and “Apeckalyspe now,” and “You’re being a hypeckrite.”
  • *puc* → *peck*: As in, pecker (pucker), peckered (puckered), and cappeckcino (cappucino).
  • *bac* → *peck*: As in, “Peckground noise,” and “Peckterial (bacterial) infection,” and “Political pecklash,” and “A beautiful peckdrop,” and “The peckchelor (bachelor),” and “In my peckyard,” and “What a depeckle (debacle).”
  • *bec* → *peck*: As in, peckome (become), peckon (beckon), barpeckue (barbecue).
  • *bic* → *peck*: As in, aeropeck (aerobic), arapeck (arabic), cupeckle (cubicle).
  • Pique → Beak: As in, “You’ve beaked my interest.” Note: to pique is to arouse.
  • Wing: “Left wing / right wing” and “Let’s just wing it” and “Take under your wing” and “Clip someone’s wings” and “Spread your wings
  • *wing: Make some turkey puns by emphasising the “wing” in certain words: swing, drawing, following, harrowing, brewing, growing, owing and knowing.
  • Wringer → Winger: As in, “Put through the winger.”
  • Win → Wing: As in, “Can’t wing for losing,” and “Due a wing,” and “Every one a winger,” and “Heads I wing, tails you lose,” and “How to wing friends and influence people,” and “It’s not the winging that counts, it’s the taking part,” and “It’s not whether you wing or lose; it’s how you play the game,” and “Play to wing,” and “Some you wing, some you lose,” and “Winger takes all.”
  • Whinge → Winge: As in, “Having a winge.”
  • Ring → Wing: As in, “Alarm bells began to wing,” and “A dead winger,” and “Doesn’t wing a bell,” and “Don’t wing us, we’ll wing you,” and “In the wing,” and “Wing of fire,” and “Run wings around,” and “Throw your hat into the wing,” and “Give them a wing,” and “My ears are winging,” and “Does that wing any bells?”
  • Tail: As in, “Happy as a dog with two tails,” and “Nervous as a long-tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs,” and “Bright eyed and busy tailed,” and “Can’t make head or tail of it,” and “Chase your own tail,” and “Two shakes of a lamb’s tail.” Note: two shakes of a lamb’s tail is a phrase used to indicated that something is very fast.
  • Tale → Tail: As in, “Dead men tell no tails,” and “Fairytail ending,” and “Live to tell the tail,” and “Never tell tails out of school,” and “An old wives’ tail,” and “Tattle tail,” and “Tell tail sign.”
  • Talent → Tailent: As in, “___’s got Tailent,” and “A tailented painter,” and “Where would you say your tailents lie?”
  • Toilet → Tailet: As in, “Down the tailet,” and “In the tailet.”
  • Style → Stail: As in, hairstail, freestail, lifestail, and stailus (stylus)
  • Tile → Tail: As in, fertail (fertile), percerntail (percentile), projectail (projectile), reptail (reptile), and versatail (versatile).
  • Spur: As in, “Spur of the moment.” Note: turkeys have a spur on the back of their feet.
  • *spir* → *spur*: As in, spural (spiral), spurit (spirit), conspuracy (conspiracy), perspuration (perspiration), and inspuration (inspiration).
  • *sper* → *spur*: As in, whispur, aspurions (aspersions), prospur (prosper), despurate (desperate).
  • *bur* → *spur*: As in, hurly-spurly, spurning (burning), spurner (burner),  spuried (buried), spurn (burn), spurst (burst), spury (bury).
  • Fan: As in, “Fan the flames,” and “I’m a big fan,” and “Fan dance,” and “Fancy one’s chances,” and “Flight of fancy,” and “Hit the fan,” and “Tickle one’s fancy,” and “Fancy free,” and “A little of what you fancy does you good,” and “Fancy pants.”
  • Than → Fan: As in, “Bite off more fan you can chew,” and “Blood is thicker fan water,” and “Easier said fan done,” and “More fan meets the eye,” and “You can’t say fairer fan that,” and “Actions speak louder fan words,” and “Better to be safe fan sorry,” and “Two heads are better fan one,” and “Better late fan never,” and “Better to be healthy fan wealthy.”
  • Thanks → Fan-ks: As in, “Accept with fan-ks,” and “Give fan-ks,” and “Fan-k your lucky stars.”
  • Nest: “Leave the nest” and “Empty nest syndrome” and “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” and “Love nest” and “Stir up a hornet’s nest” and “A nest of vipers” and “A mare’s nest” and “Nest together”. Notes: empty nest syndrome is the feeling of loneliness a parent may experience when their children move out for the first time. A mare’s nest is a state of confusion or chaos.
  • Next → Nest: As in “Nest minute …” and “Better luck nest time” and “Boy/girl nest door” and “Nest generation” and “Nest in line to the throne” and “Nest to nothing” and “Take it to the nest level” and “Nest to nothing” and “The nest big thing.” and “Cleanliness is nest to godliness” and “In nest to no time” and “Nest to nothing” and “One day chicken and the nest day feathers” and “Catch the nest wave” and “As ___ as the nest girl/guy”. Note: “One day chicken and the next day feathers” is a phrase indicating that things we consider valuable can be lost in no time at all (like a job, marriage, or a house etc).
  • Clutch: Clutch has two meanings: to hold onto something tightly, and a group of eggs. We can make some egg puns using this: “A drowning person will clutch at a straw,” and “Pearl-clutcher.” Note: a pearl-clutcher is someone who is overly prudish.
  • Claw: As in, “Tooth and claw,” and “Get your claws into.”
  • Chlo* → Claw*: As in clawride (chloride) and clawrine (chlorine).
  • Clo* → Claw*: As in, clawbber (clobber), claw-ck (clock), clawckwise (clockwise), clawg (clog), clawset (closet), clawth (cloth).
  • Flock: “To flock around/to (someone/something)” and “Flock together” and “Birds of a feather flock together”. Note: birds of a feather flock together means that ones with similar tastes or interest tend to congregate together.
  • Flick → Flock: As in, “Chick flock,” and “Give it the flock.” Note: to give something the flick is to get rid of it.
  • Fluke → Flock: As in, “A lucky flock.”
  • Flake → Flock: As in, “Flock out,” and “Flock-y pastry.” Note: to flake out is to not stand up to promises or expectations.
  • Paltry → Poultry: The term “paltry” means “small, insignificant or worthless” and the term “poultry” refers to domesticated chickens (and ducks, geese and other fowl). As in, “A poultry amount of work.” Note: young turkeys are called poults, so any poultry pun should also work with poult.
  • Poetry → Poultry: As in, “Poultry in motion,” and “Spoken word poultry.” Note: spoken word poetry is performative poetry that tends to involve themes of social justice.
  • Poltergeist → Poultrygeist: As in, “Peeves the poultrygeist.” Note: Peeves is a famous poltergeist from the Harry Potter series.
  • Pulled → Poult: As in, “He really poult me along.”
  • Bolt → Poult: As in, “A poult from the blue,” and “Poulted upright,” and “Poulted for the door,” and “Get down to the nuts and poults of it,” and “No point locking the stable door after the horse has poulted.” Notes: a bolt from the blue is a sudden, unexpected event. To lock the stable door after the horse has already bolted is to take precautions after the worst has already happened.
  • Joke → Jake: A jake is a young male turkey, so we can make some terribly turkey puns here. As in, “Beyond a jake,” and “By way of a jake,” and “An inside jake,” and “It’s not a jaking matter,” and “The jake’s on you,” and “A terrible jake,” and “Can’t take a jake.”
  • Click → Cluck: As in “Cluck on that button” and “Her explanation clucked with me straight away”.
  • Clock → Cluck: As in “The cluck is ticking” and “A race against the cluck” and “Around the cluck” and “Biological cluck” and “Turn back the cluck” and “Stop the cluck” and “10 o’cluck“.
  • Egg: There are a few phrases/idioms that contain the word “egg”: “A bad egg” and “Egg on” and “A hard egg to track” and “Don’t put all your eggs in one basket” and “Egg on one’s face” and “A good egg” and “A rotten egg” and “Egg and spoon race”. Note: to have egg on your face means that you’ve been made to look foolish.
  • *eg* → *egg*: If a word contains the “egg” sound then we can make a silly egg pun: dereggulation, beggar, begging, deggradation, eggsistence (existence), eggsit (exit), eggshortation (exhortation), eggsile (exile), eggsistential (existential), impreggnated, irreggularity, irreggular, kegg, legg, begg, meggabyte, leggings, meggawatts, neggatively, neggative, neggligently, nutmegg, peggasus, preggnancies, reggular, reggulation, seggment, unreggulated, preggnant, omegga, seggregated.
  • Agg* → Egg*: As in, eggregate, eggressive, and eggravate.
  • *igg* → *egg*: As in, tregger (trigger), geggle (giggle), peggyback (piggyback), weggle (wiggle).
  • *ugg* → *egg*: As in, streggle (struggle), seggest (suggest), regged (rugged), smeggle (smuggle), sleggish (sluggish), jeggle (juggle), beggy (buggy).
  • Coup → Coop: A “coup” is a sudden, violent, and illegal seizure of power from a government. While it works visually, “coup” is pronounced without the “p” while “coop” is pronounced with.
  • Coop: “Cooped up (confined in a small place)” and “Fly the coop (to escape)”
  • Coupe → Coop: A coupe is a car with a fixed roof and only two doors and is generally shorter than a sedan.
  • *coop*: Words with the “coop” sound are easy chicken coop puns: coopon (coupon), scoop, scooped, recoop (recoup), recooperation (recouperation).
  • Rafter: As in, “Packed to the rafters.”
  • Scoop → S-coop: As in, “Full s-coop,” and “Get the s-coop,” and “Inside s-coop,” and “Poop and s-coop,” and “What a s-coop.”
  • Strut: As in, “Strut your stuff.” Note: strutting is a courtship behaviour for turkeys.
  • Street → Strut: As in, “Easy strut,” and “Mean struts,” and “On the sunny side of the strut,” and “Right up your strut,” and “Strut cred,” and “The struts of London are paved with gold,” and “The word on the strut,” and “A two-way strut,” and “Trust is a two-way strut.”
  • Stretch → Strut-ch: As in, “By any strut-ch of the imagination,” and “Home strut-ch,” and “Strut-ch your legs,” and “Strut-ching the truth.”
  • Strat* → Strut*: As in, strutegy (strategy), strutegic (strategic), strutosphere (stratosphere), strutification (stratification). Notes: the stratosphere is a layer in the Earth’s atmosphere. Stratification is a system of layers or categories.
  • Scratch: As in, “I scratch your back, you scratch mine,” and “Scratch the surface,” and “Start from scratch,” and “Up to scratch,” and “Handwriting like chicken scratch,” and “Scratching your head.” Note: if you’ve got handwriting like chicken scratch, then you’ve got illegible handwriting.
  • Prin* → Preen*: As in, preenciple (principle), preence (prince), preencess (princess), preent (print), preenter (printer), preenciple (principal).
  • *pren* → *preen*: As in, preenatal, preenup, preenuptial, entrepreeneur, appreentice and neopreene.
  • Help → Yelp: As in, “A cry for yelp,” and “Bend over backwards to yelp,” and “Beyond yelp,” and “Can I yelp you?” and “Can’t yelp falling in love,” and “Yelp yourself,” and “A yelping hand,” and “With a little yelp from my friends,” and “Yelp make ends meet.” Note: a yelp is a type of turkey call.
  • Spit: Turkeys are known for spitting, so we can make some bad turkey puns here – as in, “Spit and polish,” and “Spit in the eye of,” and “Dummy spit,” and “Spit take,” and “Spitting image,” and “Spitting with rain,” and “Within spitting distance.” Notes: spit and polish is an extreme attention to cleanliness and appearance. A spit take is where someone spits a drink out of their mouth in reaction to something.
  • Court: As in, “Contempt of court,” and “Courting disaster,” and “Haul before the court,” and “Order in the court,” and “See you in court,” and “The ball is in your court.” Note: court has a few different meanings, including the type of courting that turkeys do to attract each other – which allows us to make use of this for some terrible turkey puns.

Turkey-Related Words

There are many more turkey puns to be made! Here’s a list of turkey-related concepts to help you come up with your own. If you come up with a new pun, please share it in the comments!

turkey, gobble, hen, tom, gobbler, poult, jake, jenny, flock, rafter bird, egg, poultry, fowl, chick, wattle, snood, caruncle, beard, feather, wing,  tail, fan, beak, spur, plumage, domesticated, wild, pecking order, strut, fly, nest, claw, scratch, preen, cluck, yelp, spit, forage, courting, clutch, eastern wild turkey, osceola, rio grande, merriam’s wild, gould’s wild, south mexican wild

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Chicken Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on chicken puns! 🐔 Whether you’re looking for some silly puns for your hen party, naming your new pet chicken, or whatever else, we hope this list is useful to you. This entry contains hen puns, rooster puns, egg puns, and puns based on words and topics closely related to chickens. If you’re after something more specific, we also have a list of egg puns.

Note: Punpedia never jokes about killing or hurting animals, and so you won’t find any puns about slaughtering, plucking, debeaking, battery cages, or anything like that. Only happy puns that are friendly to our chicken pals 🙂 Enjoy!

Chicken Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about chickens that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s the list of chicken puns:

  • Chicken: There are a few phrases/idioms related to chickens which can serve as chicken puns in the right context: “A chicken and egg situation” and “Chicken out of something” and “Don’t count your chickens before they’ve hatched” and “Chicken sh*t” and “Get up with the chickens” and “You’re chicken (scared)” and “Curses, like chickens, come home to roost” and “Chicken feed (small amount of money/something)”.
  • Chuck → Chick: As in, “Chick a sickie,” and “Get chicked out,” and “Chick overboard.”
  • Trick → Chick: As in, “Bag of chicks,” and “Every chick in the book,” and “How’s chicks?” and “Never misses a chick,” and “One chick pony,” and “A chick of the light,” and “Chick or treat!” and “Chicks of the trade,” and “Up to your old chicks.”
  • Thick → Chick: As in, “As chick as thieves,” and “Blood is chicker than water,” and “In the chick of things,” and “The plot chickens,” and “Chick and fast,” and “Through chick and thin,” and “Lay it on chick.”
  • Comedian → Comedi-hen: As in, “You’re a real comedi-hen” and “Everyone’s a comedi-hen round here.”
  • Hen: “Don’t let the fox guard the hen-house” and “As scarce as hen’s teeth” and “A mother hen” and “Hen-pecked” and “Hen’s night/party”. Note: to be henpecked is to be bullied or intimidated by a female.
  • *hen*: Words than contain “hen” can be silly chicken/hen puns: Apprehend, appre-hen-sion, comprehend, comprehension, comprehensive, hence, henceforth, repre-hen-sible, stonehenge.
  • *han* → *hen*: As in, “Give me your hend (hand),” and “Do you have a hendle (handle) on it?” and “You look so hendsome tonight,” and “Your hendwriting has improved,” and “Their kids are a real hendful,” and “She was raised as an orphen,” and “The elephent in the room,” and “Please enhence the image,” and “I’ve had an epipheny!” and “This is your last chence,” and “Change the chennel.”
  • *hin* → *hen*: As in, “You’re hendering (hindering) me,” and “Doorhenge,” and “Give me a hent (hint),” and “In hendsight (hinsight),” and “You’re a hendrance (hindrance),” and “Change comes from withen,” and “Looking a bit then (thin),” and “Take it on the chen (chin),” and “Got kicked in the shens (shins),” and “Contrary to what you may think, dolphens are mammals,” and “A rush of endorphens,” and “A street urchen.” Note: to hinder is to block someone’s progress or to make something difficult to complete.
  • *hon* → *hen*: As in, “Brutally henest (honest),” and “An henourable mention,” and “Hello, heney (honey).”
  • *hun* → *hen*: As in, “A wild hench (hunch),” and “The henter (hunter) becomes the hented (hunted),” and “One hendred,” and “I’m hengry,” and “That’s not what I henger (hunger) for.”
  • Peck: “The pecking order” and “Peck at (eat only a bit)” and “You have to eat a peck of dirt before you die”. Note: having to eat a peck of dirt before you die means that no-one can escape unpleasant things; everyone will have some kind of unfortunate circumstance to endure during their lifetime.
  • *pec* → *peck*: As in, “Peckuliar circumstances,” and “Peckan pie,” and “Work those pecks (pecs)!” and “Don’t make a specktacle of yourself,” and “A different perspecktive,” and “Treat them with respeckt,” and “Take all aspeckts into account,” and “Sexuality is a specktrum,” and “Prospecktive interests.”
  • *pac* → *peck*: As in, “Good things come in small peckages,” and “A blood peckt,” and “Pay pecket,” and “Positive social impeckt,” and “A compeckt car,” and “Peckyderm (pachyderm).” Note: a pachyderm is a type of animal (elephants are pachyderms).
  • *pic* → *peck*: As in, “The big peckture,” and “Peck up sticks,” and “In a peckle,” and “A peckturesque view,” and “A few sandwiches short of a pecknic (picnic),” and “An epeck movie,” and “I’m a bit myopeck,” and “Stay on topeck,” and “A new biopeck,” and “A philanthropeck mission,” and “Acting conspeckuous,” and “An accurate depecktion,” and “A despeckable villain.” Notes: if someone is myopic, then they’re short-sighted. A biopic is a biographical film. A philanthropic cause is one which aims to promote charity and the welfare of others.
  • *poc* → *peck*: As in, “Pecket-sized,” and “Get outta here with your hypeckrisy (hypocrisy),” and “Apeckalyspe now,” and “You’re being a hypeckrite.”
  • *puc* → *peck*: As in, pecker (pucker), peckered (puckered), and cappeckcino (cappucino).
  • *bac* → *peck*: As in, “Peckground noise,” and “Peckterial (bacterial) infection,” and “Political pecklash,” and “A beautiful peckdrop,” and “The peckchelor (bachelor),” and “In my peckyard,” and “What a depeckle (debacle).”
  • *bec* → *peck*: As in, peckome (become), peckon (beckon), barpeckue (barbecue).
  • *bic* → *peck*: As in, aeropeck (aerobic), arapeck (arabic), cupeckle (cubicle).
  • Pique → Beak: As in, “You’ve beaked my interest.” Note: to pique is to arouse.
  • Fowl: As in, “Neither fish nor fowl.” Note: this refers to something which is not easily categorised.
  • Foul → Fowl: As in “By fair means or fowl” and “Cry fowl” and “Fowl language” and “Fowl up” and “No harm, no fowl” and “A fowl-mouthed person” and “Fowl play”
  • Fell → Fowl: As in “In one fowl swoop” and “Little strokes fowl great oaks” and “The bottom fowl out of the market” and “She fowl asleep at the wheel” and “He fowl under her spell” and “It fowl into my lap” and “She fowl victim to the scammer”. Note: If something is done in one fell swoop, then it was done quickly and in one single action.
  • Fall → Fowl: As in, “A fowling out,” and “Easy as fowling off a log,” and “Bread always fowls butter side down,” and “Can’t help fowling in love,” and “Catch a fowling star,” and “Fowl about laughing,” and “Fowl between the cracks,” and “Fowl from grace,” and “Fowl into bad habits,” and “A fowlen angel,” and “Oh how the mighty have fowlen,” and “The bigger they are, the harder they fowl,” and “United we stand, divided we fowl.”
  • Vowel → Fowl: As in, “The owl without a fowl.” Note: this is a reference to Bill Mlkvy.
  • *fal* → *fowl*: As in, fowllacy (fallacy), fowlter (falter), fowlse (false), fowllout (fallout), buffowlo (buffalo), crestfowllen (crestfallen), defowlt (default), downfowl (downfall), fowlsetto (falsetto), fowlt (fault), fowlsify (falsify), freefowl (freefall), nightfowl (nightfall), waterfowl (waterfall).
  • Egg: There are a few phrases/idioms that contain the word “egg”: “A bad egg” and “Egg on” and “A hard egg to track” and “Don’t put all your eggs in one basket” and “Egg on one’s face” and “A good egg” and “A rotten egg” and “Egg and spoon race”
  • *eg* → *egg*: If a word contains the “egg” sound then we can make a silly egg pun: dereggulation, beggar, begging, deggradation, eggsistence (existence), eggsit (exit), eggshortation (exhortation), eggsile (exile), eggsistential (existential), impreggnated, irreggularity, irreggular, kegg, legg, begg, meggabyte, leggings, meggawatts, neggatively, neggative, neggligently, nutmegg, peggasus, preggnancies, reggular, reggulation, seggment, unreggulated, preggnant, omegga, seggregated.
  • Agg* → Egg*: As in, eggregate, eggressive, and eggravate.
  • *igg* → *egg*: As in, tregger (trigger), geggle (giggle), peggyback (piggyback), weggle (wiggle).
  • *ugg* → *egg*: As in, streggle (struggle), seggest (suggest), regged (rugged), smeggle (smuggle), sleggish (sluggish), jeggle (juggle), beggy (buggy).
  • Joke → Yolk: As in, “Inside yolk” and “Yolk’s on you” and “Yolking around.”
  • Paltry → Poultry: The term “paltry” means “small, insignificant or worthless” and the term “poultry” refers to domesticated chickens (and ducks, geese and other fowl). As in, “A poultry amount of work.”
  • Poetry → Poultry: As in, “Poultry in motion,” and “Spoken word poultry.” Note: spoken word poetry is performative poetry that tends to involve themes of social justice.
  • Poltergeist → Poultrygeist: As in, “Peeves the poultrygeist.” Note: Peeves is a famous poltergeist from the Harry Potter series.
  • Click → Cluck: As in “Cluck on that button” and “Her explanation clucked with me straight away”.
  • Clock → Cluck: As in “The cluck is ticking” and “A race against the cluck” and “Around the cluck” and “Biological cluck” and “Turn back the cluck” and “Stop the cluck” and “10 o’cluck“.
  • Pull it → Pullet: A pullet is a young female chicken – especially one that’s younger than 1 year old.
  • Body → Broody: A hen is “broody” if it wants to incubate eggs. Some phrases/idioms which might be used with this pun: “Broody language” and “Broody count” and “A broody of water” and “Sell (one’s) broody” and “Broody politic” and “Broody and soul” and “Over my dead broody!” and “Anybroody in their right mind” and “It’s anybroody’s guess” and “Anybroody who is anybroody” and “A kind word for everybroody” and “Everybroody and their dog”.
  • Coup → Coop: A “coup” is a sudden, violent, and illegal seizure of power from a government. While it works visually, “coup” is pronounced without the “p” while “coop” is pronounced with.
  • Coop: “Cooped up (confined in a small place)” and “Fly the coop (to escape)”
  • Coupe → Coop: A coupe is a car with a fixed roof and only two doors and is generally shorter than a sedan.
  • Scoop → S-coop: As in, “Full s-coop,” and “Get the s-coop,” and “Inside s-coop,” and “Poop and s-coop,” and “What a s-coop.”
  • *coop*: Words with the “coop” sound are easy chicken coop puns: coopon (coupon), scoop, scooped, recoop (recoup), recooperation (recouperation).
  • Rafter: As in, “Packed to the rafters.”
  • Comb: The red fleshy crest on a rooster is called a “comb”. This word obviously has other meanings that can be used in chicken word play. There are a few phrases/idioms related to combs and combing: “Hair comb” and “Comb the beach” and “Go through (something) with a fine-toothed comb“.
  • Bird: There are quite a few phrases/idiom related to birds which can be used as chicken puns in the right context: “A bird in the hand is worth 2 in the bush” and “A bird-brain” and “Bird’s eye view” and “A little bird told me …” and “An early bird” and “Early bird gets the worm” and “Like a bird in a gilded cage” and “The birds and the bees” and “Birds of a feather flock together” and “Flip someone the bird” and “Free as a bird” and “The bird has flown” and “Sing like a bird” and “Jailbird“. Note: birds of a feather flock together means that ones with similar tastes or interest tend to congregate together.
  • Flock: “To flock around/to (someone/something)” and “Flock together” and “Birds of a feather flock together”. Note: birds of a feather flock together means that ones with similar tastes or interest tend to congregate together.
  • Flick → Flock: As in, “Chick flock,” and “Give it the flock.” Note: to give something the flick is to get rid of it.
  • Fluke → Flock: As in, “A lucky flock.”
  • Flake → Flock: As in, “Flock out,” and “Flock-y pastry.” Note: to flake out is to not stand up to promises or expectations.
  • Woman → Bird: Depending on where you’re from, the term “bird” may be slang for “woman”.
  • Young woman → Chick
  • Fly: Many chicken species can fly, and often do so to escape danger, fly into trees to roost, or simply to travel short distances quickly. There are a few phrases related to flying which can be used as chicken puns in the right context: “Fly by the seat of your pants” and “Fly in the face of the evidence” and “Fly off the shelves” and “A fly on the wall” and “Fly by night” and “On the fly” and “Pigs might fly” and “Let fly” and “Watch the sparks fly” and “Fly in the ointment” and “Fly into a rage” and “Fly off the handle” and “Fly the coop” and “I’ve gotta fly” and “Fly the white flag” and “Wouldn’t hurt a fly
  • Free* → Fry*: As in, “Symbol of frydom” and “Fry as a bird” and “Born fry” and “Breathe fryly” and “Buy one, get one fry” and “Calorie fry” and “Footloose and fancy fry” and “Fry for all” and “Fry enterprise” and “Fry range” and “The best things in life are fry.”
  • Fry → Fly: As in, “Bigger fish to fly,” and “Out of the flying pan, into the fire,” and “Small fly.” Note: to be out of the frying pan and into the fire means to have escaped one situation only to be caught up in a worse one.
  • Fright → Fryt: As in, “Frytened of your own shadow” and “Frytful mess” and “Take fryt” and “Fryten to death.”
  • Flight: “Flight of fancy” and “Take flight” and “Flight of imagination” and “In full flight” and “Flight attendant”.
  • Feather: There are a few phrases related to feathers: “As light as a feather” and “In full feather” and “Feather in your cap (symbol of honour/achievement)” and “Feather one’s nest” and “Ruffle (a few/someone’s) feathers” and “You could have knocked me down with a feather“.
  • Father → Feather: As in “The founding feathers” and “Like feather, like son”
  • Further → Feather: As in “Without feather ado” and “Look no feather” and “Kick the can feather down the road”.
  • Father → Feather: As in “The founding feathers” and “Like feather, like son”.
  • Beak: “To wet one’s beak” and “beak” may be slang for nose in some places.
  • Peek → Beak: As in “Beak-a-boo” and “Sneak beak“.
  • Peak → Beak: As in “Beak performance” and “They climbed to the beak“.
  • Wing: “Left wing / right wing” and “Let’s just wing it” and “Take under your wing” and “Clip someone’s wings” and “Spread your wings
  • *wing: Make some turkey puns by emphasising the “wing” in certain words: swing, drawing, following, harrowing, brewing, growing, owing and knowing.
  • Wringer → Winger: As in, “Put through the winger.”
  • Win → Wing: As in, “Can’t wing for losing,” and “Due a wing,” and “Every one a winger,” and “Heads I wing, tails you lose,” and “How to wing friends and influence people,” and “It’s not the winging that counts, it’s the taking part,” and “It’s not whether you wing or lose; it’s how you play the game,” and “Play to wing,” and “Some you wing, some you lose,” and “Winger takes all.”
  • Whinge → Winge: As in, “Having a winge.”
  • Ring → Wing: As in, “Alarm bells began to wing,” and “A dead winger,” and “Doesn’t wing a bell,” and “Don’t wing us, we’ll wing you,” and “In the wing,” and “Wing of fire,” and “Run wings around,” and “Throw your hat into the wing,” and “Give them a wing,” and “My ears are winging,” and “Does that wing any bells?”
  • Nest: Most species of chickens nest on the ground. Some phrases related to nests and nesting: “Leave the nest” and “Empty nest syndrome” and “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” and “Love nest” and “Stir up a hornet’s nest” and “A nest of vipers” and “A mare’s nest” and “Nest together”. Notes: empty nest syndrome is the feeling of loneliness a parent may experience when their children move out for the first time. A mare’s nest is a state of confusion or chaos.
  • Next → Nest: As in “Nest minute …” and “Better luck nest time” and “Boy/girl nest door” and “Nest generation” and “Nest in line to the throne” and “Nest to nothing” and “Take it to the nest level” and “Nest to nothing” and “The nest big thing.” and “Cleanliness is next to godliness” and “In nest to no time” and “Nest to nothing” and “One day chicken and the nest day feathers” and “Catch the nest wave” and “As ___ as the nest girl/guy”. Note: “One day chicken and the next day feathers” is a phrase indicating that things we consider valuable can be lost in no time at all (like a job, marriage, or a house etc).
  • Messed → Nest: As in, “You done nest up.”
  • *net* → *nest*: As in, “The nestwork is down” and “Social nestworking” and “The five tenests of” and “Internest connection” and “Captain Planest.” Other words you could use: cabinest (cabinet), bonnest (bonnet), sonnest (sonnet) and magnest (magnet). Note: a sonnet is a type of poem. A tenet is a guiding principle.
  • *nast* → *nest*: As in, “Cheap and nesty” and “A nesty piece of work.” Other words you could use: dynesty (dynasty), nestiness (nastiness), gymnest (gymnast) and monestery (monastery). Notes: a monastery is housing for monks and nuns. A dynasty is a line of rulers from the same family.
  • *nest*: You can emphasise the “nest” in these words: earnest, honest, dishonest, soonest, anesthesia and amnesty. Note: amnesty is a pardon, usually for a political offence.
  • *nist* → *nest*: As in, “The protagonest of the story” and “A misogynest comment” and “A powerful antagonest” and “A hedonestic lifestyle.” Other words you could use: feminest (feminist), chauvinest (chauvinist), communest (communist), adminestration (administration), adminester (administer), minester (minister) and anachronestic (anachronistic). Note: if something is anachronistic, then it doesn’t fit in with the time period.
  • Tail: As in, “Happy as a dog with two tails,” and “Nervous as a long-tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs,” and “Bright eyed and busy tailed,” and “Can’t make head or tail of it,” and “Chase your own tail,” and “Two shakes of a lamb’s tail.” Note: two shakes of a lamb’s tail is a phrase used to indicated that something is very fast.
  • Tale → Tail: As in, “Dead men tell no tails,” and “Fairytail ending,” and “Live to tell the tail,” and “Never tell tails out of school,” and “An old wives’ tail,” and “Tattle tail,” and “Tell tail sign.”
  • Talent → Tailent: As in, “___’s got Tailent,” and “A tailented painter,” and “Where would you say your tailents lie?”
  • Toilet → Tailet: As in, “Down the tailet,” and “In the tailet.”
  • Style → Stail: As in, hairstail, freestail, lifestail, and stailus (stylus)
  • Tile → Tail: As in, fertail (fertile), percerntail (percentile), projectail (projectile), reptail (reptile), and versatail (versatile).
  • Clutch: Clutch has two meanings: to hold onto something tightly, and a group of eggs. We can make some egg puns using this: “A drowning person will clutch at a straw,” and “Pearl-clutcher.” Note: a pearl-clutcher is someone who is overly prudish.
  • Claw: As in, “Tooth and claw,” and “Get your claws into.”
  • Chlo* → Claw*: As in clawride (chloride) and clawrine (chlorine).
  • Clo* → Claw*: As in, clawbber (clobber), claw-ck (clock), clawckwise (clockwise), clawg (clog), clawset (closet), clawth (cloth).
  • Free → Free range: As in, “As free range as a bird” and “Born free range” and “Buy one, get one free range” and “Free range and easy” and “Free range for all” and “Free range spirit” and “Live free range or die” and “Nothing is ever free range.” Note: unfortunately, “free range” doesn’t mean what most egg consumers think it does. Free range is essentially as harmful to chicken welfare as caged/battery (and all forms of chicken farming will still start with chick culling).
  • Cage: These next few puns are dedicated to the idea of cage eggs, which is a system that provides an extremely unethical and torturous way for hens to live:
    • Age → Cage: As in, “Cage before beauty” and “Cage of consent” and “An awkward cage” and “Come of cage” and “A golden cage” and “In this day and cage” and “Mental cage” and “The cage of reason” and “Through the cages” and “One for the cages.”
    • *age* → *cage*: As in, “Double-cagent” and “Modelling cagency” and “What’s your cagenda?” and “The gay cagenda” and “Cageing gracefully” and “Increase your levercage (leverage)” and “Encage combat!”
    • Decay → Decage: As in, “Tooth decage” and “Falling into decage.”
    • Gauge → Cage: As in, “Fuel cage” and “Trying to cage your reaction.”
  • Flattery → Battery: Related to cage eggs are battery cages, which refers specifically to the housing system that’s used for producing animal byproducts (so it includes but isn’t limited to eggs): “Battery will get you nowhere” and “Imitation is the sincerest form of battery.”

Chicken-Related Words

There are many more chicken puns to be made! Here’s a list of chicken-related concepts to help you come up with your own. If you come up with a new pun, please share it in the comments!

rooster, egg, poultry, fowl, hen, bird, chickenpox, domesticated, chick, cock, pullet, rhode island red, domestic fowl, wing, wings, jungle fowl, coop, chook, henhouse, breed, yolk, comb, feathery, biddy, bantam, cluck, broody, avian, beak, plumage, chickens, cock-a-doodle-doo, fly, peck, scratch, dust bath

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