Santa Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on santa puns! 🦌🎅🏾 🍪🥛

Known by many different names (Saint Nicholas, Kris Kringle, Father Christmas and Santa Claus), Santa is a well-loved figure in the holiday world – an annual bringer of cheer and gifts to families around the world. Make your holiday preparations that much more special with our Santa puns – whether you’re making Santa puns for custom Christmas crackers, making some terribly corny Christmas party invites, or asking a special someone on a festive date, we hope that our list of Santa puns will have you covered.

While this list is as thorough as we could make it, it is specific to Santa. We do also have an entry of Christmas tree puns, reindeer puns, and will have other Christmas-specific lists coming soon too!

Santa Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about Santa that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of Santa puns:

  • Santa: To start us off, here are some Santa-related phrases for you to play with: “Santa’s little helpers,” and “Secret Santa.”
  • Satan→ Santa: As in, “The Church of Santa,” and “A santa-ist (satanist).”
  • Sanitise→ Santa-tise: As in, “Hand santa-tiser,” and “This area needs santa-tising,” and “Bad santa-tation.”
  • Sent her→ Santa: As in, “I santa a few presents, but she hasn’t received them.”
  • *sant→ *santa: As in, “Incessanta noise,” and “Pleasanta conversation,” and “Peasanta’s clothing,” and “Pheasanta’s don’t want to be eaten,” and “Are you cognisanta of that fact?” and “An unpleasanta atmosphere.”
  • *sent*→ *santa*: As in, “No is a complete santance,” and “Pigs are santa-ent (sentient) beings,” and “What a beautiful santament,” and “A santamental being,” and “All presanta and correct,” and “No time like the presanta,” and “Represantang,” and “Bet on our dissanta (dissent),” and “You have our assanta,” and “I resanta the insinuation,” and “Absanta without leave,” and “Conspicuously absanta.”
  • *cent*→ *santa*: As in, “The santa (centre) of attention,” and “Left, right and santa,” and “Take santa stage,” and “Sale of the santaury,” and “A desanta (decent) person,” and “A magnifisanta effort,” and “Don’t play innosanta,” and “The street adjasanta,” and “An eccsantaric (eccentric) character,” and “A sweet insanta-ive,” and “Are santapedes poisonous?”
  • *sand*→ *santa*: As in, santawich (sandwich), santabox (sandbox), santal (sandal), santastorm (sandstorm), thousanta (thousand), quicksanta (quicksand).
  • Hoe→ Hoe ho ho: As in, “A hard row to hoe ho ho,” and “A hoe ho ho down.” Note: if something is a hard or tough row to hoe, then it’s a very difficult task.
  • *ho*→ *ho ho ho*: We can play with words that contain “ho” to make some terrible Santa puns, as in “Drink alcoho-ho-hol in moderation over the holidays,” and “Beho-ho-hold!” and “A ho ho horrible idea,” and “Don’t ho ho hoard the leftovers.” More words that you can play with along the lines of this theme: echo (echo-ho-ho), macho (macho-ho-ho), home, cohort (coho-ho-hort), hold, horse, hole, hope, host, hook, holistic, abhorrence, blowhole, buttonhole, foothold, hoarse, hoax, Hobart, holly, homesick, hopeful, hormone, horn, horrible, horrify, horticultural, hotel, how, keyhole, pigeonhole, whole. There are many more words that could be used so be creative!
  • *oh*→ *ho ho ho*: Words that rhyme with “oh” or contain an “oh” sound can be used as the beginning or ending “ho” in “ho ho ho”. As in, “Blow-ho-ho me a kiss,” and “How do you know-ho-ho?” and “Rolling out dough-ho-ho,” and “Go with the flow-ho-ho.” Other words that would work with this: crow, flow, foe, glow, go, grow, low, mow, no, owe, plough, quo, row, roe, sew, hollow, show, slow, snow, so, stow, though, throw, toe, tow, woe, aglow, although, aloe, banjo, below, bestow, bordeaux, borrow, chateau, gateau, combo, chapeau, crossbow, bow, elbow. There are many other words that could be used so be creative.
  • Claustrophobic→ Clausetrophobic
  • Cause→ Clause: As in, “Claus a stir,” and “Claus and effect,” and “Claus for concern,” and “A lost claus,” and “Rebel without a claus,” and “A martyr to the claus,” and “Just beclaus you can, doesn’t mean you should.”
  • Claws→ Claus: As in, “Get one’s claus into,” and “Get your claus out.”
  • Clause→ Claus: As in, “A subordinate claus.”
  • Close→ Claus: As in, “A claus thing,” and “A claus call,” and “As one door clauses, another opens,” and “At claus quarters,” and “Behind claused doors,” and “Case claused,” and “Claus encounters,” and “Claus friends,” and “Claus proximity,” and “A claus shave,” and “Claus to home,” and “A claused book,” and “Don’t stand so claus to me,” and “Drawn to a claus,” and “Keep your cards claus,” and “Keep your friends claus and your enemies clauser,” and “Too claus for comfort,” and “Up claus and personal,” and “A skeleton in the clauset.”
  • Father→ Father Christmas: As in, “Father Christmas knows best,” and “Founding Father Christmas,” and “Like Father Christmas, like son.”
  • Nickel→ Nicholas: As in, “If I had a nicholas every time..”
  • Nick: St. Nick is another name for Santa, so here are some nick-related phrases: “In good nick,” and “In the nick of time.”
  • Neck→ Nick: As in, “At breaknick speed,” and “Break your nick,” and “Breathing down your nick,” and “Nick and nick,” and “A pain in the nick,” and “Stick your nick out,” and “This nick of the woods,” and “Up to your nick in trouble,” and “Win by a nick,” and “By the nape of your nick.”
  • Next→ Nicks: As in, “America’s Nicks Top Model,” and “Better luck nicks time,” and “Boy nicks door,” and “Knock into the middle of nicks week,” and “The nicks generation,” and “Nicks in line to the throne,” and “Nicks to nothing,” and “Take it to the nicks level,” and “A week from nicks Tuesday.” Note: America’s Next Top Model is a competitive reality TV show.
  • Neck*→ Nick*: As in, nicklace (necklace), nicktie, nicking (necking), nickline, bottlenick, rubbernick, breaknick and turtlenick. Notes: necking is a colloquial term for making out. Rubbernecking is the act of craning your neck to stare at something you find interesting.
  • *nick*: Emphasise the “nick” in certain words to make references to St. Nick in your wordplay: nickel, nickname, Nickelodeon, snicker, finicky, knickers, and persnickety. Note: to be finicky is to be particular or fussy. Persnickety is a synonym for finicky.
  • *nock*→ *nick*: As in, “Well knick me down with a feather,” and “What a knickout!”
  • knuckle→ nickle: As in, “Nickle sandwich,” and “Nickle dusters,” and “Nickle under,” and “A white-nickle experience.” Note: a white-knuckle experience is one that was particularly stressful or frightening.
  • *nak*→ *nick*: As in, “Nicked (naked) as the day you were born,” and “The nicked truth,” and “Lower than a snick’s belly,” and “Snick eyes.” Note: snake eyes are when two dice are rolled and both result in a one.
  • Snakes and Ladders→ St. Nicks and Ladders: Snakes and Ladders is a fairly retro board game.
  • Snakes on a Plane→ St. Nicks on a Plane: Snakes on a Plane is a thriller action movie. This pun would work particularly well as a visual/comic pun.
  • Heineken→ Heinicken: Heineken is a beer.
  • *nik*→ *nick*: As in, “A new Nickon camera,” and “Part of the beatnick scene,” and “A new monicker,” and “The artist’s manickin.” Notes: a moniker is a nickname or alias. A beatnik is a stereotype from a literary movement in the 1950s-1960s.
  • Crisp→ Kris: Santa Claus is also known as Kris Kringle, so we can use this name to make some silly Santa puns too. As in, “Burnt to a kris.”
  • Krispy Kreme→ Krispy Kringle
  • *cras*→ *kris*: As in, “Krish and burn,” and “A kriss (crass) statement,” and “Stop prokristinating!” and “Her idiosynkrisies are part of her charm.” Note: idiosyncrasies are habitual behaviours or mannerisms that a person has.
  • Cres*→ Kris*: As in, “The family krist,” and “On the krist of a wave,” and “A kriscent moon,” and “The scene reached a kriscendo,” and “She looked kristfallen.” Note: a crescendo is a slow increase in something – music, atmosphere, emotion etc.
  • *cris*→ *kris*: As in, “A krisis situation,” and “A krispy coating,” and “Put it in the krisper,” and “I won’t stand for such hypokrisy.”
  • *cros*→ *kris*: As in, “A storyline krissover,” and “The weekly krissword,” and “Animal Krissing,” and “At a krissroads,” and “Akristic poem,” and “Under a mikriscope.” Note: an acrostic is a type of poem that focuses on the first letter of each line in the poem. Animal Crossing is an RPG game.
  • Crus*→ Kris*: As in, “Upper krist,” and “Kristaceans (crustaceans) aren’t food.”
  • Ludicrous→ Ludikris: As in, “What a ludikris idea.” Note: to be ludicrous is to be foolish or unreasonable.
  • Cringe→ Kringle: As in, “Kringle-inducing,” and “Kringleworthy.”
  • Crinkle→ Kringle: As in, “You’ve kringled the paper,” and “My dress is kringled now.”
  • Crystal→ Kristal: As in, “As clear as kristal,” and “Kristal clear.”
  • *chris/chrys*→ *kris*: As in, “A white krismas,” and “Krismas is coming,” and “A born-again kristian,” and “Are you kristened?” and “I love krisanthemums (chysanthemums),” and “It’s about time you emerged from your krisalis (chrysalis).” Note: Chrysanthemums are a type of flower.
  • Slytherin→ Sleightherin
  • Slay→ Sleigh: As in, “Sleigh, queen,” and “Sleigh the dragon.”
  • Say*→ Sleigh*: As in, “As the sleighing goes,” and “Do as I sleigh, not as I do,” and “Does exactly what it sleighs on the box,” and “Have the final sleigh,” and “Just sleigh the word,” and “It goes without sleighing,” and “Never sleigh never,” and “Sleigh cheese!” and “Sleigh it loud and sleigh it proud,” and “Sleigh it with flowers,” and “Sleigh uncle,” and “Sleigh what you mean and mean what you sleigh,” and “Sleigh your prayers,” and “Simon sleighs,” and “As I was sleighing,” and “If I do sleigh so myself,” and “I’ll sleigh,” and “Let’s not and sleigh we did,” and “Sleigh again?” and “That’s sleighing something,” and “To sleigh the least,” and “You can’t sleigh fairer than that.”
  • Sleight: Emphasise the “sleigh” – “Sleigh-t of hand.”
  • Lay→ Sleigh: As in, “Sleigh a finger on,” and “Sleigh down your arms,” and “Sleigh down your life,” and “Sleigh eyes on,” and “Sleigh down the law,” and “Sleigh it on thick,” and “The sleigh of the land,” and “Sleigh down the groundwork.”
  • Laid→ Sleigh’d: As in, “Get sleigh’d,” and “Sleigh’d back,” and “Sleigh’d bare” and “Sleigh’d to rest,” and “Even the best sleigh’d plans.”
  • Said→ Sleigh’d: As in, “After all is sleigh’d and done,” and “I couldn’t have sleigh’d it better,” and “Easier sleigh’d than done,” and “Enough sleigh’d,” and “No sooner sleigh’d than done,” and “‘Nuff sleigh’d,” and “Was it something I sleigh’d?” and “That’s what you sleigh’d.”
  • Sight→ Sleigh’t: As in, “Catch sleigh’t of,” and “Hidden in plain sleigh’t,” and “Love at first sleigh’t,” and “Not a pretty sleigh’t,” and “Out of sleigh‘t,” and “Set your sleigh’ts on,” and “A sleigh’t for sore eyes,” and “A sleigh’t to behold,” and “Hindsleigh’t is 20/20,” and “Can’t stand the sleigh’t of,” and “A sorry sleigh’t.”
  • Slight→ Sleigh’t: As in, “A sleigh’t oversight,” and “Sleigh‘tly ahead of our time,” and “Not in the sleigh’test,” and “A sleigh’t misunderstanding.”
  • Slate→ Sleight’: As in, “A blank sleigh’t,” and “A clean sleigh’t,” and “Wipe the sleigh’t clean.”
  • *sight*→ *sleight*: As in, “I value your insleight,” and “An enormous oversleight,” and “In hindsleight,” and “An insleightful person,” and “I wish I had your foresleight,” and “A sleightseeing tour.”
  • *sley→ *sleigh: As in, parsleigh (parsley), paisleigh (paisley), Elvis Presleigh (Presley), and Ronald Weasleigh (Weasley).
  • Lay*→ Sleigh*: As in, “The topmost sleigher (layer),” and “Sleighout (layout) designer,” and “In sleighperson’s terms.” Note: a layperson is someone with no training or qualifications in a particular subject.
  • *say*→ *sleigh*: As in, “I have an essleigh (essay) due Monday,” and “That’s hearsleigh (hearsay),” and “Don’t be a naysleigher,” and “The old soothsleigher.” Notes: hearsay is a type of evidence that has a reputation for being untrustworthy or unreliable. A soothsayer is one who predicts the future.
  • *sly→ *sleigh: Use words that end in “sly” to make some corny sleigh puns: “It happened simultaneousleigh,” and “Well, obviousleigh,” and “You performed flawlessleigh.” Here are some other words that would work with this: surreptitiousleigh (surreptitiously), continuousleigh (continuously), vicariousleigh (vicariously), seamlessleigh (seamlessly), previousleigh (previously), thusleigh (thusly), seriousleigh (seriously), furiousleigh (furiously), carelessleigh (carelessly), shamelessleigh (shamelessly), soundlessleigh (soundlessly), maliciousleigh (maliciously), curiousleigh (curiously), ceremoniousleigh (ceremoniously), tenaciousleigh (tenaciously), frivolousleigh (frivolously), deviousleigh (deviously), fabulousleigh (fabulously), famousleigh (famously), gloriousleigh (gloriously).
  • Elvis→ Elfis
  • Chimney: A chimney-related phrase for you to play with: “Smokes like a chimney.”
  • Jiminy→ Chimney: As in, “Chimney cricket!” Note: Jiminy cricket is both a way of swearing and a character in the Disney movie Pinocchio.
  • Suit→ Soot: As in, “All over him like a cheap soot,” and “At a price to soot your pocket,” and “Follow soot,” and “In your birthday soot,” and “Soot up!” and “Soots you down to a tee,” and “Soots you down to the ground.”
  • Shoot→ Soot: As in, “Don’t soot the messenger,” and “Drive-by sooting,” and “Eats, soots and leaves,” and “The green soots of recovery,” and “Just soot me,” and “A sharp sooter,” and “Sooting blanks,” and “Soot down in flames,” and “Sooting from the hip,” and “Soot hoops,” and “Soot the breeze,” and “Soot your mouth off,” and “Soot yourself in the foot,” and “Soot for the sky,” and “Soot one a dirty look.”
  • Chute→ Soot: As in, “A golden parasoot,” and “Straight out of the soot.”
  • *suit*→ *soot*: As in, “A sootable choice,” and “A new sootor,” and “Pack your sootcase!” Other words that will work: sooted (suited), sootability (suitability), sootably (suitably), pursoot (pursuit), lawsoot (lawsuit), wetsoot (wetsuit), jumpsoot (jumpsuit), swimsoot (swimsuit), tracksoot (tracksuit).
  • Sack: Change up your Santa puns with these sack-related phrases: “Get the sack,” and “Hit the sack,” and “A sad sack.”
  • Sick→ Sack: As in, “Sack as a dog,” and “Enough to make you sack,” and “One sack puppy,” and “In sackness and in health,” and “Morning sackness,” and “Off sack,” and “On the sack list,” and “Phone in sack,” and “Pull a sackie,” and “Sack and tired,” and “Sack to death of,” and “Sack to the stomach,” and “Worried sack.”
  • Shake→ Sack: As in, “Bone-sacking,” and “A fair sack,” and “Sacking my head,” and “In two sacks of a lamb’s tail,” and “More than you can sack a stick at,” and “Sack a leg,” and “Sack like a leaf,” and “Movers and sackers.”
  • Sec*→ Sack*: As in,”Our best-kept sackret,” and “Having sackond thoughts,” and “Just a sackond,” and “Play sackond fiddle,” and “A sackond childhood,” and “Sackond nature,” and “Two-sackond rule,” and “In the wrong sacktion.” Some other sec* words: sackular (secular), sackurity (security), sackure (secure), sackretary (secretary), consackutive (consecutive), sacktor (sector).
  • *sic*→ *sack*: As in, “Blow this popsackle stand,” and “Face the musack,” and “Make beautiful musack together,” and “Physackal (physical) education,” and “Back to basacks.” Some other *sic* words: sackle (sickle), sackly (sickly), sackening (sickening), intrinsack (intrinsic), classack (classic), forensack (forensic), physacks (physics), extrinsack (extrinsic), and whimsackal (whimsical).
  • Sock → Sack: As in, “Knock their sacks off,” and “Pull your sacks up,” and “Put a sack in it,” and “Sack it to me!”
  • Shock→ Sack: As in, “Electric sack,” and “Culture sack,” and “In for a sack,” and “Shell-sacked,” and “Sack and awe,” and “Sack horror,” and “A short, sharp sack.” Some other “shock” words: sacked (shocked), aftersack (aftershock), sackwave (shockwave), sacker (shocker).
  • Suc*→ Sack*: As in, “Sack it up,” and “Sack it in,” and “Sacker punch,” and “Be careful who you step on while climbing the ladder of sackcess,” and “If at first you don’t sackceed, the hell with it.” Other suc* words: Sackcint (succinct), sackcumb (succumb), sackcessful (successful), and sackcession (succession).
  • *sack*: Other sack-related words for you to play with: ransack, rucksack, hoversack and knapsack.
  • *sac*→ *sack*: As in, “A massive sackrifice,” and “Sackrilege!” and “A committee is a cul-de-sack where ideas go quietly to die,” and “A completed transacktion,” and “The Texas Chainsaw Massackre.”
  • *shack*→ *sack*: As in, “In sackles,” and “A ramsackle apartment.” Note: if something is ramshackle, then it looks so carelessly put together that it seems on the verge of collapse.
  • *shak*→ *sack*: As in, “A sacky argument,” and “Movers and sackers,” and “This is a sackdown (shakedown)!” and “A weak handsack,” and “My milksack brings all the boys to the yard,” and “She was sacken by the news.”
  • Soc*→ Sack*: As in, “Sacker mom (soccer),” and “Electrical sacket.” Note: a soccer mom is a stereotype that broadly refers to middle-class, suburban women who spend a large amount of time at school events.
  • Shakespeare→ Sackspeare
  • *self→ *elf: As in, “An elf-made business owner,” and “Apply your-elf,” and “Be your-elf,” and “Pull your-elf together,” and “I didn’t do it my-elf.” Note: this also works for the plural forms of both self and elf – as in, “Apply your-elves (apply yourselves),” and “Pull your-elves together.”
  • Selfie→ Elfie: As in, “Take an elfie,” and “Use an elfie stick.”
  • Self-*→ Elf-*: As in, “Have some elf-conficence,” and “She’s got good elf-control.” Other words that would work with this format: elf-contained, elf-deceiving, elf-deprecating, elf-determination, elf-enrichment, elf-governing, elf-help, elf-improvement, elf-perpetuating, elf-portrait, elf-sufficient.
  • Self*→ Elf*: As in, “An elfish (selfish) person,” and “Elfless (selfless) bravery,” and “I won’t stand for such elfishness (selfishness).”
  • *alf*→ *elf*: As in, elfalfa (alfalfa), elfredo (alfredo), behelf (behalf – as in, “On behelf of”), and melfunction (malfunction – as in, “Why is the computer melfunctioning?”)
  • Health→ Helf: As in, “A helfy mind in a helfy body,” and “Bad for your helf,” and “A clean bill of helf,” and “Glowing with helf,” and “In sickness and in helf,” and “A picture of helf,” and “Take a helf-y interest,” and “Ill helf,” and “In the pink of helf,” and “Helfy as a horse.” Note: if you’re in the pink of health, then you’re in very good condition.
  • Wealth→ Welf: As in, “Rolling in welf,” and “Redistribution of welf,” and “Share the welf.”
  • Alphabet→ Elfabet: As in, “Elfabet soup,” and “Do you know your elfabet?”
  • Gift: As gifts are a part of Santa’s legend, we’ve provided gift-related phrases to play with: “Don’t look a gift horse in the mouth,” and “A gift from the gods,” and “Gift of life,” and “Gift of the gab,” and “The gift of time,” and “The gift that keeps on giving.” Notes: the gift of the gab is a talent for communication. To look a gift horse in the mouth is to question the value of a gift or to be ungrateful.
  • Give→ Gift: As in, “A dead giftaway,” and “Don’t gift up,” and “I don’t gift a monkey’s,” and “Don’t gift up your day job,” and “Frankly my dear, I don’t gift a damn,” and “Gift peace a chance,” and “Gift a hand,” and “Gift and take,” and “Gift credit where credit is due,” and “Gift an inch and they’ll take a mile,” and “Gift it all you’ve got,” and “Gift it to me straight,” and “Gift me liberty or gift me death,” and “What gifts?” and “Wouldn’t gift you the time of day.” Note” the quote “Frankly my dear, I don’t give a damn” is a line from the movie “Gone With the Wind.”
  • Giving→ Gifting: As in, “They’re gifting me a dirty look,” and “The gift that keeps on gifting.”
  • Forgive→ Forgift: As in, “Forgift your enemies; nothing annoys them more,” and “Forgift and forget,” and “To err is human, to forgift – divine,” and “Have you forgiften me yet?”
  • Present: Some present-related phrases to mix into your puns: “All present and correct,” and “Present company excepted,” and “No time like the present.” Note: if present company is excepted, then the topics or complaints at hand do not apply to those in attendance.
  • Presence→ Presents: As in, “The honour of your presents is requested,” and “Grace us with your presents.”
  • Pleasant→ Present: As in, “I don’t have time for presentries,” and “Present conversation,” and “Why the unpresentness (unpleasantness)?”
  • Resent→ Present: As in, “I present the insinuation!”
  • Naughty: We can reference Santa’s naughty or nice list with these naughty-related phrases: “The naughty corner,” and “Naughty but nice.”
  • Nutty→ Naughty: As in, “A sweet, naughty flavour.”
  • Nautical→ Naughty-cal: As in, “A naughty-cal mile,” and “Naughty-cal life.”
  • Nought→ Naughty: As in, “Naughty and crosses,” and “It’s all come to naughty.”
  • *nut→ *naughty: As in, chestnaughty (chestnut), walnaughty (walnut), doughnaughty (doughnut – could also be donaughty), peanaughty (peanut), coconaughty (coconut), butternaughty (butternut), hazelnaughty (hazelnut).
  • *naut→ *naughty: As in, astronaughty (astronaut), aeronaughty (aeronaut), cybernaughty (cybernaut), juggernaughty (juggernaut).
  • Nice: Make references to Santa’s naughty or nice list with these nice-related phrases: “Have a nice day,” and “Make nice,” and “Naughty but nice,” and “Nice and easy does it,” and “A nice place to visit,” and “Nice save,” and “Nice try,” and “Nice work if you can get it,” and “Nicely put,” and “No more mister nice guy,” and “The key to a nice, relaxed evening,” and “Wouldn’t it be nice?” and “Couldn’t happen to a nicer..” Notes: to make nice is to behave nicely to someone in an insincere manner.
  • *nis*→ *nice*: Anything with the “nice” sound or that can rhyme with nice can be changed to include the word nice: adminice-ter (administer), agnice-tic (agnostic), banniceter (bannister), botanicet (botanist), businice (business), cynicecism (cynicism), ethniceity (ethnicity), hedonicetic (hedonistic), hygienicet (hygienist), impressionicet (impressionist), happinice (happiness), uniceson (unison).
  • Good: We can also reference the naughty/nice idea with these phrases related to good: “A bill of goods,” and “A change is as good as a rest,” and “A good egg,” and “A good time was had by all,” and “A world of good,” and “All good things must come to an end,” and “All in good time,” and “No news is good news,” and “Good as gold,” and “Good as it gets,” and “Good as new,” and “Good as your word,” and “As good luck would have it,” and “Do a good turn,” and “Do you want the good news or the bad news?” and “Fight the good fight,” and “A good samaritan,” and “Good vibrations,” and “Good and ready,” and “Good enough to eat,” and “Good for a laugh,” and “Good for nothing,” and “Good riddance,” and “Good things come in small packages,” and “Goodness gracious me,” and “Read any good books lately?”
  • Could→ Good: As in, “As fast as his legs good carry him,” and “I goodn’t care less,” and “I good do it in my sleep,” and “I good see you a mile away,” and “If looks good kill,” and “Good have heard a pin drop,” and “Good have knocked me down with a feather.”
  • Bad: Make more references to Santa’s naughty/nice list with these bad-related phrases: “A bad break,” and “Ain’t half bad,” and “Bad intentions,” and “Bad romance,” and “A bad apple,” and “Bad blood,” and “Bad for your health,” and “A bad hair day,” and “Bad mouthed,” and “Bad news travels fast,” and “A bad taste in the mouth,” and “A bad time,” and “The bearer of bad news,” and “Do you want the good news or the bad news?” and “Fall into bad habits,’ and “From bad to worse,” and “Get off to a bad start,” and “Gone to the bad,” and “Got it bad,” and “In a bad way,” and “My bad,” and “Not bad,” and “On bad terms with,” and “Take the good with the bad,” and “No such thing as bad press,” and “Bad company,” and “Bad to the bone,” and “In (someone’s) bad books,” and “In bad shape,” and “Good riddance to bad rubbish.”
  • Bad→ Bed: As in, “Bad and breakfast,” and “A bad of nails,” and “Between you, me and the badpost,” and “Early to bad and early to rise,” and “Get into bad with,” and “Get out of the wrong side of the bad,” and “Go to bad with,” and “Don’t let the bad bugs bite.” Note: if something is between you, someone else, and the bedpost, then it’s a secret.
  • *bad*: Emphasize the “bad” in certain words: badger, badass, badge, badly and badminton.
  • *bed*→ *bad*: As in, “It’s badlam (bedlam) in here!” and “Strange badfellows (bedfellows),” and “Tears before badtime,” and “On your deathbad,” and “Trust is the badrock of a good relationship,” and “Change the badding (bedding),” and “Why do you look so badraggled (bedraggled)?” and “Meet you in the badroom,” and “A hotbad (hotbed) for criminal activity,” and “When laws are unjust, civil disobadience is necessary.” Notes: bedlam is a general confusion or chaos. Strange bedfellows are people who are brought together who have little in common. If something is bedraggled, then it looks ruined and dirty.
  • *bid*→ *bad*: As in, “Forbadden fruit,” and “Morbad interests,” and “To the highest badder.”
  • *bod*→ *bad*: As in, “Anybady who is anybady,” and “Bady blow,” and “Everybady and their cousin,” and “Over my dead bady,” and “Spoil somebady rotten,” and “They embady the true nature of forgiveness,” and “A feeling of forebading,” and “The embadiment of kindness.” Note: to embody something is to make it concrete and real.
  • *bud*→ *bad*: As in, “Study baddy,” and “Champagne taste on a beer badget,” and “Within badget,” and “Study Baddhism,” and “Badgie smuggler,” and “Gather rosebads,” and “A treat for your tastebads,” and “Contact the ombadsman,” and “They wouldn’t badge (budge).” Notes: a budgie smuggler is Australian slang for a type of tight-fitting Speedo. An ombudsman is a public official whose role is to represent and protect public interests.
  • Deer: Use this well-known deer-related phrase to refer to Santa’s reindeer – “Deer in headlights.”
  • Dear→ Deer: As in, “After you, my deer,” and “Deerly beloved, we are gathered here today,” and “Elementary, my deer Watson,” and “Frankly my deer, I don’t give a damn,” and “Hang on for deer life,” and “Near and deer to my heart,” and “Nearest and deerest.”
  • Eerie→ Deerie: As in, “A deerie atmosphere.” Note: eerie means creepy.
  • Dairy→ Deery: As in, “Deery is scary.”
  • Rain, dear→ Rain, deer: As in, “It looks like rain, deer!”
  • Fond→ Fawned/Fawn’d: As in, “Absence makes the heart grow fawnder,” and “A fawned farewell.”
  • Dare→ Deer: As in, “Deer for more,” and “Deer to be different,” and “How deer you!” and “Deer to dream,” and “Who deers wins.”
  • Rude→ Rudolph: As in, “A rudolph awakening.”
  • *rood*→ *rudolph*: Change words that rhyme with “rude” to include “rudolph”: “Debt accrudolph” (accrued),” and “Coffee’s brudolph (brewed),” and “Crudolph (crude) oil,” and “Don’t intrudolph (intrude).”
  • Dash→ Dasher: Since Dasher is one of Santa’s reindeer, we’ve included dash in this list: “Crash and dasher,” and “Dasher to pieces,” and “Dasher off.”
  • *dish→ *dasher: As in, “What outlandasher (outlandish) claims!” and “Radasher cake,” and “Childasher (childish) behaviour,” and “A prudasher (prudish) mindset,” and “A fiendasher (fiendish) child.”
  • Dance: As Dancer is one of Santa’s reindeer, we’ve included dance-related phrases for you to play with: “Dance around the problem,” and “Dance like nobody’s watching,” and “Dance the night away,” and “Dance your socks off,” and “Just dance,” and “Lead a merry dance,” and “Make a song and dance about,” and “Save the last dance for me.” Notes: to dance around the problem is to avoid it. To lead someone on a merry dance is to make things prolonged and complicated for someone. To make a song and dance about something is to make an unnecessarily big deal out of it.
  • *dance→ *dancer: As in, “Take attendancer,” and “I need your guidancer,” and “In abundancer of,” and “In accordancer with,” and “Good riddancer to bad rubbish,” and “Avoidancer techniques.”
  • Dense→ Dance: As in, “The cake should be light and fluffy, not dance,” and “Are you dance?”
  • *dence→ *dance: As in, “Where’s the evidance?” and “A measured cadance,” and “In confidance,” and “Enter into correspondance with.”
  • Pants→ Prance: These puns will help you refer to Prancer, another of Santa’s reindeer: “Ants in his prance,” and “Beat the prance off,” and “By the seat of your prance,” and “Caught with your prance down,” and “Drop your prance,” and “Fancy prance,” and “Fly by the seat of your prance,” and “Keep your prance on,” and “Prance on fire,” and “Smarty prance,” and “Keep it in your prance,” and “Keep your prance on.”
  • Prince→ Prance: As in, “A prance among men,” and “Prance of darkness,” and “Prance of Persia.” Note: Prince of Persia is a video game franchise.
  • Prints→ Prance: As in, “I made some prance to hang on the walls.”
  • Common→ Comet: Make references to Comet, one of Santa’s reindeer, with these: “A victory for comet sense,” and “As comet as muck,” and “Comet ground,” and “Comet sense,” and “Nothing in comet,” and “The comet good.”
  • Comment→ Comet: As in, “No comet,” and “Any questions, comets or concerns?”
  • Come→ Comet: As in, “All good things must comet to an end,” and “Good things comet to those who wait,” and “As tough as they comet,” and “Christmas comets but once a year,” and “Comet and get it,” and “Comet away with me,” and “Comet on over,” and “Comet running,” and “Comet together,” and “Comet again?” and “Comet down hard on,” and “Comet down on (someone) like a tonne of bricks,” and “Comet full circle,” and “Comet hell or high water,” and “Comet home to a real fire,” and “Comet home to roost,” and “Comet in from the cold,” and “Comet of age,” and “Comet out and play,” and “Comet out of the closet,” and “Comet out of your shell,” and “Comet out swinging,” and “Comet rain or shine.”
  • Cosmic→ Comet: As in, “Comet ordering.” Note: cosmic ordering is the idea that positive thinking without action can help you realise your dreams.
  • Comic→ Comet: As in, “Comet strip,” and “Comet timing.”
  • Cupid: As Cupid is one of Santa’s reindeer, this Cupid-related phrase can stand in as a Santa pun: “Play Cupid.” Note: to play Cupid is to attempt to act as a match-maker.
  • Stupid*→ Cupid*: As in, “Criminal cupidity,” and “I’m with cupid,” and “Keep it simple, cupid,” and “Cupid is as cupid does,” and “Very interesting, but cupid.”
  • Kewpie→ Cupid: As in, “Cupid doll,” and “Cupid mayonnaise.” Note: kewpie is both a type of doll and a brand of mayonnaise.
  • *cup→ *cupid: As in, hiccupid, buttercupid, and teacupid.
  • Done→ Donner: Donner is another of Santa’s reindeer, so it’s been included in this list too: “Been there, donner that,” and “Donner and dusted,” and “A donner deal,” and “Easier said than donner,” and “Hard donner by,” and “Well donner,” and “When all is said and donner,” and “I’m donner for.”
  • Do not→ Donner: As in, “Donner look now,” and “Donner call us, we’ll call you,” and “Donner get me started,” and “Donner give up your day job,” and “Donner go there,” and “Donner hold your breath,” and “Donner knock yourself out,” and “Donner let the door hit you on the way out,” and “Donner tell me what to do,” and “Donner believe everything you hear,” and “Donner get caught with your pants down,” and “Donner knock it til you’ve tried it,” and “I donner understand.”
  • Dinner→ Donner: As in, “Donner and a movie,” and “A donner date,” and “A dog’s donner,” and “Guess who’s coming to donner?”
  • Pardon→ Par-donner: As in, “I beg your par-donner?” and “Well par-donner me for living,” and “Par-donner my French,” and “Par-donner me.” This also works well with other words ending with “don”, like abandon (abandonner), tendon (tendonner), armageddon (armageddonner) and London (Londonner).
  • Blitz: As in, “Blitzed out.” Note: Blitzen is one of Santa’s reindeer.
  • Bliss→ Blitz: As in, “Blitzed out,” and “A blitzful slumber,” and “Domestic blitz,” and “Ignorance is blitz,” and “Marital blitz.”
  • Blister*→ Blitzer*: As in, “Blitzering barnacle,” and “At blitzering speed,” and “Blood blitzer,” and “Blitzer pack,” and “Blitzering heat.” Note: a blister pack is a type of plastic and foil packaging, usually for medicine.
  • Present: We put gifts and presents under Christmas trees, so we’ve included these words in this list too. As in, “All present and correct,” and “Present company excepted,” and “No time like the present.”
  • Percent → Present: As in, “A hundred and ten present,” and “Genius is one present inspiration and 99 present perspiration.”
  • Gift: As in, “Don’t look a gift horse in the mouth,” and “Gift of life,” and “A gift that keeps on giving,” and “A gift from above.”
  • Give → Gift: As in, “A dead giftaway,” and “Don’t gift up!” and “Don’t gift in,” and “Gift yourself a bad name,” and “Gift them a hand,” and “Gift and take,” and “Gift credit where credit is due,” and “Gift it a rest,” and “Gift it the green light,” and “Gift me a call,” and “Gift 110%”.
  • Gave → Gift: As in, “I gift my best.”
  • Cook→ Cookie: Since it’s a tradition to leave milk and cookies for Santa, we’ve included cookie puns in this list too: “Cookie the books,” and “Cookie up a storm,” and “Cookied up,” and “Too many cookies spoil the broth.”
  • Cookie: Some cookie-related phrases for you to use as puns: “A tough cookie,” and “Caught with your hand in the cookie jar,” and “That’s the way the cookie crumbles.”
  • Milk: To go with out cookie phrases, here are some milk-related phrases: “Mild as milk,” and “Don’t cry over spilt milk,” and “Just like a chocolate milkshake, only crunchy,” and “Land of milk and honey,” and “The milk of human kindness.”
  • Coal: It’s traditional for Santa to leave coal for naughty children, so we’ve included coal-related phrases here: “Black as coal,” and “Rake over the coals,” and “Like a cat on hot coals.”
  • Goal→ Coal: As in, “A coal in mind,” and “Moving the coalposts,” and “Score a coal.”
  • Cold→ Coal’d: As in, “Coal’d as blue blazes,” and “Coal’d as ice,” and “Hot and coal’d,” and “Break out in a coal’d sweat,” and “Catch a coal‘d,” and “Catch your death of coal’d,” and “A coal’d heart,” and “Coal’d calling,” and “Coal’d comfort,” and “A coal’d day in hell,” and “Coal’d feet,” and “Coal’d light of day,” and “The coal’d shoulder,” and “Come in from the coal’d,” and “Coal’d, hard cash,” and “In coal’d blood,” and “A coal’d and frosty morning,” and “Left out in the coal’d,” and “Out coal’d,” and “Revenge is a dish best served coal’d,” and “Stone coal’d sober,” and “Take a coal’d, hard look.”
  • Cool→ Coal: As in, “Coal as a cucumber,” and “Coal beans,” and “A coal million,” and “Coal off,” and “Coal your heels,” and “Coal, calm and collected,” and “Keep your coal,” and “Play it coal,” and “A coaling-off period.”
  • Crawl→ Coal: As in, “Coal back into your shell,” and “Coal out of the woodwork,” and “Don’t try to walk before you can coal,” and “Makes my skin coal.”
  • *col* → *coal*: As in, “Coalour (colour) coded,” and “A work coalleague,” and “In from the coald,” and “A stamp coallection.” Other words that work with this: coallusion (collusion), coallateral (collateral), coallege (college), coalon (colon), coallaborate (collaborate), coalumn (column), protocoal (protocol), semicoalon (semicolon), chocoalate (chocolate), coallar (collar), coalogne (cologne), Coalumbia (Columbia), coallapse (collapse), coallagen (collagen), scoald (scold).
  • *gol*→ *coal*: As in, “Good as coald (gold),” and “You’re coalden (golden),” and “Do you play coalf (golf)?” Other words that work with this: coalem (golem), coaliath (goliath), coaldilocks (goldilocks), coally (golly), and maricoald (marigold).
  • *cole*→ *coal*: As in: coalslaw (coleslaw) and narcoalepsy (narcolepsy). Note: narcolepsy is a sleeping disorder.
  • Cul*→ Coal*: As in, “Third coalture kid,” and “This is not a coalt (cult),” and “Buddhism is about coaltivating kindness.” Other words that work with this format: coalprit (culprit), coall (cull), coalinary (culinary), coalpable (culpable), and coalminate (culminate).
  • Stock→ Stocking: As in, “In stocking,” and “Lock, stocking and barrel,” and “Out of stocking,” and “Take stocking.”
  • Stick→ Stocking: This one’s a bit of a stretch, but you can make it work: “A stocking to beat you with,” and “Better than a poke in the eye with a sharp stocking,” and “Got hold of the wrong end of the stocking,” and “More than you can shake a stocking at,” and “Short end of the stocking,” and “Stocking point.” Note: a sticking point is a point in a discussion where it is difficult to reach an agreement.
  • Christmas Tree: Since it’s part of Santa’s story to leave presents under a tree, we’ve included tree-related phrases and puns in this list: “Done up like a Christmas tree,” and “Lit up like a Christmas tree,” and “Oh, Christmas tree..”
  • Tree→ Christmas tree: As in, “Difficult as nailing jelly to a Christmas tree,” and “Barking up the wrong Christmas tree,” and “Can’t see the wood for the Christmas trees,” and “Charm the birds out of the Christmas trees,” and “Legs like Christmas tree trunks,” and “Make like a Christmas tree and leave,” and “Money doesn’t grow on Christmas trees,” and “Christmas tree hugger,” and “You’re outta your Christmas tree.”
  • Three→ Tree: As in, “And baby makes tree,” and “Good things come in trees,” and “Tree strikes and you’re out!” and “Tree wise men,” and “Tree’s a charm.”
  • Free*→ Tree*: As in, “A symbol of treedom,” and “As tree as a bird,” and “Breathe treely,” and “Buy one, get one tree,” and “Tree for all,” and “Treedom of the press,” and “Get out of jail tree,” and “The best things in life are tree,” and “Land of the tree,” and “Leader of the tree world,” and “The truth will set you tree,” and “No such thing as a tree lunch,” and “When hell treezes over,” and “Think treely.”
  • *tri*→ *tree*: As in, “My hair needs a treem,” and “Full of nutree-ents,” and “What is your best attreebute?” and “How cool are golden retreevers?” and “It’s an intreensic (intrinsic) quality,” and “A new brand of vegan chicken streeps,” and “No streengs attached,” and “We’re going on a treep!” and “Pull the treegger,” and “Any more treecks up your sleeve?” and “A love treeangle,” and “A treevial problem,” and “We pay treebute to the fallen.”
  • *trea*→ *tree*: As in, “A real treet,” and “Medical treetment,” and “Royal treeson,” and “I treesure you,” and “Thick as treecle,” and “Swim upstreem,” and “A holiday retreet,” and “A winning streek,” and “A treecherous mountain path.”
  • *tee*→ *tree*: As in, “By the skin of your treeth,” and “The scene was treeming with people,” and “I guarantree it,” and “A welcoming committree,” and “A chunky manatree,” and “Self-estreem,” and “Charitable voluntreers,” and “My child’s school cantreen.”
  • *tary→ *tree: As in, “Proprietree cables,” and “Complimentree meals,” and “These colours are complementree,” and “Leave it with my secretree,” and “A sedentree life isn’t so healthy,” and “Dominion is a documentree you should watch,” and “It’s rudimentree addition,” and “But what’s the monetree value,” and “A solitree existence.” Notes: to be sedentary is to be inactive or seated. If something is rudimentary, then it’s basic.
  • *try*→ *tree*: As in, “Tree again,” and “A secret treest (tryst),” and “I’m tree-ing (trying)!” and “Meat is not an ethical industree,” and “Refugees should be welcomed to our countree,” and “Bigotree is still rampant,” and “Entree level,” and “A paltree sum,” and “Geometree is everywhere,” and “Chemistree lab,” and “What sultree weather.” Notes: if something is sultry, then it’s hot. A tryst is a private romantic meeting.
  • *ty*→ *tree*: As in, “Star qualitree,” and “Structural integritree,” and “The citree that never sleeps,” and “First-class facilitrees,” and “My dutrees come first,” and “Beautree isn’t everything,” and “A single entitree,” and “Maximum securitree.”
  • List: We’ve provided some list-related phrases so you can reference Santa’s naughty/nice list in your Santa puns: “Black list,” and “Hit list,” and “I’ve got a little list,” and “Laundry list,” and “Make a list; check it twice,” and “Short list,” and “Bucket list.” Some other list-related words: listing, listen, listless, populist, enlist, evangelist, journalist, specialist, checklist, stylist, holistic, blister and ballistic.
  • Last→ List: As in, “At long list,” and “At the list minute,” and “Breathe one’s list,” and “Famous list words,” and “First impressions list,” and “Do you have any list requests?” and “You haven’t heard the list of me!” and “The list bow,” and “List but not least,” and “List call,” and “List chance,” and “List ditch effort,” and “List gasp,” and “List in, first out,” and “The list laugh,” and “At the list minute,” and “List resort,” and “List rites,” and “The list straw,” and “The list taste of freedom,” and “List will and testament,” and “A listing impression,” and “On their list legs,” and “Save the list dance for me,” and “List I heard,” and “Every list one of us,” and “Fall at the list hurdle,” and “First and list,” and “Get in the list word,” and “The list thing I want.”
  • Lest→ List: As in, “Judge not, list you be judged,” and “List we forget.”
  • Lost→ List: As in, “All is not list,” and “Get list,” and “Better to have loved and list than never to have loved at all,” and “Long list,” and “List in translation,” and “List and found,” and “A list cause,” and “List soul,” and “List the plot,” and “List your marbles,” and “Make up for list time,” and “Missing, presumed list,” and “No love list.”
  • *last*→ *list*: As in, “A listing impression,” and “And listly…” and “A list-ditch effort.” Other words that would work with this format: listed (lasted), list-minute (last-minute), blist (blast), blister (blaster), plister (plaster), plistic (plastic), elistic (elastic), everlisting (everlasting), scholistic (scholastic).
  • *lest→ *list: As in, “Live life to the fullist,” and “The coolist friend,” and “The simplist solution.” Other words that would work with this format: tallist (tallest), smallist (smallest), cruellist (cruellest), shrillist (shrillest).
  • *lust*→ *list*: As in, “A shining listre (lustre),” and “Listrous, shining hair,” and “Listful (lustful) glances.” Other words that would work with this format: wanderlist (wanderlust), bloodlist (bloodlust), clister (cluster), illistrate (illustrate), blister (bluster), flistered (flustered), illistration (illustration).
  • *lis→ *list: As in, metropolist, trellist, chrysalist, borealist, and blisst. Notes: a trellis is an architectural structure. A borealis is a natural astronomical light display.
  • *lyst→ *list: As in, “A catalist (catalyst) for change,” and “Systems analist (analyst).”
  • Letter: Pay homage to the letter-writing tradition with these letter-related phrases: “Chain letter,” and “Four letter word,” and “Letter bomb,” and “Letter for letter,” and “Letter perfect,” and “To the letter.” Note: if something is to the letter, then it’s exactly as it’s been outlined, with great attention to detail.
  • Later→ Letter: As in, “Buy now, pay letter,” and “Catch you letter,” and “It’s letter than you think,” and “See you letter alligator,” and “Smell ya letter,” and “Sooner or letter,” and “Can we continue this letter?” and “I’ll call back letter,” and “Perhaps letter,” and “Ask questions letter.”
  • Let→ Letter: As in, “Don’t letter the sun go down on me,” and “Don’t letter the bastards grind you down,” and “Friends don’t letter friends drive drunk,” and “He wouldn’t just letter it lie,” and “How do I love thee? Letter me count the ways,” and “I won’t letter you down,” and “Letter it be,” and “Letter it bleed,” and “Letter alone,” and “Letter bygones be bygones,” and “Letter it all hang out,” and “Letter it slip through your fingers,” and “Letter me be brief,” and “Letter nature take its course,” and “Letter off some steam,” and “Letter me make one thing clear,” and “Letter off the hook,” and “Letter something slip,” and “Letter them eat cake,” and “Letter there be light,” and “Letter your conscience be your guide,” and “Letter your hair down,” and “Letter’s call the whole thing off,” and “Letter’s do lunch,” and “Letter’s face it,” and “Letter them down gently.”
  • *letter*: Letterhead, lettering, letterpress, letterbox, newsletter.
  • *latter*→ *letter*: As in, “Don’t fletter yourself,” and “It dropped with a cletter,” and “Bring a pletter.” Other words that work: spletter (splatter), slettern (slattern), flettery (flattery).
  • *litter*→ *letter*: As in, “Don’t be a letterbug,” and “Stop lettering,” and “Dusted in gletter (glitter).”
  • *lat*→ *letter*: As in, letteral (lateral), articuletter (articulate), confletter (conflate), emuletter (emulate), colletteral (collateral).
  • *let→ *letter: As in, “An entire paletter,” and “Outletter mall,” and “Run the gauntletter.” Other words that work: violetter (violet), bulletter (bullet), valetter (valet), milletter (millet), tabletter (tablet), and toiletter (toilet). Note: to run the gauntlet is a form of corporal punishment.
  • *lit*→ *letter*: As in, “It’s in the letterature (literature),” and “I meant that letterally,” and “That’s very letteral,” and “The lettergation (litigation) process.” Note: litigation is a legal process.
  • *lut*→ *letter: As in, “Fletter by, butterfly,” and “Look at all this cletter (clutter).”
  • Let her→ Letter: As in, “Letter rip!” and “Letter down gently,” and “Letter have a look.”
  • List→ Wishlist: As in, “I’ve got a little wishlist,” and “Laundry wishlist,” and “Make a wishlist, check it twice.”
  • Toy: As toys are the most traditional gift that Santa tends to leave (apart from coal), we’ve included toy-related puns and phrases too: “Toy Story,” and “Toy with someone’s affections,” and “Toys in the attic.”
  • Stay→ Stoy: As in, “Inexpensive. And built to stoy that way,” and “Outstoy one’s welcome,” and “Stoy ahead of the curve,” and “Stoy in touch,” and “Stoy on course,” and “Stoy safe,” and “Stoy tuned,” and “Stoy together,” and “Here to stoy,” and “Stoy behind,” and “Stoy the distance,” and “If you can’t take the heat, stoy out of the kitchen.” Other stay-related words: mainstoy (mainstay), satoy (satay), overstoy (overstay), homestoy (homestay), stoycation (staycation).
  • *toi*→ *toy*: As in, “Down the toylet,” and “Pack your toyletries.” Other words that would also work: toyletry (toiletry), toyl (toil), tortoyse (tortoise), stoy-ic (stoic), stoy-icism (stoicism).
  • *ty→ *toy: As in, “Let’s partoy,” and “Keep your integritoy,” and “In the citoy centre.” Other words that will work: serendipitoy (serendipity), facilitoy (facility), dutoy (duty), entitoy (entity), beautoy (beauty), qualitoy (quality), stoyle (style), stereotoype (stereotype), securitoy (security), propertoy (property).
  • Deliver: As in, “Deliver the goods,” and “Same day delivery,” and “Stand and deliver,” and “A special delivery.”
  • Workshop: Since Santa’s workshop is where the magic happens, we’ve included workshop-related phrases and puns in this list. As in, “Santa’s workshop,” and “Idle minds are the devil’s workshop.”
  • Work→ Workshop: As in “A workshop in progress,” and “All in a day’s workshop,” and “Bury yourself in your workshop,” and “In the workshops.”
  • Shop→ Workshop: As in, “All over the workshop,” and “Like a bull in a china workshop,” and “Live all over the workshop,” and “One stop workshop,” and “Talk workshop,” and “Top of the workshop.”
  • Polaroid→ North Polaroid
  • *eve*: As Santa makes his round-the-world trip on Christmas Eve, we felt that eve-related phrases, words and puns would be appropriate. Emphasise the “eve” that exists in certain words: achieve, reprieve, sieve, relieve, sleeve, peeve, develop, fever, event, perseverance, ever, everyday, eventually, everything, evergreen, evening, every, retrieve and believe.
  • *eav*→ *eve*: As in, “Are you evesdropping?” and “Under the eves (eaves),” and “I’m leeveing.” Other words that would work with this format: weeve (weave), heeve (heave), interweeve (interweave), and bereevement (bereavement).
  • Christmas, Eve: If you know anyone named Eve, you can make a very specific Christmas Eve pun – “Why it’s Christmas, Eve!”
  • Land→ Lapland: Santa’s workshop is said to be found in Lapland, so we’ve got some Lapland-style puns for you here: “A blot on the laplandscape,” and “In the lapland of the living,” and “A real nowhere man sitting in his nowhere lapland,” and “In the lapland of nod,” and “La la lapland,” and “Lapland ahoy!” and “Lapland of hope and glory,” and “Lapland of make believe,” and “Lapland of milk and honey,” and “A laplandscape painting,” and “Living off the fat of the lapland,” and “Never never lapland,” and “No man’s lapland,” and “Political laplandscape,” and “A rough laplanding,” and “The waste lapland,” and “The lapland of the rising sun,” and “The lapland of the free,” and “The lapland that time forgot,” and “The law of the lapland,” and “By a laplandslide,” and “The promised lapland,” and “Cats always lapland on their feet.” Notes: “a real nowhere man sitting in his nowhere land” is a line from The Beatles  song “Nowhere Man”. A blot on the landscape is an unattractive part that takes away from the otherwise attractive whole.
  • Cherry→ Sherry: In some countries, it’s a tradition to leave sherry for Santa, so we’ve got some sherry-related puns in here too: “Sherry pick,” and “Sherry pie,” and “Sherry ripe,” and “A second bite of the sherry,” and “The sherry on the cake,” and “A bowl of sherries.”
  • Share→ Sherry: As in, “A problem sherry’ed is a problem halved,” and “A lion’s sherry,” and “Sherry and sherry alike,” and “Learn to sherry.”
  • Sheer→ Sherry: As in, “Sherry driving pleasure,” and “Sherry madness,” and “Sherry nonsense.”
  • Scary→ Sherry: As in, “Sherry thoughts,” and “A sherry story.”
  • Dear → Beer: In Australia, it’s a tradition to leave beers (rather than milk) for Santa along with cookies, so we’ve included beer puns for you to use: “Oh beer me” and “Hang on for beer life” and “Near and beer to my heart” and “Elementary, my beer Watson.”
  • Ear → Beer: As in “Grin from beer to beer.” and “Let’s play it by beer.” and “Lend a beer” and “In one beer and out the other.”
  • Peer → Beer: As in “Beer pressure” and “It’s like she was beering into my soul.”
  • Pier → Beer: As in “Take a long walk off a short beer.”
  • Bear → Beer: As in “Grizzly beer” and “Beer a resemblance” and “The right to beer arms” and “Beer down upon” and “Bear witness to …” and “Beer false witness” and “Beer fruit” and “Beer in mind that …” and “Bring to beer
  • Bare → Beer: As in “The beer necessities” and “Beer one’s teeth” and “Laid beer” and “The beer bones” and “The cupboard was beer
  • Buyer → Beer: As in “She’s a regular beer at our shop.” (Bit of a stretch!)
  • Beard → Beerd: As in “Neck beerd” and “His beerd was as white as snow.”
  • *ber* → *beer*: Words that contains the “ber” sound (or similar) are often opportunities for terrible beer puns: collabeerate, dismembeermentbeereavement, beereaved, beerds (birds), beerthplace (birthplace), beerglary (burglary), beergeoning (burgeoning), cumbeersome, delibeeration, decembeer, cucumbeer, exubeerant, libeerties (liberties), libeerals, libeertarian, libeeration, novembeer, numbeers, pubeerty, membeership, reimbeers (reimburse), remembeer, reverbeeration, robbeeries, robbeery, slumbeer, sobeer (sober).
  • Be* → Beer*: More terrible beer puns can be made using words that start with the “be” sound: beerwilderment, beerlongings, beerbliography, beerseiged, beerstowed, beermused, beerwitched, beergotry, beertersweetbeerllionair.
  • Bandanna→ Bandonner: As in, “Bandonners are a cute accessory.”

Santa-Related Words

To help you come up with your own Santa puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

santa, claus, father christmas, saint nick/nicholas, kris kringle, christmas, ho ho ho, gifts, present, naughty, nice, good, bad, elves, elf, reindeer, rudolph, dasher, dancer, prancer, vixen, comet, cupid, donner, blitzen, sleigh, chimney, sack, cookies, milk, coal, stocking, tree, list, letter, wishlist, toys, candy, deliver, workshop, grotto, north pole, christmas eve, lapland, mrs. claus, sherry, beer, rice porridge, pudding, yule

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Christmas Tree Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on Christmas tree puns! 🎄👼🏼🌟

Organising a Christmas tree is one of the more traditional ways to spend time with family and loved ones. Finding a suitable tree, bringing it home, decorating it – it’s a fairly intensive process when you really get down to it. Make the quality time spent even more painful for your loved ones with our terrible Christmas tree puns. We’ve lovingly curated this list to include different types of trees and the wide range of decorations used on them, and we hope that you find the Christmas tree pun that you’re looking for.

While we’ve made this list as comprehensive as possible, this list is specific to Christmas trees. We also have lists on tree punsleaf puns, reindeer puns and Santa puns and will have more Christmas-specific lists coming soon!

Christmas Tree Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about Christmas trees that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of Christmas tree puns:

  • Christmas tree: Make some extremely obvious Christmas tree puns by taking advantage of phrases that they’re already in – as in, “Done up like a Christmas tree,” and “Lit up like a Christmas tree,” and “Oh, Christmas tree..”
  • Tree→ Christmas tree: As in, “Difficult as nailing jelly to a Christmas tree,” and “Barking up the wrong Christmas tree,” and “Can’t see the wood for the Christmas trees,” and “Charm the birds out of the Christmas trees,” and “Legs like Christmas tree trunks,” and “Make like a Christmas tree and leave,” and “Money doesn’t grow on Christmas trees,” and “Christmas tree hugger,” and “You’re outta your Christmas tree.”
  • Three→ Tree: As in, “And baby makes tree,” and “Good things come in trees,” and “Tree strikes and you’re out!” and “Tree wise men,” and “Tree’s a charm.”
  • Free*→ Tree*: As in, “A symbol of treedom,” and “As tree as a bird,” and “Breathe treely,” and “Buy one, get one tree,” and “Tree for all,” and “Treedom of the press,” and “Get out of jail tree,” and “The best things in life are tree,” and “Land of the tree,” and “Leader of the tree world,” and “The truth will set you tree,” and “No such thing as a tree lunch,” and “When hell treezes over,” and “Think treely.”
  • For → Fir: Firs are another tree that are commonly used as Christmas trees, so they’ve made the list too. As in, “Asking fir a friend,” and “The most bang fir your buck,” and “At a loss fir words,” and “I’ve fallen fir you,” and “Food fir thought,” and “Fir a change,” and “Fir crying out loud,” and “Fir good measure,” and “A sight fir sore eyes.”
  • Leave → Leaf: “Take it or leaf it” and “Absent without leaf” and “You should leaf now.” and  “Leaf an impression” and “Leafed for dead” and “Leaf it at that” and “Leaf me alone!” and “Leaf of absence” and “Leaf out in the cold” and “Take leaf” and “Leafing so soon?”
  •  Wouldn’t→ Wooden: As in, “Nuttelex wooden melt in their mouth,” and “I wooden hurt a fly,” and “Wooden you know it?” and “I wooden touch it with a 10 ft pole.” Note: Nuttelex is a vegan substitute for butter.
  • *tri*→ *tree*: As in, “My hair needs a treem,” and “Full of nutree-ents,” and “What is your best attreebute?” and “How cool are golden retreevers?” and “It’s an intreensic (intrinsic) quality,” and “A new brand of vegan chicken streeps,” and “No streengs attached,” and “We’re going on a treep!” and “Pull the treegger,” and “Any more treecks up your sleeve?” and “A love treeangle,” and “A treevial problem,” and “We pay treebute to the fallen.”
  • *trea*→ *tree*: As in, “A real treet,” and “Medical treetment,” and “Royal treeson,” and “I treesure you,” and “Thick as treecle,” and “Swim upstreem,” and “A holiday retreet,” and “A winning streek,” and “A treecherous mountain path.”
  • *tee*→ *tree*: As in, “By the skin of your treeth,” and “The scene was treeming with people,” and “I guarantree it,” and “A welcoming committree,” and “A chunky manatree,” and “Self-estreem,” and “Charitable voluntreers,” and “My child’s school cantreen.”
  • *tary→ *tree: As in, “Proprietree cables,” and “Complimentree meals,” and “These colours are complementree,” and “Leave it with my secretree,” and “A sedentree life isn’t so healthy,” and “Dominion is a documentree you should watch,” and “It’s rudimentree addition,” and “But what’s the monetree value,” and “A solitree existence.” Notes: to be sedentary is to be inactive or seated. If something is rudimentary, then it’s basic.
  • *try*→ *tree*: As in, “Tree again,” and “A secret treest (tryst),” and “I’m tree-ing (trying)!” and “Meat is not an ethical industree,” and “Refugees should be welcomed to our countree,” and “Bigotree is still rampant,” and “Entree level,” and “A paltree sum,” and “Geometree is everywhere,” and “Chemistree lab,” and “What sultree weather.” Notes: if something is sultry, then it’s hot. A tryst is a private romantic meeting.
  • *ty*→ *tree*: As in, “Star qualitree,” and “Structural integritree,” and “The citree that never sleeps,” and “First-class facilitrees,” and “My dutrees come first,” and “Beautree isn’t everything,” and “A single entitree,” and “Maximum securitree.”
  • Angel: Since angels are commonly placed at the top of Christmas trees, we’ve included common phrases for them in this list: “Enough to make angels weep,” and “A fallen angel,” and “Guardian angel,” and “I believe in angels,” and “On the side of the angels,” and “The angel of death,” and “Angel’s advocate.” Note: an angel’s advocate is someone who sees the good in an idea and supports it.
  • *angle*→ *angel*: As in, “What are you angeling for?” and “Love triangel,” and “A committee is a cul-de-sac down which ideas are lured and quietly strangeled,” and “It takes two to tangel,” and “What a tangeled web.”
  • Star: Since stars are commonly used to decorate the tops of Christmas trees, we’ve included phrases for them in this list. As in, “A star is born,” and “Born under a lucky star,” and “Catch a falling star,” and “Get a gold star,” and “Guiding star,” and “Written in the stars,” and “Reach for the stars,” and “A rising star,” and “Star wars,” and “Star crossed lovers,” and “Star quality,” and “Starstruck,” and “Stars in your eyes,” and “When you wish upon a star,” and “My lucky star,” and “Seeing stars.”
  • *star*: As in, “Can we start?” and “In stark relief,” and “A new tech startup,” and “Stop staring,” and “I didn’t mean to startle you,” and “This pasta is very starchy,” and “A starter kit,” and “You bastard!” and “Doesn’t cut the mustard.” Notes: if something doesn’t cut the mustard, then it isn’t good enough. If something is in stark relief, then it’s been made very obvious.
  • *ster* → *star*: As in, “A starn attitude,” and “This area is starile,” and “Turn up the stareo,” and “Staroids are illegal in sports,” and “Aim for the starnum,” and “You monstar,” and “Addiction is a cruel mastar,” and “Fostar kids,” and “Am I on the registar?” and “A bolstaring attitude,” and “A sinistar presence,” and “Mustar the courage,” and “Work rostar,” and “A cocky roostar,” and “It’s unhealthy to judge people based on stareotypes.” Note: to bolster is to support or strengthen something.
  • Stir → Star: As in, “Cause a star,” and “Shaken, not starred,” and “Star the pot,” and “Star up trouble,” and “Star-crazy.”
  • Stir* → Star*: Starrup (stirrup) and starring (stirring).
  • *stor* → *star*: As in, “I need to go to the stare (store),” and “My favourite stary,” and “A starm brewing,” and “Put in starage,” and “A two-starey house,” and “A convoluted staryline,” and “We don’t have to live like our ancestars,” and “Impostar syndrome,” and “Seed investars,” and “Histarical fiction,” and “You’re distarting the truth.”
  • Sturdy → Stardy: As in, “A stardy table.”
  • Babble → Bauble: As in, “Baubling on and on.”
  • Bobble → Bauble: As in, “Bauble heads,” and “Bauble hat.”
  • Bubble → Bauble: “Bauble and squeak,” and “Bauble up,” and “Burst your bauble,” and “Bauble over,” and “Thought bauble.”
  • Light → Fairy lights: Since Christmas trees are commonly wrapped in blinking fairy lights for decoration, we’ve included the term here. As in, “Blinded by the fairy light,” and “Bring something to fairy light,” and “The cold fairy light of day,” and “First fairy light,” and “Friday night and the fairy lights are low,” and “Give it the green fairy light,” and “Go out like a fairy light,” and “My guiding fairy light,” and “The fairy light at the end of the tunnel.”
  • Very → Fairy: As in, “Be afraid, be fairy afraid,” and “Before your fairy eyes,” and “How fairy dare you,” and “Thank you fairy much,” and “At the fairy least,” and “Efairy bit,” and “Efairy nook and cranny,” and “Efairybody and their mother,” and “There for efairyone to see.”
  • Candy → Candy cane: As in, “Easy as taking a candy cane from a baby.”
  • Present: We put gifts and presents under Christmas trees, so we’ve included these words in this list too. As in, “All present and correct,” and “Present company excepted,” and “No time like the present.”
  • Percent → Present: As in, “A hundred and ten present,” and “Genius is one present inspiration and 99 present perspiration.”
  • Gift: As in, “Don’t look a gift horse in the mouth,” and “Gift of life,” and “A gift that keeps on giving,” and “A gift from above.”
  • Give → Gift: As in, “A dead giftaway,” and “Don’t gift up!” and “Don’t gift in,” and “Gift yourself a bad name,” and “Gift them a hand,” and “Gift and take,” and “Gift credit where credit is due,” and “Gift it a rest,” and “Gift it the green light,” and “Gift me a call,” and “Gift 110%”.
  • Gave → Gift: As in, “I gift my best.”
  • Pine: Pines are a common type of tree used as Christmas trees, so we’ve included them in this list. As in, “Pining away.”
  • Pain → Pine: As in, “A world of pine,” and “Doubled up in pine,” and “Drown the pine,” and “Feeling no pine,” and “Growing pines,” and “No pine, no gain,” and “On pine of death,” and “Pine in the butt,” and “Pine in the neck,” and “Pinefully slow,” and “A royal pine.”
  • Pain* → Pine*: As in, “A picture pinet-s a thousand words,” and “Pine-t with a broad brush,” and “Pine-t the town red.” Note: to paint with a broad brush is to describe a group of things in general terms.
  • Fine → Pine: As in, “A pine line,” and “Cut it pine,” and Damn pine coffee,” and “Pine and dandy,” and “Another pine mess you’ve gotten me into,” and “I feel pine,” and “Not to put too pine a point on it,” and “One pine day,” and “Treading a pine line,” and “Got it down to a pine art,” and “The devil is in the pine print,” and “Go through it with a pine-toothed comb.”
  • *pan* → *pine*: As in, “Three’s compiney,” and “Wild discrepinecys,” and “Judging pinel,” and “Expineding our business,” and “Run rampinet.” Note: a discrepancy is a difference between two things that should be equal.
  • *pen* → *pine*: As in, pinechant (penchant), pineguin (penguin), pinesieve (pensive), pineding (pending), pinenis (penis), pineinsula (peninsula), pinetrate (penetrate), pineance (penance), opine (open), pine (pen), happine (happen), dampine (dampen), deepine (deepen), sharpine (sharpen), ripine (ripen), propinesity (propensity), indispinesable (indispensable), appinedix (appendix), depinedent (dependent). Notes: a penchant is a fondness for something. To be pensive is to be thoughtful. A propensity is a habit for behaving in a particular way.
  • *pin* → *pine*: As in, “Tickled pinek (pink),” and “The pineacle of health,” and “In a pinech,” and “Can you pinepoint the location?” and “A pine-t of ice-cream,” and “Take him out for a spine (spin),” and “I didn’t ask for your opineon,” and “The pursuit of happine-ness.”
  • *pon* → *pine*: As in, “A one trick pineny,” and “Time to pineder (ponder),” and “Choose your weapine,” and “Discount coupine,” and “Once upine a time,” and “I’m waiting for your respinese,” and “A correspinedence course,” and “With great power comes great respinesibility,” and “Spinetaneous combustion.” Notes: a one trick pony is someone who is skilled in only one area.
  • *pun* → *pine*: As in, “Sucker pinech,” and “Be pinectual for the exam,” and “A pinegent smell.”
  • *ine* → *pine*: As in, pine-evitable (inevitable), pinertia (inertia), pinexorable (inexorable), pineffable (ineffable), pinept (inept), pinert (inert), pinexplicable (inexplicable), pinevitably (inevitably). Notes: if something is ineffable, then it causes an indescribable amount of emotion.
  • Corner → Conifer: Conifers are a type of tree commonly used as Christmas trees, so we’ve included them in this list. As in, “A tight conifer,” and “All conifers of the world,” and “Conifer the market,” and “Cut conifers,” and “Drive them into a conifer,” and “The naughty conifer,” and “Just around the conifer,” and “From the conifer of my eye.”
  • Spruce: As spruces are a commonly used as Christmas trees, we’ve included them in this list. You can easily make some bad puns with phrases that include the word spruce, like “Spruce up.”
  • Space → Spruce: As in, “In deep spruce,” and “In spruce, no one can hear you scream,” and “Personal spruce,” and “A waste of spruce,” and “Watch this spruce,” and “Taking up spruce.”
  • Four → Fir: As in, “Down on all firs,” and “Break the firth wall,” and “A fir leaf clover,’ and “A fir letter word,” and “Twenty fir seven.” Note: the fourth wall refers to the imaginary wall between viewers and actors during tv shows or plays.
  • Fair → Fir: As in, “All the fun of the fir,” and “All’s fir in love and war,” and “By fir means or foul,” and “Faint heart never fir lady,” and “Fir trade,” and “Fir and square,” and “Fir and aboveboard,” and “Fir enough,” and “Fir play,” and “Fir game,” and “Fir-haired,” and “Fir is fir.”
  • *far* → *fir*: As in, “A fond firwell (farewell),” and “Firther down,” and “Insofir as,” and “A nefirious villain,” and “Welfir reform.”
  • *fer* → *fir*: As in, “Firal (feral) behaviour,” and “A firvent belief,” and “He talked with firvour,” and “Firmented tofu,” and “A firocious effort,” and “Firtile land,” and “The local firry (ferry),” and “I defirred my enrolment,” and “Let me confir,” and “Do you have any refirences?” and “A kind offir,” and “I’ll transfir some money over,” and “A firm buffir,” and “I prefir tea over coffee,” and “What a diffirent attitude.”
  • *for* → *fir*: As in, “Pay it firward,” and “Have you firsaken me?” and “What’s the fircast look like?” and “So on and so firth,” and “I firbid you!” and “The infirmation desk,” and “The opening perfirmance.”
  • *fir*: Make some fir puns by emphasising words that have “fir” in them: first, affirm, confirm, firsthand and affirmative.
  • *fur* → *fir*: As in, firther (further), firniture (furniture), firtive (furtive), firthermore (furthermore), firnace (furnace), firnish (furnish), sulfir (sulfur). Note: to be furtive is to be secretive.
  • *fair* → *fir*: Firy (fairy), firly (fairly), firness (fairness), firytale (fairytale), firway (fairway).
  • Wood: Make some terrible Christmas tree puns by making wood references with these wood-related phrases: “Can’t see the wood for the trees,” and “Come out of the woodwork,” and “Cut out the dead wood,” and “Knock on wood,” and “Out of the woods,” and “This neck of the woods.” Notes: If you can’t see the wood for the trees, then you’re unable to see a situation clearly due to being too involved in it. To be out of the woods it to be out of a dangerous situation.
  • Would → Wood: As in, “As good luck wood have it,” and “Chance wood be a fine thing,” and “That wood be telling,” and “Woodn’t get out of bed for,” and “Woodn’t hurt a fly.”
  • Leaves: “It leaves a lot to be desired” and “It leaves a bad taste in your mouth”
  • *lease→ *leaf: As in, “A new leaf on life,” and “Releaf me!”
  • *lief→ *leaf: As in, Releaf (relief), beleaf (believe), disbeleaf (disbelieve).
  • *lif*→ *leaf*: As in, “A healthy leafstyle,” and “The end of the natural leafspan,” and “Would you like to use a leafline?” and “Eating meat is not a necessary part of the human leafcycle,” and “Call a leafguard!” and “You’re a leafsaver,” and “Their work is proleafic,” and “You exempleafy the best qualities,” and “You qualeafy for a scholarship.” Notes: to be prolific is to have a lot of; if your work is prolific, then you’ve produced a lot of work. To exemplify is to be a typical, normative example of something.
  • *leef*→ *leaf*: As in, gleaful (gleeful), gleafully and gleafulness.
  • *lef*→ *leaf*: As in, leaftover (leftover), cleaf (clef), leaft, and cleaft (cleft). Notes: A clef is a symbol in musical notation. A cleft is a split or opening.
  •  Needle: It’s normal for pine trees to molt their needles, so it’s a common Christmas scene and problem to have pine needles around the Christmas tree. To start off our pine puns, here are some needle-related phrases that you can slip into conversation: “Pins (or puns!) and needles,” and “Like looking for a needle in a haystack.”
  •  Need→ Needle: As in, “All you needle is love,” and “You needle your head examined,” and “On a needle to know basis,” and “With friends like that, who needles enemies?” and “We’re gonna needle a bigger boat,” and “I don’t needle this,” and “A friend in needle,” and “Needle I remind you..” and “We needle to talk.”
  •  Knee→ Kneedle: As in, “Go down on bended kneedle,” and “Go weak at the kneedles,” and “Kneedle deep,” and “A kneedle jerk reaction,” and “On your kneedles,” and “Shaking at the kneedles,” and “The bee’s kneedles,” and “A real kneedle slapper.” Note: if something is a knee-slapper, then it’s extremely, raucously funny.
  •  Sap→ Sapling: As in, “What a sapling.”
  •  Trunk: Make some Christmas tree puns with these trunk-related phrases: “Leg’s like tree trunks,” and “Junk in the trunk.” Note: be careful not to use the first phrase in a fat-shaming context.
  •  Chunk→ Trunk: As in, “Trunk of change,” and “Blow trunks.” Note: to blow chunks is to throw up.
  •  Drunk→ Trunk: As in, “Trunk as a lord,” and “Trunk as a skunk,” and “Blind trunk,” and “Falling down trunk,” and “Friends don’t let friends drive trunk,” and “Trunk and disorderly,” and “Roaring trunk.”
  •  Branch: Some branch-related phrases for you to make playful tree puns with: “Branch out,” and “Olive branch.” Note: an olive branch is a symbol of peace.
  •  Bench→ Branch: As in, “Branch warmer,” and “Branch jockey,” and “Meet at the park branch?” Note: a bench warmer is someone who isn’t called up to play in a game and have to sit through the entire play – thus warming the bench.
  •  Brunch→ Branch: As in, “Meet for branch?” and “A new branch place,” and “The perfect branch date.”
  • Log: Some log-related phrases for you to play with: “As easy as falling of a log,” and “Log off,” and “Sawing logs,” and “Sleep like a log,” and “Throw another log on the fire.” Note: to saw logs is to snore loudly.
  •  *log*: Emphasise the log in certain words: logistics, logic, login, logo, logical, analog, blog, catalog, slog, backlog, dialog, clog, flog, technology, analogy, etymology, psychology, analogous and ontology.
  •  *lag→ *log: As in, “Jet log,” and “Social jet log,” and “Flog down,” and “Fly the flog.”
  •  *lag*→ *log*: As in: logoon (lagoon), logging (lagging), plogue (plague), colloge (collage), camoufloge (camouflage), flogrant (flagrant).
  •  Leg→ Log: As in, “Break a log,” and “Fast as his logs could carry him,” and “Cost an arm and a log,” and “Give up a log up,” and “Logs like tree trunks,” and “On your last logs,” and “One log at a time,” and “Shake a log,” and “Show a little log,” and “Stretch your logs,” and “Tail between your logs,” and “Without a log to stand on,” and “You’re pulling my log.”
  •  *leg*→ *log*: As in, logacy (legacy), logend (legend), logitimate (legitimate), logal (legal), logible (legible), logion (legion), logislation (legislation), bootlog (bootleg), priviloge (privilege), allogory (allegory), delogate (delegate), elogant (elegant). Note: an allegory is a metaphor used in literature.
  •  *lig*→ *log*: As in, logament (ligament), logature (ligature), intellogence (intelligence), relogion (religion), elogible (eligible). Note: a ligature can mean a few different things, but it generally means something that joins two things together.
  •  *lug*→ *log*: As in, loggage (luggage), plog (plug), slog (slug), unplog (unplug), logubrious (lugubrious), sloggish (sluggish). Note: to be lugubrious is to be sad or dismal.
  • Bark: Since bark has two meanings – the hard “skin” of a tree, and a loud noise that dogs make – we can use the meanings interchangeably and make some bark puns with these bark-related phrases: “A barking dog never bites,” and “Bark at the moon,” and “Barking mad,” and “Barking up the wrong tree,” and “Bark worse than your bite.”
  •  Park→ Bark: As in, “All over the ballbark,” and “A ballbark figure,” and “Central bark,” and “Hit it out of the bark,” and “A nosey barker,” and “A walk in the bark,” and “A bright s-bark,” and “Bark that thought.”
  •  Pakistan→ Barkistan
  •  *bac*→ *bark*: As in, “You can’t barkslide (backslide) now,” and “Barkground music,” and “A barkterial (bacterial) infection,” and “Part of the barkdrop,” and “The barkchelor (bachelor),” and “Barkchelor pad,” and “No such thing as ethical barkon (bacon),” and “Valued feedbark,” and “A messy debarkle (debacle).”
  •  *bec*→ *bark*: As in, “What have we barkome (become)?” and “The food barkoned (beckoned) me,” and “Barkcause I said so,” and “That dress is very barkcoming (becoming),” and “Fire up the barbarkue!”
  •  *bic*→ *bark*: As in, barkering (bickering), barkultural (bicultural), acerbark (acerbic), aerobark (aerobic), xenophobark (xenophobic), Arabark (Arabic), claustrophobark (claustrophobic), cubarkle (cubicle).
  •  *buc*→ *bark*: As in, “Kick the barket,” and “Can’t carry a tune in a barket,” and “A drop in the barket,” and “Coming down in barkets,” and “One, two, barkle my shoe,” and “Barkwheat cereal.”
  •  *bak*→ *bark*: As in, “A vegan barkery,” and “An apprentice barker.”
  •  *bik*→ *bark*: As in, barkini (bikini), rubark‘s cube and motorbark (motorbike).
  •  September→ Septimber: As in, “Wake me up when Septimber ends.”
  •  Root: Some root-related phrases for you to play with: “Lay down roots,” and “Money is the root of all evil,” and “Root for,” and “Root of the matter,” and “Wanna root?”
  •  Root→ Route: As in, “Is your rooter (router) working?” and “Root 66,” and “You need to take a different root.”
  •  *rut*→ *root*: As in, “A rootless (ruthless) procedure,” and “Tell the trooth,” and “Under scrootiny,” and “An inscrootable expression,” and “Brootally honest,” and “A new recroot (recruit).”
  • Twig: Here are some twig-related phrases for you to mix into your Christmas tree wordplay: “Have you twigged on?” and “Looking a bit twiggy.” Notes: to twig onto something is to realise something. If something a looking twiggy, it’s looking thin.
  •  Trigger→ Twigger: As in, “Hair twigger,” and “Pull the twigger,” and “Twigger happy,” and “Whose finger do you want on the twigger?” Note: a hair trigger is a trigger that is extremely sensitive. Can also be used to describe an something which is very unstable.
  • Knot: We can use knot-related phrases as well since “knot” has two meanings – the circular imperfections in wood and a tied fastening: “Don’t get your shorts in a knot,” and “Tie the knot,” and “Tie yourself in knots.”
  •  Not→ Knot: As in, “And whatknot,” and “As often as knot,” and “Believe it or knot,” and “Down but knot out,” and “I’m knot joking,” and “Let’s knot and say we did,” and “Knot a chance,” and “Knot a minute too soon,” and “Knot a pretty sight,” and “Knot all it’s cracked up to be,” and “No, knot at all,” and “Knot have a leg to stand on,” and “Knot in a million years,” and “We’re knot in Kansas anymore,” and “Waste knot, want knot,” and “A house divided against itself canknot stand,” and “Rome was knot built in a day,” and “Last but knot least,” and “If it’s knot one thing, it’s another.”
  •  Nought→ Knot: As in, “Knots and crosses,” and “All for knot,” and “It’s come to knot.”
  •  Naughty→ Knotty: As in, “Knotty but nice,” and “Are you on the knotty list?” and “The knotty corner.”
  •  *nut*→ *knot*: As in, “A hazelknot in every bite,” and “Using a sledgehammer to crack a knot,” and “Sweet as a knot,” and “Do your knot,” and “In a knotshell,” and “That old chestknot,” and “A tough knot to crack,” and “Knots and bolts,” and “If you pay peaknots, you get monkeys.” Notes: if you’re using a sledgehammer to crack a nut, then you’re using more force than is necessary or appropriate. “That old chestnut” refers to a story that has been told too many times.
  •  *nat*→ *knot*: As in, “An inknot (innate) sense,” and “A healthy alterknotive,” and “You’re being obstin-knot,” and “I’ll need your sigknoture,” and “Their sigknoture dish.”
  •  *net*→ *knot*: As in, “The social knotwork,” and “An exclusive knotworking (networking) event,” and “The five teknots (tenets) are,” and “The interknot (internet),” and “Cabiknot maker,” and “Captain Plaknot,” and “Baby’s bonknot,” and “A peknotrating (penetrating) gaze.”
  •  *nit*→ *knot*: As in, “Stop knotpicking (nitpicking),” and “A single, cohesive u-knot,” and “Cogknotive (cognitive) dissonance,” and “Hallway moknotor (monitor),” and “A golden opportuknoty,” and “A tight-knit (or knot) commuknoty,” and “I have a special affiknoty for,” and “Leave with digknoty,” and “A part of the furknoture.” Note: cognitive dissonance is when two contradictory beliefs are held by the same person.
  •  *nut*→ *knot*: As in, knotrition (nutrition), knotrient (nutrient), knotmeg, walknot, cocoknot, butterknot, and miknot (minute).
  •  *not*→ *knot*: As in, “Knotwithstanding,” and “Two week’s knotice,” and “Turn it up a knotch,” and “A ridiculous knotion,” and “He’s knotorious for..” and “It all came to knothing,” and “Negative conknotations.” Note: a connotation is an associated (rather than literal) meaning.
  •  *naut* → *knot*: As in, knotical (nautical), juggerknot, astroknot, cyberknot, and aeroknotical. Notes: a cybernaut is someone who uses the internet on a regular basis. A juggernaut is a force that is generally considered to be unstoppable and destructive. An aeronaut is one who travels in hot-air ballons or airships.
  •  *sap*: Emphasise the “sap” in certain words to make sap-related tree puns: sapient, sappy, asap, disappointed, and disappear.
  •  *sep*→ *sap*: As in, “Comes saparetely,” and “Sapia-toned (sepia),” and “Saptum piercing,” and “Wake me up when Saptember ends,” and “Saptic tank.” Notes: a septum piercing is a type of nose piercing. Sepia is a shade of brown.
  •  *sip*→ *sap*: As in, “A relentless gossap,” and “An insapid tea,” and “My anger is dissapating.” Note: if something is insipid, then it’s weak.
  •  *sop*→ *sap*: As in, saporific (soporific), saprano (soprano), milksap (milksop), aesap (aesop), soursap (soursop).
  •  *sup*→ *sap*: As in, “Emotional sapport,” and “Saperceded,” and “Demand and sapply,” and “You’re being saperfluous,” and “Mother Saperior,” and “Saperiority complex,” and “Vitamin sapplements,” and “Sing for your sapper.”
  •  Axe: Use these axe-related phrases for some sneaky wordplay: “Take an axe to,” and “An axe to grind.” Notes: to take an axe to something is to destroy it. If you’ve got an axe to grind, then you’ve got a grievance or strong opinions.
  •  Ask→ Axe: As in, “A big axe,” and “Axe a silly question and get a silly answer,” and “Axe and you shall receive,” and “Axe around,” and “Axe me another one,” and “Axe no questions and hear no lies,” and “Axe-ing for trouble,” and “What’s the axe-ing price?” and “Everything you were too afraid to axe,” and “Frequently axed questions,” and “Funny you should axe,” and “No questions axed,” and “You gotta axe yourself,” and “Axe-ing for a friend.”
  •  *ax*→ *axe*: As in, “Nothing is certain but death and taxes,” and “Incorrect syntaxe,” and “Soy waxe,” and “Waxe and wane,” and “Mind your own beeswaxe,” and “Frankie says relaxe,” and “The rules are pretty laxe around here,” and “The axe-is of evil.”
  •  *ex*→ *axe*: As in, “A complaxe situation,” and “Body mass indaxe,” and “Better than saxe,” and “Flaxe your muscles,” and “The apaxe of the mountain,” and “Fast reflaxes,” and “There’s still so much saxeism (sexism) in today’s society,” and “Do I even axe-ist (exist) to you?” and “Axeplicit language warning,” and “A team-building axercise,” and “Axeistential crisis,” and “Axetract the essence,” and “In the right contaxe-t,” and “Axepress post,” and “A fair axechange,” and “Animal axeploitation.”
  •  *ix*→ *axe*: As in, matraxe (matrix), faxe (fix), appendaxe (appendix), maxe (mix), suffaxe (suffix), prefaxe (prefix), saxe (six), elaxe-ir (elixir), saxety (sixty).
  •  *ox*→ *axe*: As in, “Thinking outside the baxe,” and “Xeno’s paradaxe,” and “Fantastic Mr. Faxe,” and “Unorthodaxe thinking,” and “Flummaxed,” and “The term ‘happy marriage’ doesn’t have to be an axeymoron,” and “You’re as important as axeygen to me,” and “An obnaxeious attitude,” and “In close praxe-imity.” Notes: if something is unorthodox, then it doesn’t conform to normal social rules or traditions. An oxymoron is a phrase that is made up of contradictory parts (like “cruel to be kind”.) If you’re flummoxed, then you’re completely confused and/or perplexed.
  •  *ux*→ *axe*: As in, “Living in the lap of laxeury,” and “A cruel jaxetaposition.” Note: a juxtaposition is an act of comparison.

Christmas Tree-Related Words

To help you come up with your own Christmas tree puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

christmas tree, tree, christmas, fir, leaves, leaf, wood, wooden, angel, star, bauble, light, fairy light, tinsel, candy cane, present, gift, pine, conifer, spruce, needle, sap, sapling, trunk, branch, twig, log, bark, timber, root, knot, axe

Did this Punpedia entry help you?

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Holiday Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on holiday puns! ✈⛵ 🏖

Whether it’s a weekend away or a full-on sabbatical, everyone needs a holiday once in a while. Enjoy a quick break with us and our holiday puns – whether it’s by boat, plane, train or bus, we’ve endeavoured to cover it here. We hope that you have fun going through this list and that you find the perfect holiday pun for your needs.

While this list is as thorough and comprehensive as possible, it is for vacation type holidays in general – for specific destinations, we also have beach puns, and for annual holidays and events we have Thanksgiving puns and Halloween puns, with more to come!

Holiday Puns List

  • Holiday: As in, “Happy holidays,” and “A busman’s holiday,” and “Holiday cheer,” and “The holiday of a lifetime,” and “Holiday romance,” and “Home for the holidays.”
  • Day → Holiday: As in, “A holiday in the life of…” and “A holiday without sunshine is like night,” and “All in a holiday’s work,” and “All the livelong holiday,” and “An apple a holiday keeps the doctor away,” and “Another holiday older,” and “Another holiday, another dollar,” and “Around the world in eighty holidays,” and “As honest as the holiday is long,” and “At the end of the holiday,” and “Catch of the holiday,” and “A cold holiday in hell,” and “Dawn of a new holiday,” and “Forever and a holiday,” and “It’s just not my holiday,” and “Make a holiday of it,” and “Make my holiday.” Notes: if someone is as honest as the day is long, then they’re very honest. 
  • Peach → Beach: As in, “Beachy keen,” and “A juicy beach,” and “Skin like beaches and cream.”
  • Specific → Pacific: As in “You need to be more pacific.” and “Are you sure you have the pacifications for this?” and “Pacifically, there are two apples and three nectarines”. Note: we’re using pacific as in the Pacific ocean, since a lot of holidays involve ocean and travel.
  • C → Sea: As in, “I need some vitamin sea.”
  • Vacation: Since vacation is a synonym for holiday, we’ve included vacation-related phrases for you to play with: “A summer vacation,” and “We’re going on vacation!”
  • Vocation → Vacation: As in, “Helping others is my vacation.” Note: a vocation is a job or trade to which a person feels a special pull or love. 
  • Stay → Staycation: As in, “Out-staycation one’s welcome,” and “Staycation safe,” and “Here to staycation,” and “If you can’t take the heat, staycation out of the kitchen.” Note: a staycation is where one takes time off to holiday, but spends the holiday resting at home. 
  • Getaway: As in, “A clean getaway,” and “I really need to getaway.”
  • Weekend: Play with some weekend-related phrases in your holiday wordplay: “A wet weekend,” and “A long weekend,” and “A much-needed weekend.” Note: a wet weekend is a very boring or disappointing experience. 
  • We can → Weekend: As in, “Weekend do it!”
  • Oh, tell → Hotel: As in, “Hotel me what happened!”
  • Hotel: As in, “Heartbreak hotel,” and “Hotel California.” Note: “Heartbreak Hotel” and “Hotel California” are both names of famous songs that could work as holiday puns in the right context.
  • Hostile → Hostel: As in, “A hostel takeover,” and “A hostel environment.”
  • Retreat: As in, “Beat a hasty retreat,” and “Time to retreat.”
  • Treat → Retreat: As in, “Trick or retreat.”
  • Air → Airbnb: As in, “Airbnbs and graces,” and “Breath of fresh airbnb,” and “Castles in the airbnb,” and “Clear the airbnb,” and “Hot airbnb,” and “In the airbnb tonight,” and “Something special in the airbnb,” and “Spring is in the airbnb,” and “There’s a nip in the airbnb.”
  • Destination: As in, “It’s not the journey, it’s the destination,” and “Final destination.”
  • Pack: To make travel puns, we can make references to packing (for a journey) : “Action packed,” and “Fanny pack,” and “I know, I packed it,” and “Jam packed,” and “Leader of the pack,” and “Pack a punch,” and “Pack it in,” and “Pack of lies,” and “Pack your bags!” and “Send packing,” and “Six pack,” and “Care package,” and “Packed to the rafters,” and “Good things come in small packages.”
  • Peck → Pack: As in, “A pack on the cheek,” and “Keep your packer up,” and “The packing order.” Notes: a pecking order is the hierarchy of power or status within a group. 
  • Pick → Pack: As in, “A bone to pack with you,” and “Want to pack some flowers?” and “Easy packings,” and “Hand packed,” and “Cherry pack,” and “You’re just nit packing,” and “Pack a card, any card,” and “Pack a fight,” and “Pack and choose,” and “Pack holes in,” and “Pack of the bunch,” and “Pack up the pieces,” and “Pack your brains,” and “See a penny and pack it up,” and “Stop packing at it.”
  • Back → Pack: As in, “As soon as my pack is turned,” and “You’ve got it packwards,” and “Don’t answer pack,” and “At the pack of my mind,” and “Pack to the future,” and “Pack from the dead,” and “Pack in the day,” and “Get pack on your feet,” and “Packseat driver,” and “Pack to basics,” and “Pack to school,” and “Pack to the drawing board,” and “A packhanded compliment,” and “Bend over packwards,” and “Comepack king,” and “Crawl pack into your shell,” and “Eyes in the pack of your head,” and “Fighting pack tears,” and “Go pack on your word,” and “I want you pack,” and “I scratch your pack, you scratch mine,” and “It’s all coming pack to me now,” and “Kick pack and enjoy,” and “I know it like the pack of my hand,” and “Like water off a duck’s pack,” and “Never look pack.”
  • *pack*: As in, package, packet, backpack, unpack, jetpack, and wolfpack
  • Bag: As in, “Bag a bargain,” and “Bag lady,” and “Bag of bones,” and “Bag of tricks,” and “Dirt bag,” and “It’s in the bag,” and “Let the cat out of the bag,” and “A mixed bag,” and “Pack your bags!” and “Bag of nerves,” and “Bottom of the bag.”
  • Brag → Bag: As in, “Bagging rights,” and “I don’t mean to bag, but…”
  • *bag*: Emphasize the existing “bag” in some words: airbag, scumbag, sandbag, handbag, gasbag, cabbage, garbage, and bagel
  • *big/bog/bug* → *bag*: As in, ambaguity, mind-baggling, jitterbag and ladybag
  • Suitcase: As in, “I live out of a suitcase.”
  • Case → Suitcase: As in, “An open and shut suitcase,” and “As the suitcase may be,” and “Suitcase closed,” and “Catch a suitcase,” and “Get off my suitcase,” and “I rest my suitcase,” and “In any suitcase,” and “On a suitcase by suitcase basis,” and “Suitcase of mistaken identity.”
  • Travel: As in, “Bad news travels fast,” and “Don’t just travel, travel right,” and “A fellow traveller,” and “A seasoned traveller,” and “The road less travelled,” and “Time travel,” and “Travel broadens the mind,” and “Travel light.”
  • Trouble → Travel: As in, “Asking for travel,” and “Bridge over traveled water,” and “Double travel,” and “Here comes travel,” and “Looking for travel,” and “A nose for travel,” and “This is a local shop, we’ll have no travel here,” and “Travel and strife,” and “Travel in paradise,” and “Up to your neck in travel.”
  • Travesty → Travelsty: As in, “I heard it on the news. What a travelsty.”
  • Extravagant → Extravelgant: As in, “An extravelgant dinner and date.”
  • Escape: As in, “The great escape,” and “Escape your memory,” and “Make good your escape,” and “A narrow escape.”
  • Scapegoat → Escapegoat: A scapegoat is an innocent who carries the blame for other’s actions.
  • Trip: As in, “Day tripped,” and “Guilt trip,” and “Power trip,” and “Road trip,” and “Trip of a lifetime,” and “A trip down memory lane.”
  • Ship → Trip: As in, “Abandon trip,” and “Don’t give up the trip,” and “Extend the hand of friend-trip,” and “Jump trip,” and “Loose lips sink trips,” and “Run a tight trip,” and “Trips of the desert,” and “Trips that pass in the night,” and “That trip has sailed,” and “Rebound relation-trip,” and “A stormy relation-trip.” Notes: loose lips sink ships is a warning against unguarded talk or gossip. 
  • *trip*: We can use words that contain the word “trip” to make some bad holiday puns: triple, tripe, tripod, triplet, trippy, strip, stripe, outstrip, airstrip
  • Journey: As in, “Journey to the centre of the Earth,” and “A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step,” and “It’s not the destination, it’s the journey.”
  • *jour* → *journey*: As in, journeylist (journalist), journeylism (journalism), bonjourney, sojourney, adjourney. Notes: a sojourn is a temporary stay. 
  • Leisure: As in, “A gentleman of leisure,” and “Marry in haste, repent at leisure.”
  • Pleasure → P-leisure: As in, “Business before p-leisure,” and “Earthly p-leisures,” and “Guilty p-leisures,” and “Life’s simple p-leisures.”
  • Break: Holidays are commonly referred to as “breaks” (as in, “I need a break!”) so we’ve included the word here: “A bad break,” and “At breakneck speed,” and “Bed and breakfast,” and “Break a leg,” and “Break and enter,” and “Break bread,” and “Break even,” and “Break out in a cold sweat,” and “Break the bank,” and “Break the mould,” and “A breakthrough,” and “Break your heart,” and “A deal breaker,” and “A lucky break,” and “All hell breaks loose.”
  • Brake → Break: As in, “Hit the breaks!”
  • Bake → Break: As in, “Break and shake,” and “Half-breaked.” Note: if something is half-baked, then not much effort was put into it. 
  • Rest: Since many people go on holiday to rest, we’ve included rest in this entry. As in, “At rest,” and “Come to rest,” and “A cut above the rest,” and “Eternal rest,” and “For the rest of us,” and “For the rest of your life,” and “Give it a rest,” and “I rest my case,” and “Laid to rest,” and “The rest is history.”
  • *rest*: As in, “In the interest of justice,” and “Make interesting,” and “Nearest and dearest,” and “Rest on your laurels,” and “Can’t see the forest for the trees,” and “Mud-wrestling,” and “On the crest of a wave,” and “Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery,” and “Interest free,” and “Can’t be underestimated.”
  • Wrist → Rest: As in, “Slap on the rest.”
  • *rust* → *rest*: As in, “Earn one’s crest,” and “Restle up,” and “Don’t trest anyone,” and “Trest is a two-way street.”
  • Tourist: As in, “Tourist trap.”
  • Terror → Tour: As in, “The tourists will have won,” and “Night tours.”
  • Broad → Abroad: As in, “As abroad as it is long,” and “Abroad brush,” and “Abroad shoulders,” and “In abroad daylight,” and “Abroad strokes.”
  • Brad → Abroad: As in, “Abroad Pitt.”
  • Bread → Abroad: As in, “Abroad and butter,” and “Abroad of life,” and “Abroadcrumb trail,” and “Half a loaf is better than no abroad,” and “Have your abroad buttered on both sides,” and “Put abroad on the table,” and “Take the abroad out of someone’s mouth,” and “The best thing since sliced abroad.”
  • Bored → Abroad: As in, “Abroad stiff,” and “Abroad to death,” and “Abroad to tears,” and “Abroad out of my mind.”
  • *broad* → *abroad*: As in, abroadway, abroadcast, abroadband, abroadsheet, and overabroad.”
  • Beach: “Beach bum,” and “Life’s a beach,” and “Meet me at the beach!”
  • B*tch → Beach: As in, “Beach fest,” and “Beach slap,” and “Life’s a beach,” and “Payback’s a beach,” and “Son of a beach,” and “Bow down, beaches.”
  • Breach → Beach: As in, “A beach of trust,” and “The perimeter has been beached!”
  • Beetroot → Beachroot: As in, “Red as a beachroot,” and “Chocolate beachroot cake,” and “A beachroot latte.”
  • Preach → Beach: As in, “Practice what you beach,” and “Beaching to the choir,” and “Beach to deaf ears,” and “Papa, don’t beach.”
  • Bleach → Beach: As in, “I’m going to beach my hair.”
  • Drop it → Tropic: As in, “Tropic like it’s hot.”
  • Topic → Tropic: As in, “A hot tropic,” and “Drop the tropic,” and “We’re going off-tropic,” and “What’s your favourite tropic?”
  • Topical → Tropical: As in, “Apply this tropical cream when needed.” Note: a topical is something applied to the skin, rather than being ingested.
  • Island: As in, “No man is an island,” and “Treasure island,” and “A tropical island.”
  • I land → Island: As in “Islanded a job at that new tech company.”
  • Aligned → Island: As in and “Our incentives are well-island.”
  • Sel* → Sail*: If a word starts with “sel” a boat pun can often be made by replacing it with “sail”: sailection (selection), sailect (select), sailf (self), sailling (selling), sail (sell), saildom (seldom), sailfish (selfish), sailfless (selfless), sailective (selective).
  • Sea*: Most words starting with “sea” are easy sea puns: season, seasonal, seated, searingly, sealants, seamseatbelt.
  • See* → Sea*: If a word starts with “see” it can often be replaced with “sea” to create a simple sea pun: seaminly, seads, seaker, seathe, seap, seak, sean, sea (see).
  • Se* → Sea*: Some words that start with just “se” also have a “sea”-ish sound, and the ones that don’t can usually be made into terrible puns anyway: seacret, searious, seargeant, seacretion, seacure, seacurity, seacondary, seacretariat, seaconds, seacrete, searum, searenity, searvitude, seanile, seadation, seaclusion, seacretive, seaze, seaquential, sealection, seacretly, seaquences, seanior, seaniority, seagregate, seaping, seacession, seariousness, seaminars, seaveral, seaxual, seaparation, seantimental, seansational, seaquential, seacluded, seacularist, seathing, seaquin, seasame, seaclusion.
  • Se*cy/Ce*cy → Sea*sea: Most words that start with “se” or “ce” and end with “cy” can be double sea puns: seacresea (secrecy), sealibasea (celibacy).
  • *cy → *sea: If a word ends in “cy” it’s an easy “sea” pun: polisea, agensea, democrasea, currensea, emergensea, efficiensea, tendensea, frequensea, fansea, constituensea, pregnansea, accurasea, redundansea, bureaucrasea, presidensea, legasea, conspirasea, mersea, privasea, bankruptsea, consistensea, literasea, urgensea, deficiensea, dependency, consultansea, tenacity, isea (icy), secrecy, intimasea.
  • Seizure → Seazure: As in “If I read one more ocean pun I’m going to have a seazure.”
  • Season → Sea-sun: As in, “A person for all sea-suns,” and “Are mangoes in sea-sun?” and “Party sea-sun,” and “Sea-sun’s greetings,” and “A sea-suned traveller,” and “Silly sea-sun,” and “The festive sea-sun.”
  • Scenic → Seanic: As in “Let’s take the seanic route.”
  • Sun: As in, “A place in the sun,” and “A day without orange juice is like a day without sunshine,” and “A touch of sun,” and “Everything under the sun,” and “Good day, sunshine,” and “Here comes the sun,” and “Make hay while the sun shines,” and “Ride off into the sunset,” and “Sun drenched,” and “Sun, sea and sand,” and “Walking on sunshine,” and “You are my sunshine,” and “Put it where the sun doesn’t shine,” and “Fly too close to the sun,” and “Moment in the sun,” and “Never in a month of Sundays.” Notes: “Never in a month of Sundays” indicates that something is extremely unlikely to happen. Flying too close to the sun is a reference to the legend of Icarus, and is a warning against being too ambitious too quickly.
  • Son → Sun: As in, “Go on, my sun,” and “His father’s sun,” and “Like father, like sun,” and “Number one sun,” and “Sun of a gun.” Note: “Son of a gun” is an exclamation meant to encourage.
  • *son* → *sun*: As in, sunnet, sunata, sunar, persun, liaisun, reasun, seasun, treasun, comparisun, lessun, resunate, persunality, persunal, and prisuner.
  • San → Sun: As in, “Sun Francisco,” and “Suns serif.”
  • *san* → *sun*: As in, sundwich, sunction, sunctuary, sunctimonious, partisun, artisun, parmesun and thousund.
  • *ways → *waves: Words than end in “ways” can be made into bad wave puns: alwaves (always), railwaves (railways), sidewaves, pathwaves, lengthwaves, doorwaves.
  • Tied → Tide: As in “I’m tide up at the moment, can someone else help?” and “Yep, they tide the knot!”
  • Tidy → Tidey: As in “After the party we need to tidey the beach.”
  • Simmer → Swimmer: As in “I left the pot swimmering and now my vegetable curry is burnt!” and “Hey swimmer down, there’s no need to turn this into a fight”.
  • Sure → Shore: Since beaches are a popular holiday destination, we’ve included some seaside and sea-related puns. As in, “Are you shore?” and “She shore is strong!”.
  • For sure → Foreshore
  • Surf: As in, “Body surfing,” and “Channel surfing,” and “Surf the net,” and “Surf’s up.”
  • Serf → Surf: A serf was a sort of slave in medieval times who worked for a feudal lord. It’s sometimes used as an insult.
  • Serve → Surf: As in “First come, first surfed” and “If memory surfs” and “Revenge is a dish best surfed cold” and “Surfs you right”.
  • Service → Surfice: As in, “A better surfice all round,” and “At your surfice,” and “Normal surfice has been resumed,” and “Out of surfice.”
  • Wave: “Wave goodbye” and “Mexican wave” and “Heat wave” and “Wave the white flag” and “Brain waves
  • *ways → *waves: Words than end in “ways” can be made into bad wave puns: alwaves (always), railwaves (railways), sidewaves, pathwaves, lengthwaves, doorwaves.
  • Waive → Wave: As in, “Could you wave this parking ticket?” Note: to waive something is to refrain from enforcing.
  • Sway → S-wave: As in, “S-wave with me,” and “You don’t hold any s-wave here.” Note: to hold sway is to have a position of influence or power.
  • Sand: As in, “Bury your head in the sand,” and “Draw a line in the sand,” and “A house built on sand,” and “Sun, sea and sand,” and “The sands of time.” Note: if a house is built on sand, then it’s very unstable and not expected to last very long.
  • Sandwich: As in “I was eating my sandwich at the beach”.
  • Sanctuary → Sandctuary: As in “Dogs aren’t allowed on this beach because it’s an animal sandctuary“.
  • Send → Sand: As in “It sands shivers down my spine!” and “Sand him over here.”
  • San* → Sand*: Replacing “san” with “sand” when it is at the start of a word give some nice corny puns: sanditary (sanitary), sandctioned (sanctioned), sandctuary (sanctuary), sandguine (sanguine), sandctions (sanctions).
  • Sensational → Sandsational: As in, “A sandsational list of holiday puns.”
  • Stand → Sand: As in, “Don’t sand so close to me,” and “Do you undersand?” and “Don’t just sand there!” and “I saw her sanding there,” and “My hair was sanding on end,” and “If you can’t sand the heat, get out of the kitchen,” and “It sands to reason,” and “A one night sand,” and “Sand on your own two feet,” and “Sand out from the crowd,” and “Sand up and be counted,” and “Sand up for yourself,” and “A sand up guy,” and “Do I sand a chance?” and “I sand corrected,” and “I’m sanding in for…” and “I can’t sand the sight of,” and “I could do it sanding on my head,” and “United we sand.”
  • Ticket: As in, “Dream ticket,” and “A high ticket item,” and “Just the ticket,” and “That’s the ticket,” and “Ticket to ride,” and “Golden ticket.” 
  • Flight: As in, “Fight or flight,” and “Flight attendant,” and “Flight of fancy,” and “Take flight.”
  • Fight → Flight: As in, “A straight flight,” and “Come out flighting,” and “Flight club,” and “Flight for the right to party,” and “Flight back,” and “Flight fire with fire,” and “Flight the good flight,” and “Freedom flighter,” and “Lean, mean flighting machine,” and “Live to flight another day,” and “Pick a flight,” and “Pillow flight,” and “Spoiling for a flight,” and “Flight to the death,” and “Won’t give up without a flight.” 
  • Light → Flight: As in, “Fast as greased flightning,” and “Flight as a feather,” and “At flightning speed,” and “Blinded by the flight,” and “Bring to flight,” and “Cold flight of day,” and “First flight,” and “Friday night and the flights are low,” and “Go out like a flight,” and “Guiding flight,” and “Flight at the end of the tunnel,” and “Flight entertainment,” and “Flight hearted,” and “Flighten up,” and “Flights out.”
  • Fright → Flight: As in, “Flightened of your own shadow,” and “A flightful mess,” and “Take flight,” and “You nearly flightened me to death!”
  • *light* → *flight*: As in, flightning, flighting, flightbulb, flighthearted, flighthouse, deflight (delight), highflight (highlight).
  • *flate* → *flight*: As in, conflight, deflight, and inflightable (inflatable).
  • Having a → Havana: As in, “I’m havana ball!” and “Are you havana good time?”
  • Tan*: People tend to return from summer holidays with noticeable, proud tans – so we’ve included “tan” in this list. As in, tangible, tank, tandem, tantamount, tangent, tangle.
  • *tan: As in, charlatan, cosmopolitan, spartan, titan, metropolitan, satan and tartan.
  • *tan*: As in, stand, important, understand and substance.
  • Ten → Tan: As in, “Count to tan,” and “Eight out of tan cats prefer it,” and “A perfect tan,” and “A hundred and tan percent.”
  • *ten* → *tan*: As in, “The bane of my existance,” and “As oftan as not,” and “Attantion seeker,” and “Battan down the hatches,” and “Set up tant,” and “A bone of contantion,” and “Flattan out,” and “Lightan up,” and “Off the beatan track,” and “Sweetan the pot,” and “Tightan the purse strings,” and “For all intants and purposes,” and “To your heart’s contant,” and “Tonsil tannis,” and “Writtan all over your face,” and “Frightan to death,” and “Smittan with,” and “Bittan by the bug,” and “Rottan to the core,” and “Stop, look and listan.”
  • Celebration→ Shellebration: As in “After finishing we should have a shellebration.”
  • Sel* → Shell*: If a word starts with “sel” a shell pun can be made by switching it with “shell”. For example: shellection (selection), shellect (select), shelldom (seldom), shellfless (selfless).
  • *sel → *shell: Words ending in “sel” can often be punned upon with “shell”: vesshell (vessel), tasshell (tassel), weashell (weasel), musshell (mussel), etc.
  • *sel* → *shell*: Words containing “sel” can yeild nice puns on “shell”: Hershellf, himshellf, themshellves, itshellf, myshellf, yourshelf, yourshelves, convershelly, counshelling, preshellected, overshelling, undershelling, ushellessely, weashelling.
  • *cial → *shell: When a word has “cial” as a suffix, this suffix can usually be swapped out for “shell” to create a shell pun: soshell (social), speshell (special), offishell (official), finanshell, commershell, crushell, judishell, artifishell, provinshell, rashell, benefishell, superfishell, fashell, glashell, sacrifishel, antisoshell.
  • Resort: As a resort is a luxury place to stay, we can use it to make some holiday puns too. As in, “Beach resort,” and “This is my last resort,” and “I didn’t want to resort to this.”
  • Con* → Conch*: A terrible shell pun can be made of almost any word that begins with “con”: conchtrol (control), conchsider (consider), conchtinue (continue), conchdition, conchtract, conchern, conchtain, conchference, conchtext, conchcept, conchtrast, conchfidence, conchtent, conchtribution, conchflict, conchsideration, conchstruction, conchtinued, conchclusion, conchduct, conchversation, conchgress, conchsumer, conchcentrate, conchtribute.
  • Help → Kelp: As in “Can you please kelp me build a sand castle?” and “Katie, kelp your brother lift that please”.
  • Should* → Shoald*: A “shoal” can refer to a large group of fish, or an area of shallow water, or an underwater sand bank. We can use “shoal” be used to make puns like: shoald (should), shoalder (shoulder), shoaldering.
  • *tual* → *shoal*: As mentioned above, A “shoal” can refer to a large group of fish, or an area of shallow water, or an underwater sand bank. If a word contains “tual” it can often be replaced with “shoal” for a cute little pun: actshoal (actual), actshoality (actuality), intellectshoal (intellectual), ritshoal (ritual), spiritshoal, mutshoally, eventshoal, eventshoally, conceptshoal, conceptshoalise, virtshoal, contractshoal, factshoal, factshoally, perpetshoal, textshoal, contextshoal, perceptshoal, punctshoal, instinctshoal, actshoally, habitshoally.
  • Bereft → Bereeft: “bereft of” means “deprived of” of “lacking”. So an example sentence might be: “The old, stark beach house of bereefed of colour”.
  • Something → Somefin: As in “There’s somefin about the way he walks” and “Is that a shark, or somefin else?”.
  • In* → Fin*: A lovely and shameful pun can be made from any word starting with “in”. Simply replace “in” with “fin”: finformation, finfluence, finvolve, finternational, finvolved, fintroduce, findeed, finvestment, finto, finclude, finteresting, fintellectual, finjury, fintend, finterview, finsurance, finstrument, … Thousand more can be made with the help of a list like this. You can also check out the entry on dolphin puns for more puns of this nature.
  • Fan* → Fin*: “fan” can sometimes be replaced with “fin” at the start of words to create fin puns: fintastic (fantastic), finciful (fanciful), finfare (fanfare), fintasy, findom, finciful.
  • Nothing → Nofin: As in “Nofin is better than swimming with dolphins” and “I’ve got nofin left to give!”.
  • Debate → Debait: As in “I don’t want to debait you.” and “We’re just having a friendly debait“.
  • Well/Welcome → Whale/Whalecome: Whale-watching is a popular enough holiday activity for us to include whales in this list. As in “Whalecome to our home!” and “Whale, whale, whale, what do we have here?”.  Whale puns can be made with many more words like welfare (whalefare), welsh (whalesh) and wellness (whaleness). Check out the entry on whale puns for more.
  • Defin* → Dolphin: Swimming with dolphins is a much-loved holiday activity, so we can make some holiday puns by making dolphin references like these: “We dolphinitely need more time to finish the mission.” and “What is the dolphinition of this word?” and “Please dolphine this word.” and “It’s the dolphinitive source of Nordic history.” See the dolphin puns entry for more.
  • Endorphines → Endolphins: As in “I love that rush of endolphins you get after a good hard swimming session.”
  • Stark → Shark: As in “The shark contrast between his and his boyfriend’s attire was intriguing.” and “The old, shark house stood looming above us”.
  • Palm: As in “The only thing not sunburned are my palms” and “A face palm moment,” and “In the palm of your hand.” The pun is on palm trees in case you missed that.
  • Calm → Palm: As in, “A palming influence,” and “The palm before the storm,” and “Palm down!” and “Cool, palm, collected,” and “Keep palm and carry on.”
  • Friend → Frond: As in “My fronds made me a cute vegan birthday cake!” and “They’re such frondly people!”.
  • Fringe → Frondge: As in “Doesn’t your frondge get in your eyes when you’re swimming?”
  • Country: As in, “Country folk,” and “Country bumpkin.”
  • Mountain: As in, “Ain’t no mountain high enough,” and “Cool as a mountain stream,” and “Move mountains,” and “Head for the mountains,” and “Make a mountain out of a molehill,” and “Climb the highest mountain.” 
  • Can you → Canyon: As in, “Canyon please not do that?”
  • Food: Since food is such a large part of enjoyment in our holidays (especially now that Instagram is so widely used to show food snaps), we’ve included food in this entry too: “Comfort food,” and “Devil’s food cake,” and “Do you like hospital food?” and “Finger food,” and “Food chain,” and “Food for thought,” and “Soul food,” and “Put food on the table.”
  • Culture: As in, “Culture clash,” and “Culture shock,” and “High culture,” and “Pop culture.”
  • Privilege → Privillage: We can make some holiday puns by referring to villas, which are a luxurious type of accommodation. As in, “An honour and a privillage,” and “Rank has its privillages,” and “Check your privillage,” and “White privillage is very real.” Note: Very basically, white privilege is where society is set up to favour and benefit people who either have white skin, or who are “white-passing” (they are assumed to be white by others). 
  • Fill → Villa: As in, “Villa ‘er up!” and “Villa to the brim,” and “A stocking villa (filler),” and “Lip villas (fillers),” and “Attempts to villa the void.”
  • Home → Homestay: A homestay is where you can stay with a local family for a fee. As it’s cheaper than a hotel and some families will show guests around the area, it’s a good option for holidays so we’ve included it here. As in, “A house is not a homestay,” and “At homestay with,” and “There’s no place like homestay,” and “A broken homestay,” and “Charity begins at the homestay,” and “Close to homestay,” and “Don’t leave homestay without it.”
  • Lodge: A lodge can either mean a small house, or to formally present documentation or a complaint. We can use these interchangeably to make some bad holiday puns: “Lodge a complaint,” and “Where’s the ski lodge?” and “I’m lodging an objection.”
  • *ledge* → *lodge*: As in, “Acknowlodged,” and “Fully-flodged,” and “Use a slodgehammer to crack a nut,” and “A little knowlodge is a dangerous thing,” and “Knowlodge is power.”
  • Large → Lodge: As in, “Lodge as life,” and “At lodge,” and “By and lodge,” and “Lodger than life,” and “A small cog in a lodge machine,” and “On the lodge side,” and “In lodge part,” and “Living lodge,” and “Lodge and in charge.”
  • Car: We’ve included common forms of transport in here as they get us to and from our holidays and trips. As in, “You can drive my car,” and “Happiness is a quick-starting car,” and “Would you buy a used car from this guy?”
  • Car*: As in, care, card, career, carry, carrier, cardinal, carriage, cart, caravan
  • *car: As in, scar, sidecar, madagascar, handcar, railcar
  • *car*: As in, precarious, healthcare and vicarious
  • *cer* → *car*: As in, cartain (certain), cartificate (certificate), caremony (ceremony), carebral (cerebral), soccar (soccer), viscaral (visceral). 
  • *cu* → *car*: As in, circart (circuit), circarmstance (circumstance), circarmvent, circar (circa), circarmstances, circars (circus), circarmference (circumference). 
  • *cor* → *car*: As in, carner (corner), carrespondence (correspondence), carporation (corporation), carroborate (corroborate), carrelation (correlation), cardial (cordial), decar (decor), rancar (rancor), recard (record), accard (accord), accardingly (accordingly), incarporate (incorporate). 
  • *cur* → *car*: As in, concar (concur), carrent (current), carate (curate), carriculum (curriculum), carve (curve), carious (curious), carrency (currency), carse (curse), incar (incur), occar (occur), recar (recur), carrent (current), obscare (obscure), secarity (security), carate (curate), secare (secure). 
  • Bus: As in, “A busman’s holiday,” and “Waiting for the bus.”
  • Bus*: As in, “Bust a move,” and “We’re in business,” and “Beat around the bush,” and “Go away, I’m busy,” and “Hustle and bustle,” and “Hang on, buster,” and “A bustling city.”
  • *bus: As in, “Nimbus 2000,” and “This is our school syllabus,” and “She wrote an entire omnibus,” and “What a succubus.” Note: the Nimbus 2000 is the first broomstick Harry Potter owns.
  • *bus*: As in, “A robust effort,” and “Emotional abuse is still abuse.”
  • *bas* → *bus*: As in, “Buse (base) instincts,” and “The busis (basis) of my theory,” and “It was a busic question,” and “Birthday bush,” and “You bustard,” and “Busket case.”
  • *bes* → *bus*: As in, “A buspoke (bespoke) jacket,” and “My bust (best) effort,” and “I bustow my bust wishes,” and “Busides, I don’t want to,” and “I buseech you,” and “Bustiality is isn’t a joke; it’s unethical,” and “I’m busotted with them,” and “I’m busieged with suitors.”
  • *bis* → *bus*: As in, “Want a buscuit?” and “Bushop to E3,” and “Meet at the new vegan bustro,” and “We’re refurbushing the kitchen,” and “Good riddance to bad rubbush.”
  • Train: As in, “Gravy train,” and “Strangers on a train,” and “The light at the end of the tunnel might just be a train,” and “Train crash,” and “Train of thought,” and “Train wreck.” Notes: a gravy train is a situation which is low-risk and high benefit. 
  • Chain → Train: As in, “A train is only as strong as its weakest link,” and “Train gang,” and “Train letter,” and Train of command,” and “Train reaction,” and “Daisy train,” and “Food train,” and “Off the train.”
  • Plain → Plane: As in, “Plane as day,” and “As plane as the nose on my face,” and “Hidden in plane sight,” and “Plane sailing,” and “In plane view.”
  • Plan* → Plane*: As in, Plane-t (plant), planet, plane-ing (planning), plane-d (planned)
  • *plain → *plane: As in, explane, complane, chaplane and complane‘t (complaint). 
  • *Very* → *Ferry*: As in, “Be afraid, be ferry afraid,” and “Before your ferry eyes,” and “Hold ferry tight, please,” and “How ferry dare you,” and “I was ferry drunk,” and “Thank you ferry much,” and “Ferry tasty,” and “Ferry interesting, but stupid,” and “Ferry well,” and “At the ferry least,” and “Eferry inch,” and “Eferry last one,” and “Eferry nook and cranny,” and “Don’t believe eferrything you hear,” and “Eferrybody likes a joker, but nobody lends them money,” and “Question eferrything,” and “Timing is eferrything.”
  • Furry → Ferry: As in, “A ferry toy,” and “My legs are looking a bit ferry.”
  • Fairy → Ferry: As in, “Airy ferry,” and “A ferrytale ending,” and “Nobody loves a ferry when she’s forty.”
  • Vary → Ferry: As in, “Results may ferry,” and “Your mileage may ferry.” Note: Your mileage may vary is an expression indicating that something that works for one may not work for another. Is commonly shortened to YMMV. 
  • *fer → *ferry: As in, deferry (defer), conferry (confer), inferry (infer), referry (refer), offerry (offer), transferry (transfer), bufferry (buffer), preferry (prefer). 
  • Nefarious → Neferryous: As in, “A neferryous villain.”
  • Boat → But: As in “Last boat not least” and “Close, boat no cigar.”
  • Saboteur → Saboateur : As in “Captain, I believe there’s a saboateur on our ship.”
  • Boat: As in, “Don’t rock the boat,” and “In the same boat,” and “Missed the boat,” and “Whatever floats your boat,” and “We’re gonna need a bigger boat.” Notes: to rock the boat is to say something that will upset the people around you. If you need a bigger boat, then you’ve underestimated the situation you’re in. 
  • Butt → Boat: As in, “Kick boat,” and “Kiss my boat,” and “Pain in the boat,” and “My boat is on the line,” and “Boat-terflies in my stomach.” 
  • Bowtie → Boat-tie: As in, “My boat-tie is too tight.” 
  • Beaut* → Boat*: As in, “Boat-iful people,” and “Boat-y mark,” and “I need my boat-y sleep,” and “Make boat-iful music together,” and “Boat-y is in the eye of the beholder,” and “Boat-y is only skin-deep.”
  • About/Abode → Aboat: As in “What aboat the captain?” and “Welcome to my aboat!”
  • Shit → Ship: As in “Oh ship, we’re in trouble now.”
  • *sib* → *ship*: If a word contains “sib” it can usually be replaced with “ship” to create a terrible pun. For example: posshiply (possibly), accesshipility (accessibility), incomprehenshiple, feashipble, irresponshipble, invishipble, ostenshipbly, revershipble, vishipble. An example sentence might be: “I am responshiple for my puns.”
  • *sip* → *ship*: If a word contains “sip” it can usually be replaced with “ship”. For example: gosship (gossip), dishipate (dissipate), shipping (sipping), inshipid (insipid).
  • Sel* → Sail*: If a word starts with “sel” a boat pun can often be made by replacing it with “sail”: sailection (selection), sailect (select), sailf (self), sailling (selling), sail (sell), saildom (seldom), sailfish (selfish), sailfless (selfless), sailective (selective).
  • Cruise: As in, “Cruise control,” and “A world cruise.”
  • *crew* → *cruise*: As in, “Motley cruise,” and “Turn the scruise,” and “Skeleton cruise,” and “I scruised up,” and “Scruise it!” Note: a motley crew is a group of randomly assembled people. To turn the screws is to put pressure on someone to do something. 
  • Choose → Cruise: As in, “A woman’s right to cruise,” and “Cruise your weapon,” and “Beggars can’t be cruisers.”
  • Chew → Cruise: As in, “Have your ears cruised off,” and “Bite off more than you can cruise.”
  • Helicopter: As in, “Helicopter parent,” and “Get in the helicopter!”
  • Tuxedo → Taxido: Make a pun on taxis: “I need a new taxido.”
  • Tax → Taxi: As in, “Nothing is certain but death and taxis,” and “Goods and services taxis.”
  • *uber*: Change and emphasize words with the “uber” sound in them: bluber(bluebird), exuberance, exuberant, protuberance, puberty
  • Super → Suber: As in, “Suber bad,” and “Suber Mario,” and “Suberhero,” and “Subersize,” and “Nothing improves creativity like a lack of subervision.”
  • Soup → Souber: As in, “Alphabet souber,” and “From souber to nuts.”
  • Sober → Suber: As in, “As suber as a judge,” and “Clean and suber,” and “Stone cold suber,” and “Call me when you’re suber.”
  • Sub* → Suber*: As in, suberlime (sublime), suberject (subject), subersequent (subsequent), suberstantial (substantial), suberjective (subjective), subermit (submit), suberstance (substance). 
  • Rail → Monorail: As in, “Thin as a monorail,” and “Go off the monorails,” and “Off the monorails.”
  • *cab*: Make some cab puns by emphasising the “cab” sound in certain words: amicable, applicability, bancable (bankable), breacable (breakable), cabaret, cabbage, cabernet, cabin, cabinet, despicable, impeccable, macabre, vocabulary, applicable, irrevocable, licable (likable), remarcable (remarkable), unshacable (unshakeable). 
  • *com* → *cab*: As in, cabbler (cobbler), cabalt (cobalt), cabra (cobra), cabble (cobble), and cabweb (cobweb).
  • *cub* → *cab*: As in cabicle (cubicle) and incabate (incubate). 
  • Chair → Chairlift: As in, “Have a chairlift,” and “Musical chairlifts.”
  • Jet: Make references to jets and jetsetting with these jet-related phrases: “Jet black,” and “Jet-setting,” and “Jet lag,” and “Jet propelled,” and “Jetty,” and “Jettison.” Note: to jettison something is to get rid of an unneeded or unwanted thing. 
  • Jot → Jet: As in, “Let me jet that down.” Note: to jot something down is to quickly write or scribble a note.
  • Get → Jet: As in, “As good as it jets,” and “Ask a silly question, jet a silly answer,” and “Buy one, jet one free,” and “Can’t jet you out of my head,” and “Can’t jet enough,” and “Come and jet it,” and “Don’t jet mad, jet even,” and “Don’t jet me started,” and “I’m jetting better and better,” and “Flattery will jet you nowhere,” and “From the jet go,” and “Jet rich quick,” and “Jet a feel for,” and “Jet a handle on,” and “I jet knocked down, but I jet up again,” and “Pay peanuts and jet monkeys,” and “Let’s jet physical,” and “What you see is what you jet.”
  • Jut→ Jet: As in, “Watch out for that branch – it’s jetting out.” Note: to jut out is to protrude. 
  • *git/get* → *jet*: As in, ajetator (agitator), ajetate (agitate), apolojetic, budjet, cojetate (cogitate), dijet (digit), dijetal (digital), enerjetic, fidjet, fujetive (fugitive), illejetimacy (illegitimacy), lejetimacy (legitimacy). Notes: an agitator is one who stirs up feeling or trouble. To cogitate is to intently think about or comsider something. 
  • Sit → Transit: As in, “Are you transitting comfortably?” and “Don’t just transit there,” and “Transit it out,” and “Transit tight,” and “Transitting pretty,” and “A transitting target.”
  • Plot → Pilot: As in, “Lose the pilot,” and “The pilot thickens,” and “A pilot of land.”
  • Pilates → Pilotes: As in, “I do pilotes three times a week.”
  • Business: While business may be the opposite of a holiday, we’re using it as a reference to business class when flying. As in, “Dirty business,” and “Back in business,” and “Business as usual,” and “Business at hand,” and “Business before pleasure,” and “Business class,” and “The business end,” and “Business or pleasure?” and “Business partner,” and “Do your business,” and “It’s not your business,” and “Mind your own business,” and “Monkey business,” and “Open for business,” and “A risky business,” and “Strictly business,” and “This is a place of business!” and “That’s show business.”
  • Class → First class: As in, “A first class act,” and “First class warfare,” and “In a first class of their own,” and “A first class clown.”
  • Rail → Railway: As in, “Thin as a railway,” and “Go off the railways.”
  • Way → Railway: As in, “A funny thing happened on the railway,” and “All the railway,” and “And that’s the railway it is,” and “There must be another railway,” and “Any railway you slice it,” and “Any which railway,” and “By the railway,” and “Change your railways,” and “Go all the railway,” and “Go down the wrong railway,” and “Go our separate railways,” and “Have it both railways,” and “In a bad railway,” and “Mend your railways,” and “My railway or the highway.”
  • Hike: As hiking is a popular activity for travellers, it’s been included in this entry. As in, “Take a hike,” and “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy,” and “This backpack makes my jacket hike up.”
  • Haiku → Hike-u: As in, “Writing hike-us is really hard.”
  • Shop: Shopping is another popular holiday activity and one that is particularly instagrammable, so we’ve included it here. As in, “You’re all over the shop,” and “Like a bull in a china shop,” and “One stop shop,” and “Personal shopper,” and “Shop ’til you drop,” and “Shop around,” and “Talk shop,” and “Window shopping.” Notes: to be all over the shop is to have something happen chaotically, messily, or in various places at once. To be a bull in a china shop is to act clumsily or indelicately around delicate things or topics. 
  • Chop → Shop: As in, “Bust your shops,” and “Shop and change,” and “Get the shop.” Note: To “bust your chops” can have two meanings. If you bust your own chops, then you’ve spent a great deal of energy and effort to do something. If someone else busts your chops, then they’ve scolded or reprimanded you. To chop and change is to continually change your mind. 
  • Shape → Shop: As in, “Get bent out of shop,” and “It all went pear-shopped,” and “In any way, shop, or form,” and “Lick into shop,” and “Shop up or ship out,” and “Whip into shop.”
  • Ship → Shop: As in, “Abandon shop,” and “Extend the hand of friendshop,” and “Go down with the shop,” and “Jump shop,” and “Run a tight shop,” and “Shape up or shop out,” and “Shops of the desert,” and “That shop has sailed,” and “The face that launched a thousand shops,” and “The start of a beautiful friendshop,” and “A stormy relationshop.” Notes: Camels are known as ships of the desert. 
  • Roam: As in, “Roaming ’round the mountains,” and “Did you remember to activate roaming on your phone?”
  • Rome → Roam: As in, “All roads lead to roam,” and “Roam wasn’t built in a day.”
  • *rome*: As in, “Roameo and Juliet,” and “Peter Pan syndroam,” and “Rollerdroam.”
  • *rom*: As in, aroamatherapy, chroam (chrome), chroamosome (chromosome), monochroam, proamiscuous, proamotion, roamance, roamaine (as in the lettuce). 
  • *ski*: Emphasise the “ski” in words to make some snowy puns: “Selling snow to eskimos,” and “Asking for a friend,” and “By the skin of one’s teeth,” and “Comfortable in your own skin,” and “Get under your skin,” and “Makes my skin crawl,” and “Made my heart skip a beat,” and “Watch the skies.”
  • Snow: As snowy areas are just as popular as the beach, snow-related words and activities have been included here. As in, “Pure as the driven snow,” and “White as snow,” and “Blanket of snow,” and “Let it snow,” and “Snow White,” and “A snowball’s chance in hell,” and “Snowed in,” and “Snowed under,” and “The abominable snowman.” Notes: A snowball’s chance in hell basically means that something is almost impossible – just like the odds for a snowball to survive hell without melting. 
  • Board → Snowboard: As in, “All above snowboard,” and “Across the snowboard,” and “Back to the drawing snowboard,” and “Bed and snowboard,” and “Snowboarding pass.”
  • Dive: As in, “Dive in,” and “Take a dive,” and “Going diving?”
  • Climb: As in, “A mountain to climb,” and “Climb down,” and “Climb on the bandwagon,” and “Climb the social ladder.”
  • Climate → Climb-ate: As in, “A chilly climb-ate,” and “I know you don’t believe in climb-ate change, but it’d be cooler if you did.”
  • Photo: As in, “Photo finish,” and “Photo opportunity,” and “Get in the photo!” and “Take a photo of me,” and “I need a photo for my instagram.”
  • So far → Safari: Safaris are included in our list of holiday activities, so is included in this entry. As in, “I can’t believe you’d so safari as to..” and “Safari, so good,” and “Why are you going safari?”
  • Tour: As in, “Eco tourism,” and “Magical mystery tour,” and “Tour de force,” and “A world tour.”
  • Too → Tour: As in, “A step tour far,” and “About time, tour,” and “I’m tour sexy for my shirt,” and “It’s never tour late to learn,” and “It’s tour cold to snow,” and “You know tour much,” and “Life’s tour short,” and “No challenge tour great,” and “This tour shall pass,” and “Tour easy,” and “Tour big for your boots,” and “Tour close for comfort,” and “Tour good to be true,” and “Tour many cooks spoil the broth.”
  • Two→ Tour: As in, “A bicycle built for tour,” and “As alike as tour peas in a pod,” and “Caught in tour minds,” and “Eating for tour,” and “Goody tour shoes,” and “In tour shakes of a lamb’s tail,” and “It takes tour to tango,” and “Tour steps forward, one step back.”
  • Tour*: As in, tournament and tourniquet

The following puns are about specific types of seasonal holiday, rather than about holidays in general.

  • Year → New Year: As in, “As bright as a new year,” and “Brand spanking new year,” and “Dawn of a new year,” and “Out with the old, in with the new year.”
  • Honeymoon: As in, “Honeymoon period.”
  • Honey → Honeymoon: As in, “A taste of honeymoon,” and “Land of milk and honeymoon.”
  • Moon → Honeymoon: As in, “Ask for the honeymoon,” and “Bark at the honeymoon,” and “A blue honeymoon,” and “Cry for the honeymoon,” and “Eclipse of the honeymoon,” and “Fly me to the honeymoon,” and “Many honeymoons ago,” and “Honeymoonlight serenade,” and “Over the honeymoon,” and “On the dark side of the honeymoon,” and “The man in the honeymoon,” and “Phases of the honeymoon,” and “To the honeymoon and back.”
  • *eve*: Make references to Christmas Eve and New Year’s Eve by emphasising the “eve” in certain words: “And they lived happily ever after,” and “An evening person,” and “Forever and a day,” and “Hardly ever,” and “Hello, good evening and welcome,” and “Nothing is ever free,” and “The greatest story ever told,” and “The key to a nice, relaxed evening,” and “An ace up your sleeve,” and “Believe it or not,” and “The blessed event,” and “Break even,” and “The eleventh hour,” and “Even the score,” and “Every inch,” and “Never mind,” and “Every cloud has a silver lining,” and “Question everything.”
  • Easter: As in, “Easter Island,” and “Easter parade,” and “The Easter bunny.”
  • East/Eastern → Easter: As in, “Easter of Eden,” and “Full of Easter promise.”
  • *east → *easter: As in, “At the very l-easter,” and “A f-easter for the eyes,” and “F-easter or famine,” and “The king of b-easters,” and “Last but not l-easter,” and “Nutritional y-easter is a good cheese substitute.”
  • Giving → Thanksgiving: As in, “The gift that keeps on Thanksgiving.” For more Thanksgiving-related puns, see our Thanksgiving list.
  • Christmas: As in, “A Christmas carol,” and “All I want for Christmas is you,” and “Christmas comes but once a year,” and “Done up like a Christmas tree,” and “Have yourself a merry little Christmas,” and “Lit up like a Christmas tree,” and “A white Christmas.” Note: If you’d like more Christmas-related puns, stay tuned for our Christmas list which is coming soon. 

Holiday-Related Words

To help you come up with your own holiday puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

General: holiday, vacation, staycation, retreat, travel, escape, trip, journey, leisure, recreation, break, rest, tourist, tourism, abroad, sabbatical, beach, sand, sea, resort, tropical, island, palm tree, surf, waves, tan, bathers, sunshine, sunscreen, country, mountain, canyon, food, culture, getaway, weekend, bed and breakfast, hotel, hostel, motel, villa, homestay, cabin, lodge, cottage, airbnb, adventure, destination, pack, bag, suitcase, luggage, ticket, airport, flight, car, bus, train, rail, airplane, aeroplane, ferry, boat, cruise, ship, helicopter, taxi, uber, flight, rickshaw, monorail, cable car, cab, caravan, rv (recreational vehicle), chairlift, jet, plane, sailboat, yacht, accommodation, backpacking, activities, transit, itinerary, pilot, flight attendant, business, first-class, economy, railway, sail, hiking, shopping, safari, roam, skiing, snowboard, dancing, diving, snorkeling, climbing, photo, photography, bird watching, festival, tour, family, honeymoon, romantic, solo, luxury

Specific holidays: new year’s, new year’s eve, good friday, easter, labor day, thanksgiving, christmas, diwali, eid, ramadan, hanukkah, chinese new year, yom kippur

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