Reindeer Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on reindeer puns! 🦌🛷❄

To help you celebrate your Christmas cheer, we’ve compiled a list of reindeer puns that covers reindeer in general (which could be more appropriate for year-round puns) and also the specific reindeer that make up Santa’s sleigh-pulling team.

While this list is as thorough as we could make it, it is specific to reindeer only. If you’re after more Christmas-related lists, we also have Christmas tree puns and Santa puns, and will have others on their way soon!

Reindeer Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about reindeer that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of reindeer puns:

  • Dear→ Deer: As in, “After you, my deer,” and “Deerly beloved, we are gathered here today,” and “Elementary, my deer Watson,” and “Frankly my deer, I don’t give a damn,” and “Hang on for deer life,” and “Near and deer to my heart,” and “Nearest and deerest.”
  • Deer: Use this well-known deer-related phrase to refer to Santa’s reindeer – “Deer in headlights.”
  • Eerie→ Deerie: As in, “A deerie atmosphere.” Note: eerie means creepy.
  • Dairy→ Deery: As in, “Deery is scary.”
  • Rain, dear→ Rain, deer: As in, “It looks like rain, deer!”
  • Dare→ Deer: As in, “Deer for more,” and “Deer to be different,” and “How deer you!” and “Deer to dream,” and “Who deers wins.”
  • There→ Deer: As in, “Ahoy deer!” and “And there deer was one,” and “Are we deer yet?” and “As if deer was no tomorrow,” and “Be deer for,” and “I’ll be deer in spirit,” and “Be deer or be square,” and “Been deer, done that,” and “Don’t go deer,” and “Don’t just stand deer, do something,” and “For every action deer is an equal and opposite reaction,” and “Hang in deer,” and “Here and deer,” and “Here deer be beasts,” and “Here, deer and everywhere,” and “Hold it right deer,” and “Is anybody deer,” and “It’s a jungle out deer,” and “Knock knock, who’s deer?” and “Let’s be careful out deer,” and “So deer!” and “The truth is out deer,” and “Deer and then,” and “Deer are two sides to every situation,” and “Deer ought to be a law,” and “Deer’s no place like home,” and “Deer’s no smoke without a fire,” and “Deer you have it.”
  • There*→ Deer*: Deerfore (therefore), deerby (thereby), deerof (thereof), deerafter (thereafter), deerin (therein).
  • Their→ Deer: As in, “Cut them down in deer prime,” and “Swept them of deer feet,” and “Everybody and deer brother,” and “Put them in deer place,” and “Deer bark is worse than deer bite,” and “Cats always land on deer feet.”
  • Idea→ Ideer: As in, “You’ve got no ideer,” and “I have a better ideer,” and “Bat the ideer around,” and “Bounce ideers off,” and “A bright ideer,” and “Warming to the ideer,” and “What’s the big ideer?”
  • Deal→ Deerl: As in, “I can’t deerl with this,” and “Big deerl,” and “Cut me a deerl,” and “A deerl breaker,” and “Deerl from the bottom of the deck,” and “Deerl me in,” and “Deerl or no deerl?” and “Deerl with it,” and “A done deerl,” and “Make a deerl with the devil,” and “A raw deerl,” and “Seal the deerl,” and “Strike a deerl,” and “Sweeten the deerl,” and “The art of the deerl,” and “The real deerl,” and “Wheeling and deerling,” and “The real deerl.” Note: to deal from the bottom of the deck is to use dishonest methods in dealing with a situation.
  • Tears→ Deers: As in, “Blood, sweat and deers,” and “Bring deers to your eyes,” and “Burst into deers,” and “Fighting back deers,” and “It will all end in deers,” and “Moved to deers,” and “No more deers.”
  • Tear*→ Deer*: deerdrop (teardrop), deerful (tearful), deery-eyed.
  • *tary→ *deery: As in, “I’m sick of propriedeery (proprietary) cables,” and “Complemendeery (complementary) colours,” and “You’re very complimendeery today,” and “My new secredeery.” Other words that work with this format: sedendeery (sedentary), documendeery (documentary), rudimendeery (rudimentary), monedeery (monetary), solideery (solitary). Notes: if something is proprietary, then it’s used or made under exclusive legal rights of the maker. To be sedentary is to not be physically active.
  • *ter*→ *deer*: As in, “Explore new deerritory,” and “Harsh deerrain,” and “Deerrible traffic,” and “A deerrific result.” Other words that would work: characdeer (character), madeer (matter), masdeer (master), fosdeer (foster), bedeer (better), compudeer (computer), leddeer (letter), indeerest (interest), ardeery (artery), indeerface (interface), aldeernative (alternative), baddeery (battery), indeernet (internet).
  • Rein: These rein-related phrases may serve as some terrible reindeer puns: “Hold the reins,” and “Rein it in,” and “Take the reins.”
  • Rain→ Rein: As in, “Right as rein,” and “Chasing reinbows,” and “Come rein or shine,” and “Don’t rein on my parade,” and “It never reins but it pours,” and “Make it rein,” and “Over the reinbow,” and “Reindrops keep falling on my head,” and “Reining in my heart,” and “Reining cats and dogs,” and “Singin’ in the rein,” and “Spitting with rein,” and “Take a reincheck,” and “Taste the reinbow,” and “The pot of gold at the end of the reinbow.” Note: to take a raincheck is to accept an invitation but with the stipulation that you can only attend or fulfill it at a later date.
  • *rain/ran*→ *rein*: Use words with a “rain” sound in them as a reference to reindeer: “Against the grein,” and “Take the trein,” and “Bucking under the strein,” and “Kindly refrein from feeding the animals,” and “My breinchild.” Other words that would work with this: birdbrein (birdbrain), breinchild (brainchild), breinstorm, breinwash, drein (drain), harebreined, reincoat, reindrop, reinfall, reining, reinstorm, reinwater, restrein (restrain), streinger (stranger), treinee (trainee), treiner (trainer), sprein (sprain).
  • *reign→ *rein: As in, “Soverein power.” Note: a sovereign is a monarch, or ruler.
  • *door*→ *deer*: As in, “Ring the deerbell,” and “Standing in the deerframe,” and “Don’t be a deermat.” Other words that would work: deerway (doorway), deerjamb (doorjamb), deerknob (doorknob), deerstep (doorstep), deerperson (doorperson), outdeer (outdoor), backdeer (backdoor), indeer (indoor), and trapdeer (trapdoor).
  • *dor*→ *deer*: As in, “Lying deermant (dormant),” and “Shared deermitories (dormitories),” and “Deersal fin,” and “Street vendeer (vendor).” Other words that would work: ardeer (ardor), candeer (candor), ambassadeer (ambassador), corrideer (corridor), odeer (odour), splendeer (splendour), adeerable (adorable), endeerse (endorse), adeern (adorn). Notes: ardor is great passion or energy. Candor is honesty. To adorn is to decorate.
  • *der*→ *deer*: As in, “Be careful of deerogatory language,” and “You’re acting deeranged,” and “A deerisive tone.” Other words that would work: deerive (derive), deerivative, deerision (derision), deerelict, ordeer, lardeer, rendeer (render), tendeer, wondeer, disordeer, consideer, leadeer, hindeer, gendeer, engendeer, undeerstand, consideeration.
  • *dur*→ *deer*: As in, “Under deeress,” and “Throughout the deeration,” and “A deerable phone.” Other words that would work: deering (during), deerability (durability), deerian (durian), endeere (endure), procedeere (procedure), endeerance (endurance).
  • *dar*→ *deer*: As in, “Heart of deerkness,” and “Advent calendeer,” and “Under the radeer.” Other words that would work: deodeerant (deoderant), standeerd, quandeery, solideerity, mandeerin, and cedeer (cedar).
  • *dir*→ *deer*: As in, “Deerect intervention,” and “Going in the wrong deerection,” and “Shoot the deerector,” and “Playing deerty.” Other possible words: deert (dirt), deerectory (directory), deerectly (directly) and deerective (directive).
  • Rein it in, dear→ Rein it in, deer
  • Slytherin→ Sleightherin
  • Hufflepuff→ Hooflepuff
  • Rude→ Rudolph: As in, “A rudolph awakening.”
  • *rood*→ *rudolph*: Change words that rhyme with “rude” to include “rudolph”: “Debt accrudolph” (accrued),” and “Coffee’s brudolph (brewed),” and “Crudolph (crude) oil,” and “Don’t intrudolph (intrude).”
  • Rude of→ Rudolph: As in, “Well, that was Rudolph you.”
  • Slay→ Sleigh: As in, “Sleigh, queen,” and “Sleigh the dragon.”
  • Say*→ Sleigh*: As in, “As the sleighing goes,” and “Do as I sleigh, not as I do,” and “Does exactly what it sleighs on the box,” and “Have the final sleigh,” and “Just sleigh the word,” and “It goes without sleighing,” and “Never sleigh never,” and “Sleigh cheese!” and “Sleigh it loud and sleigh it proud,” and “Sleigh it with flowers,” and “Sleigh uncle,” and “Sleigh what you mean and mean what you sleigh,” and “Sleigh your prayers,” and “Simon sleighs,” and “As I was sleighing,” and “If I do sleigh so myself,” and “I’ll sleigh,” and “Let’s not and sleigh we did,” and “Sleigh again?” and “That’s sleighing something,” and “To sleigh the least,” and “You can’t sleigh fairer than that.”
  • Sleight: Emphasise the “sleigh” – “Sleigh-t of hand.”
  • Lay→ Sleigh: As in, “Sleigh a finger on,” and “Sleigh down your arms,” and “Sleigh down your life,” and “Sleigh eyes on,” and “Sleigh down the law,” and “Sleigh it on thick,” and “The sleigh of the land,” and “Sleigh down the groundwork.”
  • Laid→ Sleigh’d: As in, “Get sleigh’d,” and “Sleigh’d back,” and “Sleigh’d bare” and “Sleigh’d to rest,” and “Even the best sleigh’d plans.”
  • Said→ Sleigh’d: As in, “After all is sleigh’d and done,” and “I couldn’t have sleigh’d it better,” and “Easier sleigh’d than done,” and “Enough sleigh’d,” and “No sooner sleigh’d than done,” and “‘Nuff sleigh’d,” and “Was it something I sleigh’d?” and “That’s what you sleigh’d.”
  • Sight→ Sleigh’t: As in, “Catch sleigh’t of,” and “Hidden in plain sleigh’t,” and “Love at first sleigh’t,” and “Not a pretty sleigh’t,” and “Out of sleigh‘t,” and “Set your sleigh’ts on,” and “A sleigh’t for sore eyes,” and “A sleigh’t to behold,” and “Hindsleigh’t is 20/20,” and “Can’t stand the sleigh’t of,” and “A sorry sleigh’t.”
  • Slight→ Sleigh’t: As in, “A sleigh’t oversight,” and “Sleigh’tly ahead of our time,” and “Not in the sleigh’test,” and “A sleigh’t misunderstanding.”
  • Slate→ Sleight’: As in, “A blank sleigh’t,” and “A clean sleigh’t,” and “Wipe the sleigh’t clean.”
  • *sight*→ *sleight*: As in, “I value your insleight,” and “An enormous oversleight,” and “In hindsleight,” and “An insleightful person,” and “I wish I had your foresleight,” and “A sleightseeing tour.”
  • *sley→ *sleigh: As in, parsleigh (parsley), paisleigh (paisley), Elvis Presleigh (Presley), and Ronald Weasleigh (Weasley).
  • Lay*→ Sleigh*: As in, “The topmost sleigher (layer),” and “Sleighout (layout) designer,” and “In sleighperson’s terms.” Note: a layperson is someone with no training or qualifications in a particular subject.
  • *say*→ *sleigh*: As in, “I have an essleigh (essay) due Monday,” and “That’s hearsleigh (hearsay),” and “Don’t be a naysleigher,” and “The old soothsleigher.” Notes: hearsay is a type of evidence that has a reputation for being untrustworthy or unreliable. A soothsayer is one who predicts the future.
  • *sly→ *sleigh: Use words that end in “sly” to make some corny sleigh puns: “It happened simultaneousleigh,” and “Well, obviousleigh,” and “You performed flawlessleigh.” Here are some other words that would work with this: surreptitiousleigh (surreptitiously), continuousleigh (continuously), vicariousleigh (vicariously), seamlessleigh (seamlessly), previousleigh (previously), thusleigh (thusly), seriousleigh (seriously), furiousleigh (furiously), carelessleigh (carelessly), shamelessleigh (shamelessly), soundlessleigh (soundlessly), maliciousleigh (maliciously), curiousleigh (curiously), ceremoniousleigh (ceremoniously), tenaciousleigh (tenaciously), frivolousleigh (frivolously), deviousleigh (deviously), fabulousleigh (fabulously), famousleigh (famously), gloriousleigh (gloriously).
  • Red→ Red-nosed: As in, “As red-nosed as a beetroot,” and “Better dead than red-nosed,” and “Caught red-nosed.”
  • Nose→ Red-nose: As in, “Always have your red-nose in a book,” and “Plain as the red-nose on your face,” and “Blow your red-nose,” and “Can’t see beyond the end of your red-nose,” and “Give somebody a red-nose.”
  • Dash→ Dasher: Since Dasher is one of Santa’s reindeer, we’ve included dash in this list: “Crash and dasher,” and “Dasher to pieces,” and “Dasher off.”
  • *dish→ *dasher: As in, “What outlandasher (outlandish) claims!” and “Radasher cake,” and “Childasher (childish) behaviour,” and “A prudasher (prudish) mindset,” and “A fiendasher (fiendish) child.”
  • Dance: As Dancer is one of Santa’s reindeer, we’ve included dance-related phrases for you to play with: “Dance around the problem,” and “Dance like nobody’s watching,” and “Dance the night away,” and “Dance your socks off,” and “Just dance,” and “Lead a merry dance,” and “Make a song and dance about,” and “Save the last dance for me.” Notes: to dance around the problem is to avoid it. To lead someone on a merry dance is to make things prolonged and complicated for someone. To make a song and dance about something is to make an unnecessarily big deal out of it.
  • *dance→ *dancer: As in, “Take attendancer,” and “I need your guidancer,” and “In abundancer of,” and “In accordancer with,” and “Good riddancer to bad rubbish,” and “Avoidancer techniques.”
  • Dense→ Dance: As in, “The cake should be light and fluffy, not dance,” and “Are you dance?”
  • *dence→ *dance: As in, “Where’s the evidance?” and “A measured cadance,” and “In confidance,” and “Enter into correspondance with.”
  • Pants→ Prance: These puns will help you refer to Prancer, another of Santa’s reindeer: “Ants in his prance,” and “Beat the prance off,” and “By the seat of your prance,” and “Caught with your prance down,” and “Drop your prance,” and “Fancy prance,” and “Fly by the seat of your prance,” and “Keep your prance on,” and “Prance on fire,” and “Smarty prance,” and “Keep it in your prance,” and “Keep your prance on.”
  • Prince→ Prance: As in, “A prance among men,” and “Prance of darkness,” and “Prance of Persia.” Note: Prince of Persia is a video game franchise.
  • Prints→ Prance: As in, “I made some prance to hang on the walls.”
  • Common→ Comet: Make references to Comet, one of Santa’s reindeer, with these: “A victory for comet sense,” and “As comet as muck,” and “Comet ground,” and “Comet sense,” and “Nothing in comet,” and “The comet good.”
  • Comment→ Comet: As in, “No comet,” and “Any questions, comets or concerns?”
  • Come→ Comet: As in, “All good things must comet to an end,” and “Good things comet to those who wait,” and “As tough as they comet,” and “Christmas comets but once a year,” and “Comet and get it,” and “Comet away with me,” and “Comet on over,” and “Comet running,” and “Comet together,” and “Comet again?” and “Comet down hard on,” and “Comet down on (someone) like a tonne of bricks,” and “Comet full circle,” and “Comet hell or high water,” and “Comet home to a real fire,” and “Comet home to roost,” and “Comet in from the cold,” and “Comet of age,” and “Comet out and play,” and “Comet out of the closet,” and “Comet out of your shell,” and “Comet out swinging,” and “Comet rain or shine.”
  • Cosmic→ Comet: As in, “Comet ordering.” Note: cosmic ordering is the idea that positive thinking without action can help you realise your dreams.
  • Comic→ Comet: As in, “Comet strip,” and “Comet timing.”
  • Cupid: As Cupid is one of Santa’s reindeer, this Cupid-related phrase can stand in as a reindeer pun: “Play Cupid.” Note: to play Cupid is to attempt to act as a match-maker.
  • Stupid*→ Cupid*: As in, “Criminal cupidity,” and “I’m with cupid,” and “Keep it simple, cupid,” and “Cupid is as cupid does,” and “Very interesting, but cupid.”
  • Kewpie→ Cupid: As in, “Cupid doll,” and “Cupid mayonnaise.” Note: kewpie is both a type of doll and a brand of mayonnaise.
  • *cup→ *cupid: As in, hiccupid, buttercupid, and teacupid.
  • Done→ Donner: Donner is another of Santa’s reindeer, so it’s been included in this list too: “Been there, donner that,” and “Donner and dusted,” and “A donner deal,” and “Easier said than donner,” and “Hard donner by,” and “Well donner,” and “When all is said and donner,” and “I’m donner for.”
  • Do not→ Donner: As in, “Donner look now,” and “Donner call us, we’ll call you,” and “Donner get me started,” and “Donner give up your day job,” and “Donner go there,” and “Donner hold your breath,” and “Donner knock yourself out,” and “Donner let the door hit you on the way out,” and “Donner tell me what to do,” and “Donner believe everything you hear,” and “Donner get caught with your pants down,” and “Donner knock it til you’ve tried it,” and “I donner understand.”
  • Dinner→ Donner: As in, “Donner and a movie,” and “A donner date,” and “A dog’s donner,” and “Guess who’s coming to donner?”
  • Pardon→ Par-donner: As in, “I beg your par-donner?” and “Well par-donner me for living,” and “Par-donner my French,” and “Par-donner me.” This also works well with other words ending with “don”, like abandon (abandonner), tendon (tendonner), armageddon (armageddonner) and London (Londonner).
  • Blitz: As in, “Blitzed out.” Note: Blitzen is one of Santa’s reindeer.
  • Bliss→ Blitz: As in, “Blitzed out,” and “A blitzful slumber,” and “Domestic blitz,” and “Ignorance is blitz,” and “Marital blitz.”
  • Blister*→ Blitzer*: As in, “Blitzering barnacle,” and “At blitzering speed,” and “Blood blitzer,” and “Blitzer pack,” and “Blitzering heat.” Note: a blister pack is a type of plastic and foil packaging, usually for medicine.
  • *ant→ *antler: As in, “Power plantler,” and “Pair of pantlers,” and “A poignantler story,” and “That’s irrelevantler,” and “A redundantler point.” Other words that could be used are – revenantler (revenant), redundantler (redundant), adamantler (adamant), petulantler (petulant), importantler (important), currantler (currant), resistantler (resistant), accountantler (accountant), lieutenantler (lieutenant), quadrantler (quadrant), gallantler (gallant), tenantler (tenant), constantler, grantler (grant), vagrantler, abundantler (abundant), stimulantler, implantler, giantler, mutantler, participantler, assistantler, adamantler (adamant), sergeantler, miscreantler (miscreant), servantler, merchantler, elephantler, pollutantler.
  • Bull: As male reindeers are known as bulls, we’ve included bull-related puns in this list too. To start off, some bull-related phrases: “A load of bull,” and “A cock and bull story,” and “Like a bull in a china shop,” and “A raging bull,” and “Take the bull by the horns,” and “Bullseye!”
  • Pull→ Bull: As in, “Like bulling teeth,” and “Bulling away,” and “Bull a face,” and “Bull a fast one,” and “Bull up short,” and “Bulling the strings,” and “Bull the pin,” and “Bull your finger out,” and “Bull your socks up,” and “Bull yourself together.”
  • *bal*→ *bull*: As in, “Hanging in the bullance,” and “Bullance the books,” and “A bullpark estimate,” and “Go down like a lead bulloon,” and “Stop eyebulling (eyeballing) me,” and “Go bullistic,” and “What bulloney (baloney),” and “The hairy eyebull.” Other words that would work: bullk (balk), bullot (ballot), globull (global), verbull (verbal), tribull (tribal), cymbull (cymbal), herbull (herbal), and footbull. Notes: to balk is to stop suddenly and not continue.
  • *bel*→ *bull*: As in, “Bullieve it or not,” and “Bullieve you me,” and “Bullow the belt,” and “Hitting bullow your weight,” and “Seeing is bullieving,” and “Suspend your disbullief,” and “Opportunities are seldom labulled,” and “You don’t bullong in business.” Other words that would work: bulligerent (belligerent), bull (bell), bulloved (beloved), labull (label), rebull (rebel), decibull (decibel). Note: to hit below your weight is to perform under expectation.
  • *bil*→ *bull*: As in, “Cut the umbullical cord,” and “Eliminate the possibullities,” and “Take responsibullity.” Other words that would work: bullow (billow), bullboard (billboard), bullion (billion), gerbull (gerbil), liabullity (liability), mobull (mobile), accountabullity (accountability), abullity (ability), capabullity (capability), rehabullitation (rehabilitation), sustainabullity (sustainability).
  • *bol*→ *bull*: As in, “Bulldly go where no man has gone before,” and “Close the stable door after the horse has bullted,” and “Nuts and bullts,” and “Fortune favours the bull-d (bold).” Other words that would work: bullster (bolster), bullocks (bollocks), symbull, gambull (gambol), hyperbulle (hyperbole), abullish (abolish), metabullism. Note: to close the stable door after the horse has bolted is to look after a situation after things have gone badly.
  • *bul*/*bull*: As in, “Bully for you,” and “Buy it in bullk,” and “Bite the bullet,” and “A lightbullb moment.” Other words that can work: bullwark (bulwark), bullb (bulb), bullge (bulge), bullsh*t, nebullous (nebulous), fabullous (fabulous), nebulla (nebula), and vocabullary (vocabulary). Note: if something is nebulous, then it’s vague and without clear form.
  • *boul*→ *bull*: As in, “Over the shoulder bullder (boulder) holder,” and “The bullevard (boulevard) of broken dreams.” Note: “over the shoulder boulder holder” is a very cheeky and colloquial term for a bra.
  • *pal*→ *bull*: As in, “A princibull player.” Other “pal” containing words: bullindrome (palindrome), obull (opal), municibull (municipal), archetypebull (archetypal), bullpable (palpable), and bulltry (paltry). Notes: if something is paltry, then it’s a very small amount. A palindrome is a word that is the same forwards and backwards.
  • *pel*→ *bull*: As in, “The gosbull (gospel) truth,” and “Disbulling (dispelling) rumours,” and “My dobullganger (doppelganger).”
  • *pul*→ *bull*: As in, “Keep your finger on the bullse (pulse),” and “Beaten to a bullp,” and “I won’t be manibullated (manipulated) by you.” Other words that could work: bullchritude (pulchritude), bullpit (pulpit), bulley (pulley), bullmonary (pulmonary), bullverise (pulverise), stibullate (stipulate), imbullse (impulse), pobullist (populist), pobullar (popular), combullsory (compulsory), pobullation (population), obullent (opulent). Notes: if something is opulent, it’s luxurious.
  • *pool*→ *bull*: As in, bullside (poolside), sbull (spool), cessbull, whirlbull, and carbull. Notes: a cesspool is an underground reservoir for liquid waste.
  • *poul*→ *bull*: As in, bulltry (poultry), bulltice (poultice), and ambulle (ampoule). Notes: an ampoule is a small sealed container. A poultice is a medicated cloth used to treat aching and inflammation.
  • *ble*→ *bull*: As in, “Bulleeding (bleeding) heart,” and “A bulleak (bleak) outcome,” and “Bullending (blending) in,” and “Bullessed (blessed) are the meek.” Other words that could work: bullemish (blemish), bulleach (bleach), bulleat (bleat), tabull (table), humbull (humble), feasibull (feasible), amenabull (amenable), viabull (viable), inevitabull (inevitable), vulnerabull, formidabull, sensibull, tangibull (tangible), probullem (problem).
  • *ple*→ *bull*: As in, “Bullead (plead) guilty,” and “I bulledge (pledge) my allegiance,” and “What a bulleasure (pleasure).” Other words you could use: bullethora (plethora), bullea (plea), bulleasant (pleasant), bullease (please), and abbull (apple), princibull, peobull (people), simbull (simple), stabull (stable/staple), exambull (example), multibull (multiple), coubull (couple), ambull (ample), combullement (complement), combullex (complex), imbullement (implement), and combullete (complete).
  • Fool→Bull: As in, “A bull and his money are soon parted,” and “Act the bull,” and “Tom bullery (foolery).”
  • Cow: Since cows are what female reindeer are called, we’ve included cow-related phrases and puns in here too: As in, “Cash cow,” and “Don’t have a cow, man,” and “Holy cow,” and “Till the cows come home.”
  • *cow*: Emphasise the “cow” in certain words to make some terrible reindeer puns, as in: coworker, cower, coward, cowl, cowboy, cowrie, cowardly, cowed, cowardice, scowl, and Moscow.
  • *kow*→ *cow*: As in, “Don’t cowtow to them.” Note: to kowtow is to bow deeply in a show of respect.
  • *kew*→ *cow*: As in, “Cowpie doll,” and “Cowpie mayonnaise.” Note: Kewpie is both a Japanese brand of mayonnaise and a type of doll.
  • *ka*→ *cow*: As in, Eurecow, vodcow, Alascow, papricow, remarcowble, remarkcowble, and lakcowdaisical.
  • *ca*→ *cow*: As in, “Americow can do better,” and “Circow 1999,” and “A loud advocowte (advocate).” Other suitable words: meccow (mecca), Africow (Africa), orcow (orca), alpacow (alpaca), broadcowst (broadcast), implicowtion (implication), occowsion (occasion), applicowtion (application), indicowtion (indication), and dedicowte (dedicate).
  • *cau*→ *cow*: As in, “Cowt between the devil and the deep blue sea,” and “Cowt with your pants down,” and ” Err on the side of cowtion,” and “A lost cowse,” and “Throw cowtion to the wind,” and “Wouldn’t be cowt dead.” Other suitable words: cowstic (caustic), cowtious (cautious), cowcasian (caucasian), cowldron (cauldron), becowse (because).
  • Half → Calf: As in “I’m still calf asleep” and “I’ve got calf a mind to …” and “Calf measures”.
  • Coff* → Calf*: As in, “Artisan calffee (coffee),” and “Added to the calffers (coffers),” and “Company calf-founders,” and “Back from the calffin (coffin).”
  • Caf* → Calf*: As in, calfe (cafe), calfeteria (cafeteria), calffeine (caffeine), decalf (decaf), scalffold (scaffold).
  • *cuff* → *calf*: As in, calflink (cufflink), calfed (cuffed), scalffle (scuffle), fisticalfs (fisticuffs), handcalfs (handcuffs).
  • Halves → Calves: As in, “Go calves,” and “Don’t do things by calves.”
  • Heard → Herd: As in “I overherd them speaking about …” and “The last I herd, …” and “Your herd it here first.” and “You could have herd a pin drop.” and “Stop me if you’ve herd this one”
  • Herd: You can use these herd-related phrases to make some awful reindeer puns: “Herd immunity,” and “Herd instinct,” and “Like herding cats.”
  • Tail: Use these tail-related phrases: “Happy as a dog with two tails,” and “Nervous as a long-tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs,” and “Bright eyed and busy tailed,” and “Can’t make head or tail of it,” and “Chase your own tail,” and “Two shakes of a lamb’s tail.” Note: two shakes of a lamb’s tail is a phrase used to indicated that something is very fast.
  • Tale → Tail: As in, “Dead men tell no tails,” and “Fairytail ending,” and “Live to tell the tail,” and “Never tell tails out of school,” and “An old wives’ tail,” and “Tattle tail,” and “Tell tail sign.”
  • Talent → Tailent: As in, “___’s got Tailent,” and “A tailented painter,” and “Where would you say your tailents lie?”
  • Toilet → Tailet: As in, “Down the tailet,” and “In the tailet.”
  • Style → Stail: As in, hairstail, freestail, lifestail, and stailus (stylus)
  • Tile → Tail: As in, fertail (fertile), percerntail (percentile), projectail (projectile), reptail (reptile), and versatail (versatile).
  • Who’ve → Hoof: As in “Hoof you spoken to so far?”
  • Walk → Hoof it: As in “We missed the bus and had to hoof it home.”
  • Huff → Hoof: As in, “Hoofing paint,” and “A hoofy (huffy) attitude,” and “I belong in Hooflepuff (Hufflepuff),” and “Shoofling away,” and “Shoofling the deck,” and “Feeling choofed (chuffed).” Note: to feel chuffed is to feel very pleased.
  • Half → Hoof: As in, “Ain’t hoof bad,” and “My better hoof,” and “Cheap at hoof the price,” and “Getting there is hoof the fun,” and “Hoof awake.” Other half-related words: hoofway (halfway), hoof-baked, hooftime (halftime), hoofhearted, and behoof (behalf).
  • *hef* → *hoof*: As in, “A hoofty (hefty) promise,” and “Grand Thooft Auto,” and “Identity thooft.”
  • *hif* → *hoof*: As in, “Working in shoofts,” and “A whoof of perfume,” and “Makeshooft tent,” and “Shoofty glances.”
  • Have → Hoof/Hoove: As in, “As luck may hoove it,” and “Hoof your cake and eat it too,” and “Hoove a ball,” and “Hoof a bone to pick,” and “Hoof a go,” and “The walls hoove ears.”
  • *hav* → *hoove*: As in, hoove (have), hooveoc (havoc), behooveiour, aftershoove, and behoove (behave).
  • *hev* → *hoove*: As in, “Looking dishooveled (disheveled).”
  • *hiv* → *hoove*: As in, “In the archooves,” and “Shoovers down my spine,” and “Choovealry (chivalry) is not dead, we just don’t know the meaning of it,” and “A beehoove (beehive) hairstyle.”
  • *hov* → *hoove*: As in, hoover (hover), hoovel (hovel), hoovering (hovering), hoovercraft (hovercraft), shoovel and pushoover.
  • *fur*: Use these fur-related/containing phrases in your reindeer wordplay: “Couldn’t be further from the truth,” and “Moving furniture,” and “A furtive manner,” and “And furthermore..” and “A roaring furnace,” and “Blind fury,” and “Fast and Furious,” and “Furnishing the truth.”
  • Far → Fur: As in, “A step too fur,” and “As fur as it goes,” and “As fur as the eye can see,” and “A fur cry,” and “Few and fur between,” and “Over the hills and fur away,” and “So fur, so good,” and “As fur as I know.” Other suitable “far” containing words: furm (farm), furwell (farewell), furt (fart), further (farther), insofur (insofar), nefurious (nefarious), welfur and furce (farce).
  • *fer* → *fur*: As in, “A offur you can’t refuse,” and “I beg to diffur,” and “Make a diffurence,” and “Marching to the beat of a diffurent drum,” and “Offur condolences.” Other “fer” containing words that you could use: furn (fern), fural (feral), furvent (fervent), furvor (fervor), furret (ferret), furment (ferment), furocious, furtile, furrule (ferrule), defur (defer), confur, infur, refur, offur, transfur, buffur, prefur, proffur, refurence, confurence and transfurence.
  • *fir* → *fur*: “At furst,” and “At furst blush,” and “A furm handshake.” Other suitable words: affurm, confurm, affurmation and affurmative.
  • *for* → *fur*: As in, “A furce to be reckoned with,” and “Good furm (form),” and “Move furwards,” and “Why have you fursaken me?” and “The furcast for tomorrow,” and “So on and so furth,” and “Furbidden fruit.” Other words that would work: perfurmance, infurmation, therefur, fursight (foresight) and fursee.
  • Fear* → Fur*: As in: furful, furless, fursome and furmonger.
  • *feur* → *fur*: As in: chauffur and coiffur. Note: a coiffeur is a hairdresser.
  • Four* → Fur*: As in: fur (four), furth (fourth), furteen, furty (forty) and fursome (foursome).
  • *phor* → *fur*: As in, “A useless metafur,” and “Giddy eufuria (euphoria).” Other words that could be used: camfur (camphor), phosfur, dysfuria (dysphoria) and semafur (semaphore). Note: semaphore is a system of signs.
  • *pher* → *fur*: As in, “You’re indecifurable,” and “I’m not your gofur (gopher),” and “The wedding photografur,” and “The barefoot philosofur.” Other words that could work: furomone (pheromone), cifur (cipher), philosofur (philosopher), cinematografur, perifural (peripheral), cartografur, atmosfur (atmosphere), sfur (sphere), parafurnalia (paraphernalia), perifury (periphery), hemisfur (hemisphere).
  • Sephiroth → Sepfuroth: Note: Sephiroth is a much-loved character from the Final Fantasy game franchise.
  • *phar* → *fur*: Change the “phar” in certain words to “fur” to make reindeer-related puns: furmacy (pharmacy), furaoh (pharaoh), furmacist (pharmacist), furmacology (pharmacology).
  • *phe* → *fur*: As in, “Natural furnomenon (phenomenon),” and “A furnomenal mistake.” Other words that would work: furseant (pheasant), eufurmism (euphemism), blasfurmy (blasphemy).
  • *phere* → *fur*: As in, atmosfur (atmosphere), hemisfur (hemisphere), biosfur (biosphere), stratosfur (stratosphere), and troposfur (troposphere). Note: the troposphere is the lowest layer of the Earth’s atmosphere.
  • Coat: Use these coat-related phrases in your mammalian wordplay: “Coat-tail investing,” and “Don’t forget your raincoat,” and “Ride on someone’s coat-tails.” Some coat-related words: petticoat, turncoat, overcoat, sugarcoat, waistcoat and peacoat.
  • Belt → Pelt: As in, “Below the pelt,” and “Pelt it out,” and “Buckle your seat pelts,” and “Tighten your pelt,” and “Under your pelt,” and “A notch in someone’s pelt.”
  • *pelt*: As in: spelt and misspelt.
  • Forest: As reindeer live in forests, we’ve included forest-related phrases in this list: “Forest green,” and “See the forest for the trees,” and “Only you can prevent forest fires.”
  • First→ Forest: As in, “A world forest,” and “At forest blush,” and “Be the forest to know,” and “Case the forest stone,” and “Love at forest sight,” and “Safety forest,” and “The forest cut is the deepest,” and “Today is the forest day of the rest of your life,” and “A world forest,” and “Forest impressions,” and “Forest come, forest served.”
  • Land→ Woodland: Outside of Santa’s workshop in Lapland, reindeer live in forest and woodland so we’ve included woodland in this list. As in, “A blot on the woodlandscape,” and “Cloud cuckoo woodland,” and “In the woodland of the living,” and “The woodland of hope and glory,” and “Political woodlandscape,” and “The woodland of nod.”
  • Click: The knees of reindeer can produce a clicking sound as they walk, which is a way to establish dominance among reindeer, so we’ve included click-related phrases in this list: “Click bait,” and “Click into place,” and “Click your fingers,” and “Click with,” and “Point and click,” and “Double click,” and “Mouse click.”
  • Eclectic→ Eclicktic: As in, “An eclicktic collection.”
  • Cloc*→ Click*: As in,” Like clickwork,” and “Turning clickwise,” and “Against the click,” and “Regular as clickwork.”
  • Crick*→ Click*: As in, “Jiminy Clicket,” and “It’s not clicket,” and “Holy clicket.” Note: Jiminy Cricket is a character from Pinocchio.
  • Remnant → Ruminant: As in “I haven’t a ruminant of pride left after making all these terrible goat puns.” (A “ruminant” is a family of hooved mammals comprising goats, sheep, cows, deer, giraffe and their relatives)
  • Prominent → Pruminant: As in “She’s a pruminant member of our group.”
  • Permanent → Pruminant: As in “I’ve accidentally used pruminant marker on the whiteboard.”
  • Buck: Since male deers (but not reindeers) are called bucks, we’ve included buck-related phrases in this list: “A bigger bang for your buck,” and “A buck well spent,” and “Big bucks,” and “Buck naked,” and “Buck the system,” and “Buck up,” and “A fast buck,” and “Pass the buck,” and “A quick buck,” and “The buck stops here,” and “Feel like a million bucks.” Some words containing “buck”: bucket, buckle, buckwheat, buckling, Starbucks, roebuck.
  • Back→ Buck: As in, “Answer buck,” and “As soon as my buck is turned,” and “At the buck of my mind,” and “Buck in black,” and “Buck to the future,” and “Buck down,” and “Buck from the dead,” and “Buck in business,” and “Buck in the day,” and “Buck in the saddle,” and “Buck on track,” and “Buck on your feet,” and “Buck out,” and “Buckseat driver,” and “Buck the wrong horse,” and “Buck to basics,” and “Buck to nature,” and “Buck to square one,” and “Buck to the drawing board,” and “A buckhanded compliment,” and “Buck to the wall,” and “Bend over buckwards to help,” and “Cast your mind buck,” and “Comebuck king,” and “Double buck,” and “Crawl buck into your shell,” and “Eyes in the buck of your head,” and “Face like the buck of a bus,” and “Fed up to the buck teeth,” and “Fighting buck tears,” and “Get buck at,” and “Go buck on a promise,” and “Go buck on your word,” and “Behind your buck.”
  • *back*→ *buck*: As in, buckslide (backslide), buckup (backup), buckground (background), bucklash (backlash), buckdrop (backdrop), buckyard (backyard), bucklog (backlog), buckbite (backbite), buckwards, feedbuck, setbuck, abuck (aback), drawbuck, piggybuck, pushbuck, kickbuck, and laidbuck.
  • Beck→ Buck: As in, “At your buck and call.” Note: to be at someone’s beck and call is to be entirely subservient to them.
  • Beck*→ Buck*: As in, “They’re buckoning (beckoning).”
  • *bic*→ *buck*: As in, “Stop buckering!” and “I’m learning Arabuck (Arabic).”
  • *bec*→ *buck*: As in, “What have you buckome?” and “Buckause I said so,” and “Vegan barbuckues are awesome,” and “At my buck and call,” and “A lie, told often enough, buckomes the truth,” and “Just buckause you can doesn’t mean you should.”
  • *bic*→ *buck*: As in, acerbuck (acerbic), xenophobuck (xenophobic), iambuck (iambic), aerobuck (aerobic), claustrophobuck (claustrophobic), homophobuck (homophobic), cubuckle (cubicle).
  • *puc*→ *buck*: As in, “Bucker up,” and “A soy capbuckcino (cappuccino).”
  • *pac*→ *buck*: As in, “Care buckage,” and “A wrinkly buckyderm (pachyderm),” and “A buck of lies,” and “Bucked to the rafters.” Note: a pachyderm is a type of mammal.
  • *pec*→ *buck*: As in, “Make a sbucktacle (spectacle) of yourself,” and “Put it in persbucktive (perspective),” and “Sbucktator (spectator) sport,” and “With all due resbuckt (respect),” and “Exbuckt the unexbuckted (unexpected),” and “The usual susbuckts (suspects).” Other words that would work: bucker (pecker), sbucktre (spectre), buckuliar (peculiar), buckan (pecan), bucktoral (pectoral), prosbucktive (prospective).
  • *pic*→ *buck*: As in, “The big buckture (picture),” and “In a buckle (pickle),” and “A buckturesque (picturesque) scene,” and “An ebuck (epic) argument.” Other words you could use: myobuck (myopic), tobuck (topic), philanthrobuck (philanthropic), misanthrobuck (misanthropic), cons-buck-uous (conspicuous), debuckt (depict), desbuckable (despicable), toothbuck (toothpick).
  • *poc*→ *buck*: As in, “Burn a hole in one’s bucket (pocket),” and “Four horsemen of the abuckalypse,” and “Bucket-sized,” and “Hocus puckus (pocus).” Other words you could use: Buckahontas (Pocahontas), buckmark (pockmark), hybuckrisy (hypocrisy), hybuckrite (hypocrite).
  • *bik*→ *buck*: As in, “Buckini (bikini) model,” and “Buckram yoga,” and “Rubuck‘s cube.”
  • Bequeath→ Buckeath: As in, “I buckeath to you.”
  • Do→ Doe: As female deer (but not reindeer!) are known as does, we’ve included doe-related puns in this list and may have a separate list dedicated to deer later on. As in, “You doe you,” and “Damned if I doe, damned if I doen’t,” and “Doe your best.”
  • Though→ Doe: As in, “Seriously doe,” and “You look as doe you’ve seen a ghost,” and “Really, doe?”
  • Down→ Doe-n: As in, “A spoonful of medicine makes the medicine go doe-n,” and “Back doe-n,” and “Batten doe-n the hatches,” and “Bogged doe-n,” and “Boogie on doe-n,” and “Breathing doe-n your neck,” and “Bring the house doe-n,” and “Brought doe-n to Earth,” and “Buckle doe-n,” and “Calm doe-n!”
  • Dough→ Doe: As in, “Dollars to doe-nuts,” and “Cookie doe.”

Reindeer-related Words

To help you come up with your own reindeer puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

reindeer, deer, sleigh, rudolph, red-nosed, dasher, dancer, prancer, comet, cupid, donner, blitzen, antler, bull, cow, calf, calves, herd, tail, hoof, fur, pelt, forest, woodland, clicking, ruminant, buck, doe

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Alpaca Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on alpaca puns! 🌱🐪🌿

Please note that while alpacas are visually similar to llamas, linguistically they are very different and so the two have their own separate entries. You might also like to have a look at our llama pun entry. If you’re interested in other similar mammals, have a look at our entries on goat puns, horse puns, and camel puns.

We hope you have fun looking through all of our alpaca-related wordplay!

Alpaca Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about alpacas that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of alpaca puns:

  • *-al → *-alpaca: Make some cheekily obvious puns simply by adding “paca” to any word ending in “al” or “ale” (making sure that the pronunciation suits) –  “can-alpaca” (as in canal + alpaca), “chaparr-alpaca” (chaparral: a type of plant), “chor-alpaca” (as in “chorale”, a type of choir), “corr-alpaca” (corral – to herd), “mor-alpaca” (as in “morale” – “moral” doesn’t quite have a suitable rhythm for this), “Pasc-alpaca” (Pascal – French polymath and a unit of pressure), “roy-alpaca” (as in “royale” – “royal” doesn’t have as suitable a rhythm), “sh-alpalca” (as in, “I shall!”)
  • Apocalypse → Alpaca-lypse: As in, “Alpaca-lypse Now: (the movie), and “The Four Horsemen of the Alpaca-lypse.”
  • Abaca → Al-baca: Abacas are a type of banana, and very conveniently rhymes with alpaca. Make a fruity pun by being oddly specific about your bananas: “I need some al-bacas from the store!”
  • I’ll pack a → Alpaca: As in, “Alpaca bag!” (I’ll pack a bag)
  • Jury → Sury: Suri is a type of alpaca. Make a cheesy alpaca pun by blending it with the word jury: “The sury is out.” Also works for other phrases using jury – like “Judge, sury and executioner”
  • Missouri → Missuri: As in, “You promised that we would go to Missuri.”
  • Sure he → Su-ri: As in, “Make su-ri doesn’t eat too many bananas.”
  • Korea → Cria: The term for a baby alpaca is a “cria”, which just so happens to rhyme almost perfectly with Korea. Switch the words around for a fun alpaca pun. 
  • *ria → *cria: You can use cria in other lame alpaca puns by adding it to the end of words that end in “ria”. Watch out for rhythm and pronunciation when making these up. Here are some for you: “Euphocria” (as in “euphoria”), “dysphocria” (from “dysphoria”), “allecria” (as in “allegria” – the Italian word for joy), “pizzecria” (from “pizzeria”), “bactecria” (as in “bacteria”), “Santecria” (as in “Santeria”, an Afro-American religion)
  • Embrace → H-embrace: Female alpacas are known as hembra, which fits in quite nicely to the word “embrace” like so: “My hamster routinely rejects my h-embrace.” 
  • *ember → *hembra: You can make some great alpaca puns by replacing the end of some months with “hembra”, like “Dec-hembra” and “Novhembra.”
  • Remember → Remhembra: As in, “One to remhembra.” Also works for other forms of remember, like “remhembrance” (remembrance) and “remhembra-ed” (as in remembered).
  • Nacho → Macho: Male alpacas are known as machos. Make some cheesy puns like so: “Please get me some machos.” You can also make a pun-ception (a pun within a pun, for those who haven’t seen Inception) by replacing words that rhyme with “nacho”, like “This is macho (nacho = not your) hat. Go away now.” You can also use the phrase “Macho man” in the right context. 
  • Chorizo → Chuarizo: A huarizo is a cross between a llama and an alpaca. Make some lame alpaca puns like so: “Wow, these vegan chuarizos are amazing.”
  • Pro → Peru: As in “A liberal, Peru-science atheist.”
  • *pro/pru* → *peru*: You can slip “Peru” into words that have the “pro” or “pru” sound in them. There are too many to list here, but I’ve provided quite a few to get you going. Don’t forget that for each word provided, there are other forms of the word (past, present, future tense, plurals) that will work as well: “Apperuve” (approve), “Apperuving” (approving), “Bulletperuf” (bulletproof), “Disperuven” (disproven), “Fireperuf” (fireproof), “Foolperuf” (foolproof), “Imperuv” (improve), “Imperudence” (imprudence), “Perucedures” (procedures), “Peruvable,” (provable), “Perude,” (prude), “Sperucing” (sprucing), “Unimperuved” (unimproved), “Waterperuf” (waterproof) and “Weatherperuf” (weatherproof).
  • Spit: Alpacas use spitting as a way to express generally negative feelings, and to warn others off. Use these spit-related phrases to make some great alpaca puns: “Spit and polish,” “spit and sawdust,” “spit blood,” “to spit in the eye of,” “he spit the dummy” (a temper tantrum), “spitting image” (an extremely close likeness), “spitting with rain,” “within spitting distance,” and finally, “don’t spit into the wind” (’cause it might blow it right back into your face).
  • Split → Spit: As in “Make like a banana and spit” and “Fifty-fifty spit” and “Spit hairs” and “Spit second” and “Spit up (with someone)” and “Lickety-spit” and “Spit your sides (laughing)”
  • Cud: In the right context, you could make an alpaca pun using the phrase “chewing the cud,” which means to chat aimlessly.
  • Could → Cud: As in “Cud you stop it please?” and “As fast as her legs cud carry her” and “I cud do it in my sleep.” Also works for “couldn’t” – as in, “I cudn’t see what the big deal was.”
  • Cuddle → Cud-dle: Simply put the word “cud” into “cuddle”, as in “let’s cud-dle!”
  • Heard → Herd: As in “I overherd them speaking about …” and “The last I herd, …” and “You herd it here first.” and “You could have herd a pin drop.” and “Stop me if you’ve herd this one”
  • Hay: Since a large part of alpacas’ diet is hay, you can make some alpaca puns using these hay-related phrases: “Go haywire,” and “Time to hit the hay,” and “Like looking for a needle in a haystack,” and  “Make hay” (an idiom which advises to take advantage of opportunities), “Make hay while the sun shines” (to act while you can, or while a situation is still in your favour), and “To roll in the hay.”  
  • Hey → Hay: As in “Hay, what’s up?” and “Hay there, friend.”
  • Go to sleep → Hit the hay: As in “It’s late. I better hit the hay.”
  • Grass: Here are some grass-related phrases to help you with your corny wordplay: “As exciting as watching grass grow,” and “Don’t walk on the grass,” “grass roots” (a term for organised local movements; usually social or political),  “a snake in the grass” (referring to a hidden enemy), “the grass is greener on the other side,”  and my personal favourite, “your arse/ass is grass!”
  • Field: “I’m an expert in my field.”
  • Passed/Past your → Pasture: As in “It’s just pasture house on the left.” and “I pasture stall at the fair today but you weren’t there.” and “It’s pasture bedtime.”
  • Wool: To start us off, here are some phrases containing the word “wool”, which you can use to make your own alpaca puns in the right situation: “Baa baa black sheep, have you any wool?” and “Dyed in the wool” (which refers to someone who is very steadfast and set in their ways), “pull the wool over someone’s eyes,” and “woolly thinking.” 
  • Will → Wool: As in “Against my wool” and “Accidents wool happen” and “Time wool tell” and “Every dog wool have its day” and “Heads wool roll” and “Love wool find a way” and “My grandmother left it for me in her wool” and “There wool be hell to pay!” and “I wool stop at nothing” and “It wool be the death of me” and “Whatever wool be, wool be.”
  • Well → Wool: As in “Alive and wool” and “Fare thee wool” and “(To be) wool versed (in something)” and “I hope all goes wool” and “May as wool” and “Jolly-wool” and “The point is wool-taken” and “That’s all wool and good, but …” and “All’s wool and ends wool” and “You know full wool that …” and “Might as wool.”
  • Wall → Wool: As in “A fly on the wool” and “A hole in the wool” and “Bang (one’s) head against a wool” and “Break the fourth wool” and “Drive up the wool” and “Off the wool” and “The writing is on the wool” and “Wool Street” and “Wool-to-wool” and “My back is to the wool” and “Wool of death”
  • While → Wool: As in “It was fun wool it lasted” and “Quit wool you’re ahead” and “Not worthwool” and “Every once in a wool.”
  • *wool*: Emphasise the “wool” in words and names: “A wool-f in sheep’s clothing,” “Werewool-f,” and “Virginia Wool-f,” and “Wool-fgang Amadeus Mozart,” and “Wool-verine,” and “Beo-woolf.”
  • Fleece: For a sneaky fleece pun, you can make a reference to “being fleeced,” meaning tricked or manipulated.
  • Fleas → Fleece: As in, “My puppy’s fur is full of fleece.”
  • Flees → Fleece: As in “Suddenly there is a loud crash and everyone fleece from the store.”
  • Feliz → Feleece: As in, “Fe-leece navidad.” (Feliz is Spanish for happy/merry, and feliz navidad means Merry Christmas).
  • Tail: Use these tail-related phrases: “Happy as a dog with two tails,” and “Nervous as a long-tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs,” and “Bright eyed and busy tailed,” and “Can’t make head or tail of it,” and “Chase your own tail,” and “Two shakes of a lamb’s tail.” Note: two shakes of a lamb’s tail is a phrase used to indicated that something is very fast.
  • Tale → Tail: As in, “Dead men tell no tails,” and “Fairytail ending,” and “Live to tell the tail,” and “Never tell tails out of school,” and “An old wives’ tail,” and “Tattle tail,” and “Tell tail sign.”
  • Talent → Tailent: As in, “___’s got Tailent,” and “A tailented painter,” and “Where would you say your tailents lie?”
  • Toilet → Tailet: As in, “Down the tailet,” and “In the tailet.”
  • Style → Stail: As in, hairstail, freestail, lifestail, and stailus (stylus)
  • Tile → Tail: As in, fertail (fertile), percerntail (percentile), projectail (projectile), reptail (reptile), and versatail (versatile).
  • Sheer → Shear: “Shear force of will.”
  • Her before → Herbivore: As in “I’ve never met herbivore.”
  • Man you’re → Manure: As in “Manure making some awful alpaca puns today.”
  • Withers → Withers: Withers is a homophone, meaning either the ridge between the shoulder blades of certain animals, or to shrivel. Swap the use and meaning of this word around to make a cheesy alpaca pun in the right context. 
  • Whither → Wither: As in, “Wither are we bound?” (Note: Withers refers to the ridge between the shoulder blades of certain animals).
  • Remnent → Ruminant: As in “I haven’t a ruminant of pride left after making all these terrible camel puns.” (A “ruminant” is a family of hooved mammals comprising cows, camels, sheep, deer, giraffe and their relatives)
  • Prominent → Pruminant: As in “She’s a pruminant member of our group.” (Note: A ruminant is a family of hooved mammals).
  • Permanent → Pruminant: As in “I’ve accidentally used pruminant marker on the whiteboard.” (Note: A ruminant is a family of hooved mammals).

Alpaca-Related Words

To help you come up with your own alpaca jokes, here’s a list of alpaca-related words to get you started. If you come up with any new puns, please feel free to share them in the comments!

Suri alpaca, Huacaya alpaca, cria, hembra, macho, huarizo, guanaco, wool, fleece, South America, Andes, lama pacos, vicuna, charolais, Peru, cud, withers, neck, vicugna pacos, camelid, camelidae, mammal, herd, flock, graze, Chile, spit, hum, snort, herbivore, grass, hay, quadruped, pachyderm, ruminant

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Did you find the alpaca-related pun that you were looking for? If so, great! Otherwise, please let us know what you were looking for in the comments below! Are you looking for word play for text messages, facebook, twitter, or some other social media platform? Would you like to see some funny alpaca pun pictures? Or perhaps you just want more alpaca puns for your photo captions? Whatever the case, please let us know, and help us improve this Punpedia entry. If you’ve got any alpaca puns (image or text) that aren’t included in this article, please submit them in the comments and one of our curators will add it as soon as possible. Thanks for visiting Punpedia! 🙂

Camel Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on camels! 🐫🏜🐪 There’s decent variety of puns involving or to do with camels, considering that there are only two types of camel to derive puns from.

You might also like to go through our entries on horse puns, cow puns, sheep puns, alpaca puns and llama puns.

Have fun going through the puns in this entry and let us know if there are any that we’ve missed out!

Camel Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about camels that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of camel puns:

  • Camel: To start, here are a couple of sayings involving camels which may serve as punny camel witticisms in the right context: “Trust in Allah, but tie up your camel,” and “A camel through the eye of a needle.”
  • Camembert → Camelbert: Camembert is a type of soft cheese from France, which now has some great non-dairy soy options. You can use this similar sounding word to make a cheesy camel pun: “My favourite cheese is soy camelbert.”
  • Camcorder → Camel-corder: As in, “Wait! Let me get my camel-corder.”
  • Camera → Camelra: As in, “Wait! This will look fantastic on my new camelra,” and “Camelra shy,” and “Lights, camelra, action!” and “Smile! You’re on candid camelra,” and “The camelra doesn’t lie,” and “The camelra loves you.” Also works for camelraman (cameraman) and camelramen (cameramen)
  • Scammed → S-camel’d: As in, “Gosh darn it! Those hooligans s-camel‘d me!”
  • Campaigner → Camelpaigner: As in, “The camelpaigners for this movement are really dedicated.” Also works for “campaign” (as in, “This is a really suave camelpaign.”)
  • Campus→ Camelpus: As in, “This is such a studious camelpus. I’m gonna love it here.”
  • Camelot → Camelot: As in, “The court at Camelot.”
  • Camouflage → Camelflage: As in, “Where’s your camelflage?” Also works with camelflaged (camouflaged) and camelflaging (camouflaging)
  • Cameron → Camel-ron: As in, “Camel-ron Diaz was so great in Charlie’s Angels.”
  • Cameron will → Cam will → Cam’ll → Camel: As in “Camel take care of that for you.”
  • Cameroon → Camel-roon: As in, “The Republic of Camel-roon.” (Which is a country in West Africa)
  • Amelie → Camelie: As in, “I loved the movie Camelie. So romantic and whimsical.”
  • Bechamel → Be-camel: A creamy white sauce, used in pasta and traditionally made from a butter base – but today coming in great vegan varieties. Use this to make some sneaky camel puns: “I can’t believe this be-camel is non-dairy!”
  • Camry → Camelry: As in, “They drive a Camelry.”
  • Cavalry → Camelry: As in, “Prepare the camelry!!”
  • Cambodia → Camel-bodia: As in, “I’m going to Camel-bodia this Thursday.”
  • Camagüey → Camel-güey: A city in Central Cuba whose name lends itself well to a clever camel joke: “Welcome to Camel-güey! I hope you brought a hat.”
  • Hump: Here are a couple of phrases which use the word “hump” and can be used as a pun in the right situation: “Hump day,” and “My humps.”
  • Chump → C-hump: As in, “C-hump-change.”
  • Humpty Dumpty → Hump-ty Dumpty: As in, “the character Hump-ty Dumpty” or “that’s a blatant Hump-ty Dumptyism!”
  • Calf: Calf can mean either a young camel or the lower part of a leg. You can use these double meanings to replace these words in inappropriate (or very appropriate, as the case may be) ways to make your own camel puns. Also works for the plural, “calves”, which is the same spelling for both. 
  • Cafe → Calf-e: As in, “Let’s go to that calf-e!” or, “Calf-e au soy lait.”
  • Caffeinated → Calfinated: As in, “Is this coffee decalfinated?”
  • Cuffs → Calf: As in, “Those hoodlums are engaged in fisticalfs!! (fisticuffs)” and “Get these handcalfs (handcuffs) off me!” and “These calf-links (cuff-links) are exquisite.”
  • Half → Calf: As in “I’m still calf asleep” and “I’ve got calf a mind to …” and “Calf measures,” and “Ain’t calf bad,” and “Better calf,” and “Cheap at calf the price,” and “Getting there is calf the fun,” and “Calf a chance,” and “Calf alive,” and “Calf assed,” and “Calf a mind to,” and “Calfway to paradise.”
  • Scarf → S-calf: As in, “That is an unbelievably soft s-calf (scarf)” or “Wow, he is really s-calfing (scarfing) that burrito.”
  • Desert: Here are a few phrases that use the word “desert/s” in them, which you can use to sneak in a few opportune  dromedary puns: “Just deserts” (instead of “just desserts”) and “Ships of the desert.”
  • Palindrome → Palin-dromedary: Dromedary is another word for the Arabian Camel. Use it in some great camel puns, like this one: “It would really work for this pun if ‘camel’ was a palin-dromedary, but it just isn’t.”
  • Hooey → Hoof-ey: As in, “Smells a little hoof-ey in here,” or “This is complete and utter hoof-ey.” (Hooey meaning nonsense).
  • Who f* → Hoof*: As in “Hoofeels hungry right now?” and “Hoofinished the last bit of coconut icecream?” or “Hoofarted?”
  • Who’ve → Hoof: As in “Hoof you spoken to so far?”
  • Half → Hoof: As in “Is the glass hoof full or hoof empty?” and “My other/better hoof.”
  • Run → Hoof it: As in “They’re onto us! Hoof it!”
  • Belt → Pelt: As in, “Below the pelt,” and “Pelt it out,” and “Buckle your seat pelts,” and “Tighten your pelt,” and “Under your pelt,” and “A notch in someone’s pelt.”
  • *pelt*: As in: spelt and misspelt.
  • *phar* → *fur*: Change the “phar” in certain words to “fur” to make terrible puns: furmacy (pharmacy), furaoh (pharaoh), furmacist (pharmacist), furmacology (pharmacology).
  • *phe* → *fur*: As in, “Natural furnomenon (phenomenon),” and “A furnomenal mistake.” Other words that would work: furseant (pheasant), eufurmism (euphemism), blasfurmy (blasphemy).
  • *phere* → *fur*: As in, atmosfur (atmosphere), hemisfur (hemisphere), biosfur (biosphere), stratosfur (stratosphere), and troposfur (troposphere). Note: the troposphere is the lowest layer of the Earth’s atmosphere.
  • *phor* → *fur*: As in, “A useless metafur,” and “Giddy eufuria (euphoria).” Other words that could be used: camfur (camphor), phosfur, dysfuria (dysphoria) and semafur (semaphore). Note: semaphore is a system of signs.
  • *pher* → *fur*: As in, “You’re indecifurable,” and “I’m not your gofur (gopher),” and “The wedding photografur,” and “The barefoot philosofur.” Other words that could work: furomone (pheromone), cifur (cipher), philosofur (philosopher), cinematografur, perifural (peripheral), cartografur, atmosfur (atmosphere), sfur (sphere), parafurnalia (paraphernalia), perifury (periphery), hemisfur (hemisphere).
  • Sephiroth → Sepfuroth: Note: Sephiroth is a much-loved character from the Final Fantasy game franchise.
  • *fir* → *fur*: “At furst,” and “At furst blush,” and “A furm handshake.” Other suitable words: affurm, confurm, affurmation and affurmative.
  • *for* → *fur*: As in, “A furce to be reckoned with,” and “Good furm (form),” and “Move furwards,” and “Why have you fursaken me?” and “The furcast for tomorrow,” and “So on and so furth,” and “Furbidden fruit.” Other words that would work: perfurmance, infurmation, therefur, fursight (foresight) and fursee.
  • Fear* → Fur*: As in: furful, furless, fursome and furmonger.
  • *feur* → *fur*: As in: chauffur and coiffur. Note: a coiffeur is a hairdresser.
  • Four* → Fur*: As in: fur (four), furth (fourth), furteen, furty (forty) and fursome (foursome).
  • Far → Fur: As in, “A step too fur,” and “As fur as it goes,” and “As fur as the eye can see,” and “A fur cry,” and “Few and fur between,” and “Over the hills and fur away,” and “So fur, so good,” and “As fur as I know.” Other suitable “far” containing words: furm (farm), furwell (farewell), furt (fart), further (farther), insofur (insofar), nefurious (nefarious), welfur and furce (farce).
  • *fer* → *fur*: As in, “A offur you can’t refuse,” and “I beg to diffur,” and “Make a diffurence,” and “Marching to the beat of a diffurent drum,” and “Offur condolences.” Other “fer” containing words that you could use: furn (fern), fural (feral), furvent (fervent), furvor (fervor), furret (ferret), furment (ferment), furocious, furtile, furrule (ferrule), defur (defer), confur, infur, refur, offur, transfur, buffur, prefur, proffur, refurence, confurence and transfurence.
  • *fur*: Use these fur-related/containing phrases in your wordplay: “Couldn’t be further from the truth,” and “Moving furniture,” and “A furtive manner,” and “And furthermore..” and “A roaring furnace,” and “Blind fury,” and “Fast and Furious,” and “Furnishing the truth.”
  • Tail: Use these tail-related phrases: “Happy as a dog with two tails,” and “Nervous as a long-tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs,” and “Bright eyed and busy tailed,” and “Can’t make head or tail of it,” and “Chase your own tail,” and “Two shakes of a lamb’s tail.” Note: two shakes of a lamb’s tail is a phrase used to indicated that something is very fast.
  • Tale → Tail: As in, “Dead men tell no tails,” and “Fairytail ending,” and “Live to tell the tail,” and “Never tell tails out of school,” and “An old wives’ tail,” and “Tattle tail,” and “Tell tail sign.”
  • Talent → Tailent: As in, “___’s got Tailent,” and “A tailented painter,” and “Where would you say your tailents lie?”
  • Toilet → Tailet: As in, “Down the tailet,” and “In the tailet.”
  • Style → Stail: As in, hairstail, freestail, lifestail, and stailus (stylus)
  • Tile → Tail: As in, fertail (fertile), percerntail (percentile), projectail (projectile), reptail (reptile), and versatail (versatile).
  • Coat: Use these coat-related phrases in your mammalian wordplay: “Coat-tail investing,” and “Don’t forget your raincoat,” and “Ride on someone’s coat-tails.” Some coat-related words: petticoat, turncoat, overcoat, sugarcoat, waistcoat and peacoat.
  • Heard → Herd: As in “I overherd them speaking about …” and “The last I herd, …” and “You herd it here first,” and “You could have herd a pin drop,” and “Make yourself herd” and “Stop me if you’ve herd this one.”
  • Camera → Cama-ra: A cama is a hybrid between a male dromedary camel and a female llama. You might create a really corny pun with this: “This cama-ra was $2 off eBay.”
  • Camoflage → Camaflage:  (Note: A cama is a hybrid between a male dromedary camel and a female llama.) “Their camaflage was brilliant. You wouldn’t have been able to tell the difference between them and a couple of real camels.”
  • Remnent → Ruminant: As in “I haven’t a ruminant of pride left after making all these terrible camel puns.” (Note: A “ruminant” is a family of hooved mammals comprising cows, camels, sheep, deer, giraffe and their relatives)
  • Prominent → Pruminant: As in “She’s a pruminant member of our group.”
  • (Note: A “ruminant” is a family of hooved mammals comprising cows, camels, sheep, deer, giraffe and their relatives)
  • Permanent → Pruminant: As in “I’ve accidentally used pruminant marker on the whiteboard.”
  • (Note: A “ruminant” is a family of hooved mammals comprising cows, camels, sheep, deer, giraffe and their relatives)
  • Her before → Herbivore: As in “I’ve never met herbivore.”
  • Man you’re → Manure: As in “Manure making some awful puns today.”
  • Could → Cud: As in “Cud you stop it please?” and “As fast as her legs cud carry her” and “I cud do it in my sleep.” Also works for “couldn’t” – as in, “I cudn’t see what the big deal was.”
  • Cud: In the right context, you could make an alpaca pun using the phrase “chewing the cud,” which means to chat aimlessly.
  • Cuddle → Cud-dle: Simply put the word “cud” into “cuddle”, as in “let’s cud-dle!”
  • Withers → WithersWithers is a homophone, meaning either the ridge between the shoulder blades of certain animals, or to shrivel. Swap the use and meaning of this word around to make a cheesy camel pun in the right context.
  • Whither → Wither: As in, “Wither are we bound?” (Note: Withers refers to the ridge between the shoulder blades of certain animals.)

Camel-Related Words

To help you come up with your own camel puns, here’s a list of camel-related words to get you started. If you come up with any new puns, please feel free to share them in the comments!

dromedary, bactrian, cama, hump, hooves, mammal, pachyderm, camelus, calf, desert, herbivore, cloven-hoof, genus camelus, herd, cud, saddle, cameleer, howdah, even-toed, ungulate, camelid, single-hump, double-hump, Arabian, camelops, camelidae

Did this Punpedia entry help you?

Did you find the camel-related pun that you were looking for? If so, great! Otherwise, please let us know what you were looking for in the comments below! Are you looking for word play for text messages, facebook, twitter, or some other social media platform? Would you like to see some funny camel pun images? Or perhaps you just want more camel puns for your photo captions? Whatever the case, please let us know, and help us improve this Punpedia entry. If you’ve got any camel puns (image or text) that aren’t included in this article, please submit them in the comments and one of our curators will add it as soon as possible. Thanks for visiting Punpedia 🙂