Boat Puns

This Punpedia entry is about boat puns! Whether you’re looking for a boat name, halfway through a pun battle, or just training your nautical wordplay muscles, we hope you find this entry useful! As usual, if you’re looking for visual puns (images, memes, etc.), scroll down to the bottom of this entry.

The boating and nautical area of  word play has a strong history, perhaps mostly because of the tradition of naming a boat or ship with a pun. On top of this, there are so many sub-categories of boat word play: sailing puns, anchor puns, rowing puns, naval puns, ship puns, fishing puns, and it even has a decent overlap the infamous ocean puns category – one of the more popular categories of puns. So in this Punpedia entry we’ve done our best to create and collect as many examples of maritime word play as we could. If you’ve got a nautical pun that we’re missing, please submit it in the comments at the bottom of this page!

Also check out these related articles: fish puns, beach puns, whale puns, dolphin puns and shark puns.

Boat Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any boat related puns that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page!

  • Encourage → Anchorage: As in “Stop anchoraging him!”.
  • Not → Knot: As in “Tell me this is knot happening.” and “Knot on my watch.”
  • Not → Naut: As in “Last but naut least” and “Fear naut!”
  • Boat → But: As in “Last boat not least” and “Close, boat no cigar.”
  • Saboteur → Saboateur : As in “Captain, I believe there’s a saboateur on our ship.”
  • Reckon → Wrecken: As in “Do you wrecken we’ll make it through the storm?” and “I am a force to be wreckened with.”
  • Wreck: The word “wreck” has a few meanings other than shipwreck, including slang ones (like “Ohhh rekt!” and “He’s an emotional wreck.”) and the regular, formal ones (Like “My wedding was wrecked by the storm”).
  • Wife → Wharf: As in “My wharf likes our new boat.” and “What does your wharf think?”.
  • Very → Ferry: As in “That was a ferry impressive boat pun.”
  • *very* → *ferry*: If a word contains “very” it can be a boat pun: eferry (every), eferrything (everything), deliferry, discoferry, eferryday, eferrywhere, braferry, slaferry, thieferry.
  • Indecency → In decent sea: As in “The flagrant in decent sea of these images!”
  • Carved → Craft: As in “She’s craft out a nice little niche for herself.”
  • Of course → Off course: As in “Off course I like being the navigator!”
  • Wake: The “wake” is the trail of disturbed water left by a boat. Example sentences: “Wake up!” and “I’ve been awake for days.”
  • Shit → Ship: As in “Oh ship, we’re in trouble now.”
  • Boy → Buoy: As in “Oh buoy, I can’t wait.” and “Good morning, buoys and girls.”
  • Most → Mast: As in “This is mast amusing!” and “Mast boats have a sail.”
  • Must → Mast: As in “We mast sail towards that island!” and “We mastn’t get too confident”.
  • Mas* → Mast*: Sometimes a word that begins with “mas” can be made into a boat pun by a replacement of “mas” with “mast”: mastacre (massacre), mastculinity, mastonry, mastochistic, mastquerading, mastage (massage). Obviously we can also make puns when a word starts with “mast”: master, masterpiece, masterminding.
  • Grief → Greef: As in “Good greef!” and “He was overtaken by greef.”.
  • Naughty → Knotty: As in “He’s a very knotty boy!” and “Knotty or nice?”.
  • Scenic → Seanic: As in “Let’s take the seanic route.”
  • Sooner → Schooner: As in “Schooner or later.” and “I’ll call her schoon“. A “schooner” is a sailing ship with two or more masts.
  • Doc*→ Dock*: If a word begins with “doc”, it can often be switched with “dock”: docktor, dockument, dockumentation, docktrine, docktorate, dockumentary.
  • Clue → Crew: As in “I havn’t got a crew.”
  • Sel* → Sail*: If a word starts with “sel” a boat pun can often be made by replacing it with “sail”: sailection (selection), sailect (select), sailf (self), sailling (selling), sail (sell), saildom (seldom), sailfish (selfish), sailfless (selfless), sailective (selective).
  • Aphrodisiac → Aquadisiac: As in “I heard that water is actually an aquadisiac.”
  • Alchoholic → Aquaholic: As in “I’ve been an aquaholic for 5 years now.”
  • Sure → Shore: As in “Are you shore?” and “She shore is strong!”.
  • Barge: As in “You can’t just barge in here like that!”
  • How → Scow: A “scow” is a type of flat-bottomed sailing boat. As in “Scow could you do this to me?!”
  • Are c* → Ark: If a word starting with “c” follows the word “are”, then a play on “ark” can be created. For example: “Many ark called but few are chosen” and “Most people aren’t happy unless they ark complaining.”
  • *tag* → *tug*: If a word contains “tag” we can sometimes switch it with “tug” (short for tugboat): antugonistic (antagonistic), pentugon, stugnate, tugalong (tagalong).
  • Really → Reely: As in “This is a reely good boat pun” and “I’m having a reely good day on my boat!”.
  • Re* →Reel*: Most words starting with “re” can be made into fishing puns: reelationship, reelease, reelate, reelief, reeligion, reelative, reelevant, reelax, reeluctant, reeliable,, reeliability, reelieved, reeliance, reelay, reelapse, reelinquish, reeligation, reelive, reelentlessly.
  • What are → Water: “Water you doing out so late tonight?” and “Water you doing tomorrow?”
  • What are we → Watery: As in “Watery going to do?” and “Watery doing today, friends?”
  • Whatever → Waterever: As in “Waterever, I don’t care.” and “Do waterever you want”.
  • What her → Water: As in “I know water problem is.” and “Do you know water mother thinks about this?”.
  • What do → Water: As in “Water you think about this?”
  • What about → Water boat: As in “Water boat we have tofu curry for dinner tonight?” and “Water boat Ching? Does she want to come to the beach too?”
  • *pear → *peir: As in “Then all of a sudden she dissapeired!” and “After appeiring to check his watch, he quickly ran away.” and “That is a sharp speir you’ve got there”.
  • Confiscate → Conch-fish-scate: As in “I’m going to have to conchfishcate your pun licence for that one.” See the entry on fish puns for more.
  • Row/Roe: “Row” as in “row your boat” and “roe” as in fish or shellfish eggs, are two words that can be inserted into many other words: roetine/rowtine (routine), rowmans/roemans (romans), rowtation/roetation (rotation), rowd/roed (rowed), rowse (rose), rowl (roll), rowp, rowmantic, rowbust, rowbot, rowgue, roest.
  • *row: If a word ends in “row” it’s an easy rowing pun: grow, throw, narrow, tomorrow, borrow, arrow, eyebrow, sorrow, overthrow, barrow, burrow, crow, harrow, marrow, sparrow, furrow, wheelbarrow, scarecrow, farrow, outgrow. Variations of these like growing, borrowing, sorrowful, etc. also work.
  • Kill → Keel: As in “We can be healthy with plants, keeling animals is not necessary.”
  • Skull → Scull: As in “If you could get it into your think scull!” A scull is a small oar.
  • Flag: As in “We should flag that comment as inappropriate.”
  • Punned → Punt: A “punt” is a type of long, narrow, flat-bottomed boat, so this is a lovely self-referential boat pun about punning: “I’ve punt about boats for long enough.”
  • *kily → *keely: Words containing “kil” can often be turned into boat puns: luckeely, huskeely, shakeely, silkeely, cheekeely, jerkeely, sneakeely, spookeely, freakeely.
  • Kil* → Keel*: Words starting with “kil” can be made into boat puns: keelogram, keelolitres, keeln (kiln), keeling, keeler, keelt (kilt), keeljoy.
  • Something → Somefin: As in “There’s somefin about the way he walks” and “Is that a shark, or somefin else?”.
  • Nothing → Nofin: As in “Nofin is better than swimming with dolphins” and “I’ve got nofin left to give!”.
  • Debate → Debait: As in “I don’t want to debait you.” and “Well, that’s debaitable“.
  • Summon → Salmon: As in “He salmoned a spirit from the underworld.” and “Please salmon the duke, I have an urgent message!”.
  • Someone → Salmon: As in “Will salmon please help me?” and “Salmon’s at the door”.
  • Crea* → Cray*: Many words that begin with “crea” can be used to make shoddy crayfish puns. For example: crayture (creature), craytive (creative), crayte (create).
  • Crayon: The word “crayon” includes “cray” – the short version of “crayfish”, and so can be used as a pun.
  • Slope → sloop: A “sloop” is a type of sailboat with one mast. Example sentence: “Hold on! This is a steep sloop.”
  • *sk if → As skiff: If the word “if” follows a word that ends in “sk” then we can create a play on “skiff” (a type of shallow, flat-bottomed boat). Example sentences: “Before giving it to her, askiff she wants it.” and “We’ll be back by duskiff we can fix this motor.” Many more words fit this pattern: riskiff (risk if), deskiff (desk if), taskiff (task if), diskiff, maskiff, briskiff, flaskiff, kioskiff, baskiff, whiskif, muskiff.
  • *s if → As skiff: If the word “if” follows a word that ends in “s” then we can create a play on “skiff” (a type of shallow, flat-bottomed boat). Example sentences: “As skiff!” and “You sound as skiff you’re a bit sick?” and “Ask us skiff you need anything!” There are obviously thousands of words ending in “s” so you can create your own puns using this formula with the help of a list like this.
  • Y’all → Yawl: As in “How are yawl doing today?” A yawl is a type of sailboat.
  • *sib* → *ship*: If a word contains “sib” it can usually be replaced with “ship” to create a terrible pun. For example: posshiply (possibly), accesshipility (accessibility), incomprehenshiple, feashipble, irresponshipble, invishipble, ostenshipbly, revershipble, vishipble. An example sentence might be: “I am responshiple for my puns.”
  • Like → lake: As in “Swim lake a fish.” and “Lake a fish out of water.”
  • *sip* → *ship*: If a word contains “sip” it can usually be replaced with “ship”. For example: gosship (gossip), dishipate (dissipate), shipping (sipping), inshipid (insipid).
  • Purpose → Porpoise: As in “I didn’t do it on porpoise!” and “She porpoisely ran the ship aground.”
  • Trolling → Trawling: As in “Haha, naa I’m just trawling.” and “Not sure if he’s an internet trawl.” Trawling is a method of fishing.
  • San* → Sand*: Replacing “san” with “sand” when it is at the start of a word give some nice corny puns: sanditary (sanitary), sandctioned (sanctioned), sandctuary (sanctuary), sandguine (sanguine), sandctions (sanctions).
  • Bereft → Bereeft: “bereft of” means “deprived of” of “lacking”. So an example sentence might be: “The old, stark beach house of bereefed of colour”.
  • Or → Oar: As in “Let’s go oar we’ll be late!” and “Should we swim oar keep sunbaking?”.
  • Or* → Oar*: If a word starts with “or” it can be replaced with “oar” for a neat little boat pun. Some examples: oarganisation, oariginally, oarange, oarchestra, oargan, oarbit, oarnament, oarthodoxy, oariental, oarnaments, oarchid, oardering.
  • Awe → Oar: As in “It was truly oar-inspiring.”
  • Aw* → Oar*: If a word starts with “aw” it can sometimes be made into an oar pun: oarsome (awesome), oar-wareness (awareness), oarful (aweful), oar-waited (awaited), oarkward (awkward), oar-ware (aware), oar-wakened (awakened), oary (awry).
  • Sea*: Most words starting with “sea” are easy sea puns: season, seasonal, seated, searingly, sealants, seam, seatbelt.
  • Seizure → Seazure: As in “If I read one more ocean pun I’m going to have a seazure.”
  • See* → Sea*: If a word starts with “see” it can often be replaced with “sea” to create a simple sea pun: seaminly, seads, seaker, seathe, seap, seak, sean, sea (see).
  • Sealant / Sealing / Seal: Easy seal puns can be made with words starting with “seal” (e.g. sealant, seal) or “ceil” (e.g. sealing).
  • Se* → Sea*: Some words that start with just “se” also have a “sea”-ish sound: seacret, searious, seargeant, seacretion, seacure, seacurity, seacondary, seacretariat, seaconds, seacrete, searum, searenity, searvitude, seanile, seadation, seaclusion, seacretive, seaze, seaquential, sealection, seacretly, seaquences, seanior, seaniority, seagregate, seaping, seacession, seariousness, seaminars, seaveral, seaxual, seaparation, seantimental, seansational, seaquential, seacluded, seacularist, seathing, seaquin, seasame, seaclusion.
  • *cy → *sea: If a word ends in “cy” it’s an easy “sea” pun: polisea, agensea, democrasea, currensea, emergensea, efficiensea, tendensea, frequensea, fansea, constituensea, pregnansea, accurasea, redundansea, bureaucrasea, presidensea, legasea, conspirasea, mersea, privasea, bankruptsea, consistensea, literasea, urgensea, deficiensea, dependency, consultansea, tenacity, isea (icy), secresea, intimasea.
  • Se*cy/Ce*cy → Sea*sea: Most words that start with “se” or “ce” and end with “cy” can be double sea puns: seacresea (secrecy), sealibasea (celibacy).
  • Should* → Shoald*: A “shoal” can refer to a large group of fish, or an area of shallow water, or an underwater sand bank. We can use “shoal” be used to make puns like: shoald (should), shoalder (shoulder), shoaldering.
  • Show l* → Shoal: This is a subtle one because it involves a word break. Whenever you use the word “show”, and the following word starts with an “L”, then you can replace “show” with “shoal” (a shoal is a large school of fish). For example: “That’s cool! You should shoal Liam.” and “She laughs when we shoal little blue flowers to her.”.
  • *tual* → *shoal*: As mentioned above, A “shoal” can refer to a large group of fish, or an area of shallow water, or an underwater sand bank. If a word contains “tual” it can often be replaced with “shoal” for a cute little pun: actshoal (actual), actshoality (actuality), intellectshoal (intellectual), ritshoal (ritual), spiritshoal, mutshoally, eventshoal, eventshoally, conceptshoal, conceptshoalise, virtshoal, contractshoal, factshoal, factshoally, perpetshoal, textshoal, contextshoal, perceptshoal, punctshoal, instinctshoal, actshoally, habitshoally.
  • *sole → *shoal: As in “The shoal of my shoe is worn down.” and “Your new gaming conshoal is cool.” and “Yeah, he’s a bit of an asshoal.”
  • Defin* → Dolphin: As in “We dolphinitely need more time to finish the mission.” and “What is the dolphinition of this word?” and “Please dolphine this word.” and “It’s the dolphinitive source of Nordic history.”
  • Endorphines → Endolphins: As in “I love that rush of endolphins you get after a good hard swimming session.”
  • Bubbly: “bubbly” has a “this water is bubbly” sense and a “he has a really bubbly personality” sense.
  • Bae → Bay: As in “Bay! Please stop with the beach puns, you’re embarrassing me.”
  • Combine → Combrine: As in “With our power combrined we should be able to defeat them.” and “It’s what you get when you combrine salt and water”. Similar puns can be made for most words ending in “bine”: turbrine (turbine), concubrine (concubine), columbrine (columbine).
  • Specific → Pacific: As in “You need to be more pacific.” and “Are you sure you have the pacifications for this?” and “Pacifically, there are two apples and three nectarines”.
  • Wish → Fish: As in “I just fish we had more time!” and “If you rub the lamp you get three fishes“. See the entry on fish puns for more.
  • Stark → Shark: As in “The shark contrast between his and his boyfriend’s attire was intriguing.” and “The old, shark house stood looming above us”.
  • *ways → *waves: Words than end in “ways” can be made into bad wave puns: alwaves (always), railwaves (railways), sidewaves, pathwaves, lengthwaves, doorwaves.
  • Title → Tidal: As in “I like it, but I’m not sure on the tidal” and “Use ‘Ms.’ as her tidal” and “The championship tidal match is tomorrow morning.”
  • Acquaintance → Aquaintance: As in “I don’t know her well, she’s just an aquaintance“.
  • Naughty → Nauty: As in “There’s that nauty sailor again”.
  • Tied → Tide: As in “I’m tide up at the moment, can someone else help?” and “Yep, they tide the knot!”
  • Tidy → Tidey: As in “After the party we need to tidey the beach.”
  • Gullible → Seagullible: As in “Kyani is so seagullible!”
  • Crazy → Cray-sea: As in “He is so craysea!” and “Enough of this crayseaness!”. Hyphen is, of course, optional.
  • Turn → Tern: A “tern” is a sea bird similar to a seagull, but smaller and with a forked tail.
  • About/Abode → Aboat: As in “What aboat the captain?” and “Welcome to my aboat!”
  • Big/Large/Massive → Titanic: Replace adjectives which mean “big” with “titanic“.
  • Fission → Fishin’: As in “Nuclear fishin’ is an exciting new technology.” See the entry on fish puns for more.
  • Birth → Berth: A “berth” is a ship’s allotted place at a dock or wharf. Examples: “Lucky I was using berth control!” and “Nothing but my berthday suit!”
  • Fathom: A “fathom” is a unit of length equal to 6 feet (~1.8m) and is most commonly used in reference to the depth of water. Example sentences: “I can’t fathom what she means.” and “It’s completely unfathomable!”
  • Strip → Ship: As in “A weird ship-tease” and “A thin blue ship of metal” and “I’m shipping you of your privileges.”
  • *anker → *anchor: most words ending in “anker” can be anchor puns: banchor (banker), tanchor (tanker), flanchor (flanker), hanchor (flanker), spanchor (flanker), danchor (danker).
  • Rudder →Utter: As in “I’m rudderly embarassed!” and “Pure, rudder silence.”
  • Properly → Propellorly: As in “Propellorly lame, if you ask me.” and “Finish the job propellorly.”
  • Dinghy → Dingy: A “dinghy” is a small boat and it sounds a bit like the word “dingy” which has multiple slang definitions including “gloomy and drab”.
  • Admirably → Admiralably: As in “You handled that admiralably, son.”
  • Swell: “Swell” has several meanings: “the rolling movement of waves”, “become larger in size” and “excellent/wonderful/fashionable” to name a few. Example sentences: “Dude, that was swell.” and “I can sense his ego swelling as we speak.”
  • Assail: As in “We were assailed by pirates on our way here.” and “This ship is unassailable.”
  • Sale → Sail: As in “There’s a big sail down at the boat store.”
  • *sale* → *sail*: Words containing “sale” can be turned into sailing puns: presail, resail, sailsclerk, sailsperson, wholesail.
  • Can you → Canoe: As in “I can’t think of any more boat puns. Canoe?”
  • I’m out of → Armada: An “armada” is a fleet of warships. Example sentences: “This is scary! Armada here!” and “Armada boat puns, do you have any?”.
  • You t* → Yacht*: If a word beginning with “t” follows the word “you”, a yacht pun can often be made. For example: “You’ll never know till yachtry.” and “I’m glad I bumped into yachtoday.”
  • Maria → Marina: As in “Marina, could you please pass the pepper?”
  • Maureen/Mareen  → Marine: As in “Marine, your name works well as boat pun.”

Boat-Related Phrases

Common phrases, idioms and cliches which are related to boats can be used for some subtle and witty word play. Here is a list of the boat themed phrases that we’ve found so far:

  • A stern talking to
  • Off the hook
  • Boy meets girl (Buoy meets gull)
  • Go to hell (hull)
  • They tied (tide) the knot
  • Batten down the hatches
  • Harboring strong feelings
  • Rock the boat
  • Pleasure craft
  • Hanging about (aboat)
  • All for naught (nautical)
  • Above board
  • As helpful as a screen door on a submarine
  • Throwing the baby out with the bathwater (bilge water)
  • Loose lips sink ships
  • Barge right in
  • Drown your sorrows
  • Drunk as a sailor
  • Fish out of water
  • He’s fishing for compliments
  • Hook, line and sinker,
  • A sea change
  • Knots in one’s stomach
  • Rats abandon a sinking ship
  • Plain sailing
  • She’s not the only fish in the sea
  • Strait and narrow
  • Still waters run deep
  • Take the wind out of his sails
  • Three sheets in the wind
  • Throw caution to the winds
  • To fish in troubled waters
  • Captain of one’s soul
  • Cast your bread upon the waters
  • Come hell or high water
  • Dead in the water
  • Devil and the deep blue sea
  • Different kettle of fish
  • A whale of a good time
  • Dock your pay
  • From sea to shining sea
  • Get your second wind
  • Anchors aweigh
  • Hold at bay
  • Any port in a storm
  • I didn’t come down the clyde in a banana boat
  • In hot water
  • Keep your head above water
  • Know which way the wind blows
  • Like a cork in the ocean
  • May the wind be at your back
  • A fine kettle of fish
  • Sleep with the fishes
  • Sink or swim
  • Something smells fishy
  • Tell that to the marines
  • That’s water under the bridge
  • Up shit creek without a paddle
  • Walk the plank
  • Wind swept hair
  • Water over the dam
  • Water, water everywhere, but not a drop to drink

Boat-Related Words

There are likely hundred more boat puns to be made, and that aren’t included in this Punpedia entry, so here’s a list of boat-related words to help you in your pun authorship process. If you come up with a good one, please share it with us in the comments at the bottom of the page!

ship, canoe, yacht, fathom, wake, marina, pleasure craft, sail, sailboat, watercraft, motorboat, pontoon, barge, tugboat, kayak, lifeboat, scow, longboat, powerboat, rowboat, vessel, ferry, sculler, bumboat, steamboat, ark, gondola, navigation, propellor, tug, submarine, navy, sloop, skiff, dinghy, paddleboat, yawl, boating, boater, paddle, houseboat, schooner, formast, surfboat, boatyard, troller, sailing, freighter, trawler, fisherman, dock, hull, planing, felucca, trimaran, lake, ocean, sea, barque, galleon, trireme, sailor, mainsail, foresail, carrack, rudder, water, topsail, mast, pinnace, cutter, row, punt, mooring, oar, scull, oars, tack, mackinaw, hoy, galley, boatie, boatload, topmast, shipbuilder, jetboat, jibe, lateen, nautical, monohull, cruise ship, plank, deck, poop deck, bow, cannon, motor, fishing, fish, scuba, diving, ahoy, submersible, hovercraft, aboard, board, landing, headsail, aground, captain, flag, cruise, craft, crew, docked, sink, shipwreck, bilge, bilge pump, titanic, pirate, sank, drown, moored, float, buoy, buoyant, buoyancy, warship, deckhand, outboard motor, harpoon, fishing rod, fibreglass, fleet, steamer, stern, tanker, ice-breaker, catamaran, messmate, port, porthole, anchor, rig, knot, bowsprit, container ship, pirate ship, slave trade, naval, wind, wave, waves, battleship, corvette, supertanker, mayflower, stranded, mutiny, peg leg, windlass, flagship, bay, life jacket, Mediterranean, Pacific, quarterdeck, onboard, monsoon, sunken, boarded, coast guard, abandon ship, bail out, piracy, cargo hold, cargo, banana boat, seawater, ocean spray, reef, whale, ocean liner, super liner, seagulls, mainstay, grapnel, davit, cox, crossjack, reel, rod, net, haul, jigger, clip, knots, riding lamp, canal, fishery, sharpie, torpedo, adrift, pier, ballast, cuddy, seamen, dredge, ferrying, marine, coastal, oceanic, Atlantic, gulf, seagoing, seafaring, offshore, seaborne, strait, dhow, frigate, asea, mariner, seafloor, shipping, Carribean, harbor, coastline, cruiser, destroyer, seaworthy, voyage, sweep, square sail, balloon sail, bearing, pintoon, river, skipper, commodore, helmsman, admiral, colonel, shipmaster, circumnavigate, crow’s nest, hydro, hydroplane, anchoring, submerged, cabin, docks, jetski, fish finder, ketch, radar, starboard, port side, astern, inboard, abaft, bulkhead, armada

Boat Jokes

Only the most terrible jokes use puns in their punchline, and so it is with great pleasure that we bring you the most terrible boat jokes!

  • Which type of vegetable is banned on ships? – Leeks!
  • What’s a pirate’s favorite letter? – Aye, you may think it’s the RRRRR, but it’s the C that they’re in love with!
  • What lies at the bottom of the ocean and twitches? – A nervous wreck!
  • When the bottom of a cargo ship got a hole, it had one hull of a problem.
  • The cost of a galvanized hull is enough to zinc a ship.
  • When the captain’s ship ran aground he couldn’t fathom why.
  • What did the ship’s captain say when he got stuck trying to navigate through a narrow channel? – We’re in dire straits!
  • Why is sailing like oil drilling? – They’re both a crewd business!
  • How much did the pirate pay for his piercings? – A buck-an-ear!
  • Why couldn’t the famous pirate sell his ship? – Because it was unassailable.
  • Why did the admiral decide against buying a new hat? – He was worried about cap sizing
  • What’s another name for the captain of a sail boat? – A sails manager!
  • Why is pirating addictive? – Once ye lose yer first hand, ye get hooked!
  • I used to have a fear of boats, but that ship has sailed.
  • Making a boat out of stone would be a hardship.
  • A pirate ship is assailing vessel.
  • I once saw a juggler juggling twenty paddles. It was oar inspiring.
  • Why were cruises cheaper before steam boats were invented?  – Becauses cruises were always on sale
  • Do you want to keep paddling in circles or not? It’s an either oar situation.
  • I’m not one for buoyancy, but whatever floats your boat.
  • Big sale on rowing paddles at my local shop. It’s quite an oar deal.
  • I refused to live in the same cabin as the captain. This didn’t boat dwell with him.
  • Old sailors never die, they just get a little dinghy.
  • I can’t think of any more boat puns. Canoe?
  • A tanker transporting blue paint collided into another tanker carrying red paint. Both crews were marooned.
  • Why did the admiral decide against buying a new hat? – He was afraid of cap sizing.

Boat Pun Images

Looking for visual boat puns? We’ve got you covered. Here’s some beautiful and terrible puns in image-form. If you find a good one that isn’t included here, or if you create you own, please share it with us by linking in the comments!

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