Bird Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on bird puns! 🐦 Happily, there are quite a few bird puns in the list below, mostly thanks to the many different species and families of birds whose names lend themselves well to wordplay. Hope you find this entry useful!

Note: Pigeon puns, seagull puns and parrot puns will get their own entry at some point, but there are a few of them in this list for completeness.

Bird Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about birds that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s the list of bird puns:

  • Bird: There are quite a few phrases/idioms related to birds which can be used as puns in the right context: “A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush” and “A bird-brain” and “Bird’s eye view” and “A little bird told me …” and “An early bird” and “Early bird gets the worm” and “Like a bird in a gilded cage” and “The birds and the bees” and “Birds of a feather flock together” and “Flip someone the bird” and “Free as a bird” and “The bird has flown” and “Sing like a bird” and “Jailbird“.
  • Woman → Bird: Depending on where you’re from, the term “bird” may be slang for “woman”.
  • Fly: There are a few phrases related to flying which can be used as bird puns in the right context: “Fly by the seat of your pants” and “Fly in the face of the evidence” and “Fly off the shelves” and “A fly on the wall” and “Fly by night” and “On the fly” and “Pigs might fly” and “Let fly” and “Watch the sparks fly” and “Fly in the ointment” and “Fly into a rage” and “Fly off the handle” and “Fly the coop” and “I’ve gotta fly” and “Fly the white flag” and “Wouldn’t hurt a fly
  • Fry → Fly: As in, “Bigger fish to fly,” and “Out of the flying pan, into the fire,” and “Small fly.” Note: to be out of the frying pan and into the fire means to have escaped one situation only to be caught up in a worse one.
  • Feather: There are a few phrases related to feathers: “As light as a feather” and “In full feather” and “Feather in your cap (symbol of honour/achievement)” and “Feather one’s nest” and “Ruffle (a few/someone’s) feathers” and “You could have knocked me down with a feather
  • Father → Feather: As in “The founding feathers” and “Like feather, like son”.
  • Further → Feather: As in “Without feather ado” and “Look no feather” and “Kick the can feather down the road”
  • Beak: “To wet one’s beak” and “beak” may be slang for nose in some places.
  • Peek → Beak: As in “Beak-a-boo” and “Sneak beak“.
  • Peak → Beak: As in “Beak performance” and “They climbed to the beak
  • Wing: “Left wing / right wing” and “Let’s just wing it” and “Take under your wing” and “Clip someone’s wings” and “Spread your wings
  • *wing: Make some turkey puns by emphasising the “wing” in certain words: swing, drawing, following, harrowing, brewing, growing, owing and knowing.
  • Wringer → Winger: As in, “Put through the winger.”
  • Win → Wing: As in, “Can’t wing for losing,” and “Due a wing,” and “Every one a winger,” and “Heads I wing, tails you lose,” and “How to wing friends and influence people,” and “It’s not the winging that counts, it’s the taking part,” and “It’s not whether you wing or lose; it’s how you play the game,” and “Play to wing,” and “Some you wing, some you lose,” and “Winger takes all.”
  • Whinge → Winge: As in, “Having a winge.”
  • Ring → Wing: As in, “Alarm bells began to wing,” and “A dead winger,” and “Doesn’t wing a bell,” and “Don’t wing us, we’ll wing you,” and “In the wing,” and “Wing of fire,” and “Run wings around,” and “Throw your hat into the wing,” and “Give them a wing,” and “My ears are winging,” and “Does that wing any bells?”
  • Tail: As in, “Happy as a dog with two tails,” and “Nervous as a long-tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs,” and “Bright eyed and busy tailed,” and “Can’t make head or tail of it,” and “Chase your own tail,” and “Two shakes of a lamb’s tail.” Note: two shakes of a lamb’s tail is a phrase used to indicated that something is very fast.
  • Tale → Tail: As in, “Dead men tell no tails,” and “Fairytail ending,” and “Live to tell the tail,” and “Never tell tails out of school,” and “An old wives’ tail,” and “Tattle tail,” and “Tell tail sign.”
  • Talent → Tailent: As in, “___’s got Tailent,” and “A tailented painter,” and “Where would you say your tailents lie?”
  • Toilet → Tailet: As in, “Down the tailet,” and “In the tailet.”
  • Style → Stail: As in, hairstail, freestail, lifestail, and stailus (stylus)
  • Tile → Tail: As in, fertail (fertile), percerntail (percentile), projectail (projectile), reptail (reptile), and versatail (versatile).
  • Clutch: Clutch has two meanings: to hold onto something tightly, and a group of eggs. We can make some egg puns using this: “A drowning person will clutch at a straw,” and “Pearl-clutcher.” Note: a pearl-clutcher is someone who is overly prudish.
  • Nest: “Leave the nest” and “Empty nest syndrome” and “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” and “Love nest” and “Stir up a hornet’s nest” and “A nest of vipers” and “A mare’s nest” and “Nest together”. Notes: empty nest syndrome is the feeling of loneliness a parent may experience when their children move out for the first time. A mare’s nest is a state of confusion or chaos.
  • Next → Nest: As in “Nest minute …” and “Better luck nest time” and “Boy/girl nest door” and “Nest generation” and “Nest in line to the throne” and “Nest to nothing” and “Take it to the nest level” and “Nest to nothing” and “The nest big thing.” and “Cleanliness is nest to godliness” and “In nest to no time” and “Nest to nothing” and “One day chicken and the nest day feathers” and “Catch the nest wave” and “As ___ as the nest girl/guy”. Note: “One day chicken and the next day feathers” is a phrase indicating that things we consider valuable can be lost in no time at all (like a job, marriage, or a house etc).
  • Copy → Parrot: “Parroting (someone’s) words”.
  • Pirate → Parrot: As in “People who parroted the film via bit-torrent were being sent fines.”
  • Fowl: As in, “Neither fish nor fowl.” Note: this refers to something which is not easily categorised.
  • Foul → Fowl: As in “By fair means or fowl” and “Cry fowl” and “Fowl language” and “Fowl up” and “No harm, no fowl” and “A fowl-mouthed person” and “Fowl play”
  • Fell → Fowl: As in “In one fowl swoop” and “Little strokes fowl great oaks” and “The bottom fowl out of the market” and “She fowl asleep at the wheel” and “He fowl under her spell” and “It fowl into my lap” and “She fowl victim to the scammer”. Note: If something is done in one fell swoop, then it was done quickly and in one single action.
  • Fall → Fowl: As in, “A fowling out,” and “Easy as fowling off a log,” and “Bread always fowls butter side down,” and “Can’t help fowling in love,” and “Catch a fowling star,” and “Fowl about laughing,” and “Fowl between the cracks,” and “Fowl from grace,” and “Fowl into bad habits,” and “A fowlen angel,” and “Oh how the mighty have fowlen,” and “The bigger they are, the harder they fowl,” and “United we stand, divided we fowl.”
  • Vowel → Fowl: As in, “The owl without a fowl.” Note: this is a reference to Bill Mlkvy.
  • *fal* → *fowl*: As in, fowllacy (fallacy), fowlter (falter), fowlse (false), fowllout (fallout), buffowlo (buffalo), crestfowllen (crestfallen), defowlt (default), downfowl (downfall), fowlsetto (falsetto), fowlt (fault), fowlsify (falsify), freefowl (freefall), nightfowl (nightfall), waterfowl (waterfall).
  • Owl: “A night owl” and “As wise as an owl“.
  • I will → Owl: As in “Owl not give up.” and “Owl if you will” and “Owl wear my heart upon my sleeve”
  • All → Owl: As in “Free-for-owl” and “A jack of owl trades” and “A man for owl seasons” and “A rising tide lifts owl boats” and “After owl is said and done” and “A know-it-owl” and “Above owl” and “Against owl odds” and “Owl your eggs in one basket” and “Owl at once” and “I’m owl ears” and “Owl else being equal, …” and “Owl by my lonesome” and “Owl hands on deck” and “Owl hell breaks loose” and “Owl gone” and “Owl good things must come to an end” and “Owl in owl” and “Owl in a day’s work” and “It’s owl in your head” and “Owl manner of …” and “Owl of a sudden” and “Owl or nothing” and “Owl over the place” and “Owl right.” and “Owl rights reserved” and “Owl smiles” and “Owl systems are go” and “Owl that” and “Owl talk and no action” and “Owl the best” and “Owl the rage” and “Owl the same” and “Owl things considered” and “Owl things must pass” and “Owl very well” and “Owl walks of life” and “Owl-out war” and “At owl costs” and “By owl means” and “For owl I know” and “For owl practical purposes” and “Give it owl you’ve got!” and “Go owl-out” and “In owl honesty” and “In owl likelihood” and “Firing on owl cylinders” and “If owl else fails” and “In owl seriousness” and “That is owl.” and “Owls well that ends well” and “That’s owl for now.”
  • Who’d → Hoot: As in “Hoot have thought it would be so easy?”
  • *owl*: There are a few words that contain the “owl” sound which can be used as silly owl puns: b-owls (bowels), growl, t-owl (towel), scowling, scowl, fowl, howled, v-owl (vowel), prowling, cowl.
  • Budgie: “Budgie smugglers”. Note: a budgie smuggler is another name for Speedos.
  • Geese: “Cackling geese (those who warn of something that’s about to happen)” and “All one’s geese are swans”. Note: if one’s geese are swans, then they have a habit of over exaggerating accomplishments or things.
  • Goose: “Oh I’m such a silly goose!” and “A wild goose never laid a tame egg” and “Goose bumps/pimples” and “Cook someone’s goose” and “Can’t say boo to a goose” and “Kill the goose that lays the golden eggs” and “A wild-goose chase” and “Goose up (improve performance)”.
  • Fastened → Pheasant: As in “My seat-belt is pheasant, and I’m ready to go.”
  • Swan: “As graceful as a swan” and “Swan song (Final accomplishment)” and “I swan! (What a surprise!)”.
  • Robin: “Robin Hood” and “A round robin” and “Batman and Robin“.
  • Robbing → Robbin’: As in “They were  robbin’ a bank.”
  • Duck: As in “Duck and weave” and “A sitting duck” and “Water off a duck’s back” and “Duck and cover” and “Duck out” and “Ducking and diving” and “Get one’s ducks in a row” and “Golden duck” and “If it looks like a duck and walks like a duck and (etc.) like a duck, it probably is a duck” and “Take to like a duck to water” and “Lame duck” and “Ducked the question”.
  • Cower → Quail: As in “He quailed and trembled but tried to remain still.”
  • Chicken: “A chicken and egg situation” and “Chicken out of something” and “Don’t count your chickens before they’ve hatched” and “Chicken sh*t” and “Get up with the chickens” and “You’re chicken (scared)” and “Curses, like chickens, come home to roost” and “Chicken feed (small amount of money/something)”.
  • Dodo: “Go the way of the dodo” and “As dead as a dodo“. Note: to go the way of the dodo is to become extinct.
  • Hawk: “Watch (someone) like a hawk” and “Have eyes like a hawk” and “I know a hawk from a handsaw” and “Hawks and doves” and “Between hawk and buzzard” Note: to be between hawk and buzzard is to be caught between two extremes.
  • Eagle: “When the eagle flies (payday)” and “Eagle eye” and “Legal eagle
  • *eagle*: If a word contains the “eagle” sound or anything similar, a silly eagle pun can be made: eagle-itarian (egalitarian), illeagle (illegal), geagle (giggle), jeagle (juggle)
  • Cuckoo: “Be in cloud-cuckoo land” and “Cuckoo in the nest” and “A crazy, cuckoo (coo-coo) person.” Note: to be in cloud-cuckoo land is to indulge in an over-optimistic fantasy.
  • Her own → Heron: As in “She’s moved into heron place now.”
  • More → Moa: As in “All the moa reason” and “Moa trouble than it’s worth” and “Bite off moa than one can chew” and “Do moa harm than good” and “Get moa than one bargained for” and “Have had moa than your fair share” and “Have moa luck than sense” and “I couldn’t agree moa” and “Moa and moa” and “Moa bang for you buck” and “That’s moa like it” and “Moa or less” and “Moa often than not” and “Moa power to you!” and “Moa than I bargained for” and “The moa the merrier” and “Need I say moa?” and “What’s more, …” and “You are moa than welcome” and “What moa can I do?” and “Less is moa“. Note: the moa were a type of flightless bird in New Zealand that are now extinct.
  • Swift: Swift means fast/agile, but is also the name of a type of small bird.
  • Flight: “Flight of fancy” and “Take flight” and “Flight of imagination” and “In full flight” and “Flight attendant”.
  • Twitter/Tweet: This can obviously refer to the social network, or to the sound of birds chirping. To “twitter” can also refer to talking rapidly and at length on trivial topics.
  • Swallow: A swallow is a type of bird (and obviously a thing you do when you’re eating/drinking).
  • Two can → Toucan: As in “Toucan play at that game…”
  • Stalk → Stork: As in “To stork one’s prey” and “That guy is a storker“.
  • When → Wren: As in “Wren push comes to shove” and “I’ll believe it wren I see it” and “Say wren…” and “Since wren?” and “Time flies wren you’re having fun” and “Wren in Rome, do as the Romans do” and “Wren it comes to …” and “Wren all’s said and done” and “Wren it comes down to it” and “Wren least expected” and “Wren your back is turned” and “Wren hell freezes over” and “Wren the going gets tough, the tough get going”.
  • Young woman → Chick
  • Chuck → Chick: As in, “Chick a sickie,” and “Get chicked out,” and “Chick overboard.”
  • Trick → Chick: As in, “Bag of chicks,” and “Every chick in the book,” and “How’s chicks?” and “Never misses a chick,” and “One chick pony,” and “A chick of the light,” and “Chick or treat!” and “Chicks of the trade,” and “Up to your old chicks.”
  • Thick → Chick: As in, “As chick as thieves,” and “Blood is chicker than water,” and “In the chick of things,” and “The plot chickens,” and “Chick and fast,” and “Through chick and thin,” and “Lay it on chick.”
  • Egg: There are a few phrases/idioms that contain the word “egg”: “A bad egg” and “Egg on” and “A hard egg to track” and “Don’t put all your eggs in one basket” and “Egg on one’s face” and “A good egg” and “A rotten egg” and “Egg and spoon race”. Note: to have egg on your face means that you’ve been made to look foolish.
  • Show-off → Peacock
  • Thrush: This can refer to a type of infection of the mouth and throat or of the genitals, but also refers to a family of birds that exist all over the world.
  • Turn → Tern: (Terns are a family of seabirds found all over the world) As in “Tern the other cheek” and “Wren (when) your back is terned” and “A tern of phrase” and “A tern of the screw” and “I spoke out of tern” and “Take a tern for the worse/better” and “Take terns” and “Toss and tern” and “Tern a blind eye” and “Tern a profit” and “Tern against” and “Tern around” and “Tern in one’s grave” and “Tern of events” and “Tern of the century” and “Tern of the century” and “The tides have terned” and “Tern up one’s nose” and “Whatever terns you on”.
  • Flock: “To flock around/to (someone/something)” and “Flock together” and “Birds of a feather flock together”. Note: birds of a feather flock together means that ones with similar tastes or interest tend to congregate together.
  • Flick → Flock: As in, “Chick flock,” and “Give it the flock.” Note: to give something the flick is to get rid of it.
  • Fluke → Flock: As in, “A lucky flock.”
  • Flake → Flock: As in, “Flock out,” and “Flock-y pastry.” Note: to flake out is to not stand up to promises or expectations.
  • Migrate: Since some bird species migrate, you might be able to make a bird pun by simply using the term “migrate” or “migration” in place of “move” or similar words, depending on the context.
  • Hen: “Don’t let the fox guard the hen-house” and “As scarce as hen’s teeth” and “A mother hen” and “Hen-pecked” and “Hen’s night/party”. Note: to be henpecked is to be bullied or intimidated by a female.
  • *hen*: Words than contain “hen” can be silly chicken/hen puns: Apprehend, appre-hen-sion, comprehend, comprehension, comprehensive, hence, henceforth, repre-hen-sible, stonehenge.
  • *han* → *hen*: As in, “Give me your hend (hand),” and “Do you have a hendle (handle) on it?” and “You look so hendsome tonight,” and “Your hendwriting has improved,” and “Their kids are a real hendful,” and “She was raised as an orphen,” and “The elephent in the room,” and “Please enhence the image,” and “I’ve had an epipheny!” and “This is your last chence,” and “Change the chennel.”
  • *hin* → *hen*: As in, “You’re hendering (hindering) me,” and “Doorhenge,” and “Give me a hent (hint),” and “In hendsight (hinsight),” and “You’re a hendrance (hindrance),” and “Change comes from withen,” and “Looking a bit then (thin),” and “Take it on the chen (chin),” and “Got kicked in the shens (shins),” and “Contrary to what you may think, dolphens are mammals,” and “A rush of endorphens,” and “A street urchen.” Note: to hinder is to block someone’s progress or to make something difficult to complete.
  • *hon* → *hen*: As in, “Brutally henest (honest),” and “An henourable mention,” and “Hello, heney (honey).”
  • *hun* → *hen*: As in, “A wild hench (hunch),” and “The henter (hunter) becomes the hented (hunted),” and “One hendred,” and “I’m hengry,” and “That’s not what I henger (hunger) for.”
  • Peck: “The pecking order” and “Peck at (eat only a bit)” and “You have to eat a peck of dirt before you die”. Note: having to eat a peck of dirt before you die means that no-one can escape unpleasant things; everyone will have some kind of unfortunate circumstance to endure during their lifetime.
  • *pec* → *peck*: As in, “Peckuliar circumstances,” and “Peckan pie,” and “Work those pecks (pecs)!” and “Don’t make a specktacle of yourself,” and “A different perspecktive,” and “Treat them with respeckt,” and “Take all aspeckts into account,” and “Sexuality is a specktrum,” and “Prospecktive interests.”
  • *pac* → *peck*: As in, “Good things come in small peckages,” and “A blood peckt,” and “Pay pecket,” and “Positive social impeckt,” and “A compeckt car,” and “Peckyderm (pachyderm).” Note: a pachyderm is a type of animal (elephants are pachyderms).
  • *pic* → *peck*: As in, “The big peckture,” and “Peck up sticks,” and “In a peckle,” and “A peckturesque view,” and “A few sandwiches short of a pecknic (picnic),” and “An epeck movie,” and “I’m a bit myopeck,” and “Stay on topeck,” and “A new biopeck,” and “A philanthropeck mission,” and “Acting conspeckuous,” and “An accurate depecktion,” and “A despeckable villain.” Notes: if someone is myopic, then they’re short-sighted. A biopic is a biographical film. A philanthropic cause is one which aims to promote charity and the welfare of others.
  • *poc* → *peck*: As in, “Pecket-sized,” and “Get outta here with your hypeckrisy (hypocrisy),” and “Apeckalyspe now,” and “You’re being a hypeckrite.”
  • *puc* → *peck*: As in, pecker (pucker), peckered (puckered), and cappeckcino (cappucino).
  • *bac* → *peck*: As in, “Peckground noise,” and “Peckterial (bacterial) infection,” and “Political pecklash,” and “A beautiful peckdrop,” and “The peckchelor (bachelor),” and “In my peckyard,” and “What a depeckle (debacle).”
  • *bec* → *peck*: As in, peckome (become), peckon (beckon), barpeckue (barbecue).
  • *bic* → *peck*: As in, aeropeck (aerobic), arapeck (arabic), cupeckle (cubicle).
  • Honey eater → Honeyeater: This one would require a very specific context.
  • Cheap → Cheep: As in “Dirt cheep” and “Talk is cheep” and “On the cheep” and “Cheep and nasty” and “A cheep shot” and “Cheep at twice the price” and “Cheep skate”.
  • Swoop: “In one fell swoop” (suddenly; in a single action)
  • Inexperienced person → Fledgling: A “fledgling” is a bird who has only just developed flight feathers. The term is also used for an inexperienced person.
  • Crane: “Crane your neck over the fence”.
  • Crow: “As the crow flies” and “Be up with the crows” and “A crow to pluck” and “Crow bait” and “As hoarse as a crow” and “Stone the crows” and “Something to crow about”. Note: “As the crow flies” is a phrase indicating the most direct path between two points. To be up with the crows is to be awake and active very early in the morning.
  • Canary: “Canary in the coal mine” and “Like the cat that swallowed the canary“.
  • Bill: As in “A dollar bill” and “Fit the bill“.
  • Brood: As in “Brood over/about” (See wiki article)
  • Raving → Raven: As in “Stark raven mad” and “Raven about (something)”.
  • Sore → Soar: As in “I sight for soar eyes” and “Sticks out like a soar thumb” and “Soar loser”.
  • Wobble → Warble: “Warblers” are a classification of bird.
  • Bastard → BustardBustards are a type of terrestrial bird.
  • Pigeon: There are a few phrases which contain “pigeon” and thus may be used as pigeon puns: “Clay pigeon (person who is easily exploited)” and “Set the cat among the pigeons” and “Stool pigeon (decoy/informer/police spy)” and “Pigeon-eyed (drunk)”.
  • Lark: “Happy as a lark” and “On a lark (whim)” This term is also used as a synonym for “a prank” and also playfulness, especially of a mischievous variety.
  • Lock → Lark: As in “Grid lark” and “Lark and load” and “Lark horns with” and “Under lark and key” and “Lark them up and throw away they key” and “Lark down”.
  • Cage: “Rattle (someone’s) cage” and “A gilded cage” and “Who rattled your cage?”
  • Bitten → Bittern: As in “Once bittern, twice shy” and “Bittern by the same bug”, Note: a bittern is a type of bird.
  • Black swan: This is a phrase used to refer to an event that comes as a surprise and has a major effect.
  • Turkey: As in, “Cold turkey,” and “Talk turkey.” Notes: Cold turkey refers to the abrupt and complete quitting of something. To talk turkey is to speak frankly and openly.
  • The Key → Turkey: As in, “Turkey to your heart,” and “Lock him up and throw away turkey,” and “Turkey to a nice, relaxed evening,” and “Turkey to success.”
  • Coot: This can refer to a foolish or eccentric person, especially an old man. It also refers to a type of aquatic bird.
  • Claw: As in, “Tooth and claw,” and “Get your claws into.”
  • Chlo* → Claw*: As in clawride (chloride) and clawrine (chlorine).
  • Clo* → Claw*: As in, clawbber (clobber), claw-ck (clock), clawckwise (clockwise), clawg (clog), clawset (closet), clawth (cloth).
  • Grasp → Clutch: The term “clutch” has a few meanings outside of the “grip/grasp” one. The bird-related meaning of “clutch” refers to a group of eggs, often laid at the same time and incubated by one adult.
  • Click → Cluck: As in “Cluck on that button” and “Her explanation clucked with me straight away”.
  • Clock → Cluck: As in “The cluck is ticking” and “A race against the cluck” and “Around the cluck” and “Biological cluck” and “Turn back the cluck” and “Stop the cluck” and “10 o’cluck“.
  • *rhea*: A “rhea” is a large, flightless bird related to emus and ostriches. If a word contains the “ree-ah” sound, a silly rhea bird pun can be made: approp-rhea-teness (appropriateness),  aqua-rheas (aquarius), adversa-rhea-l (adversarial), ag-rhea-ble (agreeable), aqua-rhea-m (aquarium), bacter-rhea, a-rhea (area), cerheal (cereal), crite-rhea, curheas (curious), experheance, equilibrheam, glorheas (glorius), illustrheas, industrhealised, libertarhean, librarhean, materheal (material), invarheable, memorheal, mysterheas, precarheas, rhea-djustment, rheaffirm, rhealistically, rhealignment, rheappearance, rheasserted, serheasly (seriously), terrestrheal, victorheas, vicarheas, tutorheal, vegeta-rhea-n.
  • Crest:  We say “the crest of a hill” as well as  “the crest of a parrot”. This double meaning is a potential bird/parrot pun.
  • Regret → Egret: As in “I really egret making that pun.” Note: an egret is a type of heron.
  • Full-fledged / Fully-fledged: This means “Having achieved the full status of one’s title.” It comes from “fledged” which means “Gained flight feathers”.
  • Look / glance → Gander: The term “gander” refers to a male goose. The phrase “Take a gander (at something)” simply means “To look at something.”
  • Grumble / complain → Grouse: The term “grouse” can refer to grumbling and complaining, and can also refer to a particular classification of birds that are related to chickens.
  • Grab → Grebe: A “grebe” is a type of freshwater diving bird. It it pronounced “greeb” which is probably close enough to make a silly word play on “grab”.
  • Formation: Flocking birds (especially those who travel large distances) often fly in formations to reduce air resistance and conserve energy. In the right context you might be able to simply use the word “formation” in a non-bird-related way to make a very subtle bird pun.
  • Aerial: As an adjective this means “existing, operating or happening in the air”. As an noun it is a synonym for antenna. It may be able to be used as a subtle bird pun in the right context.
  • Roost: “Come home to roost” and “Rule the roost“.
  • Snipe: This refers to a wading bird of marshes and wet meadows. It obviously has several other meanings: to shoot at from a long range, or to make a sly and petty verbal attack.
  • Rook: This term refers to a social Eurasian crow but can also refer to taking money from someone by cheating or overcharging them.
  • Strike / hit → Shrike: A “shrike” is a type of carnivorous bird. Idioms: “Shrike a cord” and “Go on shrike” and “Shrike a balance” and “Shrike a pose” and “Lightening never shrikes the same spot twice” and “Shrike up a conversation” and “Three shrikes and you’re out” and “Shrike out” and “Shrike gold”

Bird-Related Words

There are many more bird puns to be made! Here’s a list of bird-related concepts to help you come up with your own. If you come up with a new pun, please share it in the comments!

fly, beak, feather, avian, wing, nest, parrot, fowl, kingfisher, owl, hummingbird, vulture, seagull, ostrich, flamingo, budgie, sparrow, geese, goose, penguin, finch, pelican, woodpecker, pheasant, swan, starling, robin, duck, dove, quail, birdie, chicken, dodo, cassowary, hawk, eagle, nightjar, cuckoo, heron, moa, blackbird, hornbill, nightingale, emu, gull, swift, flight, twitter, tweet, swallow, toucan, stork, wren, magpie, chick, egg, peacock, plumage, buzzard, cormorant, thrush, partridge, tern, waterbird, flock, peregrin falcon, migration, waterfowl, bird watching, ornithologist, mockingbird, hen, rooster, peck, honeyeater, songbird, talon, fledgling, swoop, cheep, chirp, crane, crow, canary, bill, pip, brood, weaver, kookaburra, raven, wren, preen, soar, chitter, osprey, big-bird, warble, swordbill, bustard, pigeon, lark, flightless, albatross, plover, tern, aves, aviary, cage, bittern, black swan, blue jay, bluebird, budgerigar, coot, clutch, cockatoo, cockatiel, rhea, congregation, crest, curlew, egret, fledge, flock, gander, gizzard, grouse, grebe, ibis, incubate, kiwi, kite, kestrel, lorikeet, macaw, mallard, pintail, puffin, roadrunner, rook, roost, sandpiper, snipe, shrike, skylark, turtle dove, birdbath, aerial, float, formation

Did this Punpedia entry help you?

Did you find the bird-related pun that you were looking for? If so, great! Otherwise, please let us know what you were looking for in the comments, below! Are you looking for word play for text messages, facebook, twitter, or some other social media platform? Would you like to see some funny bird pun images? Or perhaps you just want more bird puns for your photo captions? Whatever the case, please let us know, and help us improve this Punpedia entry. If you’re got any bird puns (image or text) that aren’t included in this article, please submit them in the comments and one of our curators will add it as soon as possible. Thanks for visiting Punpedia 🙂

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Watermelon Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on watermelon puns! 🍉 This is a relatively small entry because it’s such a specific topic. Quite a few of these puns are based around the word “melon”, so they’re applicable to other types of melon too (cantaloupe, honeydew melons, etc.), but there are a some puns here that are specific to watermelons. Hope you find this useful! 🙂

You might also like to visit the Punpedia entries on fruit puns, banana puns and apple puns.

Watermelon Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about watermelons that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page!

  • Water my lawn → Watermelon: As in “In summer I schedule my sprinklers to watermelon more often or else it dies.”
  • Million → Melon: As in “You are one in a melon.” and “Thanks a melon!” and “Not in a melon years!” and “A cool melon” and “I feel like a melon bucks.” and “You look like a melon bucks!” and “A melon miles away.”
  • Melancholy → Meloncholy: As in “An air of meloncholy surrounded him.”
  • Mullin’ (Mulling) → Melon: As in “I’ve been melon over the possibilities for some time now.”
  • Malign → Melon: As in “He was harshly meloned in the local newspapers.”
  • Melanie → Melony: As in “Melony Griffith’s acting was brilliant in that film.”
  • Male on → Melon: As in “We have footage of a Caucasian melon the roof of the complex.”
  • Mail on → Melon: As in “I tend to receive more melon mondays.”
  • Mile on → Melon: As in “It’ll travel at least a melon one charge of the battery.”
  • Smellin’ (Smelling) → Smelon: As in “This house is smelon nice thanks to those incense.”
  • Smell on → Smelon: As in “You’ve got a strange smelon you today.”
  • Animal on → Ani-melon: As in “There’s always a cute ani-melon the front page of Reddit.”
  • Abnormal on → Abnor-melon: As in “She acts abnor-melon purpose so people don’t disturb her.”
  • Abysmal on → Abys-melon: As in “The proposal sounded abys-melon paper, but after the presentation, I’m really liking the idea.”
  • Camel on → Ca-melon: As in “I think it was a bad idea to take a ca-melon this trip.”
  • Decimal on → Decimelon: As in “The deci-melon the top of the fraction can be cancelled.”
  • Female on → Femelon: As in “There’s also a fe-melon duty that you can talk to if you’d feel more comfortable?”
  • Normal on → Nor-melon: As in “He seemed nor-melon our first date, but turned out to be a bit of a creep.”
  • Optimal on → Opti-melon: As in “I seem to feel opti-melon about 8 hours of sleep.”
  • Smile on → Smelon: As in “She have a big happy smelon her face.”
  • Small on → Smelon: As in “It looked smelon initial inspection, but it turned out to be quite big.”
  • Treadmill on → Treadmelon: As in “You’ll need to turn the treadmelon at the powerpoint before you can run on it.”
  • Windmill on → Windmelon: As in “There was a windmelon the property that provided the old farmstead with water.”
  • Felon → Melon: As in “He was charged with high treason, but later the conviction was changed to a melony.”
  • What are → Water: As in “Water you doing out so late tonight?” and “Water you doing tomorrow?” and “Water you going to do about it?”
  • What are we → Watery: As in “Watery going to do?” and “Watery doing today, friends?”
  • What about → Water ’bout: As in “Water ’bout we have tofu curry for dinner tonight?” and “Water ’bout Ching? Does she want to come to the beach too?”
  • What do → Water: As in “Water you think about this?”
  • What her → Water: As in “I know water problem is.” and “Do you know water mother thinks about this?”.
  • What the → Water: As in “Water hell is going on here?”
  • Whatever → Waterever: As in “Waterever, I don’t care.” and “Do waterever you want”.
  • Around (’round) → Rind: As in “Be there in 5. I’m just rind the corner.” and “We worked rind the clock to finish the project.” and “Let’s no beat rind the bush.” and “Stop messing rind.”
  • Rained → Rind: As in “It hasn’t rind in weeks – not even a cloud in the sky.”
  • Grind: As in “Relief from the daily grind.”
  • Red: Sometimes the simple use of the word “red” may constitute a watermelon pun. This heavily depends on your specific context and the desired quality/terribleness of your puns. Examples: “Caught red-handed” and “Roll out the red carpet” and “Ignore it – it’s a red herring”

Did this Punpedia entry help you?

Did you find the watermelon-related pun that you were looking for? If so, great! Otherwise, please let us know what you were looking for in the comments, below! Are you looking for puns for text messages, facebook, twitter, or some other social media platform? Would you like to see more funny watermelon pun images? Or perhaps you just want more watermelon puns for your photo captions? Whatever the case, please let us know, and help us improve this Punpedia entry. If you’re got any watermelon puns (image or text) that aren’t included in this article, please submit them in the comments and one of our curators will add it as soon as possible. Thanks for visiting Punpedia 🙂

Apple Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on apple puns! 🍎 🍏 Whether you’re looking for apple puns for captions, silly pickup lines or team/business names, we hope you find what you’re looking for.

Note that this entry is mainly focused on apple, the fruit, rather than Apple, the company. So while you wont find any Steve Jobs puns here, the puns in this entry that are specifically on the word “apple” itself could also be used in the context of Apple, the computer company.

You might also like to visit the Punpedia entries on fruit puns, banana puns and watermelon puns.

Apple Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about apples that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page!

  • Apple: As in “You’re comparing apples to oranges though.” and “You’re the apple of my eye.” and “He’s a bad apple.” and “She’s a rotten apple, that one.” and “The apple never falls far from the tree.” and “Apple of discord” and “As American as an apple pie.” and “How bout them apples?” or “How do you like them apples!” and “One bad apple spoils the barrel.” and “She’s one smart apple.” and “The Big Apple.” and “To polish the apple” and “You’ve really upset the apple cart now” and “Adam’s apple” and “An apple a day keeps the doctor away.”
  • Apply → Apple-eye / Apple-y: As in “Are you going to apple-eye for the job?” and “I’ve apple-eyed for several jobs.” and “Apple-y within” and “You need to apple-eye yourself if you want to get anywhere in life.” and “You need to apple-y for your driver’s license.”
  • Applic* → Apple-ic*: As in “The appleication form is easy to complete.” and “All apple-icants will be considered.” and “I don’t think that’s apple-icable in this situation.” and “You’ll need to make an apple-ication to the committee” and “Appleication of cool water should do the trick.”
  • Feel → Peel: As in “You can peel it in your bones.” and “I like the look and peel of the product.” and “I’m trying to get the peel for it.” and “These banana puns are making me peel unwell.” and “I peel a bit put out.” and “I’m peeling my age.” and “Peel the burn”
  • Peel: This word is sometimes used in ways which don’t refer to removing an outer covering: “The aeroplane peeled off from the rest of the formation and did a trick.” In general “peel off/out” means to move away quickly (especially with screeching tires, if it refers to a car).
  • Appeal → Appeel / A peel: “He’s so appeeling!” and “The court allowed one final a peel.” and “You need to a peel to their sense of honour.” and “I’m trying to appeel to your better judgement” and “They have 48 hours to appeel the decision.”
  • Appeal → Apple: As in “The prospect is apple-ing.” and “Apple to their blind patriotism.”
  • Pillar → Peeler: As in “You are a peeler of strength in our community.”
  • Skin: As in “Lucky I’ve got thick skin.” and “He’s all skin and bones.” and “Beauty is only skin-deep” and “By the skin of my teeth” and “I feel comfortable in my own skin.” and “She’s got skin in the game.” and “It’s no skin off my nose.” and “I almost jumped out of my skin!” and “It makes my skin crawl.”
  • Skim → Skin: As in “I was just skin-reading the comments here.”
  • Core: As in “That kid is rotten to the core.” and “That band is hardcore.” and “I prefer soft-core stuff.” and “What is the Earth’s inner core made of?” and “This exercise strengthens your core.” and “Our company is guided by 3 core principles.” and “The school should have the interests of its children at its core.” and “The core members always attend the meetings.” and “Core inflation is up 1.7 percent since last year” and “I’m mostly into emocore and mathcore music.” and “Core blimey!”
  • Caught → Cored: As in “Cored in the act” and “I was cored in the middle” and “I cored a cold from him” and “Like a deer cored in the headlights” and “Something cored my eye as we were crossing the street.” and “Cored between the devil and the deep blue sea” and “Cored unawares” and “Caught with my pants down” and “Cored in crossfire” and “You cored me off my guard.”
  • Chord → Cored: As in “It struck a cored with me.”
  • Court→ Cored: As in “I’ll see you in cored.” and “Order in the cored!” and “The ball is in your cored now.”
  • Course→ Cores: As in “I’m doing a university cores in computational neuroscience.”
  • *cor* → *-core-*: If a word contains the “cor” sound (or similar) then we can make a terrible apple core pun: “A core-tionary tale.” and “That’s be-cores I’m cool.” and “Accoredingly, we will move the meeting to Thursday.” and “Proceed with core-tion” and “She died from unknown coreses” and “He coresed an uproar with his latest staff cuts.” and “I love the core-us of that song.” and “We core-dially invite you to join us in celebrating …” and “My new core-dless drill is so handy.” and “The police will core-don off the area soon.” and “A core-porate job” and “These core-perations are the heart of our economy.” and “We go to our live core-espondent in the field.” and “It core-esponds to a shrinking middle class.” and “The core-pses of the poor animals were buried in the field.” and “We were es-core-ted to the main chamber.” and “There has been some discored amongst our members.” and “We’ve sent it over to our head-core-ters.” and “The temperature reached a re-cored high today.” and “The score was 22 to 7 after the first quarter.”
  • Name / Title → Apple-ation: The word “appellation” means “name” or “title”.
  • Aptly → Applely: As in “Religion has been applely called ‘the opium of the people.'”
  • App will → App’ll / Apple: As in “This app’ll help you track your time and make you more productive – you should download it.”
  • *ap will → *ap’ll / *apple: As in “This chap’ll help you find your way home.” and “A loud enough clap’ll wake me up.” and “This strapple help secure the load during the trip.” and “Any more of this crapple make us go mad!” and “Another mishap’ll doom this company.” and “This trapple be sure to catch one.” and “A single tap’ll make the bell ring loudly.” and “The gap’ll be hard to jump but we have no choice.” and “Each lap’ll use up a litre of fuel.” and “This map’ll help guide us to the treasure.” and “The handicap’ll make up for it.” and “Each flap’ll lift us higher and higher.” and “That rap’ll make it to the charts in no time.” and “A nap’ll refresh you and give you more energy.” and “A light slapple wake me up.”
  • A pl* → Apple-*: As in “There’s apple-ace I know not far from here.” and “That’s apple-us (a plus)” and “It’s apple-easure that I feel somewhat guilty about.” and “We’re going to see apple-ay at the theatre tonight.” and “It was nothing special. Just apple-ain old brick house.” and “She was apple-ainly spoken, intelligent person.” and “After eating we went for apple-easant stroll through the park.” and “We had apple-an, but we weren’t sure how to carry it out.” and “It was apple-easing sight.” and “It was apple-ant our botanist had never seen before.” and “Can you get apple-ate for our new guest?” and “Apple-anned extension to the highway will be finished by summer.” and “It was apple-easing evening.” and “Apple-easantly designed garden.” and “Apple-ayer from the other team was injured.” and “Apple-anet in a nearby solar system” and “We saw apple-ume of smoke on the horizon.” and “Do you have apple-astic cup for little Olivia?” – You can create many more puns like this by using this list of words starting with “pl”.
  • Eye → Pie: As in “Beauty is in the pie of the beholder.” and “A bird’s pie view’ and “We’re in the pie of the storm” and “Pies pie with my little pie” and “In the blink of a pie” and “Keep a pie out for …” and “We see pie to pie.” and “I’ve got a pie on you.” and “Something caught my pie” and “Pie-popping”
  • I → Pie: As in “Pie think you’re right.” and “Pie’m not so sure about that.”
  • Granny: Since Granny Smith apples are so widely known, you might be able to make an apple pun by simply using the word “granny” in your writing/speech.
  • Or should I → Orchard I: As in “I should stop making apple puns now… orchard I?”
  • Saw → Seed: As in “It took me a while, but I eventually seed her point of view.”
  • Seed: As in “It planted a seed of hope in their minds.” and “We got more seed capital from investors.”
  • Pink lady: This refers to a particular variety of apple. If you can somehow work the words “pink” and “lady” into your prose/speech in close proximity then you’ve got a sneaky apple pun: “I prefer pink, but that lady thinks yellow would suit it better.”
  • Downside is → Down ciders: As in “One down ciders that we’ll need to redo a lot of work.”
  • Alongside her → Along cider: As in “Her dog was running happily along cider.”
  • Beside her → Be cider: As in “Her dog stood happily be cider.”
  • Inside her → In cider: As in “She always keeps an apple in cider backpack.”
  • Insider → In cider: As in “We got some in cider information from an anonymous executive.”
  • Decided → Decidered / De-cider-d: As in “I’ve decidered to start an apple farm.”
  • Fruitful: As in “This has been a very productive and fruitful discussion.”
  • Just → Juiced: As in “I’m juiced around the corner.” and “Juiced in time.” and “Juiced the ticket.” and “Juiced this once.”
  • Fruity: Other than referring to actual fruit, this term also has several slang definitions including being flamboyant or “bouncy”. It may also refer to someone who is considered crazy in some respect.
  • Sweet: As in “You’re so sweet!” and “Oh that’s soo sweet!” and “Revenge is sweet” and “Short and sweet” and “Lay some sweet lines on someone” and “Sweet dreams” and “Sweet Jesus!” and “You bet your sweet life!” and “That was a sweet trick, dude.” and “Sweet as, bro.” and “Whisper sweet nothings” and “Home sweet home” and “Rose by any other name would smell as sweet” and “Sweet smell/taste of success/victory” and “Sweetheart
  • Got another apple pun? Please post it in the comments below! 🙂

Apple-Related Words

There are many more puns to be made than could be documented in this Punpedia entry, and so we’ve compiled a list of apple-related concepts for you to use when creating your own puns. If you come up with a new pun, please share it in the comments!

apple, apples, fruit, orchard, peel, skin, peeler, cider, apple cider, granny smith, apple sauce, apple pie, fruit tree, crabapple, apple juice, crunchy, sweet, apple core, core, seed, apple seed, pippin, pip, pome, rotten apple, costard, sweeting, redstreak, pare, paring, biffin, alligator apple, golden delicious, fuji, red delicious, mcintosh, gala, braeburn, pink lady, honeycrisp, empire, sampion, ambrosia, pomaceous, malus, toffee apple, candy apple, apple strudel, apple cider vinegar, russet

Did this Punpedia entry help you?

Did you find the apple-related pun that you were looking for? If so, great! Otherwise, please let us know what you were looking for in the comments, below! Are you looking for puns for text messages, Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, or some other social media platform? Would you like to see more funny apple pun images? Or perhaps you just want more apple puns for your photo captions? Whatever the case, please let us know, and help us improve this Punpedia entry. If you’re got any apple puns (image or text) that aren’t included in this article, please submit them in the comments and one of our curators will add it as soon as possible. Thanks for visiting Punpedia 🙂