Alpaca Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on alpaca puns! 🌱🐪🌿

Please note that while alpacas are visually similar to llamas, linguistically they are very different and so the two have their own separate entries. You might also like to have a look at our llama pun entry. If you’re interested in other similar mammals, have a look at our entries on goat puns, horse puns, and camel puns.

We hope you have fun looking through all of our alpaca-related wordplay!

Alpaca Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about alpacas that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of alpaca puns:

  • *-al → *-alpaca: Make some cheekily obvious puns simply by adding “paca” to any word ending in “al” or “ale” (making sure that the pronunciation suits) –  “can-alpaca” (as in canal + alpaca), “chaparr-alpaca” (chaparral: a type of plant), “chor-alpaca” (as in “chorale”, a type of choir), “corr-alpaca” (corral – to herd), “mor-alpaca” (as in “morale” – “moral” doesn’t quite have a suitable rhythm for this), “Pasc-alpaca” (Pascal – French polymath and a unit of pressure), “roy-alpaca” (as in “royale” – “royal” doesn’t have as suitable a rhythm), “sh-alpalca” (as in, “I shall!”)
  • Apocalypse → Alpaca-lypse: As in, “Alpaca-lypse Now: (the movie), and “The Four Horsemen of the Alpaca-lypse.”
  • Abaca → Al-baca: Abacas are a type of banana, and very conveniently rhymes with alpaca. Make a fruity pun by being oddly specific about your bananas: “I need some al-bacas from the store!”
  • I’ll pack a → Alpaca: As in, “Alpaca bag!” (I’ll pack a bag)
  • Jury → Sury: Suri is a type of alpaca. Make a cheesy alpaca pun by blending it with the word jury: “The sury is out.” Also works for other phrases using jury – like “Judge, sury and executioner”
  • Missouri → Missuri: As in, “You promised that we would go to Missuri.”
  • Sure he → Su-ri: As in, “Make su-ri doesn’t eat too many bananas.”
  • Korea → Cria: The term for a baby alpaca is a “cria”, which just so happens to rhyme almost perfectly with Korea. Switch the words around for a fun alpaca pun. 
  • *ria → *cria: You can use cria in other lame alpaca puns by adding it to the end of words that end in “ria”. Watch out for rhythm and pronunciation when making these up. Here are some for you: “Euphocria” (as in “euphoria”), “dysphocria” (from “dysphoria”), “allecria” (as in “allegria” – the Italian word for joy), “pizzecria” (from “pizzeria”), “bactecria” (as in “bacteria”), “Santecria” (as in “Santeria”, an Afro-American religion)
  • Embrace → H-embrace: Female alpacas are known as hembra, which fits in quite nicely to the word “embrace” like so: “My hamster routinely rejects my h-embrace.” 
  • *ember → *hembra: You can make some great alpaca puns by replacing the end of some months with “hembra”, like “Dec-hembra” and “Novhembra.”
  • Remember → Remhembra: As in, “One to remhembra.” Also works for other forms of remember, like “remhembrance” (remembrance) and “remhembra-ed” (as in remembered).
  • Nacho → Macho: Male alpacas are known as machos. Make some cheesy puns like so: “Please get me some machos.” You can also make a pun-ception (a pun within a pun, for those who haven’t seen Inception) by replacing words that rhyme with “nacho”, like “This is macho (nacho = not your) hat. Go away now.” You can also use the phrase “Macho man” in the right context. 
  • Chorizo → Chuarizo: A huarizo is a cross between a llama and an alpaca. Make some lame alpaca puns like so: “Wow, these vegan chuarizos are amazing.”
  • Pro → Peru: As in “A liberal, Peru-science atheist.”
  • *pro/pru* → *peru*: You can slip “Peru” into words that have the “pro” or “pru” sound in them. There are too many to list here, but I’ve provided quite a few to get you going. Don’t forget that for each word provided, there are other forms of the word (past, present, future tense, plurals) that will work as well: “Apperuve” (approve), “Apperuving” (approving), “Bulletperuf” (bulletproof), “Disperuven” (disproven), “Fireperuf” (fireproof), “Foolperuf” (foolproof), “Imperuv” (improve), “Imperudence” (imprudence), “Perucedures” (procedures), “Peruvable,” (provable), “Perude,” (prude), “Sperucing” (sprucing), “Unimperuved” (unimproved), “Waterperuf” (waterproof) and “Weatherperuf” (weatherproof).
  • Spit: Alpacas use spitting as a way to express generally negative feelings, and to warn others off. Use these spit-related phrases to make some great alpaca puns: “Spit and polish,” “spit and sawdust,” “spit blood,” “to spit in the eye of,” “he spit the dummy” (a temper tantrum), “spitting image” (an extremely close likeness), “spitting with rain,” “within spitting distance,” and finally, “don’t spit into the wind” (’cause it might blow it right back into your face).
  • Split → Spit: As in “Make like a banana and spit” and “Fifty-fifty spit” and “Spit hairs” and “Spit second” and “Spit up (with someone)” and “Lickety-spit” and “Spit your sides (laughing)”
  • Cud: In the right context, you could make an alpaca pun using the phrase “chewing the cud,” which means to chat aimlessly.
  • Could → Cud: As in “Cud you stop it please?” and “As fast as her legs cud carry her” and “I cud do it in my sleep.” Also works for “couldn’t” – as in, “I cudn’t see what the big deal was.”
  • Cuddle → Cud-dle: Simply put the word “cud” into “cuddle”, as in “let’s cud-dle!”
  • Heard → Herd: As in “I overherd them speaking about …” and “The last I herd, …” and “You herd it here first.” and “You could have herd a pin drop.” and “Stop me if you’ve herd this one”
  • Hay: Since a large part of alpacas’ diet is hay, you can make some alpaca puns using these hay-related phrases: “Go haywire,” and “Time to hit the hay,” and “Like looking for a needle in a haystack,” and  “Make hay” (an idiom which advises to take advantage of opportunities), “Make hay while the sun shines” (to act while you can, or while a situation is still in your favour), and “To roll in the hay.”  
  • Hey → Hay: As in “Hay, what’s up?” and “Hay there, friend.”
  • Go to sleep → Hit the hay: As in “It’s late. I better hit the hay.”
  • Grass: Here are some grass-related phrases to help you with your corny wordplay: “As exciting as watching grass grow,” and “Don’t walk on the grass,” “grass roots” (a term for organised local movements; usually social or political),  “a snake in the grass” (referring to a hidden enemy), “the grass is greener on the other side,”  and my personal favourite, “your arse/ass is grass!”
  • Field: “I’m an expert in my field.”
  • Passed/Past your → Pasture: As in “It’s just pasture house on the left.” and “I pasture stall at the fair today but you weren’t there.” and “It’s pasture bedtime.”
  • Wool: To start us off, here are some phrases containing the word “wool”, which you can use to make your own alpaca puns in the right situation: “Baa baa black sheep, have you any wool?” and “Dyed in the wool” (which refers to someone who is very steadfast and set in their ways), “pull the wool over someone’s eyes,” and “woolly thinking.” 
  • Will → Wool: As in “Against my wool” and “Accidents wool happen” and “Time wool tell” and “Every dog wool have its day” and “Heads wool roll” and “Love wool find a way” and “My grandmother left it for me in her wool” and “There wool be hell to pay!” and “I wool stop at nothing” and “It wool be the death of me” and “Whatever wool be, wool be.”
  • Well → Wool: As in “Alive and wool” and “Fare thee wool” and “(To be) wool versed (in something)” and “I hope all goes wool” and “May as wool” and “Jolly-wool” and “The point is wool-taken” and “That’s all wool and good, but …” and “All’s wool and ends wool” and “You know full wool that …” and “Might as wool.”
  • Wall → Wool: As in “A fly on the wool” and “A hole in the wool” and “Bang (one’s) head against a wool” and “Break the fourth wool” and “Drive up the wool” and “Off the wool” and “The writing is on the wool” and “Wool Street” and “Wool-to-wool” and “My back is to the wool” and “Wool of death”
  • While → Wool: As in “It was fun wool it lasted” and “Quit wool you’re ahead” and “Not worthwool” and “Every once in a wool.”
  • *wool*: Emphasise the “wool” in words and names: “A wool-f in sheep’s clothing,” “Werewool-f,” and “Virginia Wool-f,” and “Wool-fgang Amadeus Mozart,” and “Wool-verine,” and “Beo-woolf.”
  • Fleece: For a sneaky fleece pun, you can make a reference to “being fleeced,” meaning tricked or manipulated.
  • Fleas → Fleece: As in, “My puppy’s fur is full of fleece.”
  • Flees → Fleece: As in “Suddenly there is a loud crash and everyone fleece from the store.”
  • Feliz → Feleece: As in, “Fe-leece navidad.” (Feliz is Spanish for happy/merry, and feliz navidad means Merry Christmas).
  • Sheer → Shear: “Shear force of will.”
  • Her before → Herbivore: As in “I’ve never met herbivore.”
  • Man you’re → Manure: As in “Manure making some awful alpaca puns today.”
  • Withers → Withers: Withers is a homophone, meaning either the ridge between the shoulder blades of certain animals, or to shrivel. Swap the use and meaning of this word around to make a cheesy alpaca pun in the right context. 
  • Whither → Wither: As in, “Wither are we bound?” (Note: Withers refers to the ridge between the shoulder blades of certain animals).
  • Remnent → Ruminant: As in “I haven’t a ruminant of pride left after making all these terrible camel puns.” (A “ruminant” is a family of hooved mammals comprising cows, camels, sheep, deer, giraffe and their relatives)
  • Prominent → Pruminant: As in “She’s a pruminant member of our group.” (Note: A ruminant is a family of hooved mammals).
  • Permanent → Pruminant: As in “I’ve accidentally used pruminant marker on the whiteboard.” (Note: A ruminant is a family of hooved mammals).

Alpaca-Related Words

To help you come up with your own alpaca jokes, here’s a list of alpaca-related words to get you started. If you come up with any new puns, please feel free to share them in the comments!

Suri alpaca, Huacaya alpaca, cria, hembra, macho, huarizo, guanaco, wool, fleece, South America, Andes, lama pacos, vicuna, charolais, Peru, cud, withers, neck, vicugna pacos, camelid, camelidae, mammal, herd, flock, graze, Chile, spit, hum, snort, herbivore, grass, hay, quadruped, pachyderm, ruminant

Did this Punpedia entry help you?

Did you find the alpaca-related pun that you were looking for? If so, great! Otherwise, please let us know what you were looking for in the comments below! Are you looking for word play for text messages, facebook, twitter, or some other social media platform? Would you like to see some funny alpaca pun pictures? Or perhaps you just want more alpaca puns for your photo captions? Whatever the case, please let us know, and help us improve this Punpedia entry. If you’ve got any alpaca puns (image or text) that aren’t included in this article, please submit them in the comments and one of our curators will add it as soon as possible. Thanks for visiting Punpedia! 🙂

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Camel Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on camels! 🐫🏜🐪 There’s decent variety of puns involving or to do with camels, considering that there are only two types of camel to derive puns from.

You might also like to go through our entries on horse puns, cow puns, sheep puns, alpaca puns and llama puns.

Have fun going through the puns in this entry and let us know if there are any that we’ve missed out!

Camel Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about camels that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of camel puns:

  • Camel: To start, here are a couple of sayings involving camels which may serve as punny camel witticisms in the right context: “Trust in Allah, but tie up your camel,” and “A camel through the eye of a needle.”
  • Camembert → Camelbert: Camembert is a type of soft cheese from France, which now has some great non-dairy soy options. You can use this similar sounding word to make a cheesy camel pun: “My favourite cheese is soy camelbert.”
  • Camcorder → Camel-corder: As in, “Wait! Let me get my camel-corder.”
  • Camera → Camelra: As in, “Wait! This will look fantastic on my new camelra,” and “Camelra shy,” and “Lights, camelra, action!” and “Smile! You’re on candid camelra,” and “The camelra doesn’t lie,” and “The camelra loves you.” Also works for camelraman (cameraman) and camelramen (cameramen)
  • Scammed → S-camel’d: As in, “Gosh darn it! Those hooligans s-camel‘d me!”
  • Campaigner → Camelpaigner: As in, “The camelpaigners for this movement are really dedicated.” Also works for “campaign” (as in, “This is a really suave camelpaign.”)
  • Campus→ Camelpus: As in, “This is such a studious camelpus. I’m gonna love it here.”
  • Camelot → Camelot: As in, “The court at Camelot.”
  • Camouflage → Camelflage: As in, “Where’s your camelflage?” Also works with camelflaged (camouflaged) and camelflaging (camouflaging)
  • Cameron → Camel-ron: As in, “Camel-ron Diaz was so great in Charlie’s Angels.”
  • Cameron will → Cam will → Cam’ll → Camel: As in “Camel take care of that for you.”
  • Cameroon → Camel-roon: As in, “The Republic of Camel-roon.” (Which is a country in South Africa)
  • Amelie → Camelie: As in, “I loved the movie Camelie. So romantic and whimsical.”
  • Bechamel → Be-camel: A creamy white sauce, used in pasta and traditionally made from a butter base – but today coming in great vegan varieties. Use this to make some sneaky camel puns: “I can’t believe this be-camel is non-dairy!”
  • Camry → Camelry: As in, “They drive a Camelry.”
  • Cavalry → Camelry: As in, “Prepare the camelry!!”
  • Cambodia → Camel-bodia: As in, “I’m going to Camel-bodia this Thursday.”
  • Camagüey → Camel-güey: A city in Central Cuba whose name lends itself well to a clever camel joke: “Welcome to Camel-güey! I hope you brought a hat.”
  • Hump: Here are a couple of phrases which use the word “hump” and can be used as a pun in the right situation: “Hump day,” and “My humps.”
  • Chump → C-hump: As in, “C-hump-change.”
  • Humpty Dumpty → Hump-ty Dumpty: As in, “the character Hump-ty Dumpty” or “that’s a blatant Hump-ty Dumptyism!”
  • Calf: Calf can mean either a young camel or the lower part of a leg. You can use these double meanings to replace these words in inappropriate (or very appropriate, as the case may be) ways to make your own camel puns. Also works for the plural, “calves”, which is the same spelling for both. 
  • Cafe → Calf-e: As in, “Let’s go to that calf-e!” or, “Calf-e au soy lait.”
  • Caffeinated → Calfinated: As in, “Is this coffee decalfinated?”
  • Cuffs → Calf: As in, “Those hoodlums are engaged in fisticalfs!! (fisticuffs)” and “Get these handcalfs (handcuffs) off me!” and “These calf-links (cuff-links) are exquisite.”
  • Half → Calf: As in “I’m still calf asleep” and “I’ve got calf a mind to …” and “Calf measures,” and “Ain’t calf bad,” and “Better calf,” and “Cheap at calf the price,” and “Getting there is calf the fun,” and “Calf a chance,” and “Calf alive,” and “Calf assed,” and “Calf a mind to,” and “Calfway to paradise.”
  • Scarf → S-calf: As in, “That is an unbelievably soft s-calf (scarf)” or “Wow, he is really s-calfing (scarfing) that burrito.”
  • Desert: Here are a few phrases that use the word “desert/s” in them, which you can use to sneak in a few opportune  dromedary puns: “Just deserts” (instead of “just desserts”) and “Ships of the desert.”
  • Palindrome → Palin-dromedary: Dromedary is another word for the Arabian Camel. Use it in some great camel puns, like this one: “It would really work for this pun if ‘camel’ was a palin-dromedary, but it just isn’t.”
  • Hooey → Hoof-ey: As in, “Smells a little hoof-ey in here,” or “This is complete and utter hoof-ey.” (Hooey meaning nonsense).
  • Who f* → Hoof*: As in “Hoofeels hungry right now?” and “Hoofinished the last bit of coconut icecream?” or “Hoofarted?”
  • Who’ve → Hoof: As in “Hoof you spoken to so far?”
  • Half → Hoof: As in “Is the glass hoof full or hoof empty?” and “My other/better hoof.”
  • Run → Hoof it: As in “They’re onto us! Hoof it!”
  • Heard → Herd: As in “I overherd them speaking about …” and “The last I herd, …” and “You herd it here first,” and “You could have herd a pin drop,” and “Make yourself herd” and “Stop me if you’ve herd this one.”
  • Camera → Cama-ra: A cama is a hybrid between a male dromedary camel and a female llama. You might create a really corny pun with this: “This cama-ra was $2 off eBay.”
  • Camoflage → Camaflage:  (Note: A cama is a hybrid between a male dromedary camel and a female llama.) “Their camaflage was brilliant. You wouldn’t have been able to tell the difference between them and a couple of real camels.”
  • Remnent → Ruminant: As in “I haven’t a ruminant of pride left after making all these terrible camel puns.” (Note: A “ruminant” is a family of hooved mammals comprising cows, camels, sheep, deer, giraffe and their relatives)
  • Prominent → Pruminant: As in “She’s a pruminant member of our group.”
  • (Note: A “ruminant” is a family of hooved mammals comprising cows, camels, sheep, deer, giraffe and their relatives)
  • Permanent → Pruminant: As in “I’ve accidentally used pruminant marker on the whiteboard.”
  • (Note: A “ruminant” is a family of hooved mammals comprising cows, camels, sheep, deer, giraffe and their relatives)
  • Her before → Herbivore: As in “I’ve never met herbivore.”
  • Man you’re → Manure: As in “Manure making some awful puns today.”
  • Could → Cud: As in “Cud you stop it please?” and “As fast as her legs cud carry her” and “I cud do it in my sleep.” Also works for “couldn’t” – as in, “I cudn’t see what the big deal was.”
  • Cud: In the right context, you could make an alpaca pun using the phrase “chewing the cud,” which means to chat aimlessly.
  • Cuddle → Cud-dle: Simply put the word “cud” into “cuddle”, as in “let’s cud-dle!”
  • Withers → WithersWithers is a homophone, meaning either the ridge between the shoulder blades of certain animals, or to shrivel. Swap the use and meaning of this word around to make a cheesy camel pun in the right context.
  • Whither → Wither: As in, “Wither are we bound?” (Note: Withers refers to the ridge between the shoulder blades of certain animals.)

Camel-Related Words

To help you come up with your own camel puns, here’s a list of camel-related words to get you started. If you come up with any new puns, please feel free to share them in the comments!

dromedary, bactrian, cama, hump, hooves, mammal, pachyderm, camelus, calf, desert, herbivore, cloven-hoof, genus camelus, herd, cud, saddle, cameleer, howdah, even-toed, ungulate, camelid, single-hump, double-hump, Arabian, camelops, camelidae

Did this Punpedia entry help you?

Did you find the camel-related pun that you were looking for? If so, great! Otherwise, please let us know what you were looking for in the comments below! Are you looking for word play for text messages, facebook, twitter, or some other social media platform? Would you like to see some funny camel pun images? Or perhaps you just want more camel puns for your photo captions? Whatever the case, please let us know, and help us improve this Punpedia entry. If you’ve got any camel puns (image or text) that aren’t included in this article, please submit them in the comments and one of our curators will add it as soon as possible. Thanks for visiting Punpedia 🙂