Taco Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on taco puns! 🌮 This entry is still a work-in-progress, so please suggest any puns that we’re missing in the comments at the end of the page.

I’ve included a few burrito puns, nacho puns and other Mexican food puns, but I’ve tried to keep it centred around tacos, specifically.

You might also like to visit the Punpedia entries on food puns, pizza puns, curry puns and cooking puns.

Taco Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about tacos that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page!

  • Talk about → Taco ’bout: As in “I don’t want to taco ’bout it.” and “Taco ’bout terrible puns!”
  • Talk over → Taco-ver: As in “Don’t taco-ver me!” and “We can taco-ver the phone.” and “Let’s taco-ver coffee.”
  • Talk of → Taco-f: As in “The new restaurant is the taco-f the town.” and “There’s so much taco-f action, but no one’s doing anything!”
  • Takeover → Taco-ver: As in “It was a hostile taco-ver.”
  • Vetigo → Vertaco: As in “Symptoms include: light-headedness, vertaco, …”
  • To co* → Taco*: Some accents make “to” sound close to “tah”, especially when spoken fast. With these accents, if the word “to” is followed by a word starting with the “co” sound, we can make terrible taco puns: “Coast tacoast.” and “We need tacooperate with them.” and “I need you tacoach the team this season.” and “I was going tacoat it with icing but we ran out” and “Learning tacode is fun and rewarding.” and “We need to learn tacoexist happily.” and “My birthday is going tacoincide with a full moon.” and “I’m trying tacope with depression.” and “Trying tacoordinate 3 different jobs is hard.”
  • Take a → Taco: As in “Taco hike.” and “Are you going to taco shot at it?” and “I’m going to taco chance.” and “I’m going to taco short nap.”
  • Beat around → Burrito round: As in “Let’s not burrito round the bush.”
  • Bury it o*  → Burrito*: As in “We can’t bury it here, we’ll need to burritover there.” and “You should burriton that hill.” and “Burritoff the coast of Mexico, under the ocean.”
  • Brit or → Burrit o’: As in “He was either a burrit o’ a German.”
  • Per Italian → Burritolian: As in “None were allowed in as burritolian law.” (Bit of a stretch!)
  • One → Juan: “Juan” is a common given name in Mexico that sometimes features in taco restaurant/franchise names. There are quite a few Juan puns than can be made: “Juan and the same” and “All for Juan and Juan for all.” and “Another Juan bites the dust” and “Bite the big Juan” and “Buy Juan, get Juan free.” and “From day Juan” and “Takes Juan to know Juan” and “Hole in Juan” and “Last Juan there’s a rotton egg” and “Near to Juan’s heart” and “On the Juan hand” and “Juan for the road” and “Juan in a million” and “Juan liner” (one liner) and “Juan moment please.” and “Juan night stand” and “Juan on Juan” and “Juan step at a time” and “Pull a fast Juan” and “Table for Juan” and “Stop me if you’ve heard this Juan
  • *wan* → *Juan*: If a word contains the “wan” / “Juan” sound (or similar), you can make a silly Juan pun: everyjuan, somejuan, juanderful, juan-way, freq-juan-tly, conseq-juan-tly, subseq-juan-tly, peng-juan (penguin).
  • Not your → Nacho: As in “It’s nacho problem” and “It’s nachos, it’s mine!”
  • Not just → Nachos: As in “She’s nachos a pretty face.” and “I’m nachos another one of your minions.”
  • Not yourself → Nachoself: As in “Are you feeling all right? You’re nachoself today.”
  • Not yo* → Nacho*: As in “It’s nachogurt, it’s sour cream.” and “It’s nachoga, it’s Tai Chi”
  • Macho → Nacho: As in “Nacho man.”
  • All up in your → Jalapeño: As in “Jalapeño business.” and “Jalapeño grill.”
  • Case of → Queso: As in “A bad queso the flu.”
  • Okay, so → Queso: As in “Que, so what do we do next?”
  • Have a car though → Avocado: As in “You want me to drive you there? I don’t ‘avocado!”
  • Have a car don’t → Avocadon’t: As in “You avacadon’t you?”
  • Got → Guac: Quite a few terrible guacamole puns can be made using this simple swap. Here are some examples: “You have guac to be kidding me!” and “Give it all you’ve guac.” and “I’ve guac a soft spot for Mexican food.” and “I’ve guac no time for games.” and “You’ve guac nothing to lose…” and “Have you guac what it takes?” and “I’ve guac you covered.”
  • Rock → Guac: As in “Between a guac and a hard place” and “Don’t guac the boat” and “Hit guac bottom” and “Guac and roll” and “Guac solid” and “Guac your world” and “You guac my world!”
  • Chilly → Chili / Chilli: As in “Jeez it’s a bit chili this morning isn’t it?”
  • Awkward → Guacward: As in “Well, this is guacward…”
  • Occupation → Guacupation: As in “I’ve just enrolled for the guacupational therapy course.”
  • Octapus → Guactapus: As in “A guactapus has 8 legs.”
  • Occupy → Guacupy: As in “The guacupy Wall Street movement”
  • October → Guactober: As in “In September or Guactober?”
  • Oxygen → Guacxygen: As in “Everyone needs Guacxygen to survive.”
  • Beans: “Spill the beans
  • Been → Bean: As in “We’ve all bean there.” and “You know, I’ve bean thinking…” and “Bean there, done that.” and “He’s a has-bean.” and “The die has bean cast.” and “I’ve bean had.” and “She’s bean in the wars lately.”
  • Unbeknown(st) →Unbeanown(st): As in “Unbeanownst to me, she made some enquiries.”
  • *peen* →*bean*: If a word contains the “peen” sound we can make some silly bean puns: Phillibeano (Phillipino), beanalize (penalize), unhappbeaness (unhappiness), subbeana (subpoena).
  • Enough →Beanough: As in “Beanough is beanough.” and “Beanough to make you sick.”
  • Enormous →Beanormous: As in “Your vegetable garden is beanormous!”
  • Beam → Bean: As in “Bean me up, Scotty!” and “Tractor bean.” and “Balancing bean.”
  • Bin → Bean: As in “Please put your rubbish in the bean.”
  • Let us → Lettuce: As in “Lettuce eat!” and “Lettuce celebrate!”
  • Led us → Lettuce: As in “You’ve lettuce down the wrong path!” and “But it lettuce to the wrong conclusion.”
  • To my toes → Tomatoes: As in “I got a shiver from my head tomatoes.”
  • Tomorrow → Tomato: As in “Here today, gone tomato.”
  • Corn → Can: As in “Corn’t we all just get along?” and “Appearances corn be deceptive.” and “Bit off more than you corn chew.” and “Corn you believe it?” and “You corn count on me.”
  • Gone → Corn: As in “Here today, corn tomorrow.” and “It’s all corn pear-shaped.” and “Corn, but not forgotten.”
  • Corny: As in “Very corny taco puns”
  • Con* → Corn*: Very corny corn puns can be made with some words that start with the “con” sound (or similar): corntract, corncern, corntain, cornference, corntext, corncerned, corntrast, cornfidence, corndition, corntinue, cornsider, corntry, cornclusion, cornduct, cornversation, cornstruction, cornflict, corntribution, cornsent, cornsist, cornclude, cornservation, corntest, cornception, cornsequences, corsult, corncert, cornventional, corncrete, corntinent, cornfine, cornsistantly, cornstitutional, cornvey, cornsiderably, cornsitituent, corntempt, corncede, cornfess, cornfrontation, corngregation, corntroversial, cornsensus, cornsultancy, cornquest, cornvicted, corngratulate. See this list for more.
  • Maze → Maize: As in “It’s a complicated maize to navigate.”
  • Mace → Maize: Another term for “pepper spray” is “mace”. It can also refer to a medieval spiked club weapon.
  • Celebration→ Shellebration: As in “We should have a shellebration!”
  • Shall→ Shell: As in “Shell I compare thee to a summer’s day?” and “He who lives by the sword shell die by the sword.” and “Shell we dance? and “Ask and you shell receive.” and “Seek and you shell find.” and “The truth shell set you free.” and “You shell not pass!”
  • Sell → Shell: As in “How many do we have left to shell?” and “Shell your soul to the devil.”
  • Shell: As in “I’m not going to shell out $50 for something I don’t even need!”
  • Sel* → Shell*: If a word starts with “sel” a (taco) shell pun can be made by switching it with “shell”. For example: shellection (selection), shellect (select), shelldom (seldom), shellfless (selfless).
  • *sel → *shell: Words ending in “sel” can often be punned upon with “shell”: vesshell (vessel), tasshell (tassel), weashell (weasel), musshell (mussel), etc.
  • *sel* → *shell*: Words containing “sel” can yeild nice puns on (taco) “shell”: Hershellf, himshellf, themshellves, itshellf, myshellf, yourshelf, yourshelves, convershelly, counshelling, preshellected, overshelling, undershelling, ushellessely, weashelling.
  • *cial → *shell: When a word has “cial” as a suffix, this suffix can usually be swapped out for “shell” to create a (taco) shell pun: so-shell (social), spe-shell (special), offi-shell (official), finan-shell, commershell, crushell, judishell, artifishell, provinshell, rashell, benefi-shell, superfi-shell, fashell, glashell, sacrifi-shell, antisoshell.

Taco-Related Words

There are many more puns to be made than could be documented in this Punpedia entry, and so we’ve compiled a list of taco-related concepts for you to use when creating your own puns. If you come up with a new pun, please share it in the comments!

taco, tortilla, maize, corn, wheat, filling, salsa, cilantro, guacamole, guac, Mexico, Mexican, avocado, tomato, burrito, sandwich, chili, chipotle, nachos, lettuce, cheese, quesadilla, vegetables, Mexican cuisine, bean, beans, taco stand, taquito, flauta, enchilada, taqueria, chalupa, gordita, Barbacoa, carnitas, hard-shell, soft-shell, shell, tacodilla, tlayuda, tostada, taco bell

Did this Punpedia entry help you?

Did you find the taco-related pun that you were looking for? If so, great! Otherwise, please let us know what you were looking for in the comments, below! Are you looking for puns for text messages, Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, or some other social media platform? Would you like to see more funny taco pun images? Or perhaps you just want more taco puns for your photo captions? Whatever the case, please let us know, and help us improve this Punpedia entry. If you’re got any taco puns (image or text) that aren’t included in this article, please submit them in the comments and one of our curators will add it as soon as possible. Thanks for visiting Punpedia 🙂

Coffee Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on coffee puns! ☕ Whether you’re looking for coffee puns for a photo caption, crafting the perfect coffee pun pickup line, hunting for coffee one-liners, or just want some corny pun-based coffee jokes, I hope you’re able to find what you’re looking for here 🙂 If not, please leave me a comment at the bottom of the page!

Most coffee puns centre around one of 3 general topics: names of different types of coffee (espresso, mocha, etc.), coffee preparation utensils/procedures (plunger, grind, roast, mug, caffeine etc.) and coffee ingredients/products (sugar, grounds, cream, etc.). Mug puns seem to be a particular favourite on the internet and are included in this entry, but may also get their own entry at some point.

As usual there are related words, related phrase, coffee jokes, and visual coffee puns (comics, memes, etc.) further down the page.

You might also like to visit the Punpedia entries on tea puns and food puns.

Coffee Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about coffee that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page!

  • Procrastinating → Procaffeinating: As in “I should have been studying for the exam, but I was procaffeinating.”
  • Grounds: As in “Grounds for divorce.” and “We don’t have the grounds for arrest.” and “These are the school grounds – they’re private property.”
  • Grounded: As in “My parents said I’m not allowed to drink coffee else I’ll be grounded.” and “Aeroplane have been grounded since yesterday due to the storms.” and “The boat grounded on a mud bank.”
  • Ground: As in “I fell to the ground.” and “We need to break new ground.” and “I built it from the ground up.” and “We need to find some common ground.” and “Get in on the ground floor.” and “We need more seed money to get it off the ground.” and “Hit the ground running” and “The moral high ground
  • Mug: This can be slang for “face” or for “attack or rob in a public place”. Examples: “I was mugged in broad daylight.” and “We have mug shots of this criminal back at the station.”
  • Bitter: As in “He cam to a bitter end.” and “That’s a bitter pill to swallow.” and “No need to be bitter! (resentful)”
  • Express → Espresso: As in “Espresso your opinions politely.” and “The espresso train only stops at 2 stations on the way.” and “Words cannot espresso how much you mean to me.”
  • Been → Bean: As in “We’ve all bean there.” and “You know, I’ve bean thinking…” and “Bean there, done that.” and “He’s a has-bean.” and “The die has bean cast.” and “I’ve bean had.” and “She’s bean in the wars lately.”
  • Unbeknown(st) →Unbeanown(st): As in “Unbeanownst to me, she made some enquiries.”
  • *peen* →*bean*: If a word contains the “peen” sound we can make some silly bean puns: Phillibeano (Phillipino), beanalize (penalize), unhappbeaness (unhappiness), subbeana (subpoena).
  • Enough →Beanough: As in “Beanough is beanough.” and “Beanough to make you sick.”
  • Enormous →Beanormous: As in “Your vegetable garden is beanormous!”
  • Beam → Bean: As in “Bean me up, Scotty!” and “Tractor bean.” and “Balancing bean.”
  • Bin → Bean: As in “It was in the bargain bean – 30% off!” and “Please put your rubbish in the bean.”
  • Pin → Bean: This one’s a bit of a stretch. Examples: “Bean the tail on the donkey.”
  • Means → Beans: As in “By whatever beans necessary.” and “A beans to an end.” and “Living beyond/within your beans.” and “The ends justify the beans.”
  • You → Brew: As in “Brew can do it!” and “Brew silly goose!” and “I’m so glad to see brew!” and “Before brew know it”
  • Bro → Brew: As in “What’s up, brew?” and “Cool story, brew.”
  • *brew*: If a word contains the “brew” sound (or similar) we can sometimes make a brewing pun: brewmstick (broomstick), brews (bruise), brewnette (brunette), brewtal (brutal), brewtalize (brutalize), brewtish, (brutish), Hebrew.
  • *byoo*: If a word contains the “byoo” sound (or similar) we can sometimes make a terrible coffee brewing pun: brewtiful (beautiful), abrews (abuse), attribrewts (attributes), contribrewted, distribrewtion, rebrewke (rebuke), debrew (debut), retribrewtion, tribrewnal (tribunal).
  • *proo*: If a word contains the “proo” sound (or similar) we can sometimes make a terrible brewing pun: abrewval (approval), bulletbrewf, dissabrewve, foolbrewf, imbrewvements, disbrewve, brewdent (prudent), brewdence (prudence), waterbrewf.
  • Déjà vu → Déjà brew: As in “I’m getting déjà brew – have we been to this cafe before?”
  • Lot → Latte: As in “A latte fuss about nothing.” and “I’ve got a latte on my plate right now.” and “It leaves a latte to be desired.” and “It’s beginning to look a latte like Christmas.” and “I love you a latte!”
  • Lot of → Latte: As in “I’ve got a latte problems.”
  • Cop → Cup: As in “The cuppers pulled me over because of my broken tail light.” and “When I grow up I wanna be a cup so I can fight crime.”
  • * she know → * -ccino: As in “How could -ccino?” and “Do you think -ccinos?”
  • Grind: As in “The daily grind” and “Grind to a halt” and “Axe to grind” and “Don’t let those bastards grind you down”
  • Grinned → Grind: This one’s super corny: “I grind and had a little chuckle when I read that coffee pun.”
  • Perk: This is a coffee/barista term for “to percolate” (verb) and “percolated coffee” (noun). Examples: “My new barista job has a lot of perks.” and “I perked up my ears when I hear someone mention my favourite author.” and “I was feeling drowsy but I perked up after my morning coffee.”
  • Heated, Strong: If you can mention these two words in close succession, it might pass off as a coffee pun: “This could easily turn into a strong, heated debate.”
  • Weak, Bland: As in “That’s a weak, bland way to look at the world.”
  • Strong, Dark: As in “There’s a strong, dark storm heading our way.”
  • Lukewarm: This means “lacking interest, enthusiasm or conviction” and also “mildly warm”. It’s often used to describe coffee that isn’t hot enough. Examples: “A lukewarm applause” and “Your coffee puns are lukewarm at best.”
  • Break: The term “coffee break” is well-known enough that you might be able to make a very subtle coffee pun using the word “break”. For example: “Break new ground” and “Break out in a cold sweat” and “Break ranks” and “Break your heart” and “Make a clean break”. You can also replace “brake” with “break” to make a nice coffee pun that’s a little more obvious: “break fluid
  • Temper → Tamper: A “tamper” is used to compress ground coffee into a portafilter: “He’ll lose his tamper.” and “He has a tamper-tantrum if he doesn’t get his morning coffee.”
  • Tamper: As in “Someone tampered with the brakes on my car.”
  • Shot: This term is often used to in coffee lingo to explain the different sizes and strengths of a particular style of coffee (single shot, long shot, double shot, etc.). Thus, we can use this to make a few sneaky puns: “It’s a long shot, but I think we ca do it.” and “That was a cheap shot.” and “Why don’t you have a shot at it?” and “I gave it my best shot.” and “Not by a long shot.” and “The money shot” and “You’ll get shot.” and “Shot in the dark”
  • Sentimental → Sedimental: As in “This antique coffee pot has a lot of sedimental value.”
  • The matter → Sumata: As in “What’s Sumatra with you?” (Sumatra is an Indonesian island that is well-known for growing coffee)
  • Depressed → Despressod: As in “I’m feeling a little despressod.”
  • Brazilian: Brazilian coffee is famous world-wide, and so the term “Brazilian” could be used as a coffee pun in the right context (so long as the usage is not referring to Brazilian coffee, obviously!).
  • Turkish: Same explanation as above.
  • Muddy: This is a term used to describe coffee that has lots of sediment/particles. Example usage: “The egg industry muddies the waters by funding rigged studies on cholesterol.”
  • Froth: As in “All froth and no substance.”
  • Show → Joe: A cup of coffee is sometimes called a “cup of Joe” and so “Joe” can be used as a synonym for “coffee”. Some pun ideas: “The greatest Joe on Earth” and “One-man Joe” and “Joe a little leg.” and “Joe some appreciation.” and “Steal the Joe.” and “The Joe must go on.” and “Joe me the ropes.”
  • Above her age → A beverage: As in “Her reading skills are a beverage” and “She pitches a beverage – that’s why she got into the national team.” and “She’s a beverage group in all her subjects.”
  • Shock → Choc: As in “I was in choc for a while after hearing about it.” and “Choc and awe” and “Choc horror” and “Culture choc
  • Coughing → Coffeeing: As in “There was so much coffeeing in the office – everyone had the flu.” and “”
  • Mock her → Mocha: As in “Don’t mocha like that – she deserves respect and consideration.”
  • Stimulate: As in “This was a stimulating discussion, but I need to go now.” and “The courses aim to stimulate a passion for learning.”
  • Under → Umber: “Umber” is a brown, earthy colour that is often used to describe coffee and coffee grounds. Examples: “Get umber your skin” and “Keep it umber wraps” and “Hot umber the collar” and “Six feet umber” and “Umber cover of darkness” and “Umber pressure” and “Umber the influence” and “Umber the microscope” and “Umber your breath” and “Water umber the bridge”
  • Roast: This can refer to when someone is being criticised severely, but is also an obvious reference to roasted coffee beans. Example: “If you waste her time she’ll roast you.”
  • Drip: Refers to a “weak, ineffectual” person (aka: pushover, weakling, doorstop). It’s related to coffee because “drip brewing” is a popular method of preparing coffee. Example: “He doesn’t enjoy coffee puns – he’s such a drip!”
  • Cold press: If you can incorporate the words “cold” and “press” into a sentence in close proximity, you can probably make a cold press coffee pun: As in “No need to be cold. Pressing on, …” and “Stay away from me! If I catch your cold I’m pressing charges.”
  • Milky: This means “weak and compliant”. Example: “They just talk that way to make you turn milky.”
  • Milk: This can mean “exploit” or “fleece” or “get all possible advantage from a situation”. For example: “The newspapers were milking the story for every possible drop of drama.” and “They milked me dry.” and “Milk it for all it’s worth.”
  • Sugar: This can be used as a replacement for “shit” as in “Oh sugar!”. It is also used as a term of endearment as in “How are you feeling, sugar?”
  • Fair tradeThis term refers to a social movement which seeks to help producers in developing countries and promote sustainable farming. It’s often used to refer to “fair trade coffee”. We can use it as a coffee pun fairly easily: “I’ll stop making coffee puns, and you give me ten dollars. Is that a fair trade?”
  • *sip*: If a word contains the “sip” sound, it’s an opportunity for a terrible pun on “sip” as in “to sip your coffee” (so long as you emphasise the “sip” part somehow): Mississipi, disiplinarian, munisipality, presipitate, partisiples, presipitated, prinsipally, resipient, resiprocity.
  • *sep*: If a word contains the “sep” sound it’s a chance to make a terribly corny “sip” pun (perhaps emphasise with hyphens or underline/bold): ac-sip-tability (acceptability), bisips (biceps), consiption (conception), consipt (concept), desiptive, impersiptable, desiptive, misconsiption, persiptive, resiption, resiptionist, resiptivity, resiptors, siparatists (seperatists), siparation, siparate, susiptability, intersipt.
  • Happy → Frappe: As in “Don’t worry, be frappe.” and “Frappe birthday to you!” and “Frappe go lucky” and “Go to your frappe place” and “Not a frappe camper!” and “We’re just one big frappe family.”
  • Or lay → Au lait: This means “with milk” in French so “cafe au lait” means “coffee with milk”. It is pronounced like “aw lay”. Example pun: “We gonna get up and do something au lait here for a bit longer?”
  • Or lie → Au lait: (See explanation above) As in “Don’t cheat au lait – it’s immoral.”
  • Cup: This has a few different meaning outside of the normal one. The term “cup” is used in the measurement of bra sizes, and can be used as a verb for “form into the shape of a cup” (especially when referring to hands). These other definitions might be opportunities for subtle cup puns / coffee puns.
  • Robust → Robusta: Robusta is a variety of coffee (the other main one being Arabica). The adjective “robust” means “strong and/or healthy” or “rich and flavoursome”. Example: “He is a very robusta young fellow.”
  • They can’t → Decant: As in “They’re banned. Decant come back here.” and “Decant stop me. I can do anything.”
  • Percolate: This is a term  which describes a part of the coffee brewing process, but it’s actually a more general word that means “filter gradually through a porous surface or substance”. Thus we can use it as a synonym for “spread” or “be disseminated” or “filter”.
  • Earn → Urn: As in “I don’t urn much at the moment, but I’m working my way up.” and “You’ve urned it.” and “Urn an honest penny.” (This is a reference to hot-water “urns” which are often used to boil water for coffees in “break rooms”/kitchens at work places)
  • Felt her → Filter: As in “I filter breathing down the back of my neck.” and “I filter gaze fall on me.”
  • Filled her → Filter: As in “She has filter coffee pun quota for today.”
  • Barely → Barley: Barley coffee (or “caffè d’orzo”) is a widely available coffee alternative in Italy which is caffeine-free. If you’re particularly deep down the coffee pun rabbit hole, then this may be a viable pun.
  • Plunge → Plunger: As in “Take the plunger!” and “She jumped form the jetty and plungered into the sea.” (A reference to “coffee plungers“)
  • I forgot → Afforgato: As in “Afforgato where I parked my car.” and ” I had another coffee pun but affogato it.” (Affogato is an Italian coffee-based dessert)
  • Grandma → Crema: As in “Crema just doesn’t stop talking.” and “My crema make the most amazing hot chocolate.” (Crema is the name for the brownish foam on the top of freshly made espresso.)
  • Grammar → Crema: As in “Your crema is terrible.” and “Crema Nazis just like to feel good about themselves.”
  • Puck: This refers to compacted, spent coffee grounds from a portafilter. A few different puns can be made from this: “Oh puck!” and “The child’s face puckered, ready to cry.” and “Don’t press your puck.” and “Puck of the draw.” and “Beginner’s puck.” and “A bigger bang for your puck.” and “Puck naked.” and “Make a quick puck.”
  • Pull: Espresso shots are “pulled” – a holdover from when machines were lever operated. This may be s subtle one depending on the audience. Examples: “She doesn’t pull any punches.” and “Are you pulling my leg?” and “Pull the plug.” and “Pull your hair out” and “Pull yourself together!” and “Pull your finger out”
  • Nutty: A commonly used adjective in coffee lingo to describe a pleasant flavour of walnut, almond, hazelnut or other nuts. Examples: “Your coffee puns are a little nutty.” and “He came up with quite a few nutty proposals.”
  • Saucy / Saucier → Saucer: This is a corny one. “Saucy” has different meanings in different places. Sometimes it has a sexual connotation, other times it means “cheeky”. You’ll have to construct your pun with the audience in mind.
  • Settle → Kettle: As in “Kettle down everyone.” and “We should kettle this out of court.” and “I’ve got a score to kettle.”

Coffee-Related Phrases

Common phrases, idioms and cliches which are related to coffee can be used for some subtle and witty word play. Here is a list of the coffee themed phrases that we’ve found so far:

  • back office bean counter
  • not worth a hill of beans
  • don’t cry over spilt milk
  • came to a bitter end
  • take the bitter with sweet
  • a bitter pill to swallow
  • get in on the ground floor
  • both feet on the ground
  • hit the ground running
  • in hot water
  • that and a quarter will get you a cup of coffee
  • spill the beans
  • cool beans
  • not my cup of tea
  • tea and sympathy
  • brake fluid
  • you got creamed
  • different kettle of fish
  • the pot calling the kettle black
  • a watched pot never boils
  • between the cup and the lip
  • a storm is brewing
  • storm in a teacup
  • trouble is brewing
  • Have another? Please share it in the comments at the bottom of the page!

Coffee-Related Words

There are many more puns to be made than could be documented in this Punpedia entry, and so we’ve compiled a list of coffee-related concepts for you to use when creating your own puns. If you come up with a new pun, please share it in the comments!

espresso, flat white, bean, beans, caffeine, drink, cappuccino, cappa, java, java bean, arabica, iced, beverage, chocolate, coffee tree, mocha, stimulant, stimulated, cocoa, decaffeinated, coffee maker, barista, brew, Starbucks, Dome, cafe, latte, liberica, umber, brown,  decaf, demitasse, roast, roasting, drip, cold press, milk, milky, sugar, fair-trade, organic, sip, sipping, frappe, instant coffee, cafe au lait, coffee pot, hot, cup, cupful, teaspoon, black coffee, white coffee, café, nescafe, addictive, macciato, latte macciato, kahlua, decanter, percolate, percolator, robusta, ground, grind, chicory, urn, cafe noir, coffee break, cafetière, French press, filter, saucer, barley coffee, plunger, Turkish, lukewarm, tepid, muddy, Bazillian, rich, aroma, aromatic, bitter, Earthy, full-bodied, Americano, affogato, Chemex, dripper, cold drip, cortado, crema, dark roast, green beans, latte art, nel drop, flannel drip, portafilter, puck, pull, redeye, ristretto, slow dripper, aftertaste, malty, nutty, chai, degas, siphon brewer, mazagran, mélange, mochaccino, kettle, napoletana, ristretto, schlagobers, skilly, zurf, Biggin, tea, weak, strong, perk, mug, Sanka, Sumatra, cream, pumpkin spice latte, tamper, blend. blended, lungo, sediment, froth, stain.

Coffee Jokes

If you’re looking for some very corny coffee jokes, you’ve come to the right place. All of these one-liner-style coffee jokes use puns in their punchline. Some are phonetic puns, others are based on a slang phrase or cliche related to coffee.

  • How did the hipster burn her tongue? – She drank her coffee before it was cool.
  • What do you call a cow who’s just given birth? – De-calf-inated
  • What’s it called when you steal someone’s coffee? – A mugging!
  • Why do they call coffee “mud”? – Because it was ground a couple of minutes ago.
  • Why is a bad cup of coffee the end of a marriage?  – Because it’s grounds for divorce.
  • How are coffee beans like kids? – They are always getting grounded.
  • How is divorce like an Espresso? – It’s expensive and bitter.
  • What do you call sad coffee? – A despresso.
  • What’s the opposite of coffee? – A sneezy!

Coffee Pun Images

Below is a collection of coffee-related visual puns and meme-type images. If you’ve created your own visual coffee puns or found one that we’ve missed, please post us a link in the comments section 🙂

Did this Punpedia entry help you?

Did you find the coffee-related pun that you were looking for? If so, great! Otherwise, please let us know what you were looking for in the comments, below! Are you looking for puns for text messages, Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, or some other social media platform? Would you like to see more funny coffee pun images? Or perhaps you just want more coffee puns for your photo captions? Whatever the case, please let us know, and help us improve this Punpedia entry. If you’re got any coffee puns (image or text) that aren’t included in this article, please submit them in the comments and one of our curators will add it as soon as possible. Thanks for visiting Punpedia 🙂

Vegetable Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on vegetable puns, salad puns and related topics! 🍅🍆🌽🍄 Whether you’re looking for a name for your veggie patch, in a veg pun battle with your friend, trying to come up with some cute vegetable pickup lines, or just want to stock up on some vegetable word play for future use, I hope this entry serves you well.

As well as covering leafy vegetables (lettuce, cabbage, kale), roots, legumes and other vegetable-like foods are covered too, so you’ll see some potato puns, corn puns, onion puns, pumpkins puns, and all sorts of others based around those general topics.

You might also like to visit the Punpedia entries on food puns, fruit puns, cooking puns, corn puns and potato puns.

Vegetable Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of veggie puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about vegetables that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page!

  • Call → Kale: As in “Above and beyond the kale of duty.” and “His authenticity was kaled into question.” and “Kale it quits.” and “Kale the shots.” and “Kale of the wild.” and “Kale to action.” and “A judgement kale.” and “That was a close kale.” and “Wake-up kale
  • Gale → Kale: As in “It’s blowing a kale out here!” and “I slept well despite the howling kales outside.”
  • Keel → Kale: As in “Keep an even kale.” and “A yacht’s kale keeps it upright”
  • Solid → Salad: As in “Salad gold.” and “As salad as rock.” and “Rock salad.” and “Make sure you’ve built a salad foundation.”
  • Sullied → Salad: To be “sullied” is to be defiled, tainted, stained or spoiled. Example: “The politician’s good name was salad by the media after the allegations were confirmed.” This one’s is a bit of a stretch!
  • Salah → Salad: The term “salah” describes the act of worship (5 times a day) in the Islamic religion. Example: “Salad is recommended 5 times a day.”
  • Salary → Celery: As in “I didn’t take the job. The celery was too low.”
  • Leak → Leek: As in “The information was leeked and a huge media storm erupted.” and “I’m just going to take a leek.” and “Be careful with that shopping bag! There’s a leek in it.” and “The dam sprung a leek.”
  • Leg → Leek: As in “It cost me an arm and a leek.” and “Shake a leek!” and “Without a leek to stand on” and “Haha just pulling your leek :)”
  • Lick → Leek: As in “Leek your lips.” and “Stand up for yourself. Don’t leek his boots.” and “Leek your wounds.”
  • Parcel → Parsley: As in “Let’s play pass the parsley!”
  • Leg room → Legume: As in “I always pay a little extra for the aeroplane seats with more legume.”
  • Choke → Artichoke: This is a corny one: “I almost artichoked on my food when she told me.” and “She was artichoked by emotion as she gave her speech at the funeral.”
  • Bumpkin → Pumpkin: As in “I’m a bit of a country pumpkin, but I’m getting used to the city.”
  • Heard → Herb: As in “I herb it on the grape vine.” and “You herb it here first.” and “You could have herb a pin drop.”
  • Curb → Herb: As in “Herb your enthusiasm.” and “Drive up onto the herb.”
  • *erb* → *herb*: If a word contains the “herb” sound (or similar) a cringe-worthy herb pun can sometimes be made: advherb, distherbance, distherbingly, exacherbate, aftherburner, countherbalance, hypherbole, knickherbockers, mastherbate, nonvherbal, refherbishment, rivherbankherbanization, vherbalize.
  • Plant: This can also mean “place in a fixed or specified position”, and “a place where an industrial or manufacturing process takes place”. Examples: “She planted herself squarely in front of him” and “The new automobile manufacturing plant is the biggest in the country.”
  • Planned → Plant: As in “I had plant to get there by 8pm” and “Do you have anything plant?”
  • Bland → Plant: As in “The hospital food was flavourless and plant as usual.” and “He gave a weak, plant smile.” and “It tastes a little plant. More herbs?”
  • Let us → Lettuce: As in “Lettuce eat!” and “Lettuce celebrate!”
  • Led us → Lettuce: As in “You’ve lettuce down the wrong path!” and “But it lettuce to the wrong conclusion.”
  • It’s/Its → Oat’s/Oats: As in “Oat’s about time!” and “Look at oats cute little face!”
  • Maze → Maize: As in “It’s a complicated maize to navigate.”
  • Mace → Maize: Another term for “pepper spray” is “mace”. It can also refer to a medieval spiked club weapon.
  •  Amazing→ Amaizing: As in “Truely amaizing.” and “Amaizing Grace.” and “I’m amaized!” and “To my utter amaizement …” (Maize is another name for corn)
  • Baggage → Cabbage: This one is lovely and corny: “I’m carrying around a lot of emotional cabbage.” or “Please place personal items in the overhead cabbage compartment.”
  • Until → Lentil: As in “It ain’t over lentil it’s over!” and “It’s all fun and games lentil someone gets hurt.”
  • Care at → Carrot: As in “I don’t carrot all.”
  • Not re-enter → Nutrient-er: As in “You should nutrient-er the discussion after that terrible contribution.”
  • Beat → Beet: As in “Let’s not beet around the bush.” and “If you leave now, you’ll beet the rush.” and “Can you hear my heartbeet?” and “You deserve a beeting for that.” and “Damn, these are some fine beets you’re playing!” and “There’s always deadbeets hanging around that park at night.” and “He’s not crazy – just a little offbeet.” and “We pride ourselves in our unbeetable service.” and “I’m feeling fairly upbeet today :)” and “Diabeetes is a pun, but it’s insensitive.”
  • Between → Beetween: As in “Beetween you and me …” and “With your tail beetween your legs.” and “Read beetween the lines.” and “Beetween a rock and a hard place.”
  • Bead → Beet: As in “Tiny round beets are dangerous for children.”
  • Repeat → Rebeet: As in “I’m not going to rebeet myself.” and “Those who do not learn from history are doomed to rebeet it.” and “I warned him rebeetedly.”
  • Pizza → Beet-za: As in “I always buy my beetzas from the same beetzaria.”
  • *pit* → *beet*: If a word contains the “pit” sound, a terrible beet pun can sometimes be made: cabeetal city, hosbeetalisation, palbeetations, abeetizing, precibeetation, serendibeetous, inhosbeetable.
  • Pete → Beet: As in “His name is beet.”
  • Peed → Beet: This one is a stretch: “I laughed so hard I nearly beet my pants.”
  • Corny: As in “Very corny vegetable puns”
  • Con* → Corn*: Very corny corn puns can be made with some words that start with the “con” sound (or similar): corntract, corncern, corntain, cornference, corntext, corncerned, corntrast, cornfidence, corndition, corntinue, cornsider, corntry, cornclusion, cornduct, cornversation, cornstruction, cornflict, corntribution, cornsent, cornsist, cornclude, cornservation, corntest, cornception, cornsequences, corsult, corncert, cornventional, corncrete, corntinent, cornfine, cornsistantly, cornstitutional, cornvey, cornsiderably, cornsitituent, corntempt, corncede, cornfess, cornfrontation, corngregation, corntroversial, cornsensus, cornsultancy, cornquest, cornvicted, corngratulate. See this list for more.
  • Have a car though → Avocado: As in “I don’t ‘avocado.”
  • Her before → Herbivore: As in “I met herbivore at the gym.”
  • Turn up → Turnip: As in “Turnip the music!” and “It’ll turnip somewhere.”
  • Been → Bean: As in “We’ve all bean there.” and “You know, I’ve bean thinking…” and “Bean there, done that.” and “He’s a has-bean.” and “The die has bean cast.” and “I’ve bean had.” and “She’s bean in the wars lately.”
  • Unbeknown(st) →Unbeanown(st): As in “Unbeanownst to me, she made some enquiries.”
  • *peen* →*bean*: If a word contains the “peen” sound we can make some silly bean puns: Phillibeano (Phillipino), beanalize (penalize), unhappbeaness (unhappiness), subbeana (subpoena).
  • Enough →Beanough: As in “Beanough is beanough.” and “Beanough to make you sick.”
  • Enormous →Beanormous: As in “Your vegetable garden is beanormous!”
  • Beam → Bean: As in “Bean me up, Scotty!” and “Tractor bean.” and “Balancing bean.”
  • Bin → Bean: As in “It was in the bargain bean – 30% off!” and “Please put your rubbish in the bean.”
  • Pin → Bean: This one’s a bit of a stretch. Examples: “Bean the tail on the donkey.”
  • Deal → Dill: As in “What’s the big dill?” and “I’m kind of a big dill around here.” (“Dill” is a herb, and is often short for dill-pickle – a cucumber that has been preserved and given the flavour of the dill herb)
  • Pickle: “We’re in a bit of a pickle here.”
  • Much room → Mushroom: “It’s only a little elevator, there isn’t mushroom in here.”
  • Wait → Wheat: As in “Wheat a second…” and “I am lying in wheat.”
  • We t* → Wheat: As in “Wheat talked about this last night.” and “Wheat took our time.”
  • We’d → Wheat: As in “Wheat love for you to join us!”
  • Please → Peas: As in “Do as you peas.” and “Pretty peas?”
  • Pee → Pea: As in “Brb, really need to pea.”
  • Peace → Peas: As in “World peas.” and “Inner peas” and “Peas of mind” and “Rest in peas.” and “War and Peas” and “Keep the peas” and “Peas be with you”
  • Piece → Peas: As in “Peas by peas” and “Peas of mind” and “Peas of cake” and “Real peas of work” and “Peas of pie” and “Real peas of work” and “Speak your peas” and “How long is a peas of string?”
  • *peas*: There are a few words with the “peas” sound in them: centerpeas (centerpiece), earpeas (earpiece), Greenpeas (Greenpeace), masterpeas (masterpiece), mouthpeas (mouthpiece), peasfully, peaskeepers, peastime, Peasa (Pisa), timepeas (timepiece).
  • *pea*: If a word contains the “pea” sound, you can make a terrible pea pun by adjusting the spelling and emphasising the “pea” part: appealing, appease, bumpea (bumpy), centipeade, champeaon, champeaonship, compeate, copearight (copyright), creepea (creepy), dopea (dopey), encyclopeadia, entropea, escapea, espeaonage, Ethiopean, Europeaan, expeadient, frumpea, grumpea, hippea, happea, happeaest, homosapean, impead, loudspeaker, peacock, peafowl, peak, peadiatric, peanalize, philipeano, peano (piano), peaqued, recipeas, recipeantsm repeal, repeat, scorpeaon, speacies, peaple (people), speach, speaker, speachless, therapea.
  • Snap a piece → Snap a peas: This plays on “snap peas” – a very common type of pea: “Can you snap a peas off for me peas (please)?”
  • Remain → Romaine: “Romaine” is a type of lettuce. Examples: “Everyone romaine calm.” and “It romaines to be seen.”
  • To my toes → Tomatoes: As in “I got a shiver from my head tomatoes.”
  • Tomorrow → Tomato: As in “Here today, gone tomato.”
  • Tube of → Tuber: As in “Can I please purchase a tuber hand cream?”
  • All up in your → Jalapeño: As in “Jalapeño business.” and “Jalapeño grill.”
  • Serial → Cereal: As in “There’s a cereal killer on the loose.”
  • Surreal → Cereal: As in “The view from the summit was cereal.” and “I love impressionism and cereal art.”
  • Grain: As in “I’m going to go against the grain here and say …” and “There’s a grain of truth in what he’s saying.” and “I’d take it with a grain of salt.”
  • Grainy: Other than referring to grain (the crop food, of course), this can refer to a texture or to a low resolution photograph: “Your profile picture is a bit grainy.”
  • Ingrained: As in “It was ingrained in me from a young age.”
  • Again → A grain: As in “Come a grain?” and “Never a grain.” and “Time and time a grain.” and “Now and a grain.”
  • I love → Olive: As in “Olive you so much!” and “Olive silly food puns!”
  • Or live → Olive: As in “Live like a king olive on a shoe string.”.
  • All of → Olive: As in “Sending olive my love to your family.”
  • Time → Thyme: As in “All in good thyme.” and “Better luck next thyme.” and “We just need to buy some thyme.”
  • Platter → Plait her: “I love to platter hair – it’s therapeutic.”
  • Dip: As in “Take a dip” and “Dip your toe in.” (Playing on the “crackers and dip” form of “dip”)
  • I am → I yam: As in “I yam who I yam.”
  • Yankee → Yamkee: As in “The Newyork Yamkees are up 3 points!”
  • Mint: “All of the items are mint condition.”
  • Mean’t → Mint: As in “We were just mint to be.” and “You weren’t mint to eat it!”
  • *ment → *mint: Words that end in “ment” can be simple cheesy “mint” puns: governmint, developmint, momint, managemint, departmint, agreemint, environmint, investmint, employmint, equiptmint, commint, assessmint, requiremint, improvemint, appointmint, settlemint, experimint, establishmint, implemint, announcemint, punishmint, measuremint, dissapointmint, advertisemint, encouragemint, embarrassmint, segmint, argumint, pigmint, tormint, paymint, ornamint, sedamint, vehemint, shipmint, treatmint, statemint, merrimint. See this list for more.
  • Clothes → Cloves: As in “I’m only half-cloved” and “The emperor’s new cloves.”
  • Love → Clove: As in “I clove you so much!” and “Clove is in the air.”
  • Garret → Carrot: A “garret” is an attic, loft or roof space.
  • Root: As in “I’m rooting for you!” and “Money is the root of all evil.” (The term “root” is also a synonym for sexual intercourse in some countries/regions)
  • Rude → Root: As in “A root awakening.” and “He has no manners – very root.”
  • Green: This can obviously refer to the colour, but it can also refer to someone who is inexperienced or naive: “A green recruit fresh from college.”
  • Funnel → Fennel: “Fennel” is a herb. Example: “They were all fenneled into the same career by the specialist college.”
  • Final → Fennel: As in “It’s the fennel count down.” and “You have the fennel say.” and “It’s my fennel offer.”
  • Squash: As in “Don’t squash the poor bug!” and “We need to squash the competition.”
  • Roo bar → Rhubarb: In Australia a car’s “bullbar” is often called a “roo bar” (“roo” is short for “kangaroo”).
  • Saw → Seed: The past tense form of “see” is of course “saw”, but we can be make a silly seed pun if we “conjugate” “see” like we normally do with regular verbs: “seed”. Examples:  “I came, I seed, I conquered.”
  • Seedy: This is a describing word for someone or something that is morally questionable, fowl, or dirty. Examples: “So many seedy people hanging around that place.”
  • Seed: As in “But it planted a seed of hope.” and “We got more seed capital from investors.”
  • Properly → Broccoli: This one’s a stretch! Example: “If you’re going to do it at all, you might as well do it broccoli.”
  • Leave → Leaf: As in “Absent without leaf.” and “Leaf no stone unturned” and “Leaf your options open.” and “Love them and leaf them.” and “That’s going to leaf a mark!” and “I’m leafing tomorrow morning.”
  • Love → Leaf: As in “I leaf you so much!” and “Leaf is in the air.”
  • Laugh → Leaf: As in “Leaf all the way to the bank.” and “Leaf in your face.” and “Leaf your head off.”
  • Leaves: As in “She leaves without a trace.”
  • So → Soy: This simple soy pun works best if the word after “so” begins with a “y”, but it still works without it. Examples: “Soy you think you can dance?” and “It’s soy sad.” and “There’s only soy much you can do.”
  • Say → Soy: As in “What did you just soy?” and “To have the final soy.” and “Needless to soy, …” and “Never soy never.”
  • Soil → Soyl: As in “That tofu pun was hilarious – I almost soyled my pants.” and “Fertile soyl.”
  • *soy*: Other words containing the “soy” sound can also be soy puns: ellipsoyd (ellipsoid), sinusoydally (sinusoidally).
  • So you been → Soya bean: As in “Soya bean up to much lately?”
  • Corn → Can: As in “Corn’t we all just get along?” and “Appearances corn be deceptive.” and “Bit off more than you corn chew.” and “Corn you believe it?” and “You corn count on me.”
  • Gone → Corn: As in “Here today, corn tomorrow.” and “It’s all corn pear-shaped.” and “Corn, but not forgotten.”
  • Pulse: This term can refer to a couple of different things. First, the pulse of your veins caused by your heart-beat, or more generally, any short burst or vibration (e.g. of sound, electricity, etc.). Second, it is a synonym of “legume” which refers to produce like chickpeas, lentils, and beans.
  • But any → Botany: As in “You expect me to be impressed, botany body can do that.”
  • Culture → Agriculture: A very corny one: “I was feeling homesick and experiencing agriculture shock.”
  • Too bad → Tuberd: As in “You want some? Tuberd, it’s all mine.” and “Tuberd the shoes don’t fit you.”
  • *uber*: Words that contain the “uber” sound (or similar) can sometimes be potato puns: extuberant (exuberant), tuberis (hubris), protuberances, tuberty (puberty).
  • Guarding → Garden: As in “A soldier was garden the entry.” and “The manager was always garden his reputation by blaming others.”
  • Esteemed → E-steamed: As in “Many of these qualities are e-steamed by managers.” and “Contemporary Japanese ceramics are highly e-steamed.”
  • Raw: As in “That was a raw deal.” (a bad deal)
  • Brussels: It’s the name of a region in Belgium, but is also well known as part of the phrase “Brussels sprout” which is a well known vegetable which likely originated there.
  • She weed→ Seaweed: As in “I just got a new pet rabbit and seaweed on my carpet.”
  • Produce: When the emphasis is on the “prod” part of this word, it refers to things that have been grown on a farm. You might be able to make vegetable puns with this in the right context.
  • Crop: As in “If you crop the photo it’ll look better.” and “The cream of the crop.” and “I always ask the hairdresser for a crop.”
  • Crop up: To “crop up” means to appear unexpectedly and/or suddenly, and thus could be a pun on “crop” which is a cultivated grain, fruit or vegetable.
  • Cartoon → Cardoon: This is thistle of the sunflower family that is often called an “Artichoke thistle”. It has edible leaves and roots. Example: “Disney has some of the most famous cardoons in the world.”
  • Okay→ Okra: As in “Are you feeling okra?” (Terrible! 😀 By the way, okra is a plant the has edible green pods)
  • Rocket: As well as the obvious definition, “rocket” refers to a type of leafy salad vegetable.
  • Law → Slaw: As in “Slaw and order.” and “I am a slaw abiding citizen.” and “The slaw of diminishing returns.” and “The slaw of the jungle.” You could also use “slaw” to replace “it’s law” – perhaps add a preceding apostrophe like so: ‘slaw
  • A thousand islands: “Thousand Island” is a popular salad dressing. If you can somehow work “thousand island” into your prose, you’ve got yourself a salad pun.
  • Dressing: As in “Oh stop dressing it up!” and “Are you dressing up for halloween?”
  • Sprout: This is a general term for “to emerge and grow rapidly”, but has obvious vegetable-based connotations (and probably origins). Example: “He thought he’d sprout wings and fly.”
  • Iceberg: A popular type of lettuce, and also (obviously) a big chunk of ice floating in the ocean.
  • Fresh: This is a term that is strongly associated with vegetables and so could probably qualify as a vegetable pun if used in the right context (though it’s a bit of a stretch!). Phrases like “a fresh start” and “a fresh pair of eyes” may be useful.
  • Bulb: As in “Can you change that light bulb for me?”
  • Stalk: “The spy stalked the target for days before getting enough intel.”
  • Pretty good → Rad-ish: When something is “rad” it’s awesome, cool or really good. If something is “rad-ish” then it’s just pretty good (and not overly so).

Vegetable-Related Phrases

Common phrases, idioms and cliches which are related to vegetables can be used for some subtle and witty word play. Here is a list of the vegetable themed phrases that we’ve found so far:

  • as easy as shelling peas
  • as red as beetroot
  • carrot and stick
  • cauliflower ear
  • cool beans
  • cool as a cucumber
  • couch potato
  • sofa spud
  • dangle the carrot
  • (to play) hot potato
  • fine words butter no parsnips
  • full of beans
  • I yam what I yam
  • sprout wings and fly
  • spill the beans
  • know your onions
  • not worth a hill of beans
  • cultivate your garden
  • it ain’t rocket science
  • in a pickle
  • keep your eyes peeled
  • like two peas in a pod
  • he has a green thumb
  • small potatoes
  • separate the wheat from the chaff
  • take a leaf out of my book
  • turn over a new leaf
  • the cream of the crop
  • whatever tickles your pickle
  • you can’t squeeze blood out of a turnip
  • plant a seed of doubt
  • plant the seed
  • seed money / seed capital / seed round
  • the grass is always greener on the other side

Vegetable-Related Words

There are many more puns to be made than could be documented in this Punpedia entry, and so we’ve compiled a list of vegetable-related concepts for you to use when creating your own puns. If you come up with a new pun, please share it in the comments!

tomato, lettuce, beet, plant, onion, herb, spinach, pumpkin, potato, veggie, vegan, vegetarian, artichoke, cardoon, veg, legume, okra, cucumber, celery, asparagus, eggplant, salad, yam, bamboo shoot, bean, casava, produce, garlic, leek, mushroom, cabbage, radish, carrot, root vegetable, root, greens, fennel, squash, rhubarb, plantain, seed, turnip, chicory, kale, broccoli, leafy, leaf, leafy vegetable, soy, corn, avocado, sweet potato, cauliflower, herbal, soya bean, pulse, watercress, pea, parsnip, botany, agriculture,  tuber, beans, zucchini, garden, maize, cuisine, steamed, organic, wheat, cereals, grains, vegetation, capsicum, raw, soybean, tofu, onions, brussel sprouts, seaweed, beetroot, thyme, lentil, pea pod, runner bean, caesar salad, coleslaw, salad bar, bell pepper, croutons, bean salad, shallot, pickle, peel, aubergine, courgette, salsify, vegetative, green bean, snap peas, broad bean, salad dressing, slaw, rocket, waldorf salad, ranch dressing, thousand island dressing, chicory, greek salad, lemon grass, spring onion, cherry tomato, celtuce, cos lettuce, sprouts, alfalfa sprouts, alfalfa, arugula, butterhead lettuce, head lettuce, iceberg lettuce, chard, parsley, cassava, pickled, green, healthy, vitamins, fibre, fresh, green pepper, acorn squash, basil, black-eyed peas, capers, celeriac, chick peas, chinese cabbage, collard greens, cress, daikon, dandelion greens, endive, fava bean, ginger, gourd, chilli peppers, jicama, kohlrabi, lima bean, mung bean, mustard greens, olive, pattypan squash, peppers, radiccho, rutabaga, scallion, sorrel, spuds, succotash, string bean, swiss chard, taro, tomatillo, vegetable, wasabi, water chestnut, herbaceous, irrigation, bulb, leaves, nature, nutrition, nutrient, vegetable patch, cabbage patch, stalk, jalapeno, crop, clove.

Vegetable Jokes

If you’re looking for some very corny vegetable jokes, you’ve come to the right place. All of these one-liner-style vegetable jokes use puns in their punchline. Some are phonetic puns, others are based on a slang phrase or cliche related to vegetables.

  • Why did the cucumber blush? – Because it saw the salad dressing!
  • What do you call an angry pea? – Grump-pea.
  • Why did the potatoes argue? – Because they couldn’t see eye-to-eye.
  • How did the farmer fix his jeans? – With a cabbage patch!
  • Why did the tomato get embarrassed? – Because it saw the chick pea.
  • Which vegetable do Sailors ban from their ships? – Leeks.
  • What did the lettuce say to the celery? – Quit stalking me!
  • What is small, red and whispers? – A hoarse raddish.
  • What is green and goes to summer camp? – A Brussel scout!
  • What do root vegetables wear to bed? – Yammies!
  • What do you call a retired vegetable? – A has-bean.
  • When is a vegetable too fresh? – When he insults the farmer.
  • Why do fungi have to pay double bus fares? – Because they take up too mushroom!
  • What’s the difference between broccoli and boogers? – Kids don’t eat broccoli.
  • Why shouldn’t you tell secrets in a cornfield? – There are too many ears.
  • What’s a vegetable’s favourite martial art? – Carot-e!
  • What’s the coolest vegetable? – A rad-ish!
  • Why did the chef quit? – They cut his celery.
  • What did the sweet potato say to the pumpkin? – I yam what I yam.
  • What does a nosey pepper do? – Gets jalapeno business!
  • How do you fix a broken tomato? – Tomato paste.

Vegetable Pun Images

Below is a collection of vegetable-related visual puns and meme-type images. If you’ve created your own visual vegetable puns or found one that we’ve missed, please post us a link in the comments section 🙂

Did this Punpedia entry help you?

Did you find the vegetable-related pun that you were looking for? If so, great! Otherwise, please let us know what you were looking for in the comments, below! Are you looking for puns for text messages, Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, or some other social media platform? Would you like to see more funny vegetable pun images? Or perhaps you just want more vegetable puns for your photo captions? Whatever the case, please let us know, and help us improve this Punpedia entry. If you’re got any vegetable puns (image or text) that aren’t included in this article, please submit them in the comments and one of our curators will add it as soon as possible. Thanks for visiting Punpedia 🙂

Food Puns

Food puns! 🍽️🍛🍝🌯🍟 Whether you’re looking for a pun for your photo’s caption, the latest recipe on your food blog, or whatever else, I hope this entry of Punpedia will serve you well.

Food puns mostly revolve around puns on particular food items (especially vegetables, herbs etc.), but there’s also a few puns based around eating-related words like “supper”, “eat”, “fry” and “swallow”, for example. We’ve also got quite a few food puns about love (e.g. “Olive you so much!” and “Cutecumber”), so if you’re looking for cute food puns to message your partner, I think we’ve got you covered. This entry also covers diet puns to a certain extent, but we’ll eventually get around to giving diet puns their own entry.

In the interests of being a good influence on y’all, we’ve stayed away from puns that are a bit rude, and ones that are about unhealthy foods or foods which cause animals to suffer (dairy, meat, eggs – warning, has footage from factory farms). If you disagree with any omissions, please let us know in the comments – we’re happy to discuss and make changes 🙂 For now, most (but definitely not all) of the entries should be healthy food puns (fruits, nuts, grains, vegetables, etc.) which don’t involve cruelty to animals or crude humor.

You might also like to visit the Punpedia entries on vegetables, fruit, bread, cooking, pasta, potato, curry, corn, watermelon, pie, tacos, pizza, applescandy, coffee, beer and tea.

Food Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about food that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page!

  • Let us → Lettuce: As in “Lettuce eat!” and “Lettuce celebrate!”
  • I love → Olive: As in “Olive you so much!” and “Olive silly food puns!”
  • Or live → Olive: As in “Live like a king olive on a shoe string.”.
  • All of → Olive: As in “Sending olive my love to your family.”
  • Time → Thyme: As in “All in good thyme.” and “Better luck next thyme.” and “We just need to buy some thyme.”
  • In jest → Ingest: As in “Many a true word is spoken ingest.”
  • Done → Dine: As in “When all is said and dine” and “Dine and dusted.”
  • Din* → Dine*: If a word begins with the “dine” sound, we can make a dinner pun: dineosaur, dineamically, dineamite.
  • Scoff: This term refers to eating greedily or to talking to someone in a mean and “mocking” manner. Example: “Are you scoffing at my food puns?”
  • Fast: As in “You’re all so fast at these food puns.” and “Not so fast.” (A “fast” is an extended period of not eating. This one is reasonably subtle.)
  • So she → Sushi: As in “Sushi’s studying to become a computer programmer now.” and “Sushi loves you?”
  • Maze → Maize: As in “It’s a complicated maize to navigate.”
  • Crop up: To “crop up” means to appear unexpectedly and/or suddenly, and thus could be a pun on “crop” which is a cultivated grain, fruit or vegetable.
  • Baggage → Cabbage: This one is a bit on the corny side: “I’m carrying around a lot of emotional cabbage.” or “Please place personal items in the overhead cabbage compartment.”
  • Loaf: As in “Stop loafing around! Get up and do something!” (To “loaf” is to waste time and laze about)
  • Lunch → Hunch: As in “The lunch-back of Notre Dame.” and “I got a lunch.”
  • Until → Lentil: A very corny one: “It ain’t over lentil it’s over!” and “It’s all fun and games lentil someone gets hurt.”
  • Branch → Brunch: As in “Shall we call a truce? I’m extending an olive brunch here.” and “We’re brunching out into other industries.”
  • Knack → Snack: As in “Here, let me try, there’s a bit of a snack to it.”
  • Grain: As in “I’m going to go against the grain here and say …” and “There’s a grain of truth in what he’s saying.” and “I’d take it with a grain of salt.”
  • Nut(s): As in “He’s going nuts!” or “Yeah, he’s a bit of a nut.”
  • *nut*: If a word contains the “nut” sound (or similar), we can make a simple nut pun: affectionut, alternutively, compassionut, definutely, femininuty, coordinuts, fortunutely, genutalia, imaginutive, infinuty, magnut, insanuty, opportunuty, proportionutely.
  • Penny → Penne: As in “It cost a pretty penne.” and “A penne saved is a penne earned.” (Penne is a cylindrical type of pasta)
  • Excited → Eggcited: As in “I’m eggcited and curious about plant-based egg replacements.” and “The eggcitement is killing me!”
  • Aren’t you → Orange you: As in “Orange you glad to see me?”
  • Speechless → S-peach-less: As in “You’ve left me s-peach-less
  • Honey: As in “Honey, I’m home!”
  • Honey, do → Honey, dew: As in “Honeydew or dew not, there is no try.” or “Honey, dew you know where my keys are?”
  • Melancholy → Meloncholy: As in “An air of meloncholy surrounded him.”
  • Better → Breader: As in “You breader believe it!”
  • Mint: “All of the items are mint condition.”
  • Mean’t → Mint: As in “We were just mint to be.” and “You weren’t mint to eat it!”
  • *ment → *mint: Words that end in “ment” can be simple cheesy “mint” puns: governmint, developmint, momint, managemint, departmint, agreemint, environmint, investmint, employmint, equiptmint, commint, assessmint, requiremint, improvemint, appointmint, settlemint, experimint, establishmint, implemint, announcemint, punishmint, measuremint, dissapointmint, advertisemint, encouragemint, embarrassmint, segmint, argumint, pigmint, tormint, paymint, ornamint, sedamint, vehemint, shipmint, treatmint, statemint, merrimint. See this list for more.
  • Great → Grate: As in “Oh grate! Another food pun.” and “Grate minds think alike.”
  • All up in your → Jalapeño: As in “Jalapeño business.” and “Jalapeño grill.”
  • Serial → Cereal: As in “There’s a cereal killer on the loose.”
  • Surreal → Cereal: As in “The view from the summit was cereal.” and “I love impressionism and cereal art.”
  • Sublime: As in “The view from the summit was sublime!”
  • Stone → Scone: As in “The philosopher’s scone.” and “Leave no scone unturned.” and “Sticks and scones may break my bones …”
  • Care at → Carrot: As in “I don’t carrot all.”
  • Turn up → Turnip: As in “Turnip the music!” and “It’ll turnip somewhere.”
  • Sacrifice → Sacrifries: As in “It was a supreme sacrifries.”
  • Sacrifice → Sacrifrice: As in “It was a sacrifrice that we had to make.”
  • Suffice → Suffries: As in “Suffries it to say …”
  • Flies → Fries: As in “Time fries when you’re having fun!”
  • Tango → Mango: As in “Well, it takes two to mango.”
  • Man, go → Mango: As in “Hey mango pick on someone else.”
  • Much → Munch: As in “That’s a bit munch.” and “Too munch information.”
  • Serve: As in “Dude, you just got served.” and “My duty is to serve and protect.”
  • Menu: As in “That’s completely off the menu.”
  • Man, you → Menu: As in “Menu need to see someone about that.”
  • Not re-enter → Nutrient-er: As in “You should nutrient-er the discussion after that terrible contribution.”
  • Cook: Other than the obvious definition it can also refer to “altering dishonestly”, as in “They cooked the numbers and were done for fraud.”
  • That → Fat: As in “Fat is not true – take it back!” and “But fat’s another story.”
  • Up beat → Up beet: As in “I’m feeling fairly up beet today :)” (meaning cheerful/optimistic)
  • Sue p* → Soup*: As in “You can’t just soupeople willy nilly.”
  • *sup* → *soup*: If a word contains the “soup” sound we can of course make some silly soup puns: souperb, soupercomputer, soupercilious, souperficial, souperfluous, souperhuman, souperimposed, souperintendent, souperior, souperman, soupernatual, soupersonic, soupervise, soupremely, unsoupervised.
  • Piecemeal: Piecemeal means “a little at a time”, and has the obvious “meal” pun in it already: “I think I can manage to eat all of this, but I’ll have to do it piecemeal.”
  • Milk: As in “You’re really milking this for all it’s got, aren’t you?”
  • So → Soy: This works best when the following word starts with “y”, as in “Soy you think you’re better than me, hey?” and “Soy yesterday went well?”
  • Soil → Soyl: As in “That tofu pun was hilarious – I almost soyled my pants.” and “Fertile soyl.”
  • Wait → Wheat: As in “Wheat a second…” and “I am lying in wheat.”
  • We t* → Wheat: As in “Wheat talked about this last night.” and “Wheat took our time.”
  • We’d → Wheat: As in “Wheat love for you to join us!”
  • Greedy ent* → ‘gredient: This one’s a bit of a stretch! Examples: “Those ‘gredient-erprising bastards!” and “The ‘gredient-titled youngers.”
  • Salty: Other than the obvious food-related definition, this term has several slang definitions including “being upset/angry”.
  • Fruity: Other than referring to actual fruit, this term also has several slang definitions including being flamboyant or “bouncy”.
  • Fruit cake: This term is often used as a synonym for someone who is “one sandwich short of a picnic”, that is, someone who is crazy. Please note that it is also a slang derogatory synonym for “homosexual” in some countries/regions, so be careful using this!
  • Bred → Bread: As in “Perfect table manners! You’re well bread.”
  • It → Eat: As in “Eat is not quite as eat seems.” and “Eat’s not the first time I’ve said this, but …”
  • Its / It’s → Oats / Oat’s: As in “Oat’s just a matter of time.” and “Oat’s a shame.” and “Oat’s nothing personal” and “Oat’s worth oats weight in gold.” and “Takes oats toll.” and “A life of oats own.” and “Oat’s about time!” and “Look at oats cute little face!”
  • Ought → Oat: As in “You oat to say sorry.” and “Five minutes oat to be enough time.”
  • *eat*: Any word that contains the “eat” sound (or similar) can obviously be made into a silly eating pun: cheating, beatle, athleat, aneatime (anytime), compleat, conceated, deceatful, deleat, discreat, eleat (elite), graffeati, fleat (fleet),  featus, heartbeat, Eatalian (Italian), greating (greeting), Peater (Peter), preatending, repeatedly, reatirement, streat, sweatheart, preatentious.
  • Bowl: As in “I was completely bowled over.”
  • Stew: This term can also refer to being in a state of anxiety and agitation. As in “Stew in one’s own juices.” and “I was in a bit of a stew.”
  • Carry → Curry: As in “I’m going as fast as my legs can curry me!” and “Keep calm and curry on.”
  • Even → Oven: As in “Oven my little brother knows that!” and “That’s not oven fair.”
  • Date: A “date” is a type of dried fruit, but it obvious has some more commone meanings to: “This is my first blind date.” and “Save the date!”
  • Raising → Raisin: As in “We’re raisin the roof!” and “Raisin two kids as a single mother is hard.”
  • Reason → Raisin: As in “You’re being unraisinable.” and “Let’s use logic and raisin.”
  • Line → Lime: As in “But where do you draw the lime?” and “Drop me a lime.”
  • Piece of → Pizza: As in “You want a pizza me?” and “That’s a pizza cake.” and “They all want a pizza the action.” and “That’s a fine pizza ass.” and “That’s a pizza piss.” and “He’s a nasty pizza work.” and “How long is a pizza string?” and “I’ll give him a pizza my mind!” and “You’re a real pizza work.” and “Pizza the pie” and “Abbreviated pizza nothing”
  • Piece → Peach: As in “Just make sure you get home in one peach.” and “Yeah, he’s a nasty peach of work.”
  • Peace → Peas: As in “Peas be with you.” and “Peas of mind.” and “Inner peas.”
  • Assault → A salt: As in “He was charged with a salt with a deadly weapon.”
  • Wanton → Wonton: As in “This wonton cruelty will not go unpunished!” (Wanton means “deliberate and unprovoked” (also has other meanings), and a wonton is a type of dumpling)
  • Wanting → Wonton: As in “You’ve got me wonton more.”
  • Me so → Miso: As in “Miso hungry.” and “You make miso happy :)” (Miso is a type of Japanese seasoning)
  • Bury → Berry: As in “Don’t berry your feelings.” and “We berried it under that tree.”
  • Very → Berry: As in “These are berry bad food puns.”
  •  Amazing→ Amaizing: As in “Truely amaizing.” and “Amaizing Grace.” and “I’m amaized!” and “To my utter amaizement …” (Maize is another name for corn)
  • Saucy: As in “He was acting a little saucy the other night, no?” and “That’s a very saucy costume you’ve got going there.” (“Saucy” has a few other meanings which could also be punned upon)
  • Catch up → Ketchup: As in “C’mon! We need to ketchup with the others!”
  • Million → Melon: As in “You’re one in a melon!” and “Not in a melon years!”
  • Con* → Corn*: Very corny corn puns can be made with some words that start with the “con” sound (or similar): corntract, corncern, corntain, cornference, corntext, corncerned, corntrast, cornfidence, corndition, corntinue, cornsider, corntry, cornclusion, cornduct, cornversation, cornstruction, cornflict, corntribution, cornsent, cornsist, cornclude, cornservation, corntest, cornception, cornsequences, corsult, corncert, cornventional, corncrete, corntinent, cornfine, cornsistantly, cornstitutional, cornvey, cornsiderably, cornsitituent, corntempt, corncede, cornfess, cornfrontation, corngregation, corntroversial, cornsensus, cornsultancy, cornquest, cornvicted, corngratulate. See this list for more.
  • Have a car though → Avocado: As in “I don’t ‘avocado.”
  • Have a car don’t → Avocadon’t: As in “You avacadon’t you?”
  • I → Pie: As in “Pie am crying as pie write this.”
  • How → Chow: As in “Chow could you do this to me?” and “Chow are you feeling?”
  • Bit her → Bitter: As in “I think a bug bitter or something.”
  • Her before → Herbivore: As in “No, I’ve never met herbivore.”
  • Been → Bean: As in “We’ve all bean there.” and “You know, I’ve bean thinking…”
  • Pee → Pea: As in “Brb, really need to pea.”
  • Can only → Cannoli: As in “We cannoli dream.” and “” (“Cannoli” is a type of sweet Italian pastry)
  • Can’t elope → Cantaloupe: As in “I’d run away and marry you, but I cantaloupe – my parents would never forgive me.” (“Cantaloupe” is another name for rock-melon. “Elope” means to run away to get married, usually without parental consent.)
  • Antelope → Cantaloupe: As in “My favourite animals are deer and cantaloupe.”
  • Deal → Dill: As in “What’s the big dill?” and “I’m kind of a big dill around here.” (“Dill” is a herb, and is often short for dill-pickle – a cucumber that has been preserved and given the flavour of the dill herb)
  • Talk about → Taco ’bout: As in “Jeez! Taco ’bout bad puns!” and “I don’t wanna taco ’bout it.”
  • Not your → Nacho: As in “It’s nacho problem” and “It’s nachos, it’s mine!”
  • Please → Peas: As in “Do as you peas.” and “Pretty peas?”
  • Remain → Romaine: “Romaine” is a type of lettuce. Examples: “Everyone romaine calm.” and “It romaines to be seen.”
  • To my toes → Tomatoes: As in “I got a shiver from my head tomatoes.”
  • Dust → Crust: As in “Another one bites the crust.”
  • Brad → Bread: As in “When’s Bread Pitt’s next film coming out?”
  • Imposter → Impasta: As in “You’re a liar! An impasta!”
  • Roll: As in “We’re on a roll!” and “Ready to roll?” and “She’s a great roll model.” and “Traditional gender rolls are lame.” This could be a play on “bread roll” or other “roll” foods (spring roll, etc.), but it’s subtle.
  • Beat → Beet: As in “Let’s not beet around the bush.” and “If you leave now, you’ll beet the rush.”
  • Love → Loaf: As in “I loaf you <3″ and “The world needs more loaf.”
  • Peer → Pear: As in “Don’t give in to pear pressure.” and “Bit-torrent is a a pear-to-pear network.”
  • Pair → Pear: As in “A fresh pear of eyes.”
  • Per* → Pear*: Words that start with “per” can be made into silly little pear puns: pearformance, pearcentage, peariod, pearmission, pearsonal, pearfect, pearhaps, pearform, pearsuade, pearspective, pearsonality, pearception, pearmanent, pearceived, pearsuaded, pearmanently, pearipheral, pearimeter, pearsist, pearsecution, pearmit, pearpetuate, pearsistance, peariodically, pearvert, pearceptual, pearplexity, pearfectionist, pearpendicular, pearmission. See this list for more.
  • Pass the → Pasta: As in “Can you pasta sauce please?”
  • Past her → Pasta: As in “I walked right pasta without realising.”
  • For → Pho: Pho is a Vietnamese noodle soup. Examples: “Pho real??” and “You totally fell pho it!” and “Pho the love of god!”
  • You don’t → Udon: As in “Udon know how much you mean to me.” (Udon is a type of Japanese noodle)
  • Chilly → Chilli: As in “Goodness it’s chilli today.”
  • Fly → Fry: As in “A no-fry zone has been declared by the military.” and “Just a fry on the wall.”
  • Corny: As in “Very corny food puns”
  • Passed away → Pasta way: As in “She pasta way last night.”
  • Tomorrow → Tomato: As in “Here today, gone tomato.”
  • Walk → Wok: As in “I’ll be back soon, I’m going to wok the dog.” and “It’ll be a wok in the park.” and “You’re woking on thin ice there, bud.”
  • Work → Wok: As in “Wok hard, play hard.” and “It’s a wok in progress.” and “All in a day’s wok.”
  • Because → Becouscous: “Why? Becouscous I said so.” (One of the cornier food puns, indeed!)
  • Jam: As in “This is my jam!” and “We just finished our jam session.” and “The venue was jam-packed.”
  • Rap → Wrap: As in “That was an epic wrap battle.” (Playing on the flat-bread sandwich alternative)
  • Fork: As in “We’ve reached a fork in the road.” (There’s also an obvious swear word pun that can be made with fork.)
  • Season → Seasoning: As in “Seasoning’s greetings!” and “For everything, there is a seasoning.”
  • Thrilled → Grilled: As in “He was so grilled to see you!” and “I’m grilled to bits!”
  • Creep → Crepe: As in “That’s a bit crepey, man.” and “Yep, he’s a bit of a crepe.”
  • Source → Sauce: As in “That’s an unreliable sauce.” and “You should cite some primary sauces.”
  • Sup: This term has a few traditional meaning related to food, including “to eat dinner/supper”, but it also has the obvious slang meaning “What’s up?” Thus we can make a sneaky supper pun, but it’d be very corny and heavily dependent on context: Person1: “‘Sup?” Person2: “What? Now? It’s only 3pm!”
  • Graze: This can refer to an injury or to a steady, continual eating style: “Get into a food pun fight with me and you’ll come out grazed.”
  • Grub: This can refer to the animal and is slang for food.
  • Grab → Grub: As in “Can you grub the mail on your way home?” and “She’s good at grubbing my attention.”
  • Not → Nosh: As in “Nosh on my watch.” and “It’s a nosh-for-profit organisation.” (Nosh as a noun refers to food or as a verb to eating greedily)
  • Nos* → Nosh*: As in “It was a noshtalgic experience.” and “His noshtrils were flaring.”
  • Die yet → Diet: As in “I want to curl and and diet I know I must keep fighting.”
  • Gorge: This term can refer to eating greedily or to a narrow, steep valley.
  • Gorgeous: As in “Drop dead gorgeous.”
  • Panties → Pantries: As in “Don’t get your pantries in a twist!”
  • Girl → Grill: As in “You go grill!” and “Grill power!”
  • Toast: As well as referring to cooked bread, this term can also refer to the raising of glasses at a gathering to honour something: “Let’s call a toast.” It also has a slang usage: “You are toast.” Meaning “I’m going to beat you” at some competition (or physically).
  • Byte → Bite: As in “There must be megabites of potential food puns to be made.”
  • Fist → Feast: As in “I’ll rule with an iron feast.”
  • Desert → Dessert: As in “It was like an oasis in the middle of the dessert.”
  • Chip: As in “A chip off the old block.” and “A chip on his shoulder”
  • Cracker: Used as a derogatory term for a poor white person (Though it sometimes has positive usage.)
  • Arrange → Orange: As in “I’ve oranged an interview for tomorrow evening.”
  • A petite → Appetite: Bit of a stretch: “Does this come in appetite-sized version?”
  • Sugar: Other than the obvious definition, “sugar” is also used as a term of endearment in some countries for one’s partner (similar to “baby”).
  • Sweetie: This is often used as a term of endearment for a loved one, and has an obvious reference to food/sweets.
  • Do not → Donut: As in “I donut want to get into a pun battle with you.” and “Donut tempt me.”
  • Better → Butter: As in “Margarine is butter because it’s healthier.” and “Butter to stay on the safe side.” and “He’s my butter half.”
  • Coarse → Course: As in “Please don’t pun during dinner, Gerald. It’s very course humour.”
  • Course: As in “Is there a university course on food puns?” (“Course” can refer to a particular stage of a multi-stage meal.)
  • Great → Grape: As in “No challenge is too grape.” and “I’ve gone to grape length to compile these puns.”
  • Cater: As in “I can’t cater to your every whim.” and “We need to cater for those who are coming by bus.”
  • Staple: As in “Food puns are unfortunately my staple form of humour.” (This is a play on staple as in “staple food“)
  • Swallow: “That’s a tough pill to swallow.”
  • Pickle: “We’re in a bit of a pickle here.”
  • Killing → Kiwing: As in “Oh god these jokes are kiwing me!”
  • Bananas: As in “I am bananas for you.” and “He’s going bananas!”
  • Celebrate → Celerybrate: As in “Let’s celerybrate!”
  • I am → I yam: As in “I yam who I yam.”
  • Cold → Crisp: As in “The air is crisp this morning!”
  • Jealous → Jelly: As in “You won the raffle?! I’m so jelly!”
  • Feed: As in “You’re just feeding people misinformation.”
  • Order: “Law and order.” and “These restaurant puns are out of order.”
  • Much room → Mushroom: “There isn’t mushroom in here.”
  • Bit of (Bit ‘a) → Pita: “Don’t make a blind pita difference.”
  • Or you → Oreo: “It doesn’t make a difference whether it’s me oreo.”
  • Platter → Plait her: “I love to platter hair – it’s therapeutic.”
  • Dip: As in “Take a dip” and “Dip your toe in.” (Playing on the “crackers and dip” form of “dip”)
  • Wry → Rye: “A rye smile.” and “With rye Scottish wit.” (Rye is a type of grain used to make bread)
  • Come → Crumb: As in “Crumb to think of it…” and “Crumb to your senses” and “Crumb again?” and “Crumb hell or high water.” and “Crumb out of your shell” and “Crumb rain or shine” and “Do you crumb here often?” and “An idea whose time has crumb.” and “The best is yet to crumb.” and “What has crumb over you?”
  • So do → Soda: As in “Soda you think it’s a good idea?”
  • So de* → Soda*: Words (especially adjectives) beginning with the “de” syllable (or similar) can be made into soda puns: sodapressing (so depressing), sodatermined (so determined), sodafensive (so defensive), sodamanding, sodapendable, sodaspairing, sodalighted, sodapendent, sodascriptive.eat
  • Relish: This can refer to the condement called “relish” or to a feeling of great enjoyment: “I relish any opportunity to make a pun about food.”
  • Tube of → Tuber: As in “Can I please purchase a tuber hand cream?”
  • Stuff→ Stove: As in “Don’t sweat the small stove.” and “It’s the stove of legends/dreams.” (This one is a stretch!)
  • Take out→ Take-out: As in “I had to take-out my phone to check the time.” and “I had to take-out a loan just to pay the bill!”
  • Salsa: This can refer to a type of spicy tomato sauce, but also to the Latin American dance music and dance style.
  • Ugly→ Ugli: As in “Ugli duckling.” and “This person has an ugli heart.” (Ugli is a type of fruit)
  • Least→ Yeast: As in “Last, but not yeast.” and “Yeast common denominator.”
  • Okay→ Okra: As in “Are you feeling okra?” (Terrible! 😀 By the way, okra is a plant the has edible green pods, if you didn’t know)

Food-Related Phrases

Common phrases, idioms and cliches which are related to food can be used for some subtle and witty word play. Here is a list of the food themed phrases that we’ve found so far:

  • if you can’t stand the heat get out of the kitchen
  • too many cooks in the kitchen
  • bite the hand that feeds you
  • crammed in like sardines
  • dine in
  • dog eat dog
  • cool beans
  • enough ants can eat an elephant
  • feeding frenzy
  • he’s a few fries short of a happy meal
  • more degrees than a kitchen stove
  • small fry
  • she’s out to lunch
  • there’s no such thing as a free lunch
  • whet your appetite
  • you can’t have your cake and eat it too
  • top/bottom of the food chain
  • food of the gods
  • a moment on the lips, a lifetime on the hips
  • as cheap as chips
  • bear fruit
  • as nutty as a fruit cake
  • bite off more than you can chew
  • bite the big one
  • bite the bullet
  • bread and butter
  • cake walk
  • cast your bread upon the waters
  • chew the fat
  • ankle biter
  • chicken feed
  • cook up a storm
  • couch potato
  • eat humble pie
  • to eat out of someone’s hand
  • eat like a pig
  • eat my dust
  • feast your eyes on this
  • food for thought
  • forbidden fruit
  • fruit cake
  • have your bread buttered on both sides
  • know which side your bread is buttered
  • bread always falls buttered side down
  • the greatest thing since sliced bread
  • i’ll eat my hat
  • it’s not work crying over spilt milk
  • let the chips fall where they may
  • lean cuisine
  • make like a banana and split
  • movable feast
  • off the menu
  • shut your cake hole
  • revenge is a dish best served cold
  • sound bite
  • the big apple
  • the cherry on the cake
  • you are toast
  • a recipe for disaster
  • bite the dust
  • whet your appetite
  • out of the frying pan, into the fire

Food-Related Words

There are many more puns to be made than could be documented in this Punpedia entry, and so we’ve compiled a list of food-related concepts for you to use when creating your own puns. If you come up with a new pun, please share it in the comments!

dine, ingest, ate, gobble, devour, taste, sup, graze, forage, chow, tucker, grub, morsel, nosh, munch, munchies, diet, gorge, serving, serve, menu, larder, pantry, appetite, grill, perishable, famine, delicacy, voracious, scoff, fast, fasting, nutrition, rice, nutrient, provender, victuals, cooking, cook, pabulum, cereal, drink, fat, soup, nourishment, agriculture, pasta, feed, sustenance, meal, milk, wheat, ingredients, sushi, hunger, hungry, sugar, maize, plant, vegetarian, vegan, protein, vegetable, potato, vitamin, bitter, foodstuff, consumption, consume, salt, saltiness, edible, salad, soul food, junk food, produce, fruit, restaurant, chocolate, coconut, breakfast, dinner, lunch, bread, foody, eat, kitchen, nuts, nut, baking, baked goods, food industry, food safety, pizza, meal, crops, fast food, supermarket, taste, mineral, loaf, carbohydrate, legume, bean, pea, lentil, broccoli, cabbage, lettuce, lasagna, asparagus, cuisine, bean, tomato, pumpkin, eggplant, carrot, repast, onion, spinach, spaghetti, eating, brunch, snack, grain, luncheon, sweets, sweet, macaroni, porridge, omnivore, omnivorous, herbivore, herbivorous, celery, burrito, garlic, saliva, salivation, plate, bowl, over-eat, over-feed, farming, spoon, fork, spork, grocer, break bread, tofu, soy, fry, stew, curry, sandwich, jam, cake, apple, toast, bite, canteen, chew, dish, feast, pudding, savoury, dessert, belly, satiated, chips, glutton, grub, biscuit, peanut, grocery store, soup kitchen, digestion, garnish, roast, ration, raw, refreshment, famish, succulent, tasty, delicious, scrumptious, delectable, oatmeal, airplane food, dietary, ambrosia, appetite, bland, tin can, pepper, saute, nibble, underfed, gourmet, bbq, barbecue, spicy, staple, picnic, topping, risotto, mash, stir-fry, calories, obese, obesity, digestible, recipe, catering, coarse, starve, starving, cinnamon, caloric, wolfish, snacky, swallow, greasy, rapacious, engorge, glutton, gluttonous, banquet, dinnertime, supper, eat up, fried, overindulge, pick at, binge, gobbler, eats, tofurkey, foodtography, bagel, uneaten, perishable, taco, supermarket, brainfood, stomach, napkin, buffet, thanksgiving, dishes, olive, tomato, radish, jello, peas, romaine, crust, slice, pickle, dill, peach, orange, kiwi fruit, maize, berry, ketchup, sauce, spice, butter, cannoli, mint, date, fig, jalapeno, avocado, wonton, papaya, banana, hash brown, sweet potato, kidney bean, bread roll, roll, donut, melon, caramel, cauliflower, pear, pretzel, peal, gnocchi, brown rice, french fries, flavour, grape, appetiser, boil, bran, chick peas, cookbook, cloves, crisp, gravy, jelly, mushroom, oven, order, pot, salsa, dip, refrigerator, relish, rhubarb, rye, spatula, syrup, stove, take-out, wasabi, walnut, wok, yeast, vanilla, vinegar, utensil, toaster, slaw, coleslaw, mayonnaise, sesame seeds, zucchini.

Food Jokes

If you’re looking for some very corny food jokes, you’ve come to the right place. All of these one-liner-style food jokes use puns in their punchline. Some are phonetic puns, others are based on a slang phrase or cliche related to food.

  • What did the baby corn say to its mamma corn? – Where’s my pop corn?
  • Did you hear the joke about the peanut butter? – I’m not telling you. You might spread it!
  • Waiter, will my pizza be long? – No sir, it will be round.
  • Why couldn’t the sesame seed leave the gambling casino? – Because he was on a roll.
  • What do you call a fake noodle? – An impasta.
  • Why doesn’t bread like warm weather? – Because things get toasty
  • Did you hear about that famous Italian chef who died?  – Yeah, he pasta way.
  • Waiter, this food taste’s kind of funny… – Then why aren’t you laughing!
  • Why did the banana go to the doctor? – Because it wasn’t peeling well!
  • What are the twins’ favourite fruit? – Pears!
  • What do you call a peanut in a space suit? – An astronut!
  • What does a nosey pepper do?– Gets jalapeno business!
  • Why did the students eat their homework? – Because the teacher said it was a piece of cake.
  • Why did the tomato blush? – Because it saw the salad dressing!
  • What do you call the king of the vegetables? – Elvis Parsley

Food Pun Images

Below is a collection of food-related visual puns and meme-type images. If you’ve created your own visual food puns or found one that we’ve missed, please post us a link in the comments section 🙂

Did this Punpedia entry help you?

Did you find the food-related pun that you were looking for? If so, great! Otherwise, please let us know what you were looking for in the comments, below! Are you looking for puns for text messages, Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, or some other social media platform? Would you like to see more funny food pun images? Or perhaps you just want more food puns for your photo captions? Whatever the case, please let us know, and help us improve this Punpedia entry. If you’re got any food puns (image or text) that aren’t included in this article, please submit them in the comments and one of our curators will add it as soon as possible. Thanks for visiting Punpedia 🙂