Party Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on party puns! 🎉🎶🥤

Whether it’s a birthday, holiday event or a celebration in someone’s honour, make any social gathering you’re invited to (or hosting) a pun-filled time with our list of party puns. Should you be thinking of witty quips for your invites, Instagram captions or beverage list, we hope that you enjoy this list and find the perfect pun.

This list is specific to parties, but if you’re after some other party related puns, we have entries on firework puns and gift puns and will have birthday and New Year’s puns coming soon too.

Party Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about parties that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page! Without further ado, here’s our list of party puns:

  • *part* → *party*: We can change the “part” in words to “party” to make some silly party puns. As in, “In party-cular” and “Party-cipation award” and “Care to party-cipate? (could also be participarty)” and “Imparty your knowledge” and “That’s not your departy-ment” and “A partysan issue.” Other words you could use: partycle (particle), partytion (partition), aparty (apart), counterparty (counterpart), departy (depart), partyner (partner) party-cularly (particularly), party-cipant (participant) and reparty (repartee).
  • *pathy* → *party*: If a word has sound that’s similar enough to “party”, then we can simply change it to party to make it an appropriate pun. As in, emparty (empathy), aparty (apathy), symparty (sympathy), teleparty (telepathy) and antiparty (antipathy). Note: to feel antipathy is to feel dislike.
  • *pet* → *party*: As in, “Signed party-tion (petition)” and “Not to blow my own trumparty, but…” and “Political pupparty (this can work as it refers to both political puppets and parties of the political kind).”
  • *pert* → *party*: As in, partynent (pertinent), partynence (pertinence), exparty (expert) and proparty (property).
  • Serendipity → Serendiparty (Note: serendipity refers to unexpected and fortunate accidents.)
  • *port* → *party*: As in, “Financial partyfolio” and “You have my supparty” and “Public transparty” and “An unexpected oppartynity” and “A suppartyve (supportive) atmosphere” and “A sparty (sporty) person.”
  • *part* → *party*: As in, “A fool and his money are soon partied” and “Act the party” and “For my own party” and “Departy this life” and “If you’re not a party of the solution, you’re party of the problem” and “Drift aparty” and “Fall aparty” and “For the most party” and “Look the party” and “Worlds aparty.”
  • *vent* → *event*: eventure (venture), eventricle (ventricle), eventilation (ventilation), eventilate (ventilate), eventilator (ventilator), adevent (advent), circumevent (circumvent), prevent, coneventional (conventional).
  • Event: Some event-related phrases that could work in your party wordplay: “Current events” and “Happy event” and “The main event” and “Motion picture event” and “Turn of events.”
  • *vant* → *event*: As in, relevent (relevant) and irrelevent (irrelevant).
  • Bruise → Booze: As in, “A boozed ego” and “You can’t protect your kids from every bump and booze.”
  • *bas* → *booze*: As in, “On a first-name boozeis (basis)” and “Back to boozeics (basics)” and “Yes, boozeically” and “The boozelisk in the Chamber of Secrets (I’m sure many people will find ways to make boozy pickup lines out of this one…so use it and similar puns with your best judgement).”
  • *bes* → *booze*: As in, “All the boozet (best)” and “Boozet (best) friends forever” and “Boozet of all” and “Boozepoke suit” and “Boozetow your wisdom” and “Sit boozeside me.” Other words you could use: booze-seech (beseech), booze-sotted (besotted), booze-siege (besiege). Notes: to beseech is to beg.
  • *bos* → *booze*: As in, booze-om (bosom), rooibooze (rooibos) and verbooze (verbose). Note: rooibos is a type of tea.
  • *bus* → *booze*: As in, “Thrown under the booze” and “Walk or take the booze” and “None of your boozeiness” and “Boozey bee” and “Course syllabooze.” Other words you could use: nimbooze (nimbus), omnibooze (omnibus) and abooze (abuse). Notes: a nimbus is a circle of light, or a halo.
  • *baz* → *booze*: As in, boozear (bazaar), booze-ooka (bazooka), booze-illion (bazillion).
  • *biz* → *booze*: As in, “Boozear (bizarre) circumstances,” and “That’s showbooze.”
  • *buz* → *booze*: As in, “Booze me in” and “Booze off” and “Booze-ing with excitement” and “Boozewords.” Other words you could use: booze-ard (buzzard), booze-ing (boozing) and boozer (buzzer).
  • *bows* → *booze*: As in, “Chasing rainbooze” and “Rainbooze and unicorns” and “Rub elbooze with.”
  • Dear → Beer: As in “Oh beer me” and “Hang on for beer life” and “Near and beer to my heart” and “Elementary, my beer Watson.”
  • Ear → Beer: As in “Grin from beer to beer.” and “Let’s play it by beer.” and “Lend a beer” and “In one beer and out the other.”
  • Peer → Beer: As in “Beer pressure” and “It’s like she was beering into my soul.” Other words you could use: beerless (peerless), beered (peered).
  • Bear → Beer: As in “Grizzly beer” and “Beer a resemblance” and “The right to beer arms” and “Beer down upon” and “Bear witness to …” and “Beer false witness” and “Beer fruit” and “Beer in mind that …” and “Bring to beer“. Other bear-related or inclusive words you could use: beerings (bearings), beerer (bearer), forbeer (forbear), overbeering (overbearing), forbeerance (forbearance).
  • *pear* → *beer*: As in, “A beerlescent (pearlescent) glow” and “Abeer (appear) from thin air” and “Watch me disabeer” and “Make an abeerance.” Other words you could use: s’beerhead (spearhead), re-abeer (reappear).
  • Shakespeare → Shakesbeer
  • Pier → Beer: As in “Take a long walk off a short beer” and “Ear beercing” and “Never been habbeer (happier).”
  • Bare → Beer: As in “The beer necessities” and “Beer one’s teeth” and “Laid beer” and “The beer bones” and “The cupboard was beer“. You can also replace the “bare” in these words: barely (“beerly there”), threadbare (“A threadbeer toy”), cabaret (cabeeret), barefoot (beerfoot).
  • *bier* → *beer*: As in, grubbeer (grubbier), stubbeer (stubbier), tubbeer, scabbeer and chubbeer.
  • *pare* → *beer*: As in, “Beerent-teacher meeting” and “In beerenthesis” and “Like combeering apples and oranges” and “Be prebeered (prepared)” and “Abbeerently (apparently) so.” Other words you could use: abbeerel (apparel) and transbeerent (transparent).
  • *bar* → *beer*: As in, “Beer none” and “Behind beers” and “Language beerier” and “Raise the beer” and “Beerrelling (barreling) in” and “Beergain basement.” Other words you could use: beeren (barren), beerista (barista) and sidebeer (sidebar).
  • *ber* → *beer*: As in, “Strawbeery flavoured” and “Going beerserk” and “Got your numbeer” and “Sobeer up (this one’s a bit ironic)” and “A membeer of..” Other words you could use: beereft (bereft), beerate (berate), beerth (berth), beereavement (bereavement), chambeer (chamber), ambeer (amber), membeer, cybeer, remembeer, delibeerate, libeeral, libeerty, abeerration (aberration) and cumbeersome. Notes: to be bereft is to be deprived of something.
  • *bir* → *beer*: As in, “A little beerd told me” and “Beerthday suit” and “The early beerd.”
  • *bor* → *beer*: As in, “Beered out of your mind” and “Labeer of love” and “Harbeer a grudge” and “Good neighbeers” and “Please elabeerate” and “Collabeerate with.”
  • *bur* → *beer*: As in, “A heavy beerden.” Other words you could use: beereaucracy (bureaucracy), beergeoning (burgeoning) and excalibeer (excalibur).
  • *per* → *beer*: As in, “A different beerspective” and “Third beerson” and “Motivation and beerseverance.” Other words you could use: beertinent (pertinent), beeriod (period), beerception (perception), beernicious (pernicious), beercieve (perceive), beerformance (performance), beerfect (perfect), imbeerative (imperative) and obeeration (operation).
  • Hot → Shot: As in, “Drop it like it’s shot” and “Shot and bothered” and “Shot and heavy” and “Shot enough for you?” and “A shot mess” and “Shot stuff” and “Too shot to handle.”
  • Shut → Shot: As in, “An open and shot case” and “Put up or shot up.” You can also replace the “shut” in these words: shotdown (shutdown), shottle (shuttle), shotter (shutter), shotterbug (shutterbug) and shoteye (shuteye).
  • *shot*: You can emphasise the “shot” in some words: screenshot, hotshot, snapshot, upshot, headshot, slingshot, shotgun and mugshot.
  • Give → Gift: As in, “A dead giftaway” and “Don’t gift up!” and “Don’t gift in” and “Gift yourself a bad name” and “Gift them a hand” and “Gift and take” and “Gift credit where credit is due” and “Gift it a rest” and “Gift it the green light” and “Gift me a call” and “Gift 110%”.
  • Gave → Gift: As in, “I gift my best.”
  • Present: We’ve included present-related phrases in this list too. As in, “All present and correct” and “Present company excepted” and “No time like the present.”
  • Percent → Present: As in, “A hundred and ten present” and “Genius is one present inspiration and 99 present perspiration.”
  • Dig → Shindig: Since shindig is another word for party, we’ve included shindig in this list: “Shindig your own grave” and “Shindig yourself into a hole” and “Shindig up dirt” and “Shindig deep.”
  • Bash: Since “bash” is another word for party, we’ve got some bash-related puns and phrases for you to use here:
    • *bas* → *bash*: As in, “You b*shtard” and “Don’t keep all your eggs in one bashket” and “Saved to the databash” and “On the bashis of..” Other words you could use: bashic (basic), bashin (basin), bashtion (bastion), bombashtic (bombastic).
    • *bis* → *bash*: As in, refurbash (refurbish), cannabash (cannabis), rubbash (rubbish) and bashop (bishop).
    • *bus → *bash: As in, “Part of the syllabash” and “Collector’s omnibash.” Note: an omnibus is a collection of work.
    • *bush → *bash: As in, “Feeling ambashed” and “Filled with rosebashes” and “Babashka doll.”
    • *pas* → *bash: As in, “Bashion for fashion” and “Bashive aggressiveness” and “Bashionate about” and “Combashion fatigue.”
  • Blowout: Blowout is another word for a party or social function (particularly those with plenty of food), so we’ve included some blowout-related puns and phrases here:
    • Out → Blowout: As in, “Ins and blowouts.”
    • Blow → Blowout: As in, “Blowout hot and cold” and “Blowout some steam” and “Blowout the lid off” and “Blowout to smithereens” and “Blowout your mind.”
  • Card: Since cards (like birthday cards) can be given at parties, we’ve included some card-related puns:
    • *cred* → *card*: As in, “Street card” and “Take cardit for” and “Nothing is sacard” and “Not cardible (credible)” and “Ruined cardibility.” Other words that could work: cardentials (credentials), cardence (credence), massacard (massacred), incardulous (incredulous). Notes: credence is a mental acceptance of something as being true or real. Being incredulous is not wanting to believe something.
    • *cur* → *card*: As in, “The final cardtain (curtain)” and “A cardsory (cursory) glance” and “I concard (concur)” and “That never occard (occured) to me.” Other words that could work: cardmudgeon (curmudgeon), incard (incur), recard (recur), obscard (obscured), secardity (security), cardate (curate), cardiculum (curriculum) and manicard (manicured).
    • *cor* → *card*: As in, “Cardespondence course” and “Cut the card (cord)” and “In your cardner (corner)” and “The final scard (score)” and “For the recard.” Other words that could work in the right context: cardporation (corporation), cardoborate (corroborate), cardelation (correlation), decard (decor), rancard (rancor), accard (accord), incardporate (incorporate). Note: to corroborate is to add proof to an account. Rancor is a bitter, deeply-ingrained ill-feeling.
    • *cured* → *card*: As in, “What can’t be card (cured) must be endured” and “Her face was obscard (obscured)” and “Perimeter secard (secured)” and “Procard (procured) the goods” and “Manicard (manicured) lawns.”
    • Certain → Cardtain: As in, “In no uncardtain terms” and “Know for cardtain.”
    • *curd* → *card*: As in, card (curd), cardle (curdle) and bloodcardling (bloodcurdling).
    • Drunkard → Druncard
    • *cord* → *card*: As in, “A broken recard and “Cut the card” and “For the recard” and “In recard time” and “Off the recard” and “Accarding to…” and “Remain cardial.” Other words that could work: cardially (cordially), carduroy (corduroy), cardon (cordon), discard (discord), accardance (accordance). Notes: to do something cordially is to do it in a friendly way. A cordon is a rope used to define boundaries.
    • *car* → *card*: As in, “Courtesy and card (care)” and “Drive my card” and “Upset the apple card (apple cart)” and “Couldn’t card less.” Other words that could work: cardeer (career), cardier (carrier), cardiage (carriage), cardavan (caravan), scard (scar), Madagascard (Madagascar), railcard (railcar), handcard (handcar), precardious (precarious), vicardious (vicarious).
    • Cartier → Cardier
    • Cared → Card: As in, “I card about you” and “Run s-card” and “S-card poopless,” and “S-card to death.”
    • Card: Some card-related phrases to play with: “A few cards short of a full deck” and “Calling card” and “Card up your sleeve” and “Deck of cards” and “Get out of jail free card” and “Hold all the cards” and “Holding your cards close to your chest” and “House of cards” and “Lay your cards on the table” and “On the cards” and “Pick a card, any card” and “Play your cards right.”
    • Card*: Some card-related/inclusive words: cardinal, cardboard, cardio, cardigan, cardiac, discard, placard, wildcard, timecard, postcard and scorecard.
  • Guessed → Guest: As in, “Never would have guest” and “You guest correctly.”
  • Gist → Guest: As in, “Got the guest of it.”
  • Ghost → Guest: As in, “White as a guest” and “Guestbusters” and “Give up the guest” and “Not a guest of a chance” and “You look as though you’ve seen a guest” and “Guest from the past.” Other ghost-related words: guestly (ghostly), guestwriter (ghostwriter), guested (ghosted), guesting (ghosting).
  • Ghost in the Shell → Guest in the Shell (Ghost in the Shell is a popular Japanese manga that was whitewashed when it was adapted to film).
  • *ghast* → *guest*: As in, “Looking guestly” and “Aguest at the situation.” Note: to be aghast is to be horrified.
  • *gast* → *guest*: guestronomy (gastronomy), guestronomical (gastronomical) and flabberguested (flabbergasted).
  • *gest* → *guest*: As in, “An empty guesture” and “What do you sugguest?” and “Let me diguest” and “Sugguestive looks.” Other words you could use: conguestion (congestion), sugguestion (suggestion), longuest (longest), larguest (largest), bigguest (biggest), inguest (ingest), guestural (gestural), guesticulate (gesticulate), guestation (gestation).
  • *gust* → *guest*: As in, “With guesto” and “Disguested with your behaviour.”
  • August → Auguest
  • *gist* → *guest*: As in, “A reguestered (registered) voter” and “Professional psychologuest.” Other words you could use: meteorologuest (meteorologist), reguestration (registration), neurologuest (neurologist), anthropologuest (anthropologist), maguestrate (magistrate), loguestics (logistics).
  • *hast* → *host*: As in, “Beat a hosty retreat” and “Make hoste” and “Hostily working.”
  • History → Hostory: As in, “Making hostory” and “A short hostory of nearly everything” and “Ancient hostory” and “Hostory repeating” and “Hostory repeating” and “The rest is hostory” and “Of hostorical importance.”
  • *hust* → *host*: As in, “Hostle and bustle” and “Moving and hostling.”
  • *host*: Emphasise the “host” in certain words: hostile, hostage, hostel and hostility.
  • Toast: A toast is a salutation or well-wishing which is common at parties and celebrations, so we’ve included it in this list. Here’s a short section of toast puns:
    • Taste → Toast: As in, “An acquired toast” and “A bad toast in one’s mouth” and “A toast of your own medicine” and “No accounting for toast.”
    • Toes → Toast: As in, “Keep you on your toast” and “On your toast” and “Twinkle toast” and “Not to step on anyone’s toast.”
    • *tas* → *toast*: As in, “A toasty (tasty) sandwich” and “Toastless fashion” and “A fantoastic result.” Other words you could use: fantoasty (fantasy), catoastrophe (catastrophe), fajitoast (fajitas), gravitoast (gravitas). Notes: fajitas are a type of tex-mex dish. Gravitas refers to a feeling or atmosphere of seriousness.
    • *test* → *toast*: As in, “A toastament to” and “Give toastimony to” and “Toasting the limits of” and “Online toastimonials” and “It’s not a contoast” and “Street protoasts” and “Attoast (attest) to.”
    • *tis* → *toast*: As in, “Online advertoastments” and “Acute arthritoast.”
    • *tos* → *toast*: As in, asbestoast (asbestos), memontoast (mementos), mosquitoast (mosquitoes), photoastsynthesise (photosynthesise), comatoast (comatose), stratoastphere (stratosphere), fructoast (fructose), lactoast (lactose), halitoastsis (halitosis). Note: halitosis is bad breath.
    • *tus* → *toast*: As in, “Statoast anxiety” and “On hiatoast.” Other words you could use: impetoast (impetus), apparatoast (apparatus), detritoast (detritus) and cactoast (cactus). Notes: an impetus is a thing or factor that compels you to do something. Detritus are pieces of rock, or debris.
    • *tist* → *toast*: As in, “Scam artoast (artist)” and “Census statoastics.” Other words you could use: egotoastical (egotistical), dentoast (dentist), statoastic (statistic), pragmatoast (pragmatist), scientoast (scientist) and elitoast (elitist).
    • Testosterone → Testoasterone
    • *toes* → *toast*: As in, “Small potatoast” and “Red as a tomatoast” and “On tiptoast (tiptoes).”
    • Toast: We’ll finish this section off with some toast-related phrases that you can use as puns: “Toast of the town” and “You’re toast.”
  • *fed* → *food*: As in, foodback (feedback), fooderal (federal), foodora (fedora), confooderate (confederate), fooderation (federation).
  • Befuddled → Befoodled
  • Daffodil → Daffoodil
  • *fid* → *food*: As in, “Walk with confoodence” and “Feeling confoodent” and “High foodelity.” Other words you could use: diffoodent (diffident), fooddle (fiddle) and affoodavit (affidavit).
  • Nibble: Finger food and nibbles (or “nibblies”) are a common type of food at parties, so we’ve included them in this list. Here’s a short section of puns about nibbling:
    • *nable* → *nibble*: As in, “Be reasonibble” and “An unsustainibble work relationship.” Other words you could use: untenibble (untenable), amenibble (amenable), unconscionibble (unconscionable) and abominibble (abominable).
    • *nibl* → *nibble*: Discernibble (discernible) and indiscernibble (indiscernible).
  • As entertainment and social interaction is the main reason for parties, we’ve included some fun-related puns in this list too:
    • *fan* → *fun*: As in, “Funtastic news!” and “All a big funtasy” and “A solid funbase.” Other words that could work: funatic (fanatic), funciful (fanciful), funfare (fanfare), infunt (infant), profunity (profanity), funatically (fanatically).
    • *fen* → *fun*: As in, “Funder-bender” and “On the funce” and “In my defunce” and “On the offunsive” and “A deafuning roar.” Other words you could use: defundant (defendant), stiffun (stiffen), ibuprofun (ibuprofen) and funnel (fennel).
    • *fin* → *fun*: As in, “Close to the funish line” and “Choc chip muffun” and “By defunition.” Other words you could use: funancial (financial), funally (finally), elfun (elfin) and defunitely (definitely).
    • *fon* → *fun*: As in, “A fundness (fondness) for” and “Fundly remember” and “Chiffun skirt.” Other words that could work: fundue (fondue), fundle (fondue), fundant (fondant).
    • *fun*: Emphasise the “fun” in these words: “The fundamentals of” and “In a deep funk” and “A social function.” Other words that could work: fungus, fungi, funnel and perfunctory.
    • *van* → *fun*: As in, “A relefunt point” and “Carafun park” and “To your adfuntage” and “That’s irrelefunt.” Other words you could use: efunescent (evanescent), griefunce (grievance), nerfuna (nirvana) and funity (vanity).
    • Vanessa → Funessa
    • *phan* → *fun*: As in, “The funtom menace” and “The elefunt in the room” and “In alfunumeric order.” Other words that could work: epifuny (epiphany), orfunage (orphanage).
    • *phen* → *fun*: funomenon (phenomenon), funomenal (phenomenal), hyfun (hyphen) and hyfunate (hyphenate).
    • *phin* → *fun*: Dolfun (dolphin), endorfun (endorphin).
    • *phon* → *fun*: Funetics (phonetics), sifun (siphon), cacofuny (cacophony), homofun (homophone) and symfuny (symphony).
  • Bass: Music with heavy bass is popular at parties (especially casual or celebratory ones), so we’ve included some bass-related puns and phrases in this list:
    • Base → Bass: As in, “Caught off bass” and “Cover your basses” and “Off bass” and “Touch bass.”
    • *bes* → *bass*: As in, “A basspoke suit” and “All for the basst” and “Basst friends forever” and “Basstow your knowledge” and “Basset (beset) with doubts.” Other words you could use: bassides (besides), basseech (beseech), bassotted (bessotted), bassiege (besiege).
    • Rooibos → Rooibass (note: rooibos is a type of tea.)
    • *bos* → *bass*: As in, verbass (verbose), probasscis (proboscis), embassed (embossed).
    • Bus → Bass: As in, “Park the bass” and “Take the bass” and “The wheels on the bass go round and round.”
    • *bus* → *bass*: As in, “Not your bassiness” and “This is a place of bassiness” and “Bassy as a bee.” Other words that could work: nimbass (nimbus), syllabass (syllabus), omnibass (omnibus), inbubass (incubus), rhombass (rhombus) and robasst (robust).
    • Herbaceous → Herbasseous
    • *bic* → *bass*: basseps (biceps), bassentennial (bicentennial) and bassentenary (bicentenary).
    • *pes* → *bass*: As in, “Famine and basstilence (pestilence)” and “You’re being a basst (pest)” and “Being bassimistic (pessimistic).” Other words that could work: basster (pester), tembasst (tempest), tabasstry (tapestry) and tembasstuous (tempestuous).
    • *pis* → *bass*: As in, “The newest ebassode (episode)” and “Basstachio flavoured” and “A prolific philanthrobasst.”
    • *pace* → *bass*: bassmaker (pacemaker), worksbass (workspace), headsbass (headspace) and backsbass (backspace).
    • *bas* → *bass*: As in, “Back to bassics” and “Bargain bassment” and “Don’t let the basstards get you down.” Other words that could be used: bassin (basin), bassball (baseball), bassline (baseline), bassket (basket), bombasstic (bombastic), databass.
    • *bass*: Emphasise the “bass” in these words: bassinet, basset, bassoon, ambassador, embassy, embassador. Notes: a bassinet is a type of cradle.
  • *den* → *dance*: As in, “Rose gardance” and “Ice maidance” and “Beholdance to” and “Dancely (densely) packed” and “You’re goldance.” Other words you could use: wardance (warden), dance-ity (density), condancesation (condensation), burdancesome (burdensome), condancesate (condensate), condanced (condensed).
  • *dence* → *dance*: As in, “Where’s the evidance?” and “Overflowing with confidance” and “In correspondance with” and “Setting precedance.” Other words that could work: residance, prudance, providance and candance.
  • *tans* → *dance*: As in, “Good samaridance (samaritans)” and “A bunch of charladance (charlatans).” Note: a charlatan is a trickster.
  • *tens* → *dance*: As in, “Sexual dance-ion” and “Dance (tens) of thousands of” and “Could cut the danceion with a knife” and “By exdanceion” and “An indance situation.” Other words that could work: indance-ive (intensive), hyperdance-ion (hypertension).
  • *tance* → *dance*: As in, “Subsdance abuse” and “Pleased to make your acquaindance” and “For insdance” and “Respect exisdance or expect resisdance” and “Unfortunate circumsdances” and “Keep your disdance” and “Provide assisdance.”
  • Dance: A few dance-related phrases that could serve as party puns in the right context: “Dance around the problem” and “Dancing with wolves” and “Lead a merry dance” and “Make a song and dance about.”
  • Favour → Party favour: As in, “Call in a party favour” and “Curry party favours with” and “Owe a party favour” and “Without fear or party favours.”
  • Animal → Party animal: As in, “A whole different party animal” and “Party animal instinct” and “Party animal magnetism” and “The party animal kingdom.”
  • House: The word “house” can have multiple meanings when it comes to parties – it can refer to the type of party (house party), a specific location (Jack’s house) or a type of music (house music). We’ve got some terrible house-related puns and phrases for you here:
    • Host → House-t: As in, “Our generous house-t” and “The house-tess with the mostess.”
    • Has → House: As in, “Word house it” and “What house come over you?” and “House a heart of gold.”
    • *has* → *house*: As in, “A big house-le (hassle)” and “A frivolous purchouse.”
    • *hos* → *house*: As in, “Taken housetage” and “Generous housepitality” and “Faced with housetility” and “In the housepital.”
    • *hus* → *house*: As in, “House-tle and bustle” and “Newlywed houseband” and “Filled with enthouse-iasm.”
    • Massachusetts → Massachouse-etts
    • His* → House*: As in, “Filled with house-tory” and “Ancient house-tory” and “House-torial documents” and “A house-toric party.”
  • Birth* → Barth*: As in, “Barthday party” and “In your barthday suit” and “Give barth to..” Note: these puns could work particularly well for a birthday party that’s happening at a bar.
  • *ber* → *bar*: As in, “Daylight robbary” and “Numbar one” and “Sweet as a barry” and “Going barserk” and “Do you remembar? (this one is a bit tongue-in-cheek as there’s a trope of not remembering much the night after going to a bar)” and “I’ve got your numbar” and “Call me when you’re sobar” and “From a deep slumbar” and “A membar of…” Other words you could use: rubbar, chambar, libarty and bareft (bereft). Note: to be bereft is to be pained or deprived.
  • Berlin → Barlin
  • Bermuda → Barmuda
  • December → Decembar: Note that October (Octobar) and November (Novembar) work as well.
  • *bor* → *bar*: As in, “Bared out of your mind” and “Barn and bred” and “On barrowed time” and “A labar of love” and “Friendly neighbars” and “On the barder.” Other words that could work: baring (boring), baredom (boredom) and harbar (harbor).
  • *bur* → *bar*: As in, “On the back-barner” and “Baried treasure” and “Barn one’s bridges” and “Barst into tears/out laughing” and “Barst someone’s bubble” and “Bary your head in the sand” and “Shoulder the barden” and “Barning with desire.”
  • *par* → *bar*: Some of these puns could work really well for a party that’s happening at a bar, or a bar-crawl style party: “Fight for the right to barty” and “Below bar” and “Drift abart” and “Fool’s baradise” and “For the most bart” and “Housewarming barty” and “Life of the barty” and “Look the bart” and “Bartner in crime” and “Hit it out of the bark.” Other words you could use: Baris (Paris), sbar (spar) and sub-bar (subpar).
  • *per* → *bar*: As in, “That’s barfect” and “Barson of interest” and “Expect barfection” and “As bar usual” and “A hundred and ten barcent” and “Cast asbarsions (aspersions)” and “Not a morning barson” and “Barmanent changes” and “Sunny barsonality” and “From a different barspective” and “Overpowering barfume” and “Barsonal questions” and “Seasoned barfectly” and “Whisbared confession.”
  • Inspiration → Insbaration
  • Bahamas → Barhamas
  • Kuala Lumpur → Kuala Lumpbar
  • *bar*: Emphasise the “bar” in certain words: “Born in a barn” and “Barrel of monkeys” and “Over the barrier” and “Bargain basement.” Other words that work: barren, embarassed, Barbados, barbarian, barbecue, barbell, barbershop, Barcelona, baritone, barnacle and barricade.
  • Since a lot of parties are held in bars and clubs, we’ve included some club-related puns and phrases for you:
    • Clap → Club: As in, “Clubbed eyes on” and “If you’re happy and you know it, club your hands.”
    • Cub → Club: As in, “Club scout” and “All club-hunting should be illegal.”
    • Recyclable → Recycluble
    • *clap* → *club*: As in, “Well that’s just clubtrap (claptrap)” and “Thunderclub.”
    • *clip* → *club*: As in, clubboard (clipboard), paperclub (paperclip) and eclubse (eclipse).
    • Encyclopedia → Encyclubpedia
    • Kleptomania → Clubtomania: (note: kleptomania is a disorder where a person obsessively steals.)
  • Beach: Since beaches are popular locations for parties (enough to be considered a type of party on their own), we’ve got some beach-related puns and phrases here for you:
    • B*tch → Beach: As in, “Bow down, beaches” and “Payback’s a beach” and “Resting beach face.”
    • Breach → Beach: As in, “A beach of trust.”
    • Breech → Beach: As in, “Too big for your beaches.” Note: breeches are a very old word for pants.
    • Bleach → Beach: As in, “Beached blonde.”
    • Peach → Beach: As in, “Beachy keen” and “What a beach” and “Skin like beaches and cream.”
    • Preach → Beach: As in, “Practice what you beach” and “Beaching to the choir” and “Beaching to the converted” and “Papa, don’t beach. (note: this is also a reference to a pop song by Madonna).”
    • Bachelor → Beachelor: As in, “Beachelor pad” and “Beachelorette party” and “The Beachelor (note: this one is also a reference to the dating show, The Bachelor).”
    • Bechamel → Beachamel (note: bechamel is a type of white, cream-based sauce.)
    • Bichon Frise → Beachon Frise: (note: a bichon frise is a breed of dog.)
    • Batch → Beach: As in, “Fresh beach of cookies” and “Maybe in the next beach.”
    • Benedict Cumberbatch → Benedict Cumberbeach
    • You betcha → You beacha
    • Botch → Beach: As in, “A beached job.”
    • *patch* → *beach*: As in, “Not a beach on” and “Going through a rough beach” and “Beachouli (patchouli) scented” and “From disbeach (dispatch).”
    • Pitch → Beach: As in, “Fever beach” and “Lower your beachforks.”
    • Betray → Beachray: As in, “You have beachrayed me for the last time” and “Don’t beachray me.”
    • Ambition → Ambeachion
  • Streamer: Since streamers are a common party decoration, we’ve included some puns and phrases that could be used as streamer puns in the right context:
    • Scream → Streamer: As in, “Streamer your heart out” and “Dragged kicking and streamering” and “Streamer the place down” and “So mad I could streamer.”
    • Steam → Streamer: As in, “Blow off some streamer” and “Full streamer ahead” and “Work off a head of streamer” and “Run out of streamer” and “Under your own streamer” and “Pick up streamer.”
  • Plan: Having plans and making plans are a big part of making a party happen, so we’ve included plan-related phrases and puns here:
    • *pan* → *plan*: As in, “Flat as a plancake” and “Out of the frying plan, into the fire” and “Things didn’t plan out” and “Bad complany” and “Caught with your plants down” and “Present complany excepted” and “A splanner in the works” and “Plander to” and “Running ramplant.” Other words you could use: plantheon (pantheon), planda (panda), splan (span), lifesplan (lifespan), deadplan (deadpan), timesplan (timespan), marziplan (marzipan), complany (company), discreplancy (discrepancy), planel (panel) and expland (expand).
    • Pen → Plan: As in, “The plan is mightier than the sword.”
    • Pants → Plans: As in, “Ants in your plans” and “Fly by the seat of your plans.”
    • *pen* → *plan*: As in, “A planchant for” and “A planetrating stare” and “Give planance for” and “Oplan bar” and “Damplan your spirits” and “A deeplaning relationship.” Other words that could work: happlan (happen), sharplan (sharpen), proplansity (propensity), applandix (appendix), indeplandent (independent), indisplansible (indispensible) and deplandent (dependent).
    • *plen* → *plan*: As in, “Planty more fish in the sea” and “A splandid thing” and “Full of splandor.” Other words you can use: resplandent (resplendent), plantiful (plentiful) and replanish (replenish).
    • *plin* → *plan*: planth (plinth), disciplan (discipline) and splanter (splinter).
    • *ban* → *plan*: As in, “Money in the plan-k” and “A subur-plan family” and “Aplan-don ship.” Other words that could work: tur-plan (turban), ur-plan (urban), planter (banter).
    • *blan* → *plan*: As in, “Looking plan-k” and “A plan-k sheet of paper” and “Baby planket” and “Plan-d (bland) tasting” and “Bears a resemplance to…”
    • *ann* → *plan*: As in, “Happy planniversary” and “Plannotated notes” and “Plannihilate the competition.”
    • *ana* → *plan*: plan-alysis (analysis), plan-alogy (analogy) and plan-alog (analog).
    •  *plan*: Emphasise the “plan” in these words: plant, plane, planet, planning, plangent, explanation.

This section is dedicated to different types of parties:

  • Tea: These tea-related puns and phrases can stand in as tea-party puns in the right context:
    • *tie* → *tea*: As in “Black tea” and “Equal opportuniteas” and “Necktea party” and “Tea the knot” and “Tea up the loose ends” and “Tea yourself in knots.”
    • To → Tea: As in, “An accident waiting tea happen” and “According tea” and “All dressed up and nowhere tea go” and “Not all it’s cracked up tea be.”
    • Too → Tea: As in, “About time tea” and “Never tea late to” and “You know tea much” and “Life’s tea short.”
    • Tree → Tea: As in, “Can’t see the wood for the teas” and “Family tea.”
    • *tee* → *tea*: As in, “To the teath” and “Smells like tean spirit” and “Teaming with energy” and “100% guarantea” and “Self-esteam.” Other words you could use: teanager (teenager), committea (committee), repartea (repartee), trustea, mentea, devotea, esteam (esteem), voluntear and cantean.
    • *tei* → *tea*: As in, “Protean shake” and “Frankenstean.”
    • *teo* → *tea*: As in, courteaous, righteaous, meteaor and oesteaoporosis.
    • *teu* → *tea*: As in, “An amateaur performance” and “Agent provocateaur.”
    • *tey* → *tea*: As in, “Okay then matea” and “A chocolatea taste.”
    • *tie* → *tea*: sortea (sortie), auntea (auntie), sweetea, sentea-ent (sentient), frontea-er (frontier), ameniteas, faciliteas.
    • Tiara → Tea-ara
    • *tyi* → *tea*: As in, “Partea-ing ’til morning” and “Emptea-ing your cup” and “A pitea-ing look.”
    • *ty → *tea: As in, “Work with integritea” and “A citea mouse” and “Your dutea as a party animal” and “Filled with beautea.” Other words you could use: teapical (typical), tea-ranny (tyranny), qualitea (quality), entitea (entity), facilitea (facility), serendipitea (serendipity) and equitea (equity).
    • *dee → *tea: As in, “Party attenteas” and “The awar-teas (awardees) are…”
    • *deo* → *tea*: As in, “Vi-teao (video) star” and “A hitea-ous day” and “Opposing itea-ologies.”
    • *die* → *tea*: As in, “A captive autea-ence” and “Obetea-ent puppies.”
    • *tea*: We’ll finish this section off with words that already have the word “tea” in them: “Teamwork makes the dream work” and “Making me tear up” and “Experience is the best teacher” and “Teach someone a lesson.”
  • Birthday: Since birthdays are one of the biggest reasons to throw a party, we’ve included some birth and birthday-related phrases for you:
    • Day → Birthday: As in, “A birthday in the life,” and “A birthday without orange juice is like a birthday without sunshine,” and “After all, tomorrow is another birthday,” and “All in a birthday’s work,” and “As true as the birthday is long,” and “At the end of the birthday,” and “Call it a birthday,” and “For ever and a birthday,” and “Go on punk, make my birthday.”
    • Birthday: We’ll finish up this birthday section with some direct birthday-related puns: “Happy birthday to you,” and “In your birthday suit.”
  • Prize → Surprise: Surprise parties are a another type of party we’ve got covered in this list: “Booby surprise” and “Keep your eyes on the surprise” and “A surprise catch” and “No surprises for guessing.”
  • Cocktail: Cocktail parties are popular enough to have made our pun list:
    • Cock → Cocktail: As in, “A cocktail and bull story” and “At half cocktail.”
    • Tail → Cocktail: As in, “Can’t make head or cocktail of it” and “Chasing cocktails” and “Heads I win, cocktails I lose” and “Nose to cocktail” and “The devil is in the cocktails.”
  • Dress → Fancy Dress: As in, “All fancy-dressed up and nowhere to go” and “Fancy dress code” and “Fancy dress for success” and “Fancy dressed to kill” and “In a state of fancy dress” and “You’re never fully fancy-dressed without a smile.”
  • Well, come → Welcome: Welcome parties are usually saved for when someone moves country or starts a new job. As in, “Welcome in!”
  • Pool: Make some terrible pool party puns with these puns and phrases:
    • Pull → Pool: As in, “Like pooling teeth” and “Pool a face” and “Pool a fast one” and “Pool out all the stops” and “Pool through” and “Want to pool my hair out” and “Pooling your punches” and “Stop pooling my leg.”
    • *pal* → *pool*: As in, “Principool players” and “A pooltry amount.”
    • *pel* → *pool*: As in, “A compoolling argument” and “My doppoolganger” and “The gospool truth.” Note: a doppelganger is someone who looks like a double of another person.
    • *pol* → *pool*: As in, “Poolitical atmosphere” and “Grammar poolice” and “Poolish up your skills” and “I apoologise” and “An open-door poolicy.” Other words that could work: extrapoolate and anthropoology.
    • *pul* → *pool*: As in, “On impoolse” and “The popoolar choice” and “Rising popoolation” and “It’s compoolsory.” Other words that could work: opoolent (opulent), popoolist (populist), stipoolate (stipulate) and manipoolate (manipulate). Note: a populist is someone who advocates policies simply because they’re popular, rather than because they’re correct, moral, or socially good.
    • *poll* → *pool*: As in, poollution (pollution), poollen (pollen) and poollutant (pollutant).
    • *bal* → *pool*: As in, “A glopool problem” and “Herpool (herbal) tea” and “A verpool (verbal) argument.”
    • *bol* → *pool*: As in, “A sympool of hope” and “Fast metapoolism.”
    • *bul* → *pool*: As in, “A fapoolous outfit” and “Nepoolous (nebulous) ideas” and “An extensive vocapoolary.” Note: nebulous means hazy or ill-defined.
    • *ple* → *pool*: As in, “A second bite of the appool” and “On principool” and “A peopool person” and “A simpool solution for a simpool problem” and “Stapool foods” and ” For exampool” and “Multipool options” and “Power coupool.”
  • Mix → Mixer: Mixers are parties with the intention of meeting new people and making new connections. As in, “In the mixer” and “Mixer and match” and “Mixer it up” and “Pick ‘n’ mixer.”
  • Rave: Raves are types of dance parties that are associated with electronic dance music and drug use. We can make some puns about these with these rave-related puns and phrases:
    • *rav* → *rave*: As in, “Rave-aged by time” and “Rave-n black hair” and “Unrave-ling lies” and “A rave-ishing dress” and “Ranting and rave-ing.” Other words you could use: rave-ine (ravine), rave-enous, rave-ioli (ravioli), trave-l, trave-erse (traverse), grave-itas (gravitas), trave-esty (travesty), grave, brave, grave-ity, carave-an (caravan). Note: gravitas is an atmosphere or attitude of seriousness.
    • *rev* → *rave*: As in, “A rave rave-iew (double pun!)” and “In rave-erse” and “Rave-ert to past behaviour” and “Part of the rave-olution” and “The big rave-eal” and “Rave-oked privileges.” Other words you could use: rave-el (revel), rave-enue (revenue), rave-erie (reverie), rave-oke (revoke), prave-elent (prevalent). Note: to revel is to celebrate.
    • *riv* → *rave*: As in, “Cry me a rave-er” and “A rave-eting performance” and “Sibling rave-lry.”
  • Party → Afterparty: As in, “Fight for the right to afterparty” and “It’s my afterparty and I’ll cry if I want to” and “Life and soul of the afterparty” and “Afterparty animal” and “Afterparty on!”
  • Lan: Lan parties are social events based around playing multiplayer computer games.
    • *lan*: Emphasise the “lan” in these words: “Like speaking another language” and “On land” and “A whole different landscape” and “A landmark location” and “According to plan.” Other words you could use: languish, languid and lantern. Note: to languish is to be in a state of weakness.
    • *len* → *lan*: As in, “A lanient parenting style” and “Style over langth” and “A langthy conversation” and “Hoping for laniency” and “Looking through a different lans (lens)” and “A sullan disposition.” Other words that you could use: swollan (swollen), pollan (pollen), crestfallan, stolan (stolen), challange (challenge), ambivalant, condolances, benevolant (benevolent), prevalant (prevalent) and calandar. Note: to be lenient is to be forgiving or soft-hearted.
    • *lin* → *lan*: As in, “You little goblan” and “Running on adrenalan.” Other words you could use: insulan (insulin), disciplan (discipline), delaneate (delineate).
    • *lun* → *lan*: As in, “Utter lanacy” and “A fundraising lancheon” and “Volanteering for.”
  • Buck: Buck’s nights/parties are another word for bachelor parties, so we’ve included buck-related phrases and puns here for you:
    • Back → Buck: As in, “Answer buck” and “As soon as my buck is turned” and “At the buck of my mind” and “Buck at it” and “Never buck down” and “Buck in the day” and “Buck on your feet” and “Buck to square one” and “Buck to the drawing board” and “A buckhanded compliment” and “Bending over buckwards” and “Comebuck king” and “Doubling buck” and “Fed up to the buck teeth” and “Fighting buck tears.” Other words that have “back” in them: buckslide (backslide), buckup (backup), buckground (background), bucklash (backlash), buckdrop (backdrop) and feedbuck (feedback).
    • Back to the Future → Buck to the Future
    • Back in Black → Buck in Black
    • *bac* → *buck*: buckteria (bacteria), buck-chelor (bachelor) and debuckle (debacle).
    • *bec* → *buck*: As in, “What have you buckome?” and “Well, buckause…” and “Your attitude isn’t buckoming” and “Buckame (became) my worst nightmare.”
    • *bic* → *buck*: As in, “Aerobuck exercise” and “Feeling claustrophobuck” and “Cubuckle farm.”
    • *buc* → *buck*: As in, “A drop in the bucket” and “Buckle up!” and “Buck-aneer life” and “A buckolic (bucolic) scene.” Note: if something is bucolic, then it’s of or relating to the countryside.
    • *bak* → *buck*: As in, “A bucker’s dozen” and “Half-bucked.”
    • *bik* → *buck*: “Rubuck‘s cube” and “Buckini shoot.”
    • *buk* → *buck*: As in, “A fresh persbucktive” and “Earned my resbuckt” and “Every asbuckt of” and “Exciting prosbuckts (prospects)” and “A wide s-bucktrum (spectrum)” and “A prosbucktive employee.” Other words you could use: circumsbuckt (circumspect), desbuckable (despicable), bucktoral (pectoral) and combuckt (compact). Note: to be circumspect is to be aware and considerate of all circumstances.
    • Barbecue → Barbuckue: This one could work particularly well for a buck’s party that’s happening at a barbecue (although very specific).
    • Buck: We’ll finish this section with some buck-related phrases: “A bigger bang for your buck” and “A buck well spent” and “The big bucks” and “Buck naked” and “Buck the system” and “Buck up your ideas” and “An honest buck” and “Looking like a million bucks.”
  • Hen: Hen’s parties/nights are another word for bachelorette parties, so we’ve included hens-related phrases and puns here for you:
    • *han* → *hen*: As in, “Here’s looking at you, hensome” and “Get a hendle on the situation” and “Experiencing an epipheny.”
    • *hin* → *hen*: As in, “Hendering my efforts” and “In hendsight” and “Give me a hent (hint)” and “You’re a hendrance” and “The beauty withen” and “Street urchen” and “Filled with endorphens.”
    • *hon* → *hen*: As in, “But henestly” and “Smooth as heney” and “An henourable person” and “A real marathen.”
    • *hun* → *hen*: As in, “A hendred and ten percent” and “Hengry enough to eat an entire country.”
    • *hen*: We’ll finish this section off with words that already have the word “hen” in them: hence, Henessy, Henry, henceforth, henchman, henhouse, comprehensive and apprehensive.
  • Block: Block parties are held in the street of a city block and are generally only open to residents of that block. We’ve included some puns and phrases that could serve as block party puns here:
    • Black → Block: As in, “Block and blue” and “Not a block and white issue” and “Block magic” and “On the block list” and “A block mark” and “On the block market” and “Block out” and “Block tie” and “Little block book” and “Not as block as you are painted.” Other black-related words you could use: blockbird (blackbird), blockmail (blackmail), blockout (blackout) and blocksmith (blacksmith).
    • *blic* → *block*: As in, “A publock menace” and “Going publock” and “Publock enemy number one” and “A fresh publockation (publication)” and “Publockally announce.”
  • Sorry → Soiree: As in, “Better safe than soiree” and “Soiree seems to be the hardest word” and “A soiree sight.” Note: a soiree is a formal evening party.

Party-Related Words

To help you come up with your own party puns, here’s a list of related words to get you on your way. If you come up with any new puns or related words, please feel free to share them in the comments!

General: party, toast, guest, host, event, alcohol, booze, beer, shots, cocktail, food, nibbles wasted, fun, music, bass, beat, dance, dancing, party pooper, party favour, party animal, invite, house, bar, club, beach, balloon, planner, plans, rsvp, designated driver, exclusive, gathering, social, celebrate, get together, hang out, bash, shindig, blowout

Types of party: tea, search, political, slumber, dinner, birthday, surprise, garden, cocktail, soiree, block, costume, fancy dress, welcome, farewell, house, pool, mixer, housewarming, rave, surprise, afterparty, lan, toga, bachelor/buck, bachelorette/hens, reunion

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Beer Puns

Welcome to the Punpedia entry on beer puns! 🍻 🍺 Whether you need a name for your latest craft brew, a tagline for your beer-related business, a beer pun team name, or just some beer puns for their own sake, I hope you find this entry useful!

There’s a lot of depth to beer culture and so some of the puns in this entry may go over your head if you’re not a brewer or beer fanatic. I’ve tried to order the pun list so that it starts with general beer puns that most people will understand, and then as you go down the puns should get more obscure. That said, I have not done a perfect job of it, so apologies if there are some confusing ones here and there near the top.

A quick side note: Drinking alcohol gives your brain a reward that it didn’t earn. If you drink too often then your brain learns that the best (easiest) way to feel good is to drink more alcohol, rather than do the normal things that make you feel good (work hard, accomplish things, help others, etc.). Be careful messing with your neurotransmitters! 🙂

You might also like to visit the Punpedia entries on coffee puns, tea puns, party puns and food puns.

Beer Puns List

Each item in this list describes a pun, or a set of puns which can be made by applying a rule. If you know of any puns about beer that we’re missing, please let us know in the comments at the end of this page!

  • All → Ale: As in “Ale in a day’s work.” and “She went ale out.” and “Ale’s well that ends well” and “It’s ale downhill from here.” and “It’s ale gone pear shaped.” and “It’s ale good.” and “It’s ale grist to the mill.” and “It’s ale me, me, me.” and “Not ale it’s cracked up to be.” and “That’s ale well and good”.
  • Stout: As in “He’s a stout young man.”
  • Larger → Lager: As in “Lager than life”.
  • Six-pack: As in “Check out my six-pack.”
  • Bar: As in “You’ve raised the bar.” and “Bar none.”
  • *pub*: If a word contains the “pub” sound (or similar) you may be able to make a terrible pub pun: capubility, capuble, palpuble, public, publicity, publication, publisher, republican, republic, unstoppuble, unpublishedinescapubly, hypubole, pubble (pebble).
  • You → Brew: As in “Brew can do it!” and “Brew silly goose!” and “I’m so glad to see brew!” and “Before brew know it”.
  • Bro → Brew: As in “What’s up, brew?” and “Cool story, brew.”
  • *brew*: If a word contains the “brew” sound (or similar) we can sometimes make a brewing pun: brewmstick (broomstick), brews (bruise), brewnette (brunette), brewtal (brutal), brewtalize (brutalize), brewtish, (brutish), Hebrew.
  • *byoo*: If a word contains the “byoo” sound (or similar) we can sometimes make a terrible beer brewing pun: brewtiful (beautiful), abrews (abuse), attribrewts (attributes), contribrewted, distribrewtion, rebrewke (rebuke), debrew (debut), retribrewtion, tribrewnal (tribunal).
  • *proo*: If a word contains the “proo” sound (or similar) we can sometimes make a terrible brewing pun: abrewval (approval), bulletbrewf, dissabrewve, foolbrewf, imbrewvements, disbrewve, brewdent (prudent), brewdence (prudence), waterbrewf.
  • Déjà vu → Déjà brew: As in “I’m getting déjà brew – have we been to this pub before?”
  • Hop: As in “Just a hop, skip and jump.” and “Take 3 hops to the left.” and “Hop to it!” and “Bunny hop” and “Hip hop“.
  • Hope → Hop: As in “I have high hops.” and “A glimmer of hop.” and “Cross your fingers and hop for the best.” and “Keep hop alive.” and “There there’s life, there’s hop.” and “Cross my heart and hop to die.”
  • Hop*: If a word begins with the “hop” sound (or anything vaguely similar) then there may be an opportunity for a terrible beer pun: “Health, wealth and hoppiness.” and “Life, liberty and the pursuit of hoppiness.”  and “As it hoppens” and “Shit hoppens.” and “See what hoppens?” and “Hopatitis is an inflammation of the liver.”
  • Op* → Hop*: If a word begins with “op” it can often be turned into a silly hops pun: hopportunity, hoperation, hopposition, hopinion, hoption, hoperate, hopposite, hoperations, hoperating, hopportunities, hopera, hopponent, hoperator, hoppose, hoptions, hopposed, hopt, hoperated, hopinions, hoperational, hoptimism, hopponents, hoperates, hoperators, hoppression, hoptimistic, hoptional, hopposing, hoptical, hoptimal, hop, hoperative, hopted, hoptimum, hoppressive, hopenness, hopting, hoppressed, hopenings, hoperand, hopioid, hoptimist, hoptimise, hopaque, hoperatichopposites, hoptician, hopportunist, hoptic, hopposes, hoptimisation, hopacity, hoppress, hoperatives, hopine, hoptimality, hoptics, hoppressors, hoptimised, hopiate, hoptimists, hoptimistically, hoppressor, hopulence, hoptimize, hoppositions, hopportunistic, hopportunism, hopulent, hopportune.
  • *op* → *hop*: There are also quite a few words with the “op” sound (or similar) in them that can be turned into silly beer puns. There are a few here which have the full “hop” sound in them already. Here’s the list: acrhopolis, adhopt, adhopted, authopsy, bihopsy, bookshop, cohoperation, cohoperative, c-hop-yright, cr-hop, drhoplet, drhoppings, drhopped, flhoppy, eavesdrhopping, helic-hop-ter, imprhoper, imprhoperly, inapprhopiately, microschopic, monhopoly, philanthrhopic, photoc-hop-ier, p-hop-corn, p-hop-ularity, p-hop-ulation, prhopaganda, prhopagation, pr-hop-erly, p-hop-ulist, prhopositions, prhopped, p-hop-ulation, raindrhops, shopkeeper, st-hop, st-hop-er, synhopsis, tr-hop-ical, unst-hop-able, whopping.
  • Vain → Vine: As in “I worked so hard but it was all in vine.”
  • Vein → Vine: As in “My vines are bulging.” and “In the same vine …”
  • Fine → Vine: As in “It’s a vine day for a beer.” and “It’s a vine line.” and “You’re cutting it vine.” and “That’s a damn vine beer.” and “One vine day …” and “Treading a vine line.”
  • Van* → Vine*: As in, “Vine Gogh,” and “Vine-ish into thin air.” 
  • *ven* → *vine*: As in, “Sixes and sevines,” and “Blessed evine-t,” and “Break evine,” and “The elevineth hour,” and “Evine the score,” and “Heavine forbid,” and “A match made in heavine,” and “With a vine-geance,” and “Bun in the ovine,” and “Pure as the drivine snow,” and “Nothing vine-tured, nothing gained,” and “Revine-ge is a dish best served cold,” and “Innocent until provine guilty,” and “Lavineder (lavender) scented,” and “Twenty four sevine.”
  • *vin* → *vine*: As in, “Full of vinegar,” and “Get movine,” and “The gift that keeps on givine,” and “In livine memory,” and “In the drivine seat,” and “Knock the livine daylights out of,” and “Livine proof,” and “Livine on borrowed time,” and “Time flies when you’re havine fun,” and “Vinetage,” and “Vinedicate,” and “Vinedictive.”
  • Stain → Stein: As in “There’s a stein on your shirt.” (See beer stein)
  • Sign → Stein: As in “Give me a stein, lord!” and “Stein the pledge.” and “Stein up.” and “Stein of the times.” and “A sure stein.” and “A tell tale stein.” (See beer stein)
  • Sooner → Schooner: As in “Schooner or later.” and “The schooner the better.” and “No schooner said than done.” and “Schooner rather than later.” (A schooner is a type of glass cup.)
  • Tinkered → Tankard: As in “I tankard with this all day but I couldn’t get it working.” (A tankard is a big drinking vessel)
  • Sidle → Seidel: As in “I seideled up to her apologetically.”
  • Picture → Pitcher: As in “A pitcher is worth  thousand words.” and “See the big pitcher.” and “Motion pitcher.” and “Do I have to paint you a pitcher?” and “Pitcher perfect” (Pitcher is a synonym of “jug” – commonly used to serve beer.)
  • Pitcher: There is the potential for a pun here using the baseball meaning of this word.
  • Cling → Clink: As in “Clink on tight!”
  • Kink → Clink: As in “C’mon, be honest. Everyone has a clink or two.”
  • Blink → Clink: As in “In the clink of an eye.” and “Clink and you’ll miss it!”
  • Suds: This refers to the froth made from soap and water, but is also slang for “beer”. By using it in the original “soap and water” context you could potentially make a pun: “I got in the bath and sudsed up.” (Here we’re using the verb-form of “suds” with means “lather”)
  • Sides → Suds: As in “There are two suds to every question.” and “You’ve got to see the issue from both suds.”
  • Plastered: This means “very drunk”, but in the right context we could use its original definition as a pun: “The whole house is plastered.”
  • Wasted: As in “It’s so sad, seeing all these all wasted lives.” and “Youth is wasted on the young.”
  • Sloshed: Another one meaning “very drunk” – perhaps an opportunity to make a pun on its literal meaning: “We all sloshed around in the swimming pool for a while.”
  • Smashed, Hammered, Bombed, Legless, Messed up, Trousered, Trolleyed: Some more terms meaning “very drunk”. Each of them may have contexts in which there’s an opportunity to make a pun on its literal meaning – though these contexts may be quite specific.
  • Hang over → Hangover: As in “Mind if I hang over at your place this morning?”
  • Chug: As well as meaning “to drink fast or without pausing”, this term can refer to “The chug of a motor boat” or “The little train chugged up the hill.”
  • Hug → Chug: As in “Let’s have a group chug.” and “Chug it out.” and “Bro chug.”
  • Toast: When someone raises their beer in honour of something or someone and encourages everyone to do the same, that’s called a toast. There may be some context in which the other (normal) definition of “toast” could be punned upon.
  • Tears → Cheers: As in “Bored to cheers.” and “Burst into cheers.” and “Moved to cheers.” and “Reduced to cheers.” and “Fight back the cheers.” and “It will all end in cheers.” and “Blood, sweat and cheers.”
  • Cheers: This word also has the “the cheers of the crowd were deafening” definition which might be a viable opportunity for a pun in some contexts.
  • Tippy-toes → Tipsy-toes: As in “I snuck in on my tipsy-toes.”
  • Cough → Quaff: As in “I was quaffing all night, so I took the day off work.” (A “quaff” is an alcoholic drink and to “quaff” is to drink an alcoholic quickly or heartily)
  • Lick or → Liquor: As in “Are you going to have a liqu, or?” (Depending on your accent/pronunciation it may more like “lick her”. Please keep your puns respectful!)
  • Stubby: Refers to a beer bottle that is short and fat. This slang is taken directly from the actual definition of “stubby” so it’s an easy pun if the context is right.
  • Growler: A “growler” is a type of jug used to transport draft beer. The term has a bunch of other meanings which could be played upon in the right context.
  • Draught / Draft: Besides the beer-related meaning (beer served from barrel or tank), this term has several others: “He was drafted in 1942″ and “I drafted the letter of resignation.” and “The use of draft horses is outdated and cruel.” and “There was a nice draught coming through the window.” and “She was drafted for the national team at age 23.”
  • Dear → Beer: As in “Oh beer me” and “Hang on for beer life” and “Near and beer to my heart” and “Elementary, my beer Watson.”
  • Ear → Beer: As in “Grin from beer to beer.” and “Let’s play it by beer.” and “Lend a beer” and “In one beer and out the other.”
  • Peer → Beer: As in “Beer pressure” and “It’s like she was beering into my soul.”
  • Pier → Beer: As in “Take a long walk off a short beer.”
  • Bear → Beer: As in “Grizzly beer” and “Beer a resemblance” and “The right to beer arms” and “Beer down upon” and “Bear witness to …” and “Beer false witness” and “Beer fruit” and “Beer in mind that …” and “Bring to beer
  • Bare → Beer: As in “The beer necessities” and “Beer one’s teeth” and “Laid beer” and “The beer bones” and “The cupboard was beer
  • Buyer → Beer: As in “She’s a regular beer at our shop.” (Bit of a stretch!)
  • Beard → Beerd: As in “Neck beerd” and “His beerd was as white as snow.”
  • *ber* → *beer*: Words that contains the “ber” sound (or similar) are often opportunities for terrible beer puns: collabeerate, dismembeermentbeereavement, beereaved, beerds (birds), beerthplace (birthplace), beerglary (burglary), beergeoning (burgeoning), cumbeersome, delibeeration, decembeer, cucumbeer, exubeerant, libeerties (liberties), libeerals, libeertarian, libeeration, novembeer, numbeers, pubeerty, membeership, reimbeers (reimburse), remembeer, reverbeeration, robbeeries, robbeery, slumbeer, sobeer (sober).
  • Be* → Beer*: More terrible beer puns can be made using words that start with the “be” sound: beerwilderment, beerlongings, beerbliography, beerseiged, beerstowed, beermused, beerwitched, beergotry, beertersweetbeerllionair.
  • *pear* → *beer*: As in, “A beerlescent (pearlescent) glow” and “Abeer (appear) from thin air” and “Watch me disabeer” and “Make an abeerance.” Other words you could use: s’beerhead (spearhead), re-abeer (reappear).
  • Shakespeare → Shakesbeer
  • Pier → Beer: As in “Take a long walk off a short beer” and “Ear beercing” and “Never been habbeer (happier).”
  • Bare → Beer: As in “The beer necessities” and “Beer one’s teeth” and “Laid beer” and “The beer bones” and “The cupboard was beer“. You can also replace the “bare” in these words: barely (“beerly there”), threadbare (“A threadbeer toy”), cabaret (cabeeret), barefoot (beerfoot).
  • *bier* → *beer*: As in, grubbeer (grubbier), stubbeer (stubbier), tubbeer, scabbeer and chubbeer.
  • *pare* → *beer*: As in, “Beerent-teacher meeting” and “In beerenthesis” and “Like combeering apples and oranges” and “Be prebeered (prepared)” and “Abbeerently (apparently) so.” Other words you could use: abbeerel (apparel) and transbeerent (transparent).
  • *bar* → *beer*: As in, “Beer none” and “Behind beers” and “Language beerier” and “Raise the beer” and “Beerrelling (barreling) in” and “Beergain basement.” Other words you could use: beeren (barren), beerista (barista) and sidebeer (sidebar).
  • *ber* → *beer*: As in, “Strawbeery flavoured” and “Going beerserk” and “Got your numbeer” and “Sobeer up (this one’s a bit ironic)” and “A membeer of..” Other words you could use: beereft (bereft), beerate (berate), beerth (berth), beereavement (bereavement), chambeer (chamber), ambeer (amber), membeer, cybeer, remembeer, delibeerate, libeeral, libeerty, abeerration (aberration) and cumbeersome. Notes: to be bereft is to be deprived of something.
  • *bir* → *beer*: As in, “A little beerd told me” and “Beerthday suit” and “The early beerd.”
  • *bor* → *beer*: As in, “Beered out of your mind” and “Labeer of love” and “Harbeer a grudge” and “Good neighbeers” and “Please elabeerate” and “Collabeerate with.”
  • *bur* → *beer*: As in, “A heavy beerden.” Other words you could use: beereaucracy (bureaucracy), beergeoning (burgeoning) and excalibeer (excalibur).
  • *per* → *beer*: As in, “A different beerspective” and “Third beerson” and “Motivation and beerseverance.” Other words you could use: beertinent (pertinent), beeriod (period), beerception (perception), beernicious (pernicious), beercieve (perceive), beerformance (performance), beerfect (perfect), imbeerative (imperative) and obeeration (operation).
  • Egs* → Kegs*: Some words which start with the “egs” sound (or similar) can be turned into very bad beer puns: kegs-istence (existence), kegs-iled (exiled), kegs-istential (existential), kegs-it (exit).
  • Tap: This has at least two beer-related meanings: “to tap a barrel” and “what’s on tap?”. It also has several non-beer related meanings which might be pun opportunities in the right context: “He tapped the window gently.” and “We’ve tapped all his phone calls.”
  • Head: The “head” is the frothy foam on top of a beer. Potential puns about: “Air head” and “Don’t mess with my head.” and “Above my head” and “Over my head” and “Bite someone’s head off” and “Be it on your head” and “Couldn’t make head or tail of it” and “It’ll do your head in” and “Get it into your head” and “Get your head together” and “Got your head screwed on” and “Hanging over your head” and “You need to get your head examined.” and “Head and shoulders above the rest” and “Head count” and “Head honcho” and “Head in the sand” and “Head to head” and “Hit the nail on the head” and “I could do that standing on my head” and “Head wind” and “Hold a gun to his head” and “In over your head” and “Laugh your head off” and “Level-headed” and “Lose your head” and “Make your head spin” and “Price on his head” and “Pull your head in” and “Sleepy head” and “Upon your head be it”.
  • Bruise → Booze: As in, “A boozed ego” and “You can’t protect your kids from every bump and booze.”
  • *bas* → *booze*: As in, “On a first-name boozeis (basis)” and “Back to boozeics (basics)” and “Yes, boozeically” and “The boozelisk in the Chamber of Secrets (I’m sure many people will find ways to make boozy pickup lines out of this one…so use it and similar puns with your best judgement).”
  • *bes* → *booze*: As in, “All the boozet (best)” and “Boozet (best) friends forever” and “Boozet of all” and “Boozepoke suit” and “Boozetow your wisdom” and “Sit boozeside me.” Other words you could use: booze-seech (beseech), booze-sotted (besotted), booze-siege (besiege). Notes: to beseech is to beg.
  • *bos* → *booze*: As in, booze-om (bosom), rooibooze (rooibos) and verbooze (verbose). Note: rooibos is a type of tea.
  • *bus* → *booze*: As in, “Thrown under the booze” and “Walk or take the booze” and “None of your boozeiness” and “Boozey bee” and “Course syllabooze.” Other words you could use: nimbooze (nimbus), omnibooze (omnibus) and abooze (abuse). Notes: a nimbus is a circle of light, or a halo.
  • *baz* → *booze*: As in, boozear (bazaar), booze-ooka (bazooka), booze-illion (bazillion).
  • *biz* → *booze*: As in, “Boozear (bizarre) circumstances,” and “That’s showbooze.”
  • *buz* → *booze*: As in, “Booze me in” and “Booze off” and “Booze-ing with excitement” and “Boozewords.” Other words you could use: booze-ard (buzzard), booze-ing (boozing) and boozer (buzzer).
  • *bows* → *booze*: As in, “Chasing rainbooze” and “Rainbooze and unicorns” and “Rub elbooze with.”
  • *eth’ll → *ethyl: “Ethyl” alcohol is the type of alcohol that is in alcoholic beverages like beer. Pun examples: “My brethyl smell really bad if I drink this.” and “At least my dethyl go down in history.”
  • Moult → Malt: As in “I started malting as I got older.”
  • Mould → Malt: As in “There’s malt all over my food!” and “Malty sandwiches don’t taste great.”
  • Tiny → Tinnie / Tinny: As in “The patter of tinny feet.” (“Tinny” is slang for a can of beer)
  • Krikey! → Krieky!: As in “Krieky! That’s a big croc!”
  • Coarse / course → Coors: As in “Of coors!” and “Off coors” and “University coors” and “Blown off coors” and “Crash coors” and “In due coors” and “Let nature take its coors” and “On a collision coors” and “Stay on coors” and “He had a coors voice from drinking too much.”
  • Bro, my → Brah, ma: As in “Brah, ma beer puns are great, hey?” (Brahma is a beer brand)
  • Heinie can → Heineken: As in “Get off your heineken you? We’ve got work to do!” (“Heinie” is slang for bottom)
  • Bud wiser → Budweiser: As in “I’ve got a budweiser than all you uneducated chumps.”
  • Wiser → Weiser: As in “None the weiser” and “Older and weiser
  • Bud: As in “We’re best buds” and “Nip in the bud
  • Too bored → Tuborg: As in “I didn’t stay at the party long – I was Tuborg.”
  • Leffe → Left: Note that “Leffe” has two pronunciations. The French pronunciation sounds like “leff” and the Flemish pronunciation sounds like “leffer”. Here we’re punning with the French pronunciation. Examples: “Exist stage Leffe” and “Keep Leffe” and “Leffe for dead” and “Leffe in the lurch” and “Leffe out in the cold” and “Leffe wing” and “Leffe to your own devices” and “Out of Leffe field”.
  • Leave her → Leffe: (Here we’re using the Flemish pronunciation, see above) As in “Leffe alone!” and “Are you going to Leffe anything in your will?”
  • A lesion → Elysian: As in “What happened to your leg? Is that Elysian?”
  • A legion → Elysian: As in “She has Elysian of fans following her wherever she goes.”
  • Stellar → Stella: As in “A Stella cast has been assembled.” and “The pub received Stella ratings in the guides.” (Wikipedia)
  • Bass: This refers to the famous brewery. If you’re punning with text (rather than speaking it out loud), you can play on the audio-meaning of “bass”: “I like clubs that have good Bass.” but since this has a different pronunciation, the only exact phonetic pun is on the fish of the same name.
  • Basically → Bassically: As in “I drink Bassically the same thing all the time.”
  • Millimeter → Millermeter: As in “A millermeter more and it would have been long enough!” We can do the same thing with other units of measurement too: “The can holds 375 millerliters.” and “We just needed one millersecond longer!” and “This cable is rated to 25 millervolts.” and “A millergram of this is enough to kill a person.”
  • Million → Milleron: As in “Not in a miller-on years.” and “One in a milleron.”
  • Meantime: As in “In the meantime, we should look for a new place.” (Meantime is a brewery)
  • Foster: As in “Foster a sense of confidence in the people.” and “A bar owner must Foster a happy, friendly atmosphere.” (Foster’s is a beer company)
  • Four peeks → Four Peaks: As in “It took me about four peaks to finally read the text.”
  • For Pete’s → Four Peak’s: As in “Four peak’s sake!”
  • Car owner → Corona: As in “All coronas must pay annual car registration fees.”
  • “Youngling” → Yuengling: As in “Youth is wasted on yuenglings” and “He’s a yuengling at heart.”
  • Pills → Pils: As in “I had to pop some pils to help with this headache.”
  • Pills and → Pilsen: As in “Pilsen booze are a fast track to a ruined life.” and “It’s up to parents to keep their kids away from pilsen booze.”
  • Back’s → Beck’s: As in “My beck’s really sort today for some reason.” and “Ow! My beck!”
  • Slits → Schlitz: As in “The surgeon has to make two schlitz in the intestinal wall.”
  • Shits → Schlitz: As in “He did it for schlitz and giggles.” and “You know what gives me the schiltz?”
  • Bitter: As in “He came to a bitter end.” and “That’s a bitter pill to swallow.” and “No need to be bitter! (resentful)”
  • Least→ Yeast: As in “Last, but not yeast.” and “Yeast common denominator.” and “It’s the yeast I could do.”
  • East→ Yeast: As in “I’m heading over yeast for a holiday.”
  • Grain: As in “I’m going to go against the grain here and say …” and “There’s a grain of truth in what he’s saying.” and “I’d take it with a grain of salt.”
  • Grainy: Other than referring to grain (some varieties of which are used to make beer), this can refer to a texture or to a low resolution photograph: “Your profile picture is a bit grainy.”
  • Ingrained: As in “It was ingrained in me from a young age.”
  • Again → A grain: As in “Come a grain?” and “Never a grain.” and “Time and time a grain.” and “Now and a grain.”
  • Wait → Wheat: As in “Wheat a second…” and “I am lying in wheat.” and “Wheat and see.” (See wheat beer)
  • We t* → Wheat: As in “Wheat talked about this last night.” and “Wheat took our time.”
  • We’d → Wheat: As in “Wheat love for you to join us!”
  • What → Wheat: As in “Wheatever, man.” and “Wheat are you up to today?”
  • Why → Rye: “Rye do you ask?” and “Rye do beer puns make me giggle?” and “Rye hast thou forsaken me?” and “Rye are you doing this to me?”
  • Wry → Rye: “A rye smile.” and “With rye Scottish wit.” (Rye is a type of grain used to make beer)
  • Rye: Words that contain the “rye” sound can be made into terribly silly beer puns (Since some beers are made with rye): alryete, bryete, Brydal, b-rye-testcircumscryebed, compryesed, contryeved, copyryete, cryesis, cryeterion, cryeme, dryevers, descryebe, enterpryese, depryeved, fryeday, fryed, fryetened, pryeceless, pryemarily, pryevacy, pryeority, pryez, ryenocerous, ryeteous, ryetfully, ryevalries, samurye, subscryebed, surpryesingly, tryeangle, ryeting, tryeumph, rye-fle.
  • Riled up→ Rye-led up: As in “Jeez, calm down. No need to get rye-led up!”
  • Barely → Barley: As in “I’m barley getting by.” and “That barley passes as a beer pun.”
  • Ought → Oat: As in “You oat to say sorry.” and “Five minutes oat to be enough time.”
  • Its / It’s → Oats / Oat’s: As in “Oat’s just a matter of time.” and “Oat’s a shame.” and “Oat’s nothing personal” and “Oat’s worth oats weight in gold.” and “Takes oats toll.” and “A life of oats own.”
  • Sore gum → Sorghum: As in “I’ve got sorgums because my toothbrush bristles are too hard.” (Sorghum is a grain crop often used to create alcoholic beverages)
  • *sip*: If a word contains the “sip” sound, it’s an opportunity for a terrible pun on “sip” as in “to sip your beer” (so long as you emphasise the “sip” part somehow): Mississipi, disiplinarian, munisipality, presipitate, partisiples, presipitated, prinsipally, resipient, resiprocity.
  • *sep*: If a word contains the “sep” sound it’s a chance to make a terribly corny “sip” pun (perhaps emphasise with hyphens or underline/bold): ac-sip-tability (acceptability), bisips (biceps), consiption (conception), consipt (concept), desiptive, impersiptable, desiptive, misconsiption, persiptive, resiption, resiptionist, resiptivity, resiptors, siparatists (seperatists), siparation, siparate, susiptability, intersipt.
  • Dry: As in “These tea puns are very dry.” and “Dry humour” and “Hung out to dry” and “Keep your powder dry” and “As dry as dust”.
  • Will → Swill: As in “Against your own swill.” and “Bend to my swill” and “Love swill find a way.” and “Swill do.” and “Where there’s a swill, there’s a way.” and “Time swill tell.”
  • Back → Bock / Beck: As in “As soon as my bock is turned” and “At the bock of my mind” and “Bock to the Future” and “Bock from the dead” and “Bock in business” and “Bock in the day” and “Bock on your feet” and “He bocked out of the deal” and “Bock to bock” and “Cast your mind bock” and “Get off my bock” and “Fight bock the tears” and “Get bock on your feet” and “Get bock together” and “Hark bock to” and “Kick bock and enjoy” and “Laid bock” and “Money bock guarantee” and “On the bock burner” and “Never look bock” and “One step forward, two steps bock.” and “Put your bock into it!” and “Right bock at ya” and “Turn bock the clock” and “Watch your bock” and “You scratch my bock, I’ll scratch yours.” (Bock is a strong German lager, and the above examples can be replaced with “Beck” to play on the famous Beck’s brewery)
  • Back* → Bock* / Beck*: Words that begin with the “back” sound can also be silly beer puns: bockache, bockdrop, bockbone, bockground, bocklash, bocklog, bockside, bockroom, bockstage, bockward, bockyard, bockteria (bacteria), bockterium. (These examples can have “bock” replaced with “beck” to play on the famous Beck’s brewery)
  • Handy → Shandy: As in “This is a very shandy tool.”
  • Sandy → Shandy: As in “My towel is all shandy from the beach.”
  • Pass it → Posset: As in “Can you please posset over here?”
  • Spruce: As in “Make sure you leave some time to spruce yourself for the ball.” and “I’m all spruced up.” (See Spruce beer on Wikipedia)
  • Arrogant bastard: A simple pun on the brewing company.
  • I’m a real oldy → Amarilloldy: As in “Amarillo-ldy when it comes to my taste in beer.”
  • Citra → Sit ya: As in “Citra ass down!” – The name of a brew from Against the Grain. “Citra” is a variety of hops.
  • Nugget: As in “Nugget of wisdom” and “Nugget of truth” (Nugget is a hop variety)
  • Soz → Saaz: As in “Oh saaz! I didn’t mean to!”
  • Sim card → Simcoed: As in “I lost my phone so I need a new simcoed
  • Put her → Porter: As in “Porter down!” and “She porter hand to learning coding in her spare time.”
  • Fruity: Other than referring to the fruity taste or aroma of a brew, this term also has several slang definitions including being flamboyant or “bouncy”. It may also refer to someone who is considered crazy in some respect.
  • Noble: As in “That was very noble of you.” and “The four noble truths.” (“Noble hops” are traditionally hops which are low in bitterness and high in aroma, like Saaz)
  • Great → Gruit: As in “All creatures gruit and small.” and “I went to gruit lengths” and “Gruit minds think alike” and “The gruit outdoors” and “No challenge too gruit.” (Very corny! Gruit is an old-fashined herb mixture used for bittering and flavouring beer)
  • Asked → Oast: As in “Frequently oast questions” and “No questions oast” and “I took my harp to the party but no one oast me to play.”
  • Killin’ → Kiln: As in “She’s making a kiln!” and “Stop it, you’re kiln me!”
  • Nipple → Tipple: A tipple can refer to an alcoholic drink, or as a verb to “drink alcohol, especially habitually”.
  • Long neck → Longneck: A longneck is a common type of beer bottle.
  • Mouth feel → Mouthfeel: As in “It makes my mouthfeel funny, but it’s not too bad.” (See Wikipedia entry, Mouthfeel)
  • After taste → Aftertaste: As in “Aftertasting that beer, I’m not going back for seconds.” (See Wikipedia entry, Aftertaste)
  • Stupid → Stube-d: As in “Keep it simple, stube-d” and “Terminally stube-d” and “There’s no such thing as a stube-d question.”
  • Hey for → Hefe: As in “Hefe god’s sake could you cut it out?” (“Hefe” means “yeast” in German and sounds like “hay-fa”)
  • Goes up → Gose-p: As in “Right before it gose-p in flames.”
  • Say, son → Saison: As in “Saison, could you fetch me that spanner?”
  • Worth → Wort: As in “It’s wort it’s weight in gold.” and “For what it’s wort …” and “Get your money’s wort” and “Milk it for all it’s wort” and “Not wort a hill of beans” and “That’s my two cents wort
  • Ton / Tonne → Tun: As in “Came down like a tun of bricks.” and “That’s a tun of beer.”
  • Troop / Troupe → Trub: As in “A comedy trub is performing here tonight.” and “The trubs marched through the town.”
  • Least → Lees: As in “Last but not lees” and “Lees common denominator” and “Not in the lees” and “Line of lees resistance.”
  • Law to → Lauter: As in “There should be a lauter prevent people form making terrible beer puns.”
  • Lautering → Loitering: As in “There’s always a few shady people lautering around there at night.”
  • Spargin’ → Spare gin: As in “There wasn’t any spargin’ so I happily drank beer instead”
  • Tanning → Tannin: As in “Welcome to my tannin salon.”
  • For men t* → Ferment: As in “What we need is fermen to realise that catcalling isn’t friendly.”

Beer-Related Phrases

Common phrases, idioms and cliches which are related to beer can be used for some subtle and witty word play. Here is a list of the beer themed phrases that we’ve found so far:

  • (h)opposites attract
  • process of eliminating (h)options
  • a golden (h)opportunity
  • once in a lifetime (h)opportunity
  • window of (h)opportunity
  • contrary to popular (h)opinion
  • Adam’s ale
  • amber nectar
  • as drunk as a lord
  • as drunk as a skunk
  • as mild as milk
  • barrel of laughs
  • came to a bitter end
  • take the bitter with sweet
  • a bitter pill to swallow
  • bring out your best (a Bud Light slogan)
  • crack a tinnie
  • crack/bust some suds
  • slam a drink
  • drink like a fish
  • driven to drink
  • drink up
  • drink someone under the table
  • full of hops
  • given to drink
  • life’s not all beer and skittles
  • pint sized
  • on the piss
  • rolling drunk
  • six pack
  • slave to drink
  • stout fellow
  • you can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make her drink
  • slam some beers
  • egg in your beer
  • small beer
  • knock one back
  • social drinker
  • bottoms up!
  • here’s to [someone/something]!
  • drink to excess
  • drown your sorrows
  • on a bender
  • on the rocks
  • make it a double
  • down the hatch
  • hair of the dog
  • happy hour
  • liquid courage
  • pub crawl
  • another round
  • two/three/four sheets in the wind
  • under full sail
  • under the influence
  • take the edge off
  • chin chin! (cheers!)
  • off their head
  • roll out the barrel
  • BYOB
  • on tap
  • Dutch courage
  • sudsing up
  • beer belly
  • trouble is brewing
  • a hop, skip and a jump
  • hip hop
  • clouded judgement
  • get you over a barrel
  • seperate the wheat from the chaff
  • barrel of laughs
  • belt down some liquor
  • as slow as molasses in january
  • cakes and ale
  • eat, drink and be merry
  • full head of steam
  • head in the clouds
  • hit the nail on the head
  • i’d lose my head if it wasn’t attached
  • i need it like a hole in the head
  • in over your head
  • my head is swimming
  • off the top of my head
  • off with his head
  • put a price on his head
  • two heads are better than one
  • keep your head above water
  • it’s all grist to the mill
  • walk like a drunken sailor

Beer-Related Words

There are many more puns to be made than could be documented in this Punpedia entry, and so we’ve compiled a list of beer-related concepts for you to use when creating your own puns. If you come up with a new pun, please share it in the comments!

brew, brewery, brewski, stein, schooner, tankard, seidel, pitcher, clink, suds, plastered, wasted, sloshed, smashed, hammered, bombed, messed up, hangover, hungover, chug, chugalug, sober, toast, cheers, drunkard, drunk, drunkenness, legless, tipsy, blotto, trousered, trolleyed, inebriated, quaff, sip, numb, corked, stubby, stubbies, ale, cask, cask ale, growler, draught beer, draft beer, draft, draught, keg, nitrokeg, tap, beer tap, head, prohibition, alcohol, alcoholic, alcoholism, ethyl alcohol, malt, hops, noble hops, beverage, liquor, liqueur, pub crawl, drink, wheat, rye, sorghum, barley, oats, millet, brewpub, rotgut, hooch, alcopop, tipple, tippler, intoxication, homebrew, beery, long neck, mouthfeel, aftertaste, imbibe, pub, bar, saloon, brasserie, vine, six-pack, tinnie, chaser, rathskeller, cellar, porter, cerveza, froth, frothie, coldie, swill, alehouse, stube, biergarten, beer garden, Oktoberfest, barrel, full-bodied, thin-bodied, publican, yeast, Ninkasi, palate, punt, chill, binge

bock, maibock, doppelbock, eisbock, weizenbock, altbier, berliner weisse, dortmunder export, dunkel, gose, helles, kellerbier, kolsch, marzen, pale lager, roggenbier, schwarzbier, smoked beer, wheat beer, zoigl, dubbel, Flanders red ale, lambicger, framboise, gueuze, kriek, oud bruin, quadrupel, saison, tripel, witbier, brown ale, Indian pale ale, mild ale, old ale, porter, Scotch ale, stout, amber ale, American pale ale, American wild ale, cream ale, ice lager, Kentucky common beer, pumpkin ale, steam beer, baltic porter, biere de garde, copper ale, corn beer, grodziskie, gratzer, hard soda, Irish red ale, light beer, malt beer, millet beer, pale ale, pilsner, rye beer, sahti, small beer, sour beer, Vienna lager, trappist, sommelier, root beer, apple beer, birch beer, ginger beer, horehound beer, oatmeal stout, sake, shandy, brown ale, posset, schankbier, spruce beer, weissbier, weizen beer, hefe, hefeweizen, Lowenbrau, Hamm, Arrogant Bastard, Fat Tire, Haffenreffer, Pabst Blue Ribbon, Nastro Azzurro

amarillo, cascade, centennial, chinook, citra, crystal, CTZ, fuggle, Golding, lambic, magnum, mosaic, Mt. Hood, Northern Brewer, nugget, Perle, Saaz, Simcoe, Tardif De Bourgogne, Williamette, cluster

Coors, Brahma, Harbin, Heineken, Yanjing, Skol, Budweiser, Bud, Bud Light, Tsingtao, Snow, Carlsberg, Tuborg, Leffe, Elysian, Stella Artois, Bass, Miller, Peroni, Meantime, Radegast, Foster’s, Molson Coors, Labatt, Bintang, Goose Island, Tecate, Amstel, Birra Moretti, Four Peaks, Kronenbourg 1664, Corona, Sam Adams, Guinness, Yuengling, Efes Pilsen, Dogfish Head, San Miguel, Becks, Heady Topper, Kingfisher, Harveys, Hoegaarden, Dos Equis, Sierra Nevada, Theakston, Mikkeller, Schlitz

steep, wort, mashout, lautering, lauter, lauter tun, mash tun, tun, mash, ferment, fermentation, turbidimeter, nephelometer, sparge, sparging, tannin, pH, chaff, husk, starch, starches, sugar, enzymes, dry hopping, sprouted, molasses, carbon dioxide, carbonation, grist, gluten, microbrewery, kegger, barm, leavening, barrelage, all-malt, amber, anaerobic, black malt, bung, caramel, dextrin, ester, filter, fining, malt-extract, priming, tart, milling, nitrogen, phenols, gruit, mugwort, oast house, kiln

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